Jump to content

Warning: This Post May Offend


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, loneshark64 said:

This should be mandatory reading folks. It will curl your hair. We focus too much on the Uighurs, Hong Kong, militarized islands, etc and miss the most important threat. These are the symptoms not the underlying disease. For most of the last 800 years China has been the dominant nation on earth. This changed dramatically starting in the early 1800s, in the second half of the Qing dynasty, when a series of ineffective emperors and imperialist policies by western nations and Japan made the country a shell of its former self.

From 1912 when the first Republic came into being until now, China has been recreating itself as a modern version of it former greatness. Xi is just the first leader to do this from a global perspective - beyond just economics. Mao was almost totally focussed domestically and Deng and those who followed were focussed on increasing wealth in the country. Xi sees no reason for China not to be the world's dominant nation of the 21st century and beyond. I think he does see himself as a new age emperor and he has quite a few years to solidify himself in this role. He is 68 and apparently in good health. He quit smoking about five years ago which encouraged millions of Chinese to do the same. All you need to know is that his thoughts, in his name, are now part of the country's constitution.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 340
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Can someone please explain to me why Shanghai Sailor is always able to have his posts slapped up on the Front Page? To be honest, his latest serving of pablum is nothing more than blatant propaga

Shanghai Sailor is a long-term positive contributor to SA and SAAC. Not very fair to attack him just because you don't like China. And yes, this belongs on PA; it isn't about sailing, it's about your

AJ is without a doubt the biggest, stupidest & most irrelevant jackoff on these forums. I often agree & disagree with the same people on different topics but almost all of them also offer

Posted Images

16 hours ago, Bored Stiff said:

China may be a fascinating and beautiful country with kind and generous people.

I have been there a dozen times. It’s a fucking dump. I liked a lot of the people I met. A lot of the time though, especially in business, as an American you don’t really know what the heck is going on. PRC Chinese are so different from us culturally and their frame of reference living in that political system is so different that their motivations are not the same. And the corruption is unbelievable; it is cliche to say that but it’s beyond anything I could have imagined. Makes Russia look like amateur hour. 
You might think you know why people are operating the way they are in China, but I concluded that a lot of times I just didn’t. That is the danger, assuming you understand. I learned to go into all meetings assuming that the real meeting already happened before the round eyes showed up and that I was going to be aware of about 25% of what was going on. I would have translators from there but they lied or omitted. I tried to have a Chinese American colleague with me when possible to tell me what the fuck was really happening. I got a lot done that way. But on the occasions where I met with Minister level guys or guys in big financial or city posts, I was alway very careful and nervous because you don’t want to get on anybody’s list. 
I went one time with a very close friend who had moved to the US from China in his 20s. Hated the PRC govt. He was a tough guy but he was more nervous than I have ever seen him the whole time he was there and he was a totally different guy there.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-china-blog-40627855

"Why China censors banned Winnie the Pooh"

Shinzo Abe, Xi Jinping and Winnie the Pooh characters

 

This is the spark that really lit the fuse.......

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, KillickThere said:

I have been there a dozen times. It’s a fucking dump. I liked a lot of the people I met. A lot of the time though, especially in business, as an American you don’t really know what the heck is going on. PRC Chinese are so different from us culturally and their frame of reference living in that political system is so different that their motivations are not the same. And the corruption is unbelievable; it is cliche to say that but it’s beyond anything I could have imagined. Makes Russia look like amateur hour. 
You might think you know why people are operating the way they are in China, but I concluded that a lot of times I just didn’t. That is the danger, assuming you understand. I learned to go into all meetings assuming that the real meeting already happened before the round eyes showed up and that I was going to be aware of about 25% of what was going on. I would have translators from there but they lied or omitted. I tried to have a Chinese American colleague with me when possible to tell me what the fuck was really happening. I got a lot done that way. But on the occasions where I met with Minister level guys or guys in big financial or city posts, I was alway very careful and nervous because you don’t want to get on anybody’s list. 
I went one time with a very close friend who had moved to the US from China in his 20s. Hated the PRC govt. He was a tough guy but he was more nervous than I have ever seen him the whole time he was there and he was a totally different guy there.

Will only address a couple of your points. I don't think China is a dump although there are not too many places where I would want to live unless the payment made up for it. In general, the motivation of most Chinese business types is to make lots of money. Had the pleasure of sitting in on a business dinner meeting of Chinese business types in a Four Seasons hotel in Xi'an. My BIL took us from Beijing to Xi'an to Shanghai and set up a fancy dinner with half a dozen business buddies. I got a sense that to do business in China you better be able to drink a lot since everyone, other than my wife and I, were drinking Mao Tai. At the beginning of the evening he gave me a glass of the stuff and said I wouldn't like it. He was right and I am sure it was very good quality hooch considering the location. My only thought was that it might be good for paint removal. Whenever anyone said anything witty (or profound?) someone would tap the table with their glass and everyone emptied their glass (I was drinking a very low alcohol pijiu that was surprisingly good although I spent the rest of the night peeing). By the end of the night one of the guys who made biometric door locks had sold the provincial rights to sell his products to a guy who owned an iron ore mine in Xinjiang. I was offered the Canadian rights for $70,000.

As to corruption, a respected NGO called Transparency International ranks countries for corruption. There is a strong and perhaps not surprisingly high correlation between corruption and level of development using measures like Human Development Index and surveys of where people would most like to live.

The least corrupt countries are

T1 NZ and Denmark

T3 Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, Singapore

7 Norway

8 Netherlands

9 Luxembourg

10 Germany

T11 Canada. Oz, UK, Hong Kong

The US is tied with Chile for 25th.

The most corrupt (from worst going up)

Somalia, South Sudan (T179), Syria, Yemen, Venezuela 

China is ranked T78 with Argentina and Kuwait and is slowing improving. The other BRIC countries are India 86, Brazil 94, and Russia 129. All of these are improving except for Brazil which is dropping in the table. Anyone doing business in BRIC and similar countries is naive at best to think that corruption is not a serious issue. If you want honesty go to Auckland or Copenhagen

https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/ind

Link to post
Share on other sites

949 days now, consular access rare. The thing of it is, the longest extradition battle in Canada was the Lai case which went on for more than ten years. That was only resolved when China took Lai's children hostage. Therefore I am not optimist about two Michaels issue. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

This should be mandatory reading folks. It will curl your hair. We focus too much on the Uighurs, Hong Kong, militarized islands, etc and miss the most important threat. These are the symptoms not the underlying disease. For most of the last 800 years China has been the dominant nation on earth. This changed dramatically starting in the early 1800s, in the second half of the Qing dynasty, when a series of ineffective emperors and imperialist policies by western nations and Japan made the country a shell of its former self.

From 1912 when the first Republic came into being until now, China has been recreating itself as a modern version of it former greatness. Xi is just the first leader to do this from a global perspective - beyond just economics. Mao was almost totally focussed domestically and Deng and those who followed were focussed on increasing wealth in the country. Xi sees no reason for China not to be the world's dominant nation of the 21st century and beyond. I think he does see himself as a new age emperor and he has quite a few years to solidify himself in this role. He is 68 and apparently in good health. He quit smoking about five years ago which encouraged millions of Chinese to do the same. All you need to know is that his thoughts, in his name, are now part of the country's constitution.

Australians are already aware of the China risk.

Our relations with China went into a spin when our Prime Minister suggested we really needed an independant international enquiry as to the cause of the COVID pandemic. He didn't mention China.

Seems like a sensible idea, no?

China went ballistic.

Banned our coal, our wine and just about every other export to them they could (would love to ban our Iorn Ore too, but they need it). All in complete breech of WTO rules by the way (but theyre not very good at keeping agreements as HK have already found).

Then issued a 14 point demand for better relations. [ see here https://twitter.com/ErykBagshaw/status/1328983898911457280 . Need to read it with a Chinese properganda spin to get it full meaning. As one example, stopping unfriendly media reports on China means muzzling your free press]

The bottom line was surrender your sovereignty.

Australia said no.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2021 at 12:31 PM, OneWorldSailing said:

 

If you are so concerned about my mental and physical state and the impact it is having on the membership

Where did you read that I was concerned? I’m slightly amused and slightly saddened by manic depressives in a state,  it it ain’t like it’s that rare here. Mikey/comstock is just another side of your coin. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Where did you read that I was concerned? I’m slightly amused and slightly saddened by manic depressives in a state,  it it ain’t like it’s that rare here. Mikey/comstock is just another side of your coin. 

Clean, he can't remmeber what he wrote himself 24 hours before, how can you expect him to remember what someone else wrote

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I got a sense that to do business in China you better be able to drink a lot since everyone, other than my wife and I, were drinking Mao Tai. At the beginning of the evening he gave me a glass of the stuff and said I wouldn't like it. He was right and I am sure it was very good quality hooch considering the location. My only thought was that it might be good for paint removal. Whenever anyone said anything witty (or profound?) someone would tap the table with their glass and everyone emptied their glass (I was drinking a very low alcohol pijiu that was surprisingly good although I spent the rest of the night peeing). By the end of the night one of the guys who made biometric door locks had sold the provincial rights to sell his products to a guy who owned an iron ore mine in Xinjiang. I was offered the Canadian rights for $70,000.

As to corruption, a respected NGO called Transparency International ranks countries for corruption. There is a strong and perhaps not surprisingly high correlation between corruption and level of development using measures like Human Development Index and surveys of where people would most like to live.

The least corrupt countries are

T1 NZ and Denmark

T3 Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, Singapore

7 Norway

8 Netherlands

9 Luxembourg

10 Germany

T11 Canada. Oz, UK, Hong Kong

The US is tied with Chile for 25th.

The most corrupt (from worst going up)

Somalia, South Sudan (T179), Syria, Yemen, Venezuela 

China is ranked T78 with Argentina and Kuwait and is slowing improving. The other BRIC countries are India 86, Brazil 94, and Russia 129. All of these are improving except for Brazil which is dropping in the table. Anyone doing business in BRIC and similar countries is naive at best to think that corruption is not a serious issue. If you want honesty go to Auckland or Copenhagen

https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/ind

I have drunk a fair amount of mao tai at Chinese business dinners. There is a semi structured protocol where as the foreign guest the want you to share an individual toast with each person. The glasses are typically thimble sized. You can sometimes get the server to dilute the stuff but it’s not very strong. There is “good” and bad mao tai, like any liquor but none of it was great. I kind of enjoyed the ceremony of it and the experience of recognizing every person. I don’t really drink much at all but my policy with food and mao tai in Chinese business dinners was to choke down whatever they put in front of me. Some of the food was terrific. Some, like the crickets, tested my fortitude. Same in Japan but the food was better, the drinking was worse, and I remember my boss barfing up booze and sea urchins in the back of a taxi one time.

I don’t know where you got the corruption study but sorry, China is more corrupt by far than the US or all those European countries you listed combined.

Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, loneshark64 said:

I have drunk a fair amount of mao tai at Chinese business dinners. There is a semi structured protocol where as the foreign guest the want you to share an individual toast with each person. The glasses are typically thimble sized. You can sometimes get the server to dilute the stuff but it’s not very strong. There is “good” and bad mao tai, like any liquor but none of it was great. I kind of enjoyed the ceremony of it and the experience of recognizing every person. I don’t really drink much at all but my policy with food and mao tai in Chinese business dinners was to choke down whatever they put in front of me. Some of the food was terrific. Some, like the crickets, tested my fortitude. Same in Japan but the food was better, the drinking was worse, and I remember my boss barfing up booze and sea urchins in the back of a taxi one time.

I don’t know where you got the corruption study but sorry, China is more corrupt by far than the US or all those European countries you listed combined.

No corruption in the USA, it's called lobbying - a US$5Bn a year industry

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, loneshark64 said:

I have drunk a fair amount of mao tai at Chinese business dinners. There is a semi structured protocol where as the foreign guest the want you to share an individual toast with each person. The glasses are typically thimble sized. You can sometimes get the server to dilute the stuff but it’s not very strong. There is “good” and bad mao tai, like any liquor but none of it was great. I kind of enjoyed the ceremony of it and the experience of recognizing every person. I don’t really drink much at all but my policy with food and mao tai in Chinese business dinners was to choke down whatever they put in front of me. Some of the food was terrific. Some, like the crickets, tested my fortitude. Same in Japan but the food was better, the drinking was worse, and I remember my boss barfing up booze and sea urchins in the back of a taxi one time.

I don’t know where you got the corruption study but sorry, China is more corrupt by far than the US or all those European countries you listed combined.

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough. China is certainly more corrupt than the US and the European and other advanced countries, but similar to India and Brazil and much less corrupt than Russia which is really an outlier. Its development level suggests it should be much less corrupt than it is. Check out the weblink I provided and you can see the study and methodology. Transparency is a highly respected organization. My point was that as a country becomes more advanced it becomes less corrupt. It would be interesting to see a simple x/y graph of the corruption index vs GDP per capita. China is certainly moving in the right direction but these things take time as in decades.

Xi has imposed anti-corruption policies but seems to apply them most to political rivals who, to be fair are corrupt but not the only ones who are.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

 ........

The least corrupt countries are

T1 NZ and Denmark

T3 Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, Singapore

7 Norway

8 Netherlands

9 Luxembourg

10 Germany

T11 Canada. Oz, UK, Hong Kong

The US is tied with Chile for 25th.

The most corrupt (from worst going up)

Somalia, South Sudan (T179), Syria, Yemen, Venezuela 

China is ranked T78 with Argentina and Kuwait and is slowing improving. The other BRIC countries are India 86, Brazil 94, and Russia 129. All of these are improving except for Brazil which is dropping in the table. Anyone doing business in BRIC and similar countries is naive at best to think that corruption is not a serious issue. If you want honesty go to Auckland or Copenhagen

https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/ind

I used to work in DoD, engineer for the navy.

I've seen some stuff... corruption?  Hahaha....

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Perhaps I wasn't clear enough. China is certainly more corrupt than the US and the European and other advanced countries, but similar to India and Brazil and much less corrupt than Russia which is really an outlier. Its development level suggests it should be much less corrupt than it is. Check out the weblink I provided and you can see the study and methodology. Transparency is a highly respected organization. My point was that as a country becomes more advanced it becomes less corrupt. It would be interesting to see a simple x/y graph of the corruption index vs GDP per capita. China is certainly moving in the right direction but these things take time as in decades.

Xi has imposed anti-corruption policies but seems to apply them most to political rivals who, to be fair are corrupt but not the only ones who are.

They have quite a battle here but it is nowhere as bad as it used to be. I remember one marina director who was also the legal representative of the pontoon supplier - all out in the open, go figure. That was well over a decade ago though.

Although the anti-corruption drive was/is against those in government, a friend of mine who was GM of a boat builder did tell me that there was a positive impact on those in the private sector as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shanghaisailor said:

No corruption in the USA, it's called lobbying - a US$5Bn a year industry

Hi SS,  I enjoy all of your sailing news.

You will lose comparing China's political system to the USA.  Yes, there is corruption and lobbying in the USA as there is everywhere. The differences are that every four years we get the opportunity to approve the guys in the top job and either keep them for another four years or chuck them out. For all of its faults, the USA is a democracy. We have laws about lobbying, people break them, but when they get caught they are prosecuted.  The rule of law is transparent and a transgressor is judged by a jury of their peers.  It is certainly not perfect but I can sleep at night feeling that I live in a free country where I have rights and ultimately the elected officials report to the electorate.

China has many attributes and advantages but we have a democracy , the rule of law, and free enterprise.   

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, IPLore said:

Hi SS,  I enjoy all of your sailing news.

You will lose comparing China's political system to the USA.  Yes, there is corruption and lobbying in the USA as there is everywhere. The differences are that every four years we get the opportunity to approve the guys in the top job and either keep them for another four years or chuck them out. For all of its faults, the USA is a democracy. We have laws about lobbying, people break them, but when they get caught they are prosecuted.  The rule of law is transparent and a transgressor is judged by a jury of their peers.  It is certainly not perfect but I can sleep at night feeling that I live in a free country where I have rights and ultimately the elected officials report to the electorate.

China has many attributes and advantages but we have a democracy , the rule of law, and free enterprise.   

Totally agree. Lobbying in the US is bad. But to compare that to the corruption in China? That is ridiculous. ANYBODY who has seriously done business there, from any country knows this. It is top down, through the government ministries to heads of cities to SOEs, Universities, banks. Tsinghua “University” which I did business with, as an example, is completely controlled by the state and is used as a shell for Tsinghua Holdings, Unigroup, and a bunch of tech companies that are stealing western tech left and right. The whole country is like this. And no, even India is not as bad as China. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have lived in Indonesia  Singapore and China. Worked extensively in Philippines Malaysia and Thailand.  In my experience China is not the worst state in this part of the world  for corruption at the personal level for daily living of its citizens. Nowhere close. That's not to defend the situation in China;  though as SS and others point out, it has improved both at a personal and business level. It used to be like the wild west. Now its  like the slightly crazy west.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

How many CCP attaboys do you get for this shit?

That’s what I’m talking about! How much do corrupt Chinese officials and “business” execs extort from the coffers in China? Let’s hear a number SS. Or at least one slight against your new home. They can’t be completely above rebuke, can they?

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult to not respond when, through personal experience one can see the post is incorrect or biased.

2 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

How many CCP attaboys do you get for this shit?

Just quoting facts. There is an old English saying 'the pot calling the kettle black'. Of course there is corruption everywhere. To attempt to suggest there isn't is naïve. Calling it lobbying only changes the name and method.

Companies and organisations do not spend $5Bn per annum with no expectation of benefit beyond that they would democratically receive in any case.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that our money driven political process sucks. But you’re using your sailing generated credibility to unilaterally support the CCP. Obviously you’re afraid to criticize the CCP.  I suggest you stick to sailing if you’re afraid to be honest. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

I agree that our money driven political process sucks. But you’re using your sailing generated credibility to unilaterally support the CCP. Obviously you’re afraid to criticize the CCP.  I suggest you stick to sailing if you’re afraid to be honest. 

Thank you. You beat me too it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, fastyacht said:

U.S. constitution explicitly gives its citizens the right to petition the govmt.

 

And a free press. Unthinkable in China.
Numbers about corruption (or just anything) in totalitarian regimes are very difficult to verify because they are produced by a corrupt government themselves with no possibility to cross-check. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Qingdaosog said:

it has improved both at a personal and business level. It used to be like the wild west. Now its  like the slightly crazy west.  

I am sorry, no. But if you really want to make an equivalency with the Wild West, here it is: The US destruction of Native American people and cultures was genocide on a grand scale. 

China is doing the same thing right now.
 

Read:  https://apple.news/ASkz0yl2-RTmBNCnie2GUZA

Upon arrival in the western province of Xinjiang, however, she was arrested, for no given reason. No charges were ever brought, but she spent the next 15 months being ferried between five different prison camps with barbed wire and watchtowers, during which she was interrogated 19 times and tortured with electric batons. Her interrogators had no clear explanation for her detention. “Once they asked me, ‘Do you have a TV in Kazakhstan?’ ” says Auelkhan, 42. “‘In which case your ideology has been corrupted.’ ”

Auelkhan, an ethnic Kazakh Muslim who grew up speaking a Turkic dialect, was forced to learn Mandarin Chinese, salute the Chinese flag and sing songs exulting the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) beneath photos of President Xi Jinping. “We all had to eat pork, and I was forced to burn a Koran and a prayer mat,” she says. “There was to be no more praying.” Afterward, she was sent to a labor camp for two months, where she sewed gloves until she says her neck ached and her eyes turned bloodshot.

Auelkhan was told she would be paid 6,000 yuan ($930) but received only 220 yuan ($33). Camp guards told detainees that “from now, all ethnicities will be as one and must share the same language and food,” she says. At one point, Auelkhan was given what she was told was a flu shot, and afterward her periods became infrequent and irregular. “I became lethargic and today can’t even knead bread without feeling tired,” she says.

CCP officials are assigned to live with minorities in their own homes, while AI-powered facial-recognition cameras enable predictive policing in what Amnesty International calls a “dystopian hellscape.” Wearing a slightly longer dress, or forgetting to shave, is enough to flag the surveillance algorithm, according to recently leaked internal files, possibly resulting in detention. “They want to destroy [non-Han] language and culture,” says Auelkhan, who is now based in the U.S. “To brainwash the people.”

Life for Xinjiang’s Muslim minorities—mostly Uighurs but also Kyrgyz, Uzbeks and Kazakhs like Auelkhan—is a daily grind of surveillance, indoctrination and detention. The U.N. estimates over 1 million have been placed in “re-education centers” across the Alaska-size region—abuses that the U.S. and other nations have labeled genocide. China, however, justifies its stifling security apparatus as battling the “three evils” of “separatism, terrorism and extremism,” heaping blame on the collective rather than individuals.

The 21st century rebooting of concentration camps in Xinjiang province has horrified the world, but it obscures a more insidious campaign rolling out across the world’s most populous nation. China is in the final stage of a covert and until now little-understood crusade to transform people in peripheral regions perceived as “backward” and “deviant” into “loyal,” “patriotic” and “civilized.”

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Caecilian said:

Still raving on about Chyna? Chill out One World they are junk sailors

Nice play on words Caecillian. Nice to see a bit of humour injected in this thread for a change.

I'm out. Fed up of the ill informed comments and personal attacks.

See y'all

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Nice play on words Caecillian. Nice to see a bit of humour injected in this thread for a change.

I'm out. Fed up of the ill informed comments and personal attacks.

See y'all

Thanks for playing. :)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Keith said:

Thanks for playing. :)

Might have been more fun if some of the attacks had a modicum of accuracy.  :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Attacks on facts? None of the facts are “fun” if you read the above posts by Loneshark  and the others, including me.
 

I’m going to guess that you can’t insert them in a quote and maybe don’t even see them from your side of the digital firewall. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

@shanghaisailor.    The inaccurate attacks are much easier to laugh off.

Dont leave us . Where else are we going to find out if China will come back again with a Sail GP team?

Or do you think they were dis-invited by Larry?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, EYESAILOR said:

@shanghaisailor.    The inaccurate attacks are much easier to laugh off.

Dont leave us . Where else are we going to find out if China will come back again with a Sail GP team?

Or do you think they were dis-invited by Larry?

That's why I kept responding EYESAILOR, it was fun winding them up but they just became repetitive. 

China coming back with a SailGP Team? I think the forums might learn that from me - not the other way round.

Dis-invited by Larry? That's highly amusing, China is a huge ORACLE market, especially in the retail world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s also called towing the party line. 

56 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

China coming back with a SailGP Team? I think the forums might learn that from me - not the other way round.

Too late!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll play along. Please keep us updated on SailGP China team. I’m highly entertained by SGP.
 

Thanks for playing SS. I think we’re just beginning the next big cold war and it will be fought on the web one way or another. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

I’ll play along. Please keep us updated on SailGP China team. I’m highly entertained by SGP.
 

Thanks for playing SS. I think we’re just beginning the next big cold war and it will be fought on the web one way or another. 

He he - much of it was fun and it was amazing how the attacks, assumptions and claims just got crazier and crazier.

I think the cold war of words has already started in the real world. It would be cool if it just remained words.

Anyway, for the next few weeks I will be rather more focussed to see if Team GBR can continue its multi-Games run of success. I think in RIO we reached the "final" in every event (medal race that is). Almost as important as the actual medals when measuring depth of talent.

Anyway, off to try and sort out the carb on my ancient 5hp Johnson 2 stroke. As this is already NOT a sailing thread, can anyone give me any pointers?

Stay well guys and lets hope the 15 cases reported on the front page doesn't grow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...