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Heatwave Killed Shellfish


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Washington State - Dead Shellfish

My beach smells terrible and there are many dead clams on the surface.  We had extreme low tides (-3.8) during the recent heat wave (100+) for several days.  I'm hoping that my 6,500 planted oysters have survived.  I'm adding another 800 oysters tomorrow, and will check their status.

This also happened about 10 years ago when we had extreme low tides, with freezing weather.  It killed most of the mussels, and they have not recovered.

What's this "Global Warming" that people are talking about?

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1 hour ago, view at the front said:

We had extreme low tides (-3.8)

Why oh why does the NOAA or whoever defines chart datum in the US use a datum that goes negative all the time.

Us Canadians use a much lower datum so that a negative tide may only appear once every month or two.

The math is much, much harder with adding a negative number to the charted numbers.

(Actually semi-seriously more chances for making a math error)

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1 hour ago, view at the front said:

Washington State - Dead Shellfish

My beach smells terrible and there are many dead clams on the surface.  We had extreme low tides (-3.8) during the recent heat wave (100+) for several days.  I'm hoping that my 6,500 planted oysters have survived.  I'm adding another 800 oysters tomorrow, and will check their status.

This also happened about 10 years ago when we had extreme low tides, with freezing weather.  It killed most of the mussels, and they have not recovered.

What's this "Global Warming" that people are talking about?

That's gotta be feet, right? 

 

From https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/est/

Screenshot 2021-07-09 at 11-52-02 Extreme Water Levels - NOAA Tides Currents.png

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wonder how the oyster farms made out,  I know they hang in deeper water,  but the warmer water has got to take a toll...  

you know i kind of laugh at these reports of these heatwaves..  when first moved to texas , had 40+ straight days of 100+*s 

but was in juneau once and the van driver was complaining about the heatwave,  it was 62*    so it is relative..

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7 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

wonder how the oyster farms made out,  I know they hang in deeper water,  but the warmer water has got to take a toll...  

you know i kind of laugh at these reports of these heatwaves..  when first moved to texas , had 40+ straight days of 100+*s 

but was in juneau once and the van driver was complaining about the heatwave,  it was 62*    so it is relative..

It takes people some time to adapt to temperatures that they aren't accustomed to.  It's a scientific fact, not just a perception. 

Relativity is real, just ask Einstein!

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3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

wonder how the oyster farms made out,  I know they hang in deeper water,  but the warmer water has got to take a toll...  

 

I'll talk to Taylor Shellfish tomorrow so see how their oysters made out?

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Our local hotspell only hit the low to mid 90s and only for a few days. Didn't seem to impact my oysters much what with surface water temps still in the high 50s- low 60s.

Unfortunately we had a warm spell in late May just as I was bringing then up off the bottom and had them out of the water for over 24 hours. That cost me a few oysters. They were already stressed though, from being on the bottom until too late in the spring.

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Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Washington; Cliff Mass' blog on the recent heatwave. 

Was Global Warming The Cause of the Great Northwest Heatwave? Science Says No.

Seattle Times article yesterday pointing at Climate Change as a possible culprit. In the comments in this article Cliff Mass disputes these findings, two Washington State Climatologists, Dr. Nick Bond and Karin Bumbaco weigh in on the discussion as well.

Without climate change, record Pacific Northwest heat wave would have been near impossible, researchers say 

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Indeed it's huge catastrophe for marine life, especially with the mussel die off from the excessive heat - wide scoped - since they're a foundation species because a lot of the marine ecosystem depends upon them.

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We were at Pen Cove last weekend at low tide. It is locally famous for muscles. Most are grown out in the bay on floats, but the smell was pretty bad so I suspect the naturally occurring ones near shore did not do well.

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1 hour ago, steele said:

We were at Pen Cove last weekend at low tide. It is locally famous for muscles. Most are grown out in the bay on floats, but the smell was pretty bad so I suspect the naturally occurring ones near shore did not do well.

Muscles will suffer from extreme heat.....

Mussels will too. The Coosa Moccasin shell mussel has just been granted a couple of new safe harbors (so to speak) in N. Fl.

 I doubt very much that the people who endanger this specie will care about new regulations, and I doubt that FWC has enough resources to protect them, but it's a step in the right direction.

image.jpeg.f8f654fdc7dfbb47794707bcbc28644b.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

wonder how the oyster farms made out,  I know they hang in deeper water,  but the warmer water has got to take a toll...  

you know i kind of laugh at these reports of these heatwaves..  when first moved to texas , had 40+ straight days of 100+*s 

but was in juneau once and the van driver was complaining about the heatwave,  it was 62*    so it is relative..

I grew up in the desert where the 90's were commonplace and over 100 happened with a degree of regularity. I have literally watched an egg fry on the sidewalk.

But - having lived for 50 years here where mid 80's are the usual peak temps, I find 90's and over 100 (it was 108 at my kids place) to essentially be survival conditions.

We just dialed everything back and rode it out. If it was all summer there would be some serious problems.

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4 hours ago, view at the front said:

A billion sounds like a lot but there are probably 10's of millions of mussels just on the pilings in my marina. :ph34r:

And every one of the fuckers is alive and kicking.

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2 hours ago, steele said:

We were at Pen Cove last weekend at low tide. It is locally famous for muscles. Most are grown out in the bay on floats, but the smell was pretty bad so I suspect the naturally occurring ones near shore did not do well.

We were recently at Front Street Grill in Coupeville, WA (our favorite restaurant).  We were having saffron mussels, and Tom Douglas came in with his tour group after visiting  Penn Cove Mussels.  We knew then that we were at the correct restaurant.  We eat there when the tides don't encourage harvesting my own mussels.

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6 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

A billion sounds like a lot but there are probably 10's of millions of mussels just on the pilings in my marina. :ph34r:

And every one of the fuckers is alive and kicking.

I think that the affected mussels were those on the beach exposed at low tide in the sun and heat.  Come smell my beach and house, and crunch on their dead shells.

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1 hour ago, view at the front said:

We were recently at Front Street Grill in Coupeville, WA (our favorite restaurant).  We were having saffron mussels, and Tom Douglas came in with his tour group after visiting  Penn Cove Mussels.  We knew then that we were at the correct restaurant.  We eat there when the tides don't encourage harvesting my own mussels.

The Front St Grill is fine, but the locals know Toby's is the place for mussels.

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I did Toby's for years, but have moved on, FSG has more variety, and less surly staff.  A good friend. . . a 20+ year opposing skipper at WIRW owns the rowing shell suspended from the ceiling.  The management refuses to acknowledge that he still owns it.  They are assholes. . .  I won't go there any more.  

I have 15,000 mussels that I grow on my beach. . . until the recent die-off?

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

A billion sounds like a lot but there are probably 10's of millions of mussels just on the pilings in my marina. :ph34r:

And every one of the fuckers is alive and kicking.

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

When life gives you 10's of millions of mussels, make zuppa di cozze!

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I talked to the owner of Taylor Shellfish this morning as I picked up 800 Duploid Pacific Oysters to plant.  He said that the heat seemed to mostly affect the native clams, cockles and mussels that have been in place on the beach for a long time.  He has had several sleepless nights worrying about his shellfish growing operation, but it seems to be OK.

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20 hours ago, boomer said:

Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Washington; Cliff Mass' blog on the recent heatwave. 

Was Global Warming The Cause of the Great Northwest Heatwave? Science Says No.

Seattle Times article yesterday pointing at Climate Change as a possible culprit. In the comments in this article Cliff Mass disputes these findings, two Washington State Climatologists, Dr. Nick Bond and Karin Bumbaco weigh in on the discussion as well.

Without climate change, record Pacific Northwest heat wave would have been near impossible, researchers say 

Mass knows PNW weather well but he's kind of gone wackadoodle with the climate change denial. He always couches his arguments in terms of "climate change may be real but it's important not to overhype it and the data don't support that this [pick your event] was related", which is great camouflage until you dig a little deeper. A few years back I started cross-checking his data sources and noticed that he would consistently cherry pick temp and precip data ranges to support his assertions but if you looked a little farther back, it would undermine them. There's never been a clearer case than the recent heat wave and even as it was happening, I was asking myself how long it would take Mass to put up his "not due to climate change" post. Turns out it was exactly 1 week.

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20 hours ago, boomer said:

Indeed it's huge catastrophe for marine life, especially with the mussel die off from the excessive heat - wide scoped - since they're a foundation species because a lot of the marine ecosystem depends upon them.

River ecosystems, for example, are also being severely stressed because of heat (on top of every other factor almost entirely directly caused by human influence). 

They say nature is 'resilient', maybe it will so again if the Anthropocene releases it's brutal and toxic stranglehold at some point, because currently, she can't take much more of this shit.

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1 hour ago, view at the front said:

I talked to the owner of Taylor Shellfish this morning as I picked up 800 Duploid Pacific Oysters to plant.  He said that the heat seemed to mostly affect the native clams, cockles and mussels that have been in place on the beach for a long time.  He has had several sleepless nights worrying about his shellfish growing operation, but it seems to be OK.

sounds he is being very shellfish

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You Can NOT Fuck-Up The EARTH

you can only Fuck-Up your stay +/or your ability to stay

a Thousand Billion Years from now no Matter what whoever did WON"T even be detectable

same thing  if  When a Super Volcano Rips a BIG ONE

or a chunky Meteor Collides perhaps splitting the Earth sending in off in completely different orbits

or a 2,000' Tsunami caused from inner or outer space

but ya blame it on gas not costing enough and plastic

 

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3 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

You Can NOT Fuck-Up The EARTH

it should be said that 'argument' is shit, always will be. it doesn't acknowledge the past or present, and it lacks respect.

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19 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

you can't fuck up the earth, but you sure can fuck up the things living on it...  the earth will be here after everything is long gone and new things start growing..

Maybe. Maybe not. I'd rather it not be decided while I'm still alive.

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7 hours ago, IStream said:

Mass knows PNW weather well but he's kind of gone wackadoodle with the climate change denial. He always couches his arguments in terms of "climate change may be real but it's important not to overhype it and the data don't support that this [pick your event] was related", which is great camouflage until you dig a little deeper. A few years back I started cross-checking his data sources and noticed that he would consistently cherry pick temp and precip data ranges to support his assertions but if you looked a little farther back, it would undermine them. There's never been a clearer case than the recent heat wave and even as it was happening, I was asking myself how long it would take Mass to put up his "not due to climate change" post. Turns out it was exactly 1 week.

Yes which is why I posted both those links.

Though Cliff states he believes the scientific consensus on global warming - he has a long history of being lukewarm on the subject.

Charles Mudede and Cliff Mass debated their separate stances climate change about four years ago.

 

Cliff appears to be deliberately ignoring the excessive increase in CO2 in parts per billion, and that climate change is changing  weather drastically across all measurable metrics. 

Those 3% of scientific papers that deny climate change? A review found them all flawed

Over the past several millennia, the average CO2 reading was 280 ppb of CO2...we now have readings over 400 which represent and increase of 120+ ppb. If you examine raw data on CO2 concentrations from core samples which is available from NOAA and other research sites you will see that following volcanic eruptions CO2 jumped 200 ppb and remained at those levels for approximately 5 years. CO2 was the main cause of a cooling trend that began 50 million years ago, large scale glaciation occurring when CO2 reached 425±75 ppm, a level that will be this year or the next, barring prompt policy changes.

We breached the 410 PPM Threshold for CO2 in April of 2017. Carbon dioxide has not reached this height in millions of years. If humanity wishes to preserve a planet similar to that on which civilization developed and to which life on Earth is adapted, paleoclimate evidence and ongoing climate change suggest that CO2 will need to be reduced from its current 410 ppm to at most 350 ppm. The largest uncertainty in the target arises from possible changes of non-CO2 forcings.

An initial 350 ppm CO2 target may be achievable by phasing out coal use except where CO2 is captured and adopting agricultural and forestry practices that sequester carbon. If the present overshoot of this target CO2 is not brief, there is a possibility of irreversible catastrophic effects.

It is expected to take 300-400 years or more, for the earth and it's oceans to just partially recover from CO2. However it's expected to take at the minimum 2000 years - for C02 to return to normal levels. If we continue to allow the levels to increase over the next 100 years - It will probably result in the greatest mass extinction in earth's history.

How the world passed a carbon threshold and why it matters

The Holocene extinction, otherwise referred to as the Sixth extinction or Anthropocene extinction, is a current event, and is one of the most significant extinction events in the history of the Earth. This ongoing extinction of species coincides with the present Holocene epoch, and is a result of human activity.
 
This large number of extinctions spans numerous families of plants and animals, including mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and arthropods. With widespread degradation of highly biodiverse habitats such as coral reefs and rainforests, as well as other areas, the vast majority of these extinctions are thought to be undocumented, as the species are undiscovered at the time of their extinction, or no one has yet discovered their extinction.
 
The current rate of extinction of species is estimated at up to 1,000 times higher than natural background rates. The Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services published by IPBES posits that roughly one million species of plants and animals face extinction caused by anthropogenic impacts.
 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

you can't fuck up the earth, but you sure can fuck up the things living on it...  the earth will be here after everything is long gone and new things start growing..

YUP !!

we are just here in a microscopic window of the existence of the Earth

allowing life to exist long enough for us to wipe ourselves out existance

how much longer is the 1/2 life of Planet Earth ?

what's the odds of Earth Rupturing

sending the Molten Core out to cover the surface cooking off everything becoming a Liquid Ball ??

or How many Meteorites. Comets or Planets from another Solar system will Hit and Trash the Earths Atmosphere

is there MEGA RADIATION that is keeping the Earths Core Moulton

and may spew out making the Earths surface RADIOACTIVE for a million + years

All the Horrible, Toxic, OZone Eating BS and TRASH we can throw or Dump anywhere on this Earth

Is just part of what the Earth is Made of, as that's where we got in in the 1st place

 

Until Mankind Learns that You Can't Fuck with the Earths Moody Evolution

And Quits building along the oceans shore, along cliffs, in River Valleys and on Fault-lines & Volcanos

we are but collateral damage

We have EVERYTHING We Need to Live in Comfort

But Noooooooooooooooooo you don't want to waste, water and land to grow/raise food

when we need water for concrete and the land for housing

AND we All need to live in clumps along the Least Life-Sustaining parts of the Earth

The Earth does NOT show all of its cards

But a portion of its past going back Millions of years before any form of mankind Is an Open Book

Look at the Land Formations that went Hot, Cold, Hot, Cold over and over who knows how many times

ALL Without influence of any life forms

You can NOT Kill the Earth even if you Blow it Up into Molecules as they shall just form the Newest Incarnation of EARTH

 

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22 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

 

 

don't be dumb, we're forcing millions of components of a planetary biosphere that took billions of years to evolve toward the point of collapse at ever increasing rates. come to your senses and quit trying to rationalize what can't be.

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