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A few snapped from hurst

A small sample of the many hundreds of photos I took today from the Hurst Castle vantage point. Skorpios, Hugo Boss, Apivia, 11th Hour Racing etc. I will add more tomorrow when I have time t

If I was involved with a boat where checking the keel bolts that often was considered necessary in a lumpy sea I would not be doing the Fastnet on it.

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8 minutes ago, Jethrow said:

@Frogman, the build quality of the JPK is awsome. It's Australian of course! :D

Has Innovation Composite actually built one yet? I heard about the license but wasn't aware any of the boats had been finished and then shipped over to the world at great expensive compared to sailing one across the channel from the original yards :P

 

20 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

The interesting thing with this race is there were a lot of JPK1180's competing however they range from the winner Sunrise to boats that haven't even finished yet. They are all over the place. I think it's fair to say Sunrise was very well sailed, perhaps a little lucky and in a boat that rates very well. ...

Disclaimer, this is total hear-say, but I hear the trick is to buy either a used JPK thats been sorted, or set aside budget and time to sort a new one to the sort of racing you wish to do. No different to any other top end of boat of course, but not something you expect from a more production style run.

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5 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

Has Innovation Composite actually built one yet? I heard about the license but wasn't aware any of the boats had been finished and then shipped over to the world at great expensive compared to sailing one across the channel from the original yards :P

Actually @JonRowe I don't know. I saw the IC guys had finished a boat and had posted about the win, but I don't know if it's the same boat ;)

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JPKs are very well build indeed, the different with the sunfast is significant( but they are a bit more expensive).

I have sailed extensively on the 10.10 and 10.80 they are just simple but good performers in all conditions with no glaring weakness, easy to sail and  very well behaved even in strong conditions.

 

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16 minutes ago, Jethrow said:

Actually @JonRowe I don't know. I saw the IC guys had finished a boat and had posted about the win, but I don't know if it's the same boat ;)

As far as I know Sunrise is a 2018 boat, so I'd be surprised if it was :) 

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7 minutes ago, JL92S said:

Got to love that Leon sailed out the Solent in 25-35kts of wind over tide carrying a full main when other boats were overwhelmed with 2 reefs and a J4FEABF043-D150-4802-A019-668FCEB884C5.thumb.jpeg.21cb686d3863f5c540532c977c52b429.jpegDD4439FE-9674-4208-A0DD-3E78C44B6E72.thumb.jpeg.e19f07ee6fdbbdb7c22f1e4cfad75735.jpeg

Not sure if that's just a moment or if they really had their main trimmed to the extreme, so that the top creates lift to windward, uprighting the boat. If so, that's not sailing anymore, that's occultism ;)

 

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Some fun with numbers:

So overall, the most succesful 'class' / design in this Fastnet were the SF 3200, with an average place of 43. They are also one of the most consitent fleets, with a standard deviation of 15, so the odds of achieving a Top 1/3rd place with a SF 3200 are very good. 

Very interesting to see the consistency of each Sun Fast group (but samples size is too small to really gauge sth. from there).

The JPK designs (all) -as mentioned- show far more deviation, the 1180 ranges from 1st place to 133rd, which is almost last of the finishers. Average place 'only' 48th.

X-Yachts (only very few) show an average place of 76,6, which is not really ok for performance boats, showing in my view a) their age and b) that they are not really good IRC boats. But it's a small sample.

First 40 and  40.7: consistently poor, average 95, first came 72nd, and a large chunk of them is down there, so we see a small deviation (relatively large sample).

Fun Fact: A First Class 10 placed 18th in 4days 21hrs, beating the first 40.7 by an hour ON SAILED TIME! Even a Dehler 33 cruising beat the first 40.7 by 12 minutes on sailed time.

Volvos astonishingly poor, no pick for a win here, seems like a sandwich position to me: too large for a chance in corrected time, too small for a shot at the line honours.

fastnet.thumb.jpg.fa121ffe99f8ef5f6b6ce594c15cae18.jpg

So, in hindsight:

If I had to chose a design to have a good shot at a Rolex (on a budget), I think I'd pick the Dehler 33 cruising and try to survive it in the 2H division, because:

Winning time in 2H for Leon corrected: 4:18:46

Dehler 33 in IRC 4 corrected: 4:18:06 - DING

Here is a nice video from Sun Hill 3, the Dehler 33 in question:

 

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12 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Some fun with numbers:

So overall, the most succesful 'class' / design in this Fastnet were the SF 3200, with an average place of 43. They are also one of the most consitent fleets, with a standard deviation of 15, so the odds of achieving a Top 1/3rd place with a SF 3200 are very good. 

Very interesting to see the consistency of each Sun Fast group (but samples size is too small to really gauge sth. from there).

The JPK designs (all) -as mentioned- show far more deviation, the 1180 ranges from 1st place to 133rd, which is almost last of the finishers. Average place 'only' 48th.

X-Yachts (only very few) show an average place of 76,6, which is not really ok for performance boats, showing in my view a) their age and b) that they are not really good IRC boats. But it's a small sample.

First 40 and  40.7: consistently poor, average 95, first came 72nd, and a large chunk of them is down there, so we see a small deviation (relatively large sample).

Fun Fact: A First Class 10 placed 18th in 4days 21hrs, beating the first 40.7 by an hour ON SAILED TIME! Even a Dehler 33 cruising beat the first 40.7 by 12 minutes on sailed time.

Volvos astonishingly poor, no pick for a win here, seems like a sandwich position to me: too large for a chance in corrected time, too small for a shot at the line honours.

fastnet.thumb.jpg.fa121ffe99f8ef5f6b6ce594c15cae18.jpg

So, in hindsight:

If I had to chose a design to have a good shot at a Rolex (on a budget), I think I'd pick the Dehler 33 cruising and try to survive it in the 2H division, because:

Winning time in 2H for Leon corrected: 4:18:46

Dehler 33 in IRC 4 corrected: 4:18:06 - DING

Here is a nice video from Sun Hill 3, the Dehler 33 in question:

 

How do J boats fit into the scores?

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29 minutes ago, JL92S said:

How do J boats fit into the scores?

All over the place, but a bit more of them in the top 50%.

Keep in mind, that above is just a snapshot, many variables have not been taken into account. In fact, I find it astonishing that you see some clear consistency in some fleets.

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3 hours ago, Jethrow said:

Actually @JonRowe I don't know. I saw the IC guys had finished a boat and had posted about the win, but I don't know if it's the same boat ;)

Most likely all of the JPK's in the Fastnet are from the JPK boatyard in Larmor-Plage France unless it's a newer boat owned by someone from Australia.  If I remember correctly the JPK Pacific boats in Australia relationship just started 3 or 4 years ago?  Jean-Pierre is still running the show in France and building boats there.  'Leon', the 1030 is owned by Jean-Pierre although he didn't race this year and Sunrise is a UK boat which was built in France.

3 hours ago, razcaillou said:

JPKs are very well build indeed, the different with the sunfast is significant( but they are a bit more expensive).

I have sailed extensively on the 10.10 and 10.80 they are just simple but good performers in all conditions with no glaring weakness, easy to sail and  very well behaved even in strong conditions.

 

Couldn't agree more!  They are very special boats, though admittedly I'm biased because I own one.  Build quality is 2nd to none and it just takes a short time sailing one to realize they are built and designed by someone who's spent many, many miles sailing and racing offshore.  So many little but very important details you just don't appreciate until you sail one.  Boats are supposed to be all about compromises but there are very few with a JPK.  Set it and forget it cruising or full on offshore racing in 30+knots and everything in between it can do quite well.  I'm not saying JPK's are the only boats made this well but for sure among just a small handful maybe.

3 hours ago, JonRowe said:

Disclaimer, this is total hear-say, but I hear the trick is to buy either a used JPK thats been sorted, or set aside budget and time to sort a new one to the sort of racing you wish to do. No different to any other top end of boat of course, but not something you expect from a more production style run.

Respectfully, not sure I would agree with that, at least in my experience.  I'd say the best reason to buy a JPK used is firstly because it will be cheaper and secondly there's often a 2 year wait for a new one.  Because they are semi custom boats Jean-Pierre will build it almost any way you want for any type of sailing you do. I don't think he's going to let a fugly Frankenstein shit box leave his yard with his name on it but beyond that whatever you want he'll make happen.  

We were incredibly lucky when we bought our 1080, we had the best of both worlds.  Bought it used but it had only been sailing less than 5 times.  So basically brand new but didn't have to wait 2 years.  Except for a few tweaks here and there to get it set up the way we like it was ready to race out of the box.   The biggest issue was it didn't have a stereo when I bought it.  A very serious WTF moment when I realized that after I paid for the boat.  Seriously, what kind of psychopath sails without music playing???  My god, the horror! :)  For sure any limitations about the boat were more on the part of the owner and crew and not the boat.

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You have to remember that the Fastnet is a race of tidal gates and changing winds. So if your boat is just the right speed to get to the turns at the right time then you are likely to do well. But if yours is then others in the same class of boat are probably not that far away either. Whereas 10% faster or slower and you can be screwed. So I would expect some consistency of results between boats of the same class. What stands out to me from your analysis is actually how little that is the case and therefore how much is down to how well the boats are set-up and sailed. 

Which is good.

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13 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

You have to remember that the Fastnet is a race of tidal gates and changing winds. So if your boat is just the right speed to get to the turns at the right time then you are likely to do well. But if yours is then others in the same class of boat are probably not that far away either. Whereas 10% faster or slower and you can be screwed. So I would expect some consistency of results between boats of the same class. What stands out to me from your analysis is actually how little that is the case and therefore how much is down to how well the boats are set-up and sailed. 

Which is good.

Interesting observation, I guess a good boat gives you a chance to win every race, the rest is up to the knuckleheads sailing the boat.  Also has me wondering if a top level crew could win on a 6ksb.  Would be a very interesting experiment.

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19 minutes ago, psycho tiller said:

 Seriously, what kind of psychopath sails without music playing???  My god, the horror! :)  For sure any limitations about the boat were more on the part of the owner and crew and not the boat.

I recently spent 7 days 8 hours racing to Hawaii with out any music.  No pleasant at all, but stereo not required either.  I have become a convert to portable speakers and ipods.

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6 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

I recently spent 7 days 8 hours racing to Hawaii with out any music.  No pleasant at all, but stereo not required either.  I have become a convert to portable speakers and ipods.

But if you can’t torture the crew with 8 days straight 24/7 of Johnny Cash’s ‘Boy named Sue’ then what’s the point? :D

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41 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

You have to remember that the Fastnet is a race of tidal gates and changing winds. So if your boat is just the right speed to get to the turns at the right time then you are likely to do well. But if yours is then others in the same class of boat are probably not that far away either. Whereas 10% faster or slower and you can be screwed. So I would expect some consistency of results between boats of the same class. What stands out to me from your analysis is actually how little that is the case and therefore how much is down to how well the boats are set-up and sailed. 

Which is good.

I absolutely agree, external factors play an enormous role here.

On the other hand, we should note two things:

1. the consistency with which some teams / owners turn out good results: Sun Hill is a very well managed amateur crew, Léon is very professional as well. I think local knowledge as in these two examples plays out and was even more important this year with the Cherbourg finish.

2. A good design gives you more options to be where you want to be. Esp. given the TSS (note how many finishers got penalties), pointing ability in this race can be decisive. If you've got a good boat, you can manage the tidals gates far better, with a slow boat, you're always struggling to make it.

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1 hour ago, psycho tiller said:

Respectfully, not sure I would agree with that, at least in my experience.

Like I say, thats just what the rumour mill says, I've not sailed on one personally, so if you have then your experience has more weight. As this is the internet and not pub banter I'll now STFU :) 

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24 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

Like I say, thats just what the rumour mill says, I've not sailed on one personally, so if you have then your experience has more weight. As this is the internet and not pub banter I'll now STFU :) 

Meh, the internet is probably worse than pub banter and if everything was fact checked and absolutely true this place would have tumbleweeds blowing through each room and be a ghost town.  The banter makes things interesting!

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3 hours ago, Matagi said:

I absolutely agree, external factors play an enormous role here.

On the other hand, we should note two things:

1. the consistency with which some teams / owners turn out good results: Sun Hill is a very well managed amateur crew, Léon is very professional as well. I think local knowledge as in these two examples plays out and was even more important this year with the Cherbourg finish.

2. A good design gives you more options to be where you want to be. Esp. given the TSS (note how many finishers got penalties), pointing ability in this race can be decisive. If you've got a good boat, you can manage the tidals gates far better, with a slow boat, you're always struggling to make it.

Oh absolutely, but those 2 factors apply more within a class (by which I mean start group ie boats of similar size and speed) far more than overall. 

It is possible to sail a near perfect race, win your class by hours, but be well down the overall honours because the win dropped off after the big boats finished, or it was light winds at critical gate or something . 

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4 hours ago, psycho tiller said:

But if you can’t torture the crew with 8 days straight 24/7 of Johnny Cash’s ‘Boy named Sue’ then what’s the point? :D

You make a very strong argument which is difficult if not impossible to rebut.

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My favourite use of the boat stereo was to record a very bad shipping forecast and the one day in France after racing over and before the cruise back we played it so lots of people heard it.

Storm force 10 cyclonic was in there somewhere iirc.

Got a few people nervous

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7 hours ago, Matagi said:

Some fun with numbers:

So overall, the most succesful 'class' / design in this Fastnet were the SF 3200, with an average place of 43. They are also one of the most consitent fleets, with a standard deviation of 15, so the odds of achieving a Top 1/3rd place with a SF 3200 are very good. 

Very interesting to see the consistency of each Sun Fast group (but samples size is too small to really gauge sth. from there).

The JPK designs (all) -as mentioned- show far more deviation, the 1180 ranges from 1st place to 133rd, which is almost last of the finishers. Average place 'only' 48th.

X-Yachts (only very few) show an average place of 76,6, which is not really ok for performance boats, showing in my view a) their age and b) that they are not really good IRC boats. But it's a small sample.

First 40 and  40.7: consistently poor, average 95, first came 72nd, and a large chunk of them is down there, so we see a small deviation (relatively large sample).

Fun Fact: A First Class 10 placed 18th in 4days 21hrs, beating the first 40.7 by an hour ON SAILED TIME! Even a Dehler 33 cruising beat the first 40.7 by 12 minutes on sailed time.

Volvos astonishingly poor, no pick for a win here, seems like a sandwich position to me: too large for a chance in corrected time, too small for a shot at the line honours.

fastnet.thumb.jpg.fa121ffe99f8ef5f6b6ce594c15cae18.jpg

So, in hindsight:

If I had to chose a design to have a good shot at a Rolex (on a budget), I think I'd pick the Dehler 33 cruising and try to survive it in the 2H division, because:

Winning time in 2H for Leon corrected: 4:18:46

Dehler 33 in IRC 4 corrected: 4:18:06 - DING

Here is a nice video from Sun Hill 3, the Dehler 33 in question:

 

The “Cruising” in Dehler 33 Cruising is a bit of a misnomer. I think the proper title is Dehler 33 CR, and it’s a tall rig version of the boat. SA/D just under 24 and a long waterline for it’s LOA. Easily driven J/V hull and powerful sail plan makes them a bit of a IRC secret weapon. There are not many around but there’s one in the Solent called Ruthless which is also very competitive.

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On 8/11/2021 at 11:38 PM, Afrayedknot said:

I have not done that job per say but I have been a part of programs that large and at that level.

which one? because thats just about the pinnacle of ocean racing. i'm impressed that you have, takes skill and years to get there.

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3 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

which one? because thats just about the pinnacle of ocean racing. i'm impressed that you have, takes skill and years to get there.

Thanks. I appreciate your candor. As I said a few programs and it took a bit of work but I’m not here to have a dick wagging contest. You can PM me for my CV but I doubt I’ll share it. 

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Spare a thought for the poor buggers on Sundance, the Fastnet back marker. 300Nm still to go to Cherbourg with a rather large and angry looking weather system bearing down on them in the Western Approaches

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1 hour ago, shanghaisailor said:

Spare a thought for the poor buggers on Sundance, the Fastnet back marker. 300Nm still to go to Cherbourg with a rather large and angry looking weather system bearing down on them in the Western Approaches

It’s going to be the best beer ever in Cherbourg, though.

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1 hour ago, shanghaisailor said:

Spare a thought for the poor buggers on Sundance, the Fastnet back marker. 300Nm still to go to Cherbourg with a rather large and angry looking weather system bearing down on them in the Western Approaches

I will pour one out, wonder if they'll stop or head home like so many people have.

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11 minutes ago, JonRowe said:

I will pour one out, wonder if they'll stop or head home like so many people have.

I think they might need at least a short rest and a shower after a week on a 36 footer

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2 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

I think they might need at least a short rest and a shower after a week on a 36 footer

Well from instagram a 32 footer (Cora) went straight home last night, it depends on their covid status, if they're not all double vaccinated, or don't fancy having to do a  day 2 covid test on return they may well head straight home to avoid that issue

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Just now, JonRowe said:

Well from instagram a 32 footer (Cora) went straight home last night, it depends on their covid status, if they're not all double vaccinated, or don't fancy having to do a  day 2 covid test on return they may well head straight home to avoid that issue

Good Point.

We have just had a ramping up of precautions here in China with some cities mandating mask wearing outdoors and it isn't anything like as rampant here as some other countries, just a few hundred nationwide in a country this big. 

I suppose though, taking precautions is sensible. Personally I am just waiting my second jag. The way I look at it is any effects of the vaccine cannot be anywhere as bad as catching the full blown COVID itself and although it doesn't give complete immunity, all reposrts say it least 'takes the edge off'.

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1 minute ago, shanghaisailor said:

Good Point.

We have just had a ramping up of precautions here in China with some cities mandating mask wearing outdoors and it isn't anything like as rampant here as some other countries, just a few hundred nationwide in a country this big. 

I suppose though, taking precautions is sensible. Personally I am just waiting my second jag. The way I look at it is any effects of the vaccine cannot be anywhere as bad as catching the full blown COVID itself and although it doesn't give complete immunity, all reposrts say it least 'takes the edge off'.

Plus these Double Handed guys are a tough lot. Seems she placed 6th in the two handed fleet, good going.

 

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1 hour ago, shanghaisailor said:

Good Point.

We have just had a ramping up of precautions here in China with some cities mandating mask wearing outdoors and it isn't anything like as rampant here as some other countries, just a few hundred nationwide in a country this big. 

I suppose though, taking precautions is sensible. Personally I am just waiting my second jag. The way I look at it is any effects of the vaccine cannot be anywhere as bad as catching the full blown COVID itself and although it doesn't give complete immunity, all reposrts say it least 'takes the edge off'.

To enter France from the UK without quarantine requires each crew to be double vaxed, otherwise they can stop but have to isolate (which might well be a nice rest) on the boat although I'm sure someone could be arranged to bring them "supplies", but until the friday before the race entering France meant a 10 day quarantine on return, luckily they dropped that from 4am on the day of the race start, instead just requiring a mandatory 2 day pcr test which ranges from £20 per person to £140 per person dependant on who you book it through

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On 8/13/2021 at 4:39 AM, terrafirma said:

Charlie talking about how Apivia was able to foil upwind due to the conditions, something he says they can't normally do.! After that they got to favourible conditions that some of the other boats didn't get. 

 

Yes, that was interesting. Flat water strong wind and a little help from the tide. 

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Come on, you have to acknowledge their perseverance. 

Many contenders had long given up by then (which is ok, seasickness gets to the best of us), so good on them for finishing that job. Hope the next hours don't get too bumpy.

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2 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Come on, you have to acknowledge their perseverance. 

Many contenders had long given up by then (which is ok, seasickness gets to the best of us), so good on them for finishing that job. Hope the next hours don't get too bumpy.

I agree. For any long race, never knock the tail-enders. Someone has to be last, but they stick with it. 

Criticise those who quit for no good reason if you want, or even those who never tried, but never people who finish what is a fairly tough race.  

Better to raise a glass to them

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On 8/13/2021 at 10:17 PM, Black Jack said:

Out of curiosity - 

How many of the top finishing boats this year were skippered by their owners? It seems youth carried the days.

 

I'm pretty certain us lot of "old duffers" on Pegasus were first boat home with owners and an amateur crew sailing & who also do all the  majority of the boat work. 

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Just now, shanghaisailor said:

She's now showing at Cherbourg. Perhaps there was a tracker failure - it happens

yep - quite a number of YB trackers failed, According to YB tracker we were still at sea with 170miles to go whilst simultaneously partying in the crews tent :-)

 

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some thoughts
on race start ;
we (Pegasus of Northumberland -Open50) and a number of other owners requested a change in start time for Class Z as we felt to start at the back. in big winds, having to race through 400 smaller/slower craft would lead to an accident(s).  It was obviously a last minute decision as Tim T doing the briefing only found out part way through!!

a question : why it is thought OK to start  big boats at the back (other then looking nice for the photographers) of a large fleet??

the course;
we believe we made a number of good tactical calls (going south of the Sillies TSS on way into Celtic sea and crossing Alderney race.  It definitely evened up the lengths of the upwind/downwind legs... we lost out to the scow bow Class40s as they went past us 2-3knots faster on the close reach up the channel. So a Plymouth finish would have suited us better - but that is the course and we sail as best as we can, and we will work on those pesky scow bow Class40s next year
It is  longer course and much longer at sea for Class 3 and 4, but overall we felt the longer course was an improvement

the finish;
the big controversy - and yes as expected (i have raced RdR and TJV so knew what to expect) Cherbourg knocked Plymouth into a cocked hat. They really did the race and sailors proud with an excellent atmosphere, ; we were applauded as we entered the marina at midnight by a group of 30+ locals. Lots of locals in and around the race village and all incredibly welcoming
- well done RORC for having the b*** to make the change
 

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On 8/14/2021 at 2:50 PM, shanghaisailor said:

Good Point.

We have just had a ramping up of precautions here in China with some cities mandating mask wearing outdoors and it isn't anything like as rampant hereEded as some other countries, just a few hundred nationwide in a country this big. 

I suppose though, taking precautions is sensible. Personally I am just waiting my second jag. The way I look at it is any effects of the vaccine cannot be anywhere as bad as catching the full blown COVID itself and although it doesn't give complete immunity, all reposrts say it least 'takes the edge off'.

A neighboring family of five recently had Covid-19 in the house. The dad, double vaccinated, lost taste and smell and was more tired than usual, all for a week or so. One teenager had a slight cough for a day or two. Another teenager had a temperature for four hours and the third teenager had no symptoms. The mother didn’t catch it. Weird.

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19 hours ago, SSolo said:

a question : why it is thought OK to start  big boats at the back (other then looking nice for the photographers) of a large fleet?

I've never really understood why this is so common. It only compresses the finishing window marginally. Maybe it gives you more tidal options, as boats like me at the back of IRC4 (0.990) need 2-3 hours' favourable tide to clear Hurst if it's not that windy?

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On 8/12/2021 at 10:50 AM, terrafirma said:

Jules has a great reputation.! I don't know his Fastnet record but the guy has been everywhere.! Honest Mistake.? Did BB make the call.? Strange.? :(

Jules Salter was definitely NOT on R88 this year!!

I was having a cup of tea at home watching the start. Still I guess facts don't matter these days before people comment.

Still, hats off to anyone who took the race on, it was pretty sporty just leaving the Solent!

IMG_7240.jpg

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19 minutes ago, Snowden said:

I've never really understood why this is so common. It only compresses the finishing window marginally. Maybe it gives you more tidal options, as boats like me at the back of IRC4 (0.990) need 2-3 hours' favourable tide to clear Hurst if it's not that windy?

It can help equalise the impact of the first gate at least. Though I suspect it is more for entertainment value. 

Personally I have never had an issue with much bigger or small monohulls in the Fastnet or similar. Ability levels are high enough that it is all predictable.

I have had many more problems with non-racing boats - for example I can clearly remember a cruiser coming through the Fastnet start line on port gybe - he would have crossed the line about 30s after we crossed it going the other way on stbd, close in to Cowes Green trying to catch the tide in a fair prize. He made absolutely no attempt to avoid anyone. Still not sure how we all missed. 

Also had problems with lots of boats on the round the island (Isle of Wight) race, but that was nothing to do with size or speed, just the lack of ability of some of the entry list

Only real scare I had with a much faster boat was at the start of the double handed round Britain with the 60ft multis trying to overtake us in a 30ft mono on the triangle within the Sound. But then they started at the same time us as. And even then it was more a fear of the potential than the actual- they look quit scary from right in front when they get a gust and start to lift a hull!

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22 minutes ago, enigmatically2 said:

Personally I have never had an issue with much bigger or small monohulls in the Fastnet or similar. Ability levels are high enough that it is all predictable.

The collision risk is manageable but defending against shitty air for the first two hours is a bit boring, particularly in light airs downwind starts! It's OK for us with an asym but for a small symmetric boat running deep in the tide...

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40 minutes ago, Snowden said:

The collision risk is manageable but defending against shitty air for the first two hours is a bit boring, particularly in light airs downwind starts! It's OK for us with an asym but for a small symmetric boat running deep in the tide...

True.

Though on a cross-channel offshore (can't remember which one) I do remember we got a 3/4 tonner surfing on the quarter-wave of a bigger boat and stayed there. At first he laughed, then as we stayed there a couple of minutes he got annoyed and tried to luff until we fell off. But we managed to hang on to the 3rd wave back for ages after he realised how much it was costing him to luff(helped by us shouting advice on the matter).

So it can work the other way too

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Quote

[11:10, Cargo ship on VHF:]

- Yes mam'... i'm waiting for a while... No worries

[MACSF, Isabelle Joschke on VHF:]

- All right! Thank you very much. Have a good watch.

[Cargo ship on VHF:]

- ok, increase your speed, because you are last on this race!

[Isabelle to co-skipper Fabien Delahaye:]

- HAHAHAHA! He told me to fuck off, he said "you are the last ones!"

I love her sense of humor.

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4 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

I love her sense of humor.

Good one and the start renders pretty well, shows how stressful it might be for double handed IMOCA in a big fleet environment and lack of maneuverability. 

Good job from the mediaman.

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On 8/13/2021 at 7:26 PM, psycho tiller said:

But if you can’t torture the crew with 8 days straight 24/7 of Johnny Cash’s ‘Boy named Sue’ then what’s the point? :D

With portable speakers you can do even better.

One friend who was sailing on another boat left his portable speaker to our boat. As soon as they got inside working range of speaker he started blasting all kinds of bad songs trough it.

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On 8/16/2021 at 7:14 AM, KoN said:

Jules Salter was definitely NOT on R88 this year!!

I was having a cup of tea at home watching the start. Still I guess facts don't matter these days before people comment.

Still, hats off to anyone who took the race on, it was pretty sporty just leaving the Solent!

IMG_7240.jpg

Hysterical!

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5 hours ago, Pertsa said:

With portable speakers you can do even better.

One friend who was sailing on another boat left his portable speaker to our boat. As soon as they got inside working range of speaker he started blasting all kinds of bad songs trough it.

You're friend is an evil genius and I love it!  So many things could be done with this technique.  Boy bands at full blast, death metal, Right Said Fred "I'm too sexy" or maybe just a prerecorded voice yelling "Starboard! Starboard! Starboard!" or a simple recording of 5 horns from a container ship played at just the right moment.  :D 

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12 minutes ago, psycho tiller said:

You're friend is an evil genius and I love it!  So many things could be done with this technique.  Boy bands at full blast, death metal, Right Said Fred "I'm too sexy" or maybe just a prerecorded voice yelling "Starboard! Starboard! Starboard!" or a simple recording of 5 horns from a container ship played at just the right moment.  :D 

A recording of a labouring bilge pump.

Intermittently. 

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