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46 yrs and 5'10 170.  Former 6kt shitboxer(crew not owner) looking to get a dingy to drift around in and teach the kiddos(13 and 10) how to hack about the water.  Currently no place to store other than backyard, but we are looking for a lake place, so that would be its ultimate home.   Think smaller inland lakes - so big wind probably isnt in the future.  

Only dingys I have sailed are a banshee and a sunfish(how I learned) 

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Lots of similar threads - much depends on your launching spot and if you have an upper weight limit.

A Hobie 14 in good or great condition (there are lots of them) might be a good option. It has actual seating inside which I think is nice for some.

It's similar to a Puffer I guess (some may chime in and say they are the same in certain sizes...who knows?). 

Sometimes your choice is easier because you find a certain well-kept boat nearby. It's not always accurate, but you can get a vibe from owners and by how a boat is pictured and stored as to how well it has been taken care of. If you buy a really nice model (many older boats have already been restored...hopefully by a craftsperson!) - then you are Golden even if you decide you don't like it - you can sell it for what you paid or close. 

I'd make the decisions about weight and beach/ramp dollies and stuff like that...and also about whether that interior seating holds value for you. 

I've never sailed a Puffer but it can't be too different than some of the small CB Precisions, Catalinas or American Sail models (12 to 16 ft). If so, you'll be lucky to get 6kts, which is fine b/c that feels nice in a boat of that size.  

Got $$? With two kids maybe not? But if you did, look at the Fulcrum Rocket. Less than 5G new and lightweight and fast and safe and most everything else. It's not wasted money b/c it will hold value to a certain extent. 

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You mean a Holder 14? Yes, those and the Capri 14.5 are nice enough little sloops, room for a grown up and some kids too. The Hobie 14 is a catamaran, and a nice enough one as long as you don't stick the bow(s) under water.

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I had a Puffer, they are nice little boats if not badly abused by former owners. They tend to be beat to shit and have 40 year old sails. I spent the buck$ to get nice new sails for mine, made a new daggerboard, fixed the bent/busted rudder cartridge.... and it was a great little boat for quick evening sails with beer or with my wife (and beer).

My recommendation would be to look for any 13 ~ 15 ft sloop, an Oday Javelin, or an FJ or 420 (these are common but also in demand by junior sailing programs so they don't often turn up on the private market), A Puffer (a bit small-ish but do-able), a Bombardier, a Capri or Holder... anything except an MFG Pintail (don't ask). It would be nice to say "Yes the XYZ-14 is totally perfect for your needs" but then driving across 3 states to get one, or waiting years in the search, etc etc. Yes there's a lot of difference between boats, some are better all-round, some are faster or better in rough weather or some particular thing, but most of them are OK (the Pintail is not).

Go!

FB- Doug

 

 

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11 hours ago, KevV said:

46 yrs and 5'10 170.  Former 6kt shitboxer(crew not owner) looking to get a dingy to drift around in and teach the kiddos(13 and 10) how to hack about the water.  Currently no place to store other than backyard, but we are looking for a lake place, so that would be its ultimate home.   Think smaller inland lakes - so big wind probably isnt in the future.  

Only dingys I have sailed are a banshee and a sunfish(how I learned) 

Consider a pair of small dinghies. You take your kids with you the first couple times, teach them the basics, and the push them out to sail on their own - they can sail together on one (at 10+13, they'll fit fine) and soon can switch to sailing one each. You might need a 3rd one if you don't want to be left out.

Some time ago I got a Taz (too small for your kids, but it does fit kid+adult), taught my oldest son on it, and then got a 2nd one. Pretty soon we were on adventures. See

Early outings 2 on one boat - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DK3jF8cOWw

And then...  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4PbObCWYLc

 

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Sounds like you will be driving to the lake so you need something for 3 unless your preference is to chill on the shore.  Sloop gives them each something to do if sailing together but as MH said, they may get more kicks out of sailing against one another.  The initial learning curve is quickly climbed.  May want to be on the look out for something with a spinnaker for the kiddo's to master together.   The three of you together can probably handle getting something off the top of a triple trailer (Laser / F-5 / Sunfish etc)

Back in the day, there was a husband & wife sailing single hand dinghies.  They made a trailer where they could ramp launch the lower boat then the upper rack hinged down & back so they could also ramp launch it without struggling.

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16 hours ago, KevV said:

46 yrs and 5'10 170.  Former 6kt shitboxer(crew not owner) looking to get a dingy to drift around in and teach the kiddos(13 and 10) how to hack about the water.  Currently no place to store other than backyard, but we are looking for a lake place, so that would be its ultimate home.   Think smaller inland lakes - so big wind probably isnt in the future.  

Only dingys I have sailed are a banshee and a sunfish(how I learned) 

You must be looking at an old AMF sales brochure - `1975 vintage maybe... :D  If my memory is not totally gone AMF offered the; Minifish, Sunfish, Super Sunfish, Force 5, Puffer, and Sunbird.

There is a local gent that has a Catalina 14.2.  Looks like a boat that may fit your mission

Catalina (Capri) 14.2 Review | Which Sailboat?

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, martin 'hoff said:

Consider a pair of small dinghies. You take your kids with you the first couple times, teach them the basics, and the push them out to sail on their own - they can sail together on one (at 10+13, they'll fit fine) and soon can switch to sailing one each. You might need a 3rd one if you don't want to be left out.

 

 

I have thought this - would be pretty neat to have 2 or 3 sunfish and have our own race fleet.  That's assuming I can get these kids to like and want to sail.  The 13 yr old is as tall as I am already so cant get anything too small.  

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4 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

You must be looking at an old AMF sales brochure - `1975 vintage maybe... :D  If my memory is not totally gone AMF offered the; Minifish, Sunfish, Super Sunfish, Force 5, Puffer, and Sunbird.

 

 

 

 

I tossed those out there as there are a few of those for sale in the vicinity and decent priced - alas..no ancient, tattered sales brochure in front of me

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3 hours ago, KevV said:

I tossed those out there as there are a few of those for sale in the vicinity and decent priced - alas..no ancient, tattered sales brochure in front of me

I hink I actually have that one somewjere. I can remember it. I remember the sinbird being yellow. Hahaha.

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While I have taught my boys to sail on the Force 5, I would only suggest it if you are willing to buy the Short Rig sail and cap for the mast mid-section.  It can be easy to get into trouble with light weight and that big sail.  It definitely has enough space for two kids or you and a kid in it, though. 

 

Edit:  Crappy pic of my 7 year old and me using the standard sail to show size comparison with two people in it (we use Short rig for my 10yr old when he has gone out on his own)

VideoCapture_20210720-102954.jpg

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5 hours ago, Grestone said:

While I have taught my boys to sail on the Force 5, I would only suggest it if you are willing to buy the Short Rig sail and cap for the mast mid-section.  It can be easy to get into trouble with light weight and that big sail.  It definitely has enough space for two kids or you and a kid in it, though. 

 

Edit:  Crappy pic of my 7 year old and me using the standard sail to show size comparison with two people in it (we use Short rig for my 10yr old when he has gone out on his own)

 

Quote

 

Is your 10yr old able to right it by himself?

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15 hours ago, KevV said:

Is your 10yr old able to right it by himself?

It is a struggle, but yes. Also, if he's out on it, I'm out in my kayak nearby to help and he only gets to practice solo in a tiny, shallow lake.

It is definitely heavy for him to right it.

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5 hours ago, Grestone said:
20 hours ago, KevV said:

Is your 10yr old able to right it by himself?

It is a struggle, but yes. Also, if he's out on it, I'm out in my kayak nearby to help and he only gets to practice solo in a tiny, shallow lake.

It is definitely heavy for him to right it.

I'm uneasy with kids righting boats that are borderline for their weight, arm reach, muscles. This week I'm sheepdogging kids in 420s, and I have two skinny girls who can only 'scoop' each other on capsize recovery once or twice and then are too tired. If there is real wind, it takes both of them to right the 420 and then they struggle to get in.

A righting line really helps. In the 420, we take the bow line aft of the chainplate and over the gun'l to the one on the centerboard pulling it upright. For the Force 5, I'd put two eyes just under the gun'l abeam of the mast and another abeam of the daggerboard trunk, and run a line thru them and aft to a shock cord to hold it retracted.

Of course, kids get bigger almost by the day, so it's a problem that fixes itself as long as they don't either have an accident or a crises of confidence in the meantime.

Try teaching him to dry-roll the boat, in calm weather.

FB- Doug

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I b

On 7/19/2021 at 7:39 AM, Steam Flyer said:

IMy recommendation would be to look for any 13 ~ 15 ft sloop, an Oday Javelin, or an FJ or 420 (these are common but also in demand by junior sailing programs so they don't often turn up on the private market), A Puffer (a bit small-ish but do-able), a Bombardier, a Capri or Holder... anything except an MFG Pintail (don't ask). It would be nice to say "Yes the XYZ-14 is totally perfect for your needs" but then driving across 3 states to get one, or waiting years in the search, etc etc. Yes there's a lot of difference between boats, some are better all-round, some are faster or better in rough weather or some particular thing, but most of them are OK (the Pintail is not).

Go!

FB- Doug

 

 

.

I believe I found a pintail for sale about 120miles from my AO

Always enjoy reading the insight from this board as I swear you people have sailed everything

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4 hours ago, KevV said:

Holder 14 vs a Flying Junior?  Much differences?

FJ narrower waterline? In college racing they are even faster tackingbthan 420 according to my son

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3 minutes ago, fastyacht said:
4 hours ago, KevV said:

Holder 14 vs a Flying Junior?  Much differences?

FJ narrower waterline? In college racing they are even faster tackingbthan 420 according to my son

Does he like them more? My college club sailors hated FJs for several stupid reasons, no jib sheet cleats etc etc. I actually like the FJ more, largely because I think they're prettier boats. The 420 always seemed kind of utilitarian, industrial.

@KevV there's a big difference in hull shape, rig, foil configuration, etc between the Holder and FJ. But for your usage, the biggest difference is going to be seating, knee room. The Holder has bench seating and a raised sole so the cockpit drains itself easily. Some FJs were also built like this, but the vast majority here in the US were not. They have "tank seats" meaning that the sides of the boat are wide, rounded down into the cockpit, and instead of sitting down inside the boat you are sitting up on the side... but hiking is considerably easier.

The FJ will also feel a bit zippier; both boats are pretty responsive.

The real deciding factor is is, which boat do you like the looks of, more? Which is in better condition, on a better trailer, more recent sails (new sails are indecently expensive)? Personally, I'd take an FJ and get a new set of Intensity square-top sails..........

FB- Doug

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Interesting thread. I've been thinking about a cheap dinghy to tow once in a while, and also something like a Puffer for a small lake if we were to go to the mountains to cool off. It looks like the Puffer is set up for rowing too.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Im still cruising the ads on facebook and craigslist, but have not pulled a trigger yet.  Curious as to what dinghies are able to fly spinnakers? Thinking future here, as it would be a good training tool and keep people busy.  I think most the chrysler ones(Bucc,Mutt, and Pirateer) could..others?

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Long list.

Not comprehensive:

Mirror, 420 (both club and intl), GP-14, Jet 14, International 14, OD 14, 470, 505, Buccaneer etc, ODay Daysailer, Thistle, Flying Dutchman, Flying Scot, Lighting, various sloop rigged scows, this off top of my head. I assume all about old designs. I have books...

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