Jump to content

Corsair/Farrier Anarchy


Recommended Posts

7 minutes ago, rustylaru said:

Going to have to disagree with you on your trimming advice. When your 7 year old is in the zone, you touch fucking nothing.

Focus, not over steering, that kid can drive my boat any time. Our 6yo grandkid isn't quite there yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rustylaru said:

Also the outhaul was jammed inside the boom. I set it up weird this year with a reef hook on it that I double back for full main and extend up for 1st reef. Didn't really work out.

We have a homemade boom for our F-82R made from a standard 2" x 3" x 0.120" extrusion. 

We use a reef hook on the outhaul and I quite like the setup because I can use the same outhaul with full main or reefs. 

There is a 2:1 reduction inside the boom, plus another 2:1 reduction outside the boom, where the line from the boom end sheave goes through the hook and back to the boom end. 

Vertical clew loads with full main are taken by a soft shackle that goes through the clew, around the boom, and connects to the main sheet block.

Vertical clew loads for reefs are taken by standard slab reef lines which come out of the boom end sheave, over the reef cringle, and tie back down to the boom. Reef lines terminate in jammers on the boom (like outhaul below).

IMG_2907.thumb.jpeg.a633ccbe2d383fd3faf0eece8eecbb3d.jpeg

IMG_2908.thumb.jpeg.e9af1111606654f1d0115c3e2c3b8469.jpeg

IMG_2909.thumb.jpeg.55f920f0dc8b1e733eaf2ea03a06b830.jpeg 

Overall cost about $120.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, gspot said:

We have a homemade boom for our F-82R made from a standard 2" x 3" x 0.120" extrusion. 

We use a reef hook on the outhaul and I quite like the setup because I can use the same outhaul with full main or reefs. 

There is a 2:1 reduction inside the boom, plus another 2:1 reduction outside the boom, where the line from the boom end sheave goes through the hook and back to the boom end. 

Vertical clew loads with full main are taken by a soft shackle that goes through the clew, around the boom, and connects to the main sheet block.

Vertical clew loads for reefs are taken by standard slab reef lines which come out of the boom end sheave, over the reef cringle, and tie back down to the boom. Reef lines terminate in jammers on the boom (like outhaul below).

IMG_2907.thumb.jpeg.a633ccbe2d383fd3faf0eece8eecbb3d.jpeg

 

 

Overall cost about $120.  

Nice solution.

Because we roll sail on the boom all the action has to take place in the 10" that stick out the end. Additionally, I've only got one sheave to work with. I'm just going to return to the strop for reefing at the clew and the outhaul as it was designed. Maybe a Velcro strop. It's worked for heavily loaded  screecher blocks wrapped around the center of the rear beam.

Lots of folks who roll reef don't use anything at all to the reef cringle but i like to add a little something because all the reinforcement doesn't always end up positioned on the boom where you want it and I often take 1/2 a reef. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, rustylaru said:

Nice solution.

Because we roll sail on the boom all the action has to take place in the 10" that stick out the end. Additionally, I've only got one sheave to work with. I'm just going to return to the strop for reefing at the clew and the outhaul as it was designed. Maybe a Velcro strop. It's worked for heavily loaded  screecher blocks wrapped around the center of the rear beam.

Lots of folks who roll reef don't use anything at all to the reef cringle but i like to add a little something because all the reinforcement doesn't always end up positioned on the boom where you want it and I often take 1/2 a reef. 

The 10” and single sheave is certainly a constraint in your case.

On days when we’ve needed to reef but hadn’t rigged the appropriate reef lines we just used a big soft shackle through the clew reefing cringle and around the boom. 

We also use soft shackles to rig the screecher and spinnaker blocks to the aft beam.

They are super easy to make from scraps of Dyneema so we keep lots of spares of varying lengths on the boat. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2021 at 1:59 PM, RedHerring said:

Thread needs more sailing pics.  

Well I guess the sail isn't really up jn most of them, should I be in the cruising form?,  but it is a F31

FB_IMG_1628745203213.jpg

FB_IMG_1628745190670.jpg

FB_IMG_1628745131326.jpg

FB_IMG_1628745105581.jpg

FB_IMG_1618683777103.jpg

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/4/2021 at 9:34 AM, MultiThom said:

Since you are set up for slab reefing, it makes sense to control mast rotation at the boom.  You don't need multipurchase tackle either.  Simplest would be to replace the eye on the bottom of the boom with a jam cleat (which is how it is done on an F242).  You could also move the mainsheet attachment to directly over the traveler so the boom is pulled down instead of down and in.  That does reduce a little leach tension, though.

Not to hi-jack this line of thought but...  I'm new to my F31 and it has a rotating mast with dyneme shrouds.  Can any of you gentlemen offer any advice on how to tune them?  It seems like they are either so loose that the mast flops around at anchor or under power (if there is any swell) or so tight that the mast can’t rotate very much. 

 

Thanks, John

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like you're doing some amazing sailing!  Your mast will always be moving around some but you should be able to limit it with the rotator and a lot of mainsheet tension.  If you have running backs they can also help limit the annoying movements.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JohnAK said:

Not to hi-jack this line of thought but...  I'm new to my F31 and it has a rotating mast with dyneme shrouds.  Can any of you gentlemen offer any advice on how to tune them?  It seems like they are either so loose that the mast flops around at anchor or under power (if there is any swell) or so tight that the mast can’t rotate very much. 

 

Thanks, John

At anchor or motoring with sails down  you can use spare halyards to tighten things up athwartships and main halyard to main sheet to tighten it up fore-aft. Alternatively you can use a spare line to grab the shrouds and haul slack out with mainsheet.   While sailing there will be some slack with sails up, doesn't hurt anything.  Tuning beyond making sure the mast is vertical (shrouds the same length and tight) isn't needed.   Hard to figure why your mast isn't rotating much with slack removed from shrouds, did previous owner relocate the boom attachment of the mainsheet to forward of the traveler?  Boom provides the force to over rotate the mast which is why you have the limiter.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mundt said:

Looks like you're doing some amazing sailing!  Your mast will always be moving around some but you should be able to limit it with the rotator and a lot of mainsheet tension.  If you have running backs they can also help limit the annoying movements.  

Does a vee main sheet system solve some of the mast slop in light winds and waves?

I have returned to using a boomvang to control boom slop in light winds, not bad. I found myself using the vang tackle to create a vee mainsheet with the traveler all the way up and the vang connected to the opposite  end of the traveler creating the vee.   A cannon to control motor boats that cross your bow at 20kts while there children wave at you would be frowned upon I suppose, but could solve several wake problems with one solution but... oh my the weight it would add to the bow.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, rustylaru said:

Does a vee main sheet system solve some of the mast slop in light winds and waves?

I have returned to using a boomvang to control boom slop in light winds, not bad. I found myself using the vang tackle to create a vee mainsheet with the traveler all the way up and the vang connected to the opposite  end of the traveler creating the vee.   A cannon to control motor boats that cross your bow at 20kts while there children wave at you would be frowned upon I suppose, but could solve several wake problems with one solution but... oh my the weight it would add to the bow.

Perhaps a harpoon gun would be more appropriate.  I seem to recall one mounted to the bow of another trimaran.

 

waterworld harpoon.png

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rustylaru said:

A cannon to control motor boats that cross your bow at 20kts while there children wave at you would be frowned upon I suppose, but could solve several wake problems with one solution but... oh my the weight it would add to the bow.

Lighter weight solution is to get one of these

image.png.31a1d7571a1e8f9110afde14ecf244fa.png

And insert it into a hole in the bowsprit.  Might have some issues with rocket exhaust into the cabin, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mast slop at anchor is solved by a light weight, jury rigged handy billy shroud tensioner on one side, like the F27 non rotating mast above on Rusty's boat.  Mine is 3:1 with 1/8" line & vee cleat integral to the fiddle block.  One end is a toggle that goes thru the top deadeye eye, ~2 feet above the ama, other end is clipped to a handy pad eye on the ama, ~3' aft of the chain plate.  Quick, light, and easy to deploy

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not boat specific, but whatever.  Out of nowhere, Honda BF15D did not want to start.  Obvious it was a fuel delivery problem.  The orig in-line filter was still there.  Rancor filter/separator was orig to the boat as well (based on UK price tag).  Replaced the Rancor filter with a Rancor.  Replaced the OEM at the outboard with a slightly larger Wix (oem rubber prophylactic fit over it with some effort). I don't care to run two filters, but didn't feel like digging through boxes trying to find a suitable replacement fuel line in order to do away with the little filter in the outboard. So, I'll do that some other day...or not. Tossed the Denso plugs for NGK.  Drained the fuel chamber on the outboard in case any water using in there, as well as float bowl.  Fires right up. Looking forward to getting on the water tomorrow after work.  Not much wind in the forecast, so need the Honda in tip-top.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, deminimis said:

Not boat specific, but whatever.  Out of nowhere, Honda BF15D did not want to start.  Obvious it was a fuel delivery problem.  The orig in-line filter was still there.  Rancor filter/separator was orig to the boat as well (based on UK price tag).  Replaced the Rancor filter with a Rancor.  Replaced the OEM at the outboard with ta slightly larger Wix (oem rubber prophylactic fit over it with some effort). I don't care to run two filters, but didn't feel like digging through boxes trying to find a suitable replacement fuel line in order to do away with the little filter in the outboard. So, I'll do that some other day...or not. Tossed the Denso plugs for NGK.  Drained the fuel chamber on the outboard in case any water using in there, as well as float bowl.  Fires right up. Looking forward to getting on the water tomorrow after work.  Not much wind in the forecast, so need the Honda in tip-top.

I appreciate the share.  Boats suck up time.  If it isn't outboard maintenance, it is trailer maintenance.  Then sailing rigging to fiddle with whether running rigging or what have you and figuring out better ways to suit you.  Chasing down leaks, preventing dock scrapes....oh yah, then you get to sail.  It is a great pass time.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, deminimis said:

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!

No block needed at the front, your sail will sheet further bac than that

The block in the upper left corner is the spin turning block at rear beam float connection. You will use this location if you are running deep or broad reaching with you screecher. If you going to use it going up wind you'll probably going to want to strap a block to the center of your rear beam and sheet to spinnaker winch again. Some screechers are cut to go to your genny leads on your cabin top. It's a fun sail to play with different sheeting angles.

If you splice a block to a 30" bit of spectra with a 4" loop on the end you can use the on the rear beam. Go aroung the beam at desired location and through the loop. Randy Smyth I believe set his various fboats up with this same idea but with webbing with Velcro for center of rear beam block.

IMG_0233.jpg

Edited by rustylaru
addition
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, deminimis said:

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!

What's the SMG of the sail (mid girth divided by foot length)?  It is probably somewhere between 60% and 75% since 75% or more would be called a spinnaker.  How do you intend to use it?  If it is for reaching (most likely) you will want to route your sheets inside the shrouds.  You can find a starting sheet point along the length of the boat by the ratio of leach to foot on the sail.  You'll want to mimic that ratio with the length from the bowsprit and from the halyard exit.  That way you will pull the clew at about a 45 degree angle.  Like your jib track, you'll want to pull from back further in big wind to tighten the foot (vice versa for light wind).  How far out from the boat depends on how close you are wanting to reach (don't want to clog the slot).  

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, deminimis said:

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!

Our screacher is relatively flat, so we use blocks attached to the aft beam with soft shackles, situated about 10 degrees off the boat centerline, which works out to being closer to the main hull than the float, just inboard of the upper folding strut on the F-82R.  

From there we tweak the clew laterally inboard to point in light air, or outboard to reach in heavy air. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2021 at 5:15 AM, deminimis said:

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!

 

Screacher and tweaker.png

Tweaker Hardware.JPG

Tweaker and Screacher MEDIUM SIZE.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Sailabout said:

yep most sheeting for most angles ends up over the tramp so barber hauls everywhere

Agreed if racing with crew, but KISS if not racing or no crew. 

If the sail was made for the boat, the sailmaker "should" have made the foot and leach lengths so that sheeting from the back beam would be good for most conditions (however, there are no guarantees that the sailmaker knows or has measured your boat these days).  A spinnaker would sheet from outboard and outside the shrouds; a screacher would sheet inside the shrouds.  If sheets go to a winch, the line has to come from below the winch or you get overrides.  Where along the beam you put the screacher turning block will depend (that day) on what windspeed (more outboard for more wind).   The SMG of the screacher tells you what AWA the sail will be most happy with-smaller the SMG, the closer to the wind the sail will work when the luff is tight (and closer to the CL you will want to sheet from)--but you can loosen the halyard to make it run deeper (assuming it is roller furling with torque rope inside the luff).  

For someone still learning their boat and sails (or sailing in a new area), I'd leave the haulers off until I feel the need for them.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic, but I took a sail on a friends F28 last night and what an absolute blast. It was just a fun sail with a bunch of people but still felt fast blasting along upwind at 7-8kts and 11kts when we cracked off downwind.   First time on a tri and man what a fun time!  You guys know whats up :D

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Agreed if racing with crew, but KISS if not racing or no crew. 

If the sail was made for the boat, the sailmaker "should" have made the foot and leach lengths so that sheeting from the back beam would be good for most conditions (however, there are no guarantees that the sailmaker knows or has measured your boat these days).  A spinnaker would sheet from outboard and outside the shrouds; a screacher would sheet inside the shrouds.  If sheets go to a winch, the line has to come from below the winch or you get overrides.  Where along the beam you put the screacher turning block will depend (that day) on what windspeed (more outboard for more wind).   The SMG of the screacher tells you what AWA the sail will be most happy with-smaller the SMG, the closer to the wind the sail will work when the luff is tight (and closer to the CL you will want to sheet from)--but you can loosen the halyard to make it run deeper (assuming it is roller furling with torque rope inside the luff).  

For someone still learning their boat and sails (or sailing in a new area), I'd leave the haulers off until I feel the need for them.  

The screacher is really the one to outhaul from the main hull track, but like you said perhaps only if racing. It makes a  huge difference.
I have added a one foot strop to raise the block from the track on a 24 and that works great.
Allows it to come in when sheeted hard and will ease out a little without using a barber haul.
Stops the sheet rubbing through the deck as well like it does on a stock boat.

 

Also use that screacher block to outboard sheet the jib in big wind when cracked off, makes the boat lots safer to handle

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the weekend, I changed out the net attachment lacing on one side with dyneema.  Holy crap what a difference!  No squeaks!!  I also changed up the front and aft setup.  The lines are permanently attached up to the last four attachment eyes (last four before reaching the hull).  The final four are secured with seperate line.  Speeds up the lacing and unlacing when splashing or packing up the boat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

RE: Barber haulers.  I have a snatch block and a LFR on a soft shackle so that I can move the attachment point around (jib outboard front beam netting locations, screacher maybe all the way out to the front beam/float eye, etc.) Currently it is single rope to a snatch block, but I could just as easily run the rope through the snatch block to create a 2:1 with the end run back out to the soft shackle.  My real question is - do you run the sheet end of the barber back to the windward jib winch across everything, or has someone come up with a convenient single pully/cleat solution?  I didn't do a block and tackle with cleat option because I though it would be a challenge to sheet on and release the cleat if it is on leeward float, etc.  But I may be wrong.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Too windy last weekend to splash the boat (gusting to 50 on Sunday, apparently).  So piddled around with this and that. 

Let's talk gooseneck/furling handle:  Although I have slab reefing, I still have the furling gooseneck and handle (handle taped to the mast).  It's ghetto and it does not inspire a ton of confidence.  Have any of you improved on this and if so, let's hear/see some details.  There's a somewhat recent viddy of a 37.  I like that setup quite a bit. Here's a screenshot of it.  A setup along these lines (kind of a pun there) would be sweet.  Thanks!

Screenshot_20210824-082831_YouTube.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay you meddling kids, let's see if you can solve this mystery.  PO is traveling, so info is spotty.  I only have one of these.  He says it's for the Code 0, but he never really used the sail.  That's the info I have.  Well, it was in the Code 0 sailbag, but I have no clue how or why.  I have both sheets wrapped around the sail already.  The furler pins to the bow sprint, I have the continuous line for the furler (w/ tandem fiddle block) and I definitely have a halyard.  However, I do need to buy a pair of blocks for the sheets as he did not have these, so perhaps that's a clue (I think I may go Harken T2 off the rear beam padeyes, but who knows).  Anyway, I can't imagine what this line is used for.  Perhaps tensioning the working sheet?  Seems a hassle switching it from side to side (I'm sailing a fat river, so perhaps not a hassle on the big open).  Anyway, that's just a guess.  What say ye? Thanks!20210823_174501.thumb.jpg.8cea0cb4f52fdad94925d4aff9783c41.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you verified that the sheets that are around the sail are long enough?  That looks like a sheet for one side and he may have furled the sail with one sheet.  A lot of folks use a sheet on either side instead of one continuous sheet.  That line certainly looks unused so it also may be just a convenient place to store an extra line and blocks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two sheets.  Haven't rigged this sail, but I'm going to assume they are long enough.  Lots of line wrapped.  It's different than the line shown in the pic.  My continuous line is the furler line.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"That line certainly looks unused so it also may be just a convenient place to store an extra line and blocks."  A pretty good guess.  I'm starting to lean that way.  In fact, I think that is the same line as one of my halyards (not near the boat, but if memory serves, it's the halyard that runs through a cheek block on the mast and likely the one I'd use for the C0).  Well, I'm going to say mystery solved (for now).

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, deminimis said:

 In fact, I think that is the same line as one of my halyards (not near the boat, but if memory serves, it's the halyard that runs through a cheek block on the mast and likely the one I'd use for the C0).  Well, I'm going to say mystery solved (for now).

Do you recall the improvement you experienced with changing the lacing lines to dyneema?  When you need to do so, replace your yacht braid halyards with something less stretchy.  A less expensive alternative is to splice a dyneema line onto the yacht braid starting above where it runs through the clutches (that's so you don't have to replace your clutches to hold something smaller in diameter).  

Link to post
Share on other sites

The PO may have rigged that as a tack line for your Code 0.  If your continuous furler is rigged like mine it's not possible to attach the sail tack without either retracting the sprit or (somehow) climbing out onto it.  A tack line would allow you to simply bring the furler and sail to the bow of the boat.   The snatch block would attach to the sprit in place of the furler, the regular block would attach to the snap shackle at the bottom of the furler, and then the line would simply be tied around the sprit with the other end going to a cabin top clutch.  Now you have a 2:1 tack line and rigging it this way prevents the entire furler assembly from being able to spin, which you don't want.  It's like this image except the fairlead is replaced by the standard block.  

Ronstan 21.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  I'll do some investigating tonight when I get home.  If the furler pin is held in place with a normal cotter pin (as opposed to a circle, reusable cotter pin), then I think we can say he (well dealer) may have rigged something similar to above.  I just can't recall for sure.  Also, I'll check for wear/marks on the bowspring bobstay tab dealio to see how it matches up.  There should also be a wear mark from the line where tied around the bowsprint. He said he didn't use the Code, but it was a demo for two years prior to him buying it, so it appears to have been used in the past. I do think the furler simply pins to the tab (so it would require a removable/reusable circular cotter pin), but now I need to check to make sure.   If not, then there's the likely answer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, deminimis said:

It does not.  It's a storage pain in the ass.  I've been watching your thread with interest. 

I would use the hardware under question as a 2:1 tack line unless it's easy for you to access the tack/furler connection on your sprit.  Otherwise getting the sail on/off is a pain.  If the furler can be connected to that Harken Classic block is basically already setup for this.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, prskier17 said:

I would use the hardware under question as a 2:1 tack line unless it's easy for you to access the tack/furler connection on your sprit.  Otherwise getting the sail on/off is a pain.  If the furler can be connected to that Harken Classic block is basically already setup for this.

It is true that folks who routinely fly Zero/Screachers competitively try to find ways to add luff tension to sail higher angles with them up.  However, having broken the bow off my F242 a couple times and reinforcing it with 1/4" plate Stainless and watching that stainless bend over time, it might be best to wait to use a 2:1 until it is really needed.  These boats are robust, but they are still breakable.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, MultiThom said:

It is true that folks who routinely fly Zero/Screachers competitively try to find ways to add luff tension to sail higher angles with them up.  However, having broken the bow off my F242 a couple times and reinforcing it with 1/4" plate Stainless and watching that stainless bend over time, it might be best to wait to use a 2:1 until it is really needed.  These boats are robust, but they are still breakable.

 

Right, don't winch the crap out of the 2:1 tack line.  The beauty of the 2:1 is that it effectively prevents rotation of the furler body although there are other options for doing that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all.  I'm gonna run what I brung.  Since a trailer sailor, it's nothing to do up the bowsprint and attach the furler.  Once I'm on a slip, I may well do something along the lines as you're doing, Chris.  Thanks!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Confession time:  A week and half back we were in Hood River (windsurfing capital of the world...for a reason).  Friends came by in their little monohull and wanted us to meet them out at Wells Island.  Wind was up pretty good (forecast was for light winds all weekend....They lied), so only planned on motoring to the island (threading all the windsurfers and kiteboarders in the process).  As a result, mistake #1, I did not have sails ready to deploy quickly.  A mistake I will never make again.  While motoring out of the marina, the outboard died.  We were just outside the wind shadow of the marina.  The wind was quickly driving our boat towards the bridge.  I had a friend on the prime bulb and he said there was no pressure.  Ah, fuel delivery problem.  With not much time to spare I discovered that although I had opened my tank vent cap (non-EPA), I failed to open it enough (mistake #2).  Many years of dirt bikes and outboards, and yet I made this bonehead move.  Opened it up more, friend quickly got pressure in the bulb, the outboard started and we avoided a disaster.  Yup, should have been in a position to deploy the jib, if nothing else.  As I said, I will never make that mistake again.  Also, I had the anchor in an ama, not in the locker (I was going to set it up once at Wells mistake #3).  Locker is full of chain/rode, so I just put the anchor in the ama.  I will correct this as well.  The wind had increased so much we decided to just head back to the dock and drink nerve-calming beers (Smart Move #1).  They worked.  There. I admit it.  F'd up big time. Other friends came by later, in their big Sea Ray, and asked us to join them (We did. They had lots of beer on hand.... Smart Move #2). 

20210826_093228.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you got it sorted before the bridge. I had a similar event where a line wrapped around the prop leaving me seconds and one chance to set the anchor before the boat would have been driven up on the on the rocks. If the anchor had not held the boat would have been a write off.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/12/2021 at 8:42 AM, MultiThom said:

At anchor or motoring with sails down  you can use spare halyards to tighten things up athwartships and main halyard to main sheet to tighten it up fore-aft. Alternatively you can use a spare line to grab the shrouds and haul slack out with mainsheet.   While sailing there will be some slack with sails up, doesn't hurt anything.  Tuning beyond making sure the mast is vertical (shrouds the same length and tight) isn't needed.   Hard to figure why your mast isn't rotating much with slack removed from shrouds, did previous owner relocate the boom attachment of the mainsheet to forward of the traveler?  Boom provides the force to over rotate the mast which is why you have the limiter.  

Yup.  When the main isn't up, spin halyard to the port ama, screacher halyard to the starbord ama, tightened enough to remove/dampen any slop.  Shrouds are just loose enough that mast rotation is uninhibited under light wind loading, which seems really loose when the main is down in sloppy wave conditions.   

When powered up, windward halyard is eased so that the shroud is taking the load, and the mast position and rotation are locked by the forestay/shroud/mainsheet triangle.  

That's how I do it, anyway.  And @johnAk, beautiful pics, and serious location envy.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, deminimis said:

...just head back to the dock and drink nerve-calming beers (Smart Move #1).  They worked.  There. I admit it.  F'd up big time. Other friends came by later, in their big Sea Ray, and asked us to join them (We did. They had lots of beer on hand.... Smart Move #2). 

"Ah, Beer.  The cause of and the solution to all the worlds problems." - Homer Simpson

 

beer.thumb.jpg.fbb1dbbdff4396e15583075064e59afd.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not Corsair Specific:  Honda (Scepter) tanks are rotomolded. My orig tank has a wear hole in an upper corner.  Only an issue when full, but an issue.  Bought a replacement tank, but want to keep the orig tank on board as well (better than a gas can -Easier to swap out tanks than trying to fill from a can).  There are plenty of kits available to repair rotomolded plastic.  Anyone had success doing this with gas tank/can?  There's a cost/benefit analysis to consider as well (a Scepter tank (the maker of the Honda tank and identical to the Honda tank) is only $65 (wish I would have known this before buying my $100 Honda branded Scepter tank)).  Kits run the gambit, price wise, but seems a bunch cost more than a replacement Scepter tank.  I guess I just answered my question.  Disregard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, deminimis said:

Not Corsair Specific:  Honda (Scepter) tanks are rotomolded. My orig tank has a wear hole in an upper corner.  Only an issue when full, but an issue.  Bought a replacement tank, but want to keep the orig tank on board as well (better than a gas can -Easier to swap out tanks than trying to fill from a can).  There are plenty of kits available to repair rotomolded plastic.  Anyone had success doing this with gas tank/can?  There's a cost/benefit analysis to consider as well (a Scepter tank (the maker of the Honda tank and identical to the Honda tank) is only $65 (wish I would have known this before buying my $100 Honda branded Scepter tank)).  Kits run the gambit, price wise, but seems a bunch cost more than a replacement Scepter tank.  I guess I just answered my question.  Disregard.

A small hole such as you describe will likely be able to be closed with just a heat gun.  Some sacrificial additional plastic might make it easier.  You are just looking for leak seal, not pressure seal, right?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Practical Sailor magazine did a test on rotomolded fuel tank repair. If the tank was faded by the sun, they were unable to repair it. They apparently were able to repair tanks that had no sun damage, but they pretty strongly recommended against it. I've plastic welded with moderate success on rotomolded boats. I used G-Flex 655, which is thickened, a couple of times, and those repairs held up well. G-Flex 655 is about $40 or so.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Help.

Our f27 just sold. We had it for 15 years. Loved it. We're just getting to old for the lack of cruising comfort.

My wife wants a F31. Other than the increase in head room is it really a more comfortable as a cruiser? Clearly a more sailing performance but lets set that aside for a moment.

NW summertime live aboard for 30 days is the goal.

I'm ready for a 35' monomaran like a J 32 or some such for interior volume. I want shelter in the cockpit and good motoring at 5 knots to head further up the inside passage.

She gets seasick and has only ever sailed on the 2 trimarans we have owned and thinks she will hate a monohull leaner.

Will I be shocked if I get a monohull and discover that sailing at 6 knots is dull?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Shocked?  Probably not.  But you won't like leaning in a blow and you also will likely want more crew on a keelboat.  Did you guys ever live aboard the F27 for 30 days?  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/2/2021 at 6:55 PM, rustylaru said:

Help.

Our f27 just sold. We had it for 15 years. Loved it. We're just getting to old for the lack of cruising comfort.

My wife wants a F31. Other than the increase in head room is it really a more comfortable as a cruiser? Clearly a more sailing performance but lets set that aside for a moment.

NW summertime live aboard for 30 days is the goal.

I'm ready for a 35' monomaran like a J 32 or some such for interior volume. I want shelter in the cockpit and good motoring at 5 knots to head further up the inside passage.

She gets seasick and has only ever sailed on the 2 trimarans we have owned and thinks she will hate a monohull leaner.

Will I be shocked if I get a monohull and discover that sailing at 6 knots is dull?

 

Corsair C36/37

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you get the mast raising/lowering sorted?  Or are there further tweaks to get it just right.  Is your wife still a little gun shy about it?  Truth be told I usually raise/lower without my wife being around.   I usually only do it once a year and wait for near perfect conditions.   Good to see you out sailing.  I imagine you've experienced that Farrier grin by now.   Yeeha!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Corsair grin and Corsair pucker.   Wife actually took that pic.  Her first day of actual sailing.  She did not expect to be tacking every two minutes while we shot the narrows, but trial by fire.  Sailed quite a bit the last two days.  Figured a few things out.  Got off the river almost in time yesterday.  Once I started seeing 23 knots wind (knowing gust were going to be over 30), we called it.  The Gorge is punchy and it was super punchy yesterday. 

Fixed the mast raising pivots (bimini pivots) by fab'n a spacer like other 970s have.  That helped a ton.  I need to build new triangles.  I haven't pinned the pole or come up with the right straps for that,  but that's coming.  Just a little added security doing by that.

20210902_150323.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the thing about daysailing in a smaller body of water:  A lot of tacking.  The closest spot for me to sail, and the area I like best is just under mile across.  I barely have a few minutes to get in the groove/zen before having to make a turn and start over again.  Fortunately there is the ddw back home where I can kick back and chill, if I don't set the spinnaker.  I actually prefer my Lightning for my typical 2 or 3 hour daysailing loop on the lake.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
2 hours ago, Monkey said:

I really like these boats, but the whole myth about them embarrassing monohulls is silly!  

Well, depends on the owner of the monohull.  I recall distinctly coming back from the Faralones in a race on my F24.  We're main and barberhauled jib on a reachy course in 25-35 kt breeze when we passed Thursday's Child (older race monohull that won awards in the 1980s and 90s).  He had 10 crew on the rail.  He was pissed enough to change course to try to head me up but I was bye before he got close enough to worry about.  He wasn't in the race since it was a double handed event, but he did not appreciate being passed to windward by a dinky trimaran.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MultiThom said:

Well, depends on the owner of the monohull.  I recall distinctly coming back from the Faralones in a race on my F24.  We're main and barberhauled jib on a reachy course in 25-35 kt breeze when we passed Thursday's Child (older race monohull that won awards in the 1980s and 90s).  He had 10 crew on the rail.  He was pissed enough to change course to try to head me up but I was bye before he got close enough to worry about.  He wasn't in the race since it was a double handed event, but he did not appreciate being passed to windward by a dinky trimaran.  

It was my first time ever with the boat, but those silly trimarans weren’t an issue. Hell, we even stuck the rig in the water to slow down!  

5207D844-6A35-479B-AD11-DA78E2087630.jpeg

0D361BC1-9B43-4506-A1A8-67B70F1C0B67.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully I’m not out of line.

but I’ve just had a friend, who has cancer, ask if I would ask around to see if anyone is interested in his F-25A. Please PM me here and I’ll refer you. I don’t know what he wants for it, but he did tell me that there may be issues with the title, as in, he didn’t change it. Boat in FL.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Monkey said:

It was my first time ever with the boat, but those silly trimarans weren’t an issue. Hell, we even stuck the rig in the water to slow down!  

5207D844-6A35-479B-AD11-DA78E2087630.jpeg

0D361BC1-9B43-4506-A1A8-67B70F1C0B67.jpeg

13-16kts and the keel boats are in front?

doesnt sound right even if it was a perfect winward leward race

Link to post
Share on other sites

I begrudgingly disagree.  Especially on a very windward/leeward course fast monos will get er done.  An F-27 and a 28cc are great boats but not super fast and if there's not much reaching they'll sail to the rating just like those monos will.  Going to weather, waterline will rule.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mundt said:

I begrudgingly disagree.  Especially on a very windward/leeward course fast monos will get er done.  An F-27 and a 28cc are great boats but not super fast and if there's not much reaching they'll sail to the rating just like those monos will.  Going to weather, waterline will rule.

For the shorter Corsairs 13-16 is just about the windspeed at which the tri can keep up with the longer keelboats who will point higher to weather and drive deeper downwind.  There were lots of races in Benicia where J24s were faster than my F24.  Particularly frustrating to gybe back and forth and never catch up with the symspins.  Our courses were pretty much wind-lee.  13-16 is likely the max seen on the committee boat when filling in the form.  Part of the reason PHRF TOD is not appropriate for mixed fleets of keelboats/multihulls is that skipper skill is not often the reason one type wins over another.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Eric!  Yes, I need to order up a flatbed tarp for the rest.  Will hook that heavy bastard to the inside of the door header, drape it out over the front/mast, and down towards the ground.  Unfortunately, my shop is no longer secure, with the slider open, so I'll have to beef up the interior door (from cold storage side (boat side) to the insulated projects/gym side).  Hands are blistered up today from all that trenching:  After getting through the gravel, then the dry, rock hard, compacted clay underneath was a bear.  Eventually water made the digging a bit easier.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish I had a bunch of land to store stuff.  I'd be temped to frame up a bay extension on your shop.  A few pier blocks, 2x4's, rafters, T1-11, roll roofing and Bob's your uncle.  Doesn't look like you have any neighbors to object or call the bldg dept.  I get tired just setting up my boat's tarp every year... x 10 years of ownership you might be time ahead adding on to the shop.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No extension for me.  This may be temp (may be moving within the next few years).  If so, a 40x60 ag building will be the first order of business.  If, on the other hand, we stay where at, then I'll likely build a 25X45 addition on the end (with an east/west ridge, as opposed the the current N/S ridge)... if not both ends.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, eric1207 said:

Wish I had a bunch of land to store stuff.  I'd be temped to frame up a bay extension on your shop.  A few pier blocks, 2x4's, rafters, T1-11, roll roofing and Bob's your uncle. 

You are thinking of busting out the back wall?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the general idea; to make Deminimus' shop larger to fit his new boat.  Seems like a reasonable thing if he owns it for many years.  However, if he's going to move soon then its not a good payoff. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's a start. Four hooks installed in the inside of the header. 12 more to go, after I pull the tarp back inside a bit.  16x27 18oz flatbed machinery tarp.  That's one heavy SOB.  Meeting with builder buddy tomorrow to talk new shop at the other place.  I only want to to string up this beast once or twice.  Next time will be easier, however (rolled up vs folded).

20211012_182334.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I kind of missed this thread but figured I'd share the modifications I've made to Makika (f25-c).   I've un-farriered the cockpit and removed the annoying "lid" over the huge hole that was there.  I found both to be unnecessary design choices where compromises were made.

Just finished the cockpit remodel for a race this last weekend and it is SO much nicer to race this way, feels like a sports boat.   you can stand side by side in the cockpit trimming etc with plenty of space and you can quickly pass float to float when tacking/gybing etc.     The removal of the diagonal combing means that you have a flat spot, further outboard to help from if you are helming in the cockpit which is actually passable now (typically we helm from the float).   I also removed the annoying, loose "lid" over the cabin top and its a lot sleeker now.

 

 

94A75BEF-9E18-4038-8484-FC161DDBFDE8.jpeg

IMG_9482.jpeg

IMG_9481.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, nige said:

I kind of missed this thread but figured I'd share the modifications I've made to Makika (f25-c).   I've un-farriered the cockpit and removed the annoying "lid" over the huge hole that was there.  I found both to be unnecessary design choices where compromises were made.

Just finished the cockpit remodel for a race this last weekend and it is SO much nicer to race this way, feels like a sports boat.   you can stand side by side in the cockpit trimming etc with plenty of space and you can quickly pass float to float when tacking/gybing etc.     The removal of the diagonal combing means that you have a flat spot, further outboard to help from if you are helming in the cockpit which is actually passable now (typically we helm from the float).   I also removed the annoying, loose "lid" over the cabin top and its a lot sleeker now.

 

 

94A75BEF-9E18-4038-8484-FC161DDBFDE8.jpeg

IMG_9482.jpeg

IMG_9481.jpeg

That is a sleek looking boat.  Very nice.  Did you build her?  Do you need the 3 to race? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love that you removed the diagonal coamings. Those are stupid. Removal would make the cockpit of the F-27 so much better. The pop top not so much, I love that. Its really nice to have standing headroom at the galley. I realize yours is a pure race boat though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Wess said:

That is a sleek looking boat.  Very nice.  Did you build her?  Do you need the 3 to race? 

Thanks!   No, the boat was originally owned/put together by Jude Stoller and has always been very minimal.

We double hand a lot but 3 is ideal we think.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Mizzmo said:

I love that you removed the diagonal coamings. Those are stupid. Removal would make the cockpit of the F-27 so much better. The pop top not so much, I love that. Its really nice to have standing headroom at the galley. I realize yours is a pure race boat though. 

Yeah the combings drove me nuts.     I would not remove the pop top either if I had a galley or a reason to spend more than 5 mins wanting to stand up inside.   I do cruise with my kids every now and again but its a "take a jet boil and think about the boat as a hard shell tent" kind of cruise.  

Link to post
Share on other sites