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How to sink someone else’s boat


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 So the boat ($250k 30ft powerboat, one year old, well maintained) capsizes/sinks at it’s mooring sometime overnight. The weather was calm. Subsequent inspection by the yard/surveyor did not determine cause. The loss was fully covered by insurance.  
Now, for the pure speculation part: absent any mechanical/hull fitting type explanation there does exist a (sad/societal) reason to suspect the boat was sunk deliberately out of pure prejudice and malice. We are not without a lunatic fringe around here  

Question. Would it have been possible for a miscreant to sink the boat in a way that avoids later detection and if so how? 

I am a friend of the owners. The possibility that something so shitty was done to such good people upsets me. My suspicions are my own. If you could tell me if they are unfounded, in a general, feasibility sense, would be much appreciated. 

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I see... checking to see which of us has guilty knowledge... :unsure:

Absent creating an opening, one must pump water in.  

But my evil twin would say that the yard/surveyor might somehow overlook a fault if they themselves were culpable.  

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Personally, I think that there should be a lot more sinking of stinkpot boats.  Most of them are just fossil-fuel-guzzling, polluting, wake-creating, noisy vulgarities whose main function is to advertise their owners's crassness.  (Yes,there are exceptions, but those are a small minority).

So if someone did this, congratulations to them.    Otherwise, congrats to the weather gods or whatever other divine forces helped to clean up the seas.  Either way, #MoreOfThisPlease

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3 hours ago, Gilldog said:

 So the boat ($250k 30ft powerboat, one year old, well maintained) capsizes/sinks at it’s mooring sometime overnight. The weather was calm. Subsequent inspection by the yard/surveyor did not determine cause. The loss was fully covered by insurance.  
Now, for the pure speculation part: absent any mechanical/hull fitting type explanation there does exist a (sad/societal) reason to suspect the boat was sunk deliberately out of pure prejudice and malice. We are not without a lunatic fringe around here 

Was it flying a Trump flag? Or a Biden flag? Have the owners pissed off anyone in some way?

I'm reluctant to attribute to malice as a reason absent some basis for it. More likely the post-salvage inspection overlooked something but  - that should be easy to determine. If something was overlooked, then the boat should fill again when re-launched. Not *quite* how you might want to trouble-shoot, though.

FKT

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Has there been recent rain and the possibility of clogged scuppers?   I had a swamped cockpit and full bilge from a wren family that moved into a coaming compartment between Wednesday and Sunday, but was very messy with grass intended for their nest.   A couple weeks of rain on a boat lacking integral flotation might have been unfortunate.  Evidence might be lost or confused after salvage.

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5 hours ago, Gilldog said:

 So the boat ($250k 30ft powerboat, one year old, well maintained) capsizes/sinks at it’s mooring sometime overnight. The weather was calm. Subsequent inspection by the yard/surveyor did not determine cause. The loss was fully covered by insurance.  
Now, for the pure speculation part: absent any mechanical/hull fitting type explanation there does exist a (sad/societal) reason to suspect the boat was sunk deliberately out of pure prejudice and malice. We are not without a lunatic fringe around here  

Question. Would it have been possible for a miscreant to sink the boat in a way that avoids later detection and if so how? 

I am a friend of the owners. The possibility that something so shitty was done to such good people upsets me. My suspicions are my own. If you could tell me if they are unfounded, in a general, feasibility sense, would be much appreciated. 

When I worked boat a yard in Seattle a owner requested a 4" thru hull be installed with no attachment not other info.  You do what they ask....

Anyone with basic knowledge could sink a boat if they had no scruples.  However small failures can do the same thing so better to keep the glass half full till you know better.  Ironically before I met my wife in Friday harbor.  I was walking down the dock and saw a boat looked odd, after a second take it was way below the waterline.  She was a local diver and had cleaned the bottom and rotated the shaft. Their seal had failed and it was taking on water.  This was only a couple hrs from bottom cleaning and zincs to Oh shit big pumps from the port.  A small failure overnight is enough to put a unattended boat down so it's best to find the facts and go from there.

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19 minutes ago, SASSAFRASS said:

When I worked boat a yard in Seattle a owner requested a 4" thru hull be installed with no attachment not other info.  You do what they ask....

Anyone with basic knowledge could sink a boat if they had no scruples.  However small failures can do the same thing so better to keep the glass half full till you know better.  Ironically before I met my wife in Friday harbor.  I was walking down the dock and saw a boat looked odd, after a second take it was way below the waterline.  She was a local diver and had cleaned the bottom and rotated the shaft. Their seal had failed and it was taking on water.  This was only a couple hrs from bottom cleaning and zincs to Oh shit big pumps from the port.  A small failure overnight is enough to put a unattended boat down so it's best to find the facts and go from there.

I had a somewhat similar experience.  Rowing in from my mooring, I saw a boat that looked odd....... I told a yard guy, he went out with a pump, etc. I think that boat had been launch earlier in the day.

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I’m not a boater. My not wanting to jump to conclusions is exactly why I posted to a forum with such a deep and wide knowledge base. I’ve since learned that the vast majority of sinkings occur on unattended boats tied to a dock or mooring so the circumstances were not as rare as I would have assumed. And although this was a fairly new boat built by a reputable company and just back from dealer servicing I now understand funny things can and do happen on boats. The malice I referred to earlier was race based (as in skin color, not rounding buoys fast) so knowing possible explanations other than sabotage exist is a relief.  

 

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56 minutes ago, Gilldog said:

I’m not a boater. My not wanting to jump to conclusions is exactly why I posted to a forum with such a deep and wide knowledge base. I’ve since learned that the vast majority of sinkings occur on unattended boats tied to a dock or mooring so the circumstances were not as rare as I would have assumed. And although this was a fairly new boat built by a reputable company and just back from dealer servicing I now understand funny things can and do happen on boats. The malice I referred to earlier was race based (as in skin color, not rounding buoys fast) so knowing possible explanations other than sabotage exist is a relief.  

 

so it seems the only difference between floating and sinking was dealer servicing?

 

 

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1 hour ago, Gilldog said:

I’m not a boater. My not wanting to jump to conclusions is exactly why I posted to a forum with such a deep and wide knowledge base. I’ve since learned that the vast majority of sinkings occur on unattended boats tied to a dock or mooring so the circumstances were not as rare as I would have assumed. And although this was a fairly new boat built by a reputable company and just back from dealer servicing I now understand funny things can and do happen on boats. The malice I referred to earlier was race based (as in skin color, not rounding buoys fast) so knowing possible explanations other than sabotage exist is a relief.  

 

Maybe you could ask yourself why you imagined racism without any evidence. Serious question, I'm not saying this to disparage you. The times we live in are difficult enough and the current hysteria only makes it worse, not better.

Thanks for having the gumption to ask.

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I was getting in my dinghy in the Bahamas and heard the bilge kick on for a few seconds in the big boat. Whatever. The boat was rocking from my movements, and that often kicked it on. I was starting to putt putt away in the dinghy when the bilge in the big boat came on again. That’s not right! I scrambled back aboard and sure enough the bilge was slowly filling with water. It’s amazing how quickly you can trash your own boat emptying every locker as she slowly sinks from under you in some remote archipelago.

It was not an easy find. Turns out the burp line from the PSS dripless shaft seal was siphoning water into the boat. It was installed running up the hull from the shaft seal and then looping back down. A very brisk sail had heeled the boat enough at some point to position enough of that hose below the waterline to fill it and start a siphon. Another lesson learned.

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4 hours ago, Gilldog said:

I’m not a boater. My not wanting to jump to conclusions is exactly why I posted to a forum with such a deep and wide knowledge base. I’ve since learned that the vast majority of sinkings occur on unattended boats tied to a dock or mooring so the circumstances were not as rare as I would have assumed. And although this was a fairly new boat built by a reputable company and just back from dealer servicing I now understand funny things can and do happen on boats. The malice I referred to earlier was race based (as in skin color, not rounding buoys fast) so knowing possible explanations other than sabotage exist is a relief.  

 

Basic troubleshooting to ask whether anything is different or has been changed from when it was working. "Just back from dealer servicing" would make me wonder.

(I always check my boat, car, etc after someone else has been using it.)

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My buddy pumped his sump dry with a kayak hand pump into the sink on a MORC 30’. The flex nozzle fit right in the sink drain. Amazingly, it maintained the siphon and almost sank overnight. 

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I came way too close to sinking my own boat with the combination of a portable bilge pump hose led overboard and a large helping of stupidity.

Boat had two bilge areas, one of which did't fully empty with the built in bilge pump. I did what I normally did after a storm, and put on a portable pump with a hose led overboard out of the cockpit to clear the last bits from the bilge. Only this time, I allowed the outboard end of the hose to droop all the way into the water. The water outside the boat, that is. Oops. 

Went off for a peasant morning row, and returned after an hour to find water more than a foot over the floorboards. I had created a perfect siphon. So you could sink a boat that way, and likely the hose would just float away. 

That said, the screaming detail is "recently serviced". Absent firm evidence to the contrary that's where suspicion should lie. 

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If you want us to play detectives we need to know a bit more...

Age,  type of boat inboard,  outboard,  stern leg,  twin set up..... there are myriad ways to sink a vessel,  some are good,  others not so good.

A power vessel is generally a good start.......... 

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On 7/27/2021 at 2:57 PM, Gilldog said:

 So the boat ($250k 30ft powerboat, one year old, well maintained) capsizes/sinks at it’s mooring sometime overnight. The weather was calm. Subsequent inspection by the yard/surveyor did not determine cause. The loss was fully covered by insurance.  
Now, for the pure speculation part: absent any mechanical/hull fitting type explanation there does exist a (sad/societal) reason to suspect the boat was sunk deliberately out of pure prejudice and malice. We are not without a lunatic fringe around here  

Question. Would it have been possible for a miscreant to sink the boat in a way that avoids later detection and if so how? 

I am a friend of the owners. The possibility that something so shitty was done to such good people upsets me. My suspicions are my own. If you could tell me if they are unfounded, in a general, feasibility sense, would be much appreciated. 

Maybe it’s insurance fraud?

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I should be more precise, “just back from dealer servicing”, meant the boat had been returned to it’s mooring by the dealer in mid-June a month before the incident. I don’t know the exact scope of the service but imagine it consistent with hauling, winterization, storage, spring prep. At that point the boat had a total 4 months of actual in-the-water usage. I get why mention of servicing elicited questions but wouldn’t any errors/oversights serious enough to sink have manifested themselves earlier or at least been noted in the post mortem? Certainly the insurer would have done a thorough examination. The boat was a fiberglass open cruiser type, stylish, lowish freeboard, big twin outboard engines. 

 

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Now you've got me thinking about ice cubes between the dripless bellows and the bearing. How big a cube can you wedge in there? Is it better to go with two or three? How long until they melt? Is that enough time to sink the boat?

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Couple years ago at my marina, engine shop was working on a motor replacement.  Pulled out the old one - and shaft too - and called it a day. How they missed the water gushing in is a mystery, but it sank overnight in the slip.

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50 minutes ago, Gilldog said:

Not to mention these are good people

There's nothing fundamentaly bad about ripping an insurance off, you know. (disclaimer : "this is a joke, not to be taken seriously")

Also, the "zero financial incentive" is debatable, again from a neutral pov. If you know them and you're sure they would not do that, fine. No disrespect was intended. But your request and the way you present the event inherently include this possibility. Boats cost lots of money after the purchase. As in shit tons. In many departments. And many unexperienced folks tend to realize that a bit late. Selling back will definitely not be as interesting as a 100% insurance refund. Based on the surveyor conlusions, or rather the lack thereof, it is a reasonable lead. But again, off the mark, got that.

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It’s a legit question and one I would have asked.
I guess we can put this to bed. I don’t have any further facts to give so at this point it’s all speculation. Thanks for the input. I’ve learned it’s not that hard to sink a boat even when you’re not trying, and if trying it can be accomplished without leaving any fingerprints. So who knows. 

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6 hours ago, Wess said:

Maybe it’s insurance fraud?

And by "insurance fraud" do you mean a pissed off hull cleaner who is owed money? :lol:

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Several years ago, a power boat at our marina "sunk" in the slip. Apparently, there were some seals (rubber-type, not mammals) around the stern-drive that lake otters found tasty.

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On 7/27/2021 at 5:22 PM, Marcjsmith said:

Open seacock remove hose.   Wait until boat sinks.  Don dive gear, swim down reattach hose. Swim away...

 

True, but  a lot of opportunity to be caught, especially when diving on the already sunk boat.

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Plastic tubing you can jam in the bilge pump outlet. Fix other end to log or float under water. Prime with a drill powered tubing pump. Boat sinks, tubing floats away with log. Sorta scary. Please don’t share on the internet. 

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20 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Plastic tubing you can jam in the bilge pump outlet. Fix other end to log or float under water. Prime with a drill powered tubing pump. Boat sinks, tubing floats away with log. Sorta scary. Please don’t share on the internet. 

Thanks!  Great for late night boaters having a loud party in a quiet anchorage. 

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12 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Plastic tubing you can jam in the bilge pump outlet. Fix other end to log or float under water. Prime with a drill powered tubing pump. Boat sinks, tubing floats away with log. Sorta scary. Please don’t share on the internet. 

??? I've got a non-return valve on my bilge discharge line.

FKT

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9 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

??? I've got a non-return valve on my bilge discharge line.

FKT

A check valve? Do you know how much that restricts the flow of your bilge pump? It will restrict any type of pump, ESPECIALLY Rule type centrifugal pumps, they generate barely enough pressure to get past the check valve and flow will be a fraction of what it is without the check valve. Could make a sucky situation even worse. 

Also, if you are in an area that freezes you will have water trapped in the line subjecting it to freezing and breaking the discharge hose.

And a few more reasons here...... http://www.electricmarine.com/web/bad_practice_stories/check_valves.htm

 a 1.5" Check valve creates as much flow restriction (Total Dynamic Head) as 13' Pipe. 1.25" = 11' of pipe.

a Rule 500 is 500gph at zero head. in typical install it will be pumping 250-300gph,  11' feet of head reduces the rule 500 from 500gpm to <50gpm. 11' of head reduces a 1500gpm rule pump to <50 gpm and the 2000 down to apx 525 gpm.

 

RuleChart_Small.jpg

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@ 13' of head all the pumps <1500gpm are reduced to zero flow.

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8 minutes ago, Baldur said:

 

 a 1.5" Check valve creates as much flow restriction (Total Dynamic Head) as 13' Pipe. 1.25" = 11' of pipe.

 

13 feet of pipe is NOT the same thing as 13 feet of head. The additional head imposed by a length of pipe depends on the flow rate. It seems like you might be confused, or have done your calculations wrong, because it seems like you are saying that adding a check valve is the same as adding 13 (or 11) feet of head.

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16 minutes ago, Baldur said:

A check valve? Do you know how much that restricts the flow of your bilge pump? It will restrict any type of pump, ESPECIALLY Rule type centrifugal pumps, they generate barely enough pressure to get past the check valve and flow will be a fraction of what it is without the check valve. Could make a sucky situation even worse. 

Also, if you are in an area that freezes you will have water trapped in the line subjecting it to freezing and breaking the discharge hose.

And a few more reasons here...... http://www.electricmarine.com/web/bad_practice_stories/check_valves.htm

 a 1.5" Check valve creates as much flow restriction (Total Dynamic Head) as 13' Pipe. 1.25" = 11' of pipe.

a Rule 500 is 500gph at zero head. in typical install it will be pumping 250-300gph,  11' feet of head reduces the rule 500 from 500gpm to <50gpm. 11' of head reduces a 1500gpm rule pump to <50 gpm and the 2000 down to apx 525 gpm.

 

RuleChart_Small.jpg

At 8.33 GPM (500 GPH) a 100 foot horizontal run of 1.25" ID pipe adds 1.67 feet of head. (https://www.tuhorse.us/total-dynamic-head-tdh-calculator/)

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25 minutes ago, mckenzie.keith said:

13 feet of pipe is NOT the same thing as 13 feet of head. The additional head imposed by a length of pipe depends on the flow rate. It seems like you might be confused, or have done your calculations wrong, because it seems like you are saying that adding a check valve is the same as adding 13 (or 11) feet of head.

You are right, I over simplified a bit. but yes adding the check valve is 13' of TDH for the 1.5" check valve I looked at. 

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27 minutes ago, Borracho said:

Rule brand pumps on a yacht? Really? Hilarious. 

Give me another brand model, I am curious to see how much flow restriction the check valve will cause.

 

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24 minutes ago, mckenzie.keith said:

At 8.33 GPM (500 GPH) a 100 foot horizontal run of 1.25" ID pipe adds 1.67 feet of head. (https://www.tuhorse.us/total-dynamic-head-tdh-calculator/)

correct. For smooth wall pipe, like PVC. Crappy corrugated hose we see on boats at times adds significantly to this. As does vertical lift.

 

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8 minutes ago, Baldur said:

Give me another brand model, I am curious to see how much flow restriction the check valve will cause.

 

Jabsco diaphragm pump. No check valve needed. Also about a thousand time more reliable. 

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1 hour ago, Baldur said:

You are right, I over simplified a bit. but yes adding the check valve is 13' of TDH for the 1.5" check valve I looked at. 

OK, but that would be valid for one flow rate only. The lower the flow rate the less dynamic head is generated. At very low flow, dynamic head due to restriction of the check-valve will be negligible. I feel that you are saying things which are pretty inaccurate and misleading.

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6 hours ago, Baldur said:

A check valve? Do you know how much that restricts the flow of your bilge pump?

Don't care. Just use a bigger pump. And a bigger bore pipe.

At least I don't have to worry about the boat sinking by getting flooded by the hose that's SUPPOSED to be getting water out of the boat.

In point of tested fact, on MY boat, the pump works just fine and I've tested it once a year by filling the sump with fresh water while on the hard. This also tests the non-moving magnetic water level switch.

You do it your way, I'll do it mine.

FKT

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6 hours ago, Borracho said:

Jabsco diaphragm pump. No check valve needed. Also about a thousand time more reliable. 

Reliable??!! Those flapper valves leak with microscopic debris under them. And even when running properly they pump miniscule amounts compared to a centrifugal pump. Good for the little amounts of nuisance water tho.

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On 7/30/2021 at 8:31 PM, Zonker said:

Thanks!  Great for late night boaters having a loud party in a quiet anchorage. 

Much better solution:

Scuba and an old potato into the raw water seacock for the generator that is being used to keep the noise level so high....

The difficult part is knowing which hole is the raw water intake for the generator...

I always take a whole bag of potatoes when I do this....    

 

I would suppose that one should take a whole bag of potatoes if one were to attempt such a feat....

(thinking hypothetically of course..... )

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A boat with outboards is usually tough to sink as common culprits (coolant intake, exhausts, shaft and rudder bearings) aren't present. However, I know of a number of boats which sank due to problems with heads or sinks. That's the #1 cause of sinkings I've personally seen or heard of.

 

Presumably the insurance company looked the boat over, but finding nothing is not the same as there being nothing wrong. Without super obvious signs of fraud it's not worth the insurance company's time to obsessively check over every little detail in the bilges. They'd rather pay out what they have to and hope to get the insurance contract for those boaters' next boat.

 

So: probably an innocuous cause that nobody cared enough to find.

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The local DNR lost their boat a couple years ago to the drainplug mafia.  The cause was obvious but not the culprit.  The state still hasn't found the budget for cameras.   

 

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3 hours ago, Lark said:

The local DNR lost their boat a couple years ago to the drainplug mafia.  The cause was obvious but not the culprit.  The state still hasn't found the budget for cameras.   

What's DNR?

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24 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

What's DNR?

Sorry.   Park ranger.   Department Natural Resources.    My home slip is in an underfunded state park.   The locals can be a bit rough.   

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6 minutes ago, Lark said:

Sorry.   Park ranger.   Department Natural Resources.    My home slip is in an underfunded state park.   The locals can be a bit rough.   

Thanks for the explanation.  It's much the same round may way: overbearing officials find bad stuff happening to them and their gear.  And in an area where where everyone knows that smallest details of everyone else's business, nobody knows anything at all about the things that happen to the officials ;)

It keeps manners on the powers-that-be.

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6 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Thanks for the explanation.  It's much the same round may way: overbearing officials find bad stuff happening to them and their gear.  And in an area where where everyone knows that smallest details of everyone else's business, nobody knows anything at all about the things that happen to the officials ;)

It keeps manners on the powers-that-be.

Well said.   

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A know a guy who sank his own boat by overfilling the water tank. The sump pump couldn't quite keep up with the rather high volume hose....

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On 8/7/2021 at 8:35 AM, thinwater said:

A know a guy who sank his own boat by overfilling the water tank. The sump pump couldn't quite keep up with the rather high volume hose....

Don't they usually vent overboard or into the galley sink or something?

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Prior owner of mine just ran the vent to the top of the bulkhead across from the head (tank is under the v-berth). Rerouting it to the sink is on my list of things to do.

I have heard of stinkboaters hooking a semi-permanent pressurized line up to their boats. They have more faith in their plumbing than I do. I've also heard a few of them have paid for it, after a fitting or hose failed.

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On 7/31/2021 at 7:56 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Don't care. Just use a bigger pump. And a bigger bore pipe.

Still a really bad practice. Check valves tend to accumulate schmegma on the seal that can make forcing it open more difficult,especially with the discharge head hholding it shut. Plus, pump efficiency decreases with age and accumulated detritus, until one day, when you are away from the boat for a few weeks, the pump comes on, can't open the flapper, drains the battery and the boat floods.

To each their own though.

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Dunno - mine came with a (Rule-branded, I think) check valve in the line and there's never been any problem.  I took it apart once (after fearful warnings) and it seemed in good shape.  The one thing that did happen was water apparently froze in the discharge line and blocked it, causing the pump to blow a fuse.  (FWIW, the fuse was a bit undersized.) But this was on the hard - boat doesn't get that cold when floating.  Though I have had the cockpit scupper ice up.  

If the check valve were not there, that water would have drained back to the bilge instead of freezing.  Remove check valve before sailing to the arctic. Check.  

(Sail to the tropics instead. Check.)

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On 8/6/2021 at 10:53 AM, h20man said:

Much better solution:

Scuba and an old potato into the raw water seacock for the generator that is being used to keep the noise level so high....

The difficult part is knowing which hole is the raw water intake for the generator...

I always take a whole bag of potatoes when I do this....    

 

I would suppose that one should take a whole bag of potatoes if one were to attempt such a feat....

(thinking hypothetically of course..... )

If you ever were to actually do this, just holding your hand near the intakes will tell you which one is in use.

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3 hours ago, mookiesurfs said:

If you ever were to actually do this, just holding your hand near the intakes will tell you which one is in use.

I hate swimming out a second time when they switch engines....  By blocking every hole...  gets rid of the generosity of sharing noise with whole anchorage...

also no flushing of waste into bay..    really makes it a nice weekend....

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On 7/28/2021 at 1:51 AM, Fleetwood said:

Basic troubleshooting to ask whether anything is different or has been changed from when it was working. "Just back from dealer servicing" would make me wonder.

(I always check my boat, car, etc after someone else has been using it.)

Mechanic for a warranty job forgot to replace the break fluid cap and the power steering fluid cap.  Checked thank god.  Made em fill the res too...  pricks...  

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43 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

Same. Dealer mechanic forgot to refill the gearbox oil during a service - car didn't make it down the street. They eventually admitted the error!

You just HAD to say that, didn't you? I was about to drop off my 4WD for s full oil change & service. Maybe I'll go to Supercheap and buy the oil, do it myself. As usual. Getting closer to time to do a runner out of this pestilential shit-hole.

FKT

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Yeah, I once drove home (well, back to the office) from a dealer service and the engine seized up.  There was a factory recall on the head gasket, so they blamed it on that. But it was running fine before the service.  Anyhow, I got a new engine out of it, after 100,000 miles of driving, on Toyota's dime.  So I didn't examine too carefully who exactly was to blame.  But I'm pretty sure they neglected to replace some fluid.  

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7 hours ago, h20man said:

I hate swimming out a second time when they switch engines....  By blocking every hole...  gets rid of the generosity of sharing noise with whole anchorage...

also no flushing of waste into bay..    really makes it a nice weekend....

What to do about the guy with the contractor generator on his foredeck? Throw potatoes at the genset? 

 

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1 hour ago, gptyk said:

What to do about the guy with the contractor generator on his foredeck? Throw potatoes at the genset? 

 

Grapnel anchor from the water. That's all they are good for anyhow. 

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19 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Grapnel anchor from the water. That's all they are good for anyhow. 

I like. They're not on the boat anyway, the damn generator is too loud. They went ashore. 

 

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On 7/27/2021 at 7:51 PM, Gilldog said:

I’m not a boater. My not wanting to jump to conclusions is exactly why I posted to a forum with such a deep and wide knowledge base. I’ve since learned that the vast majority of sinkings occur on unattended boats tied to a dock or mooring so the circumstances were not as rare as I would have assumed. And although this was a fairly new boat built by a reputable company and just back from dealer servicing I now understand funny things can and do happen on boats. The malice I referred to earlier was race based (as in skin color, not rounding buoys fast) so knowing possible explanations other than sabotage exist is a relief.  

 

I would go with "just back from dealer servicing" as the prime suspect. 

There are multiple through-holes that are typically left open because they are supposed to be securely attached to one thing or another.  A small error in serving could cause one to be "not so attached" to its appropriate thingamajig....which could lead to a slow but constant leak.

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22 hours ago, gptyk said:

What to do about the guy with the contractor generator on his foredeck? Throw potatoes at the genset? 

 

Potato Cannon....  so much easier then throwing......  I tell you.. God's solution to problems are potatoes...

not so impressed with this link.. The photo (below) of the plastic pipe saying not for pressure.. is frightening... https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-make-a-potato-cannon/ 

Parts of pipe attached after applying glue.

This is a better link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato_cannon

A Scuba tank is a great source of pressure.... non flammable...

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1 minute ago, h20man said:

Potato Cannon....  so much easier then throwing......  I tell you.. God's solution to problems are potatoes...

not so impressed with this link.. The photo (below) of the plastic pipe saying not for pressure.. is frightening... https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-make-a-potato-cannon/

Parts of pipe attached after applying glue.

This is a better link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato_cannon

A Scuba tank is a great source of pressure.... non flammable...

It suddenly occurred to me after posting.... that a great hybrid solution would be to use a underwater scuba tank powered spud gun to really 'block' the seacocks.... Wonder what the noise makers would think if a woosh came out of their water lift mufflers, with bits of spud and other crap...  Scare the crap out of them....

hmmmm...

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Have been sitting on a mooring in Boothbay next to a guy with two (2) contractor generators that have been running since we got in last night. When we passed by in the dinghy they were inside watching TV. Haven’t shut them off once, as far as I can tell. Sigh. We’ll be casting off soon.

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On 8/17/2021 at 6:07 PM, ChrisJD said:

Have been sitting on a mooring in Boothbay next to a guy with two (2) contractor generators that have been running since we got in last night. When we passed by in the dinghy they were inside watching TV. Haven’t shut them off once, as far as I can tell. Sigh. We’ll be casting off soon.

Do you have any scuba gear?

Do you have a bag of soft spuds?

 

If so.. you may have a solution to your problem.. ;)

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4 hours ago, h20man said:

Do you have any scuba gear?

Do you have a bag of soft spuds?

 

If so.. you may have a solution to your problem.. ;)

Big can of spray foam. Less fuss, available almost anywhere.

FKT

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