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Food, fixes and notes from the casual coastal sailor.


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I ate grits for breakfast this morning and can tell you, lobster is not the best butter delivery food ever, not since rustic style stone ground grits made a comeback.*  Come at me bro...  * I wil

No sunset pic's this trip, but great company and good food. Some decent sailing too, but I'm the only one of my cruising buddies who takes photos. We had a bone-rattling ride back across the straits. 

The steamy weather we've had, when it's not raining,...was a good reason to use the grill. And Pulpit Harbor is the perfect setting.  On the pronunciation theme, mis en place:    Ripe p

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I'm still not used to the fact that someone anchored nearby - that you will never meet in your life - sends you a photo of your boat to your phone via 'messenger'.

Over zoomed so I applied the photo fix-all, B&W button. 

2070425489_MoonoverXmasBW.thumb.jpg.fe3e0ab46ff32d8b110699e53ef83edb.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm still not used to the fact that someone anchored nearby - that you will never meet in your life - sends you a photo of your boat to your phone via 'messenger'.

Over zoomed so I applied the photo fix-all, B&W button. 

2070425489_MoonoverXmasBW.thumb.jpg.fe3e0ab46ff32d8b110699e53ef83edb.jpg

 

Well now here's a good debate. Does applying a filter give one rights to take credit for the photo?

I'd argue no. Were the photograph on actual film the person who develops it wouldn't take credit for it, even if there was some shading, overexposure, or other arcane developing technique involved.

However, since the boat, let's call it the model, is the actual subject of the photograph, would the model have rights to the photo? Certainly, if it were a person (leaving the selfie monkey debate aside), the person could claim no release form was signed and that the photo couldn't be used. Would that apply to the owner of the model in this case?

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm still not used to the fact that someone anchored nearby - that you will never meet in your life - sends you a photo of your boat to your phone via 'messenger'.

Over zoomed so I applied the photo fix-all, B&W button. 

2070425489_MoonoverXmasBW.thumb.jpg.fe3e0ab46ff32d8b110699e53ef83edb.jpg

 

You have a really big anchor light. 

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1 hour ago, mgs said:

Well now here's a good debate. Does applying a filter give one rights to take credit for the photo?

I'd argue no. Were the photograph on actual film the person who develops it wouldn't take credit for it, even if there was some shading, overexposure, or other arcane developing technique involved.

However, since the boat, let's call it the model, is the actual subject of the photograph, would the model have rights to the photo? Certainly, if it were a person (leaving the selfie monkey debate aside), the person could claim no release form was signed and that the photo couldn't be used. Would that apply to the owner of the model in this case?

I import all my photos into Lightroom. When I export I often forget the program watermarks them with my id. Still I usually give credit to whomever was the shooter. 

 

I see my photos on various platforms and media online. I'm never asked for permission but I wouldn't expect it (sometimes I get a credit mention).

 

I'm of the thinking that once you send it 'out' in social media, it's everybody's. I know a few people have had run ins with that (Dylan for one I think), but I doubt it's worth the $pursuit for an online photo. They're always low res so not any good for quality printing. 

 

When I first worked on this photo, I thought the owner had used one of those oil painting apps. On closer inspection I see it was just digitally zoomed which in my mind makes it worthless, except to me. :) 

 

So who owns the rights to it? Good question. 

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A lot going on in this photo. Start with the screen: Garnet's Gold, a documentary that Mary Ann downloaded.

 

Doesn't hold a candle to the T&A show on the Youtube sailing channel. Yet hunkered down in Perry Creek with a stiff 30 knot northerly wind blowing overhead, as we burned a few watts that I brought from home, I found it captivating. 

 

I was torn between my impatience for Garnet, as a man, and the unconditional love a parent has for their ne'er do well child (or an extremely homely terrier). 

 

779007974_Movieanddinner.thumb.jpg.64270cf5ffa320e606e5dfc21a494460.jpg

Let's not forget the food which makes or breaks your life.

All leftovers: 2 uneaten lobsters (company night before at home) out of 10 bought in town from the 'lobster lady' who's husbands boat is mooring in our harbor.

Left over fingerling potatoes grown in Rockland (a friends farm-ette).

Both the lobster meat and the potatoes were 'cooked' again in olive oil in a hot skillet.

The local greens (the best!) come from Dooryard Farm in nearby Camden. 

The dressing is not my bailiwick (nor was the rest of it), and was exceptional - and never the same,...as always. 

At home, this would all be ordinary and we might have turned Garnet's Gold off. 

 

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When Sailing; a good pb&j is as good as anything made. Since I am usually at the helm, anything more than a pb&j, plus a few apple slices and maybe a few grapes is Far More than I have time to enjoy.  

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In (almost) quiet Perry Creek I could hear a casual conversation between two boats about 150 yards away.

 

"I hope my generator wasn't bothering you", with real concern from boat number 1. 

 

Then from boat #2 who ran his engine for an hour earlier, "Oh no, no no. I could hardly hear it". 

 

It had the tone of a conversation between loved ones, such as "Do these pants make my rear end look too big?",..."Oh no honey, you look great" 

 

It wasn't all that annoying to me (with diagnosed hearing loss) but it made me think I may have heard an increase in engines in anchorages in 2021. Probably just me who - living in a village that gets quite busy in season - is aware of noise pollution. 

 

These folks made about the same amount of decibels for an hour in Somesville in mid August, but it was enjoyable to me. Maybe not to everyone though. 

707030807_GuiterbongosSomesville.thumb.jpg.ee09a3d6048a0aa71b37319ba6a02f34.jpg

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

In (almost) quiet Perry Creek I could hear a casual conversation between two boats about 150 yards away.

 

"I hope my generator wasn't bothering you", with real concern from boat number 1. 

 

Then from boat #2 who ran his engine for an hour earlier, "Oh no, no no. I could hardly hear it". 

 

It had the tone of a conversation between loved ones, such as "Do these pants make my rear end look too big?",..."Oh no honey, you look great" 

 

It wasn't all that annoying to me (with diagnosed hearing loss) but it made me think I may have heard an increase in engines in anchorages in 2021. Probably just me who - living in a village that gets quite busy in season - is aware of noise pollution. 

 

These folks made about the same amount of decibels for an hour in Somesville in mid August, but it was enjoyable to me. Maybe not to everyone though. 

707030807_GuiterbongosSomesville.thumb.jpg.ee09a3d6048a0aa71b37319ba6a02f34.jpg

 

 

 

Charging batteries is a fraught thing.....The demands of modern electrical systems make it hard not to be, "that guy", and the quieter the ambient noise level, the worse it is.  One of the things I really treasure about the more remote anchorages is the relative absence of human generated sound, and even then there is the odd airplane or lobsterboat with a loud engine. You have to go a long way to escape humans. So I feel the guilt strongly when I shatter the silence, burning dinosaurs to generate a few meagre amps to power my fridge. I try to avoid sunrise and sunset, and I don't like motoring while sailing, so that leaves maybe an hour after dinner while washing up  -  after dark so it's more difficult to identify the miscreant, (though in reality it's obvious). 

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57 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

In (almost) quiet Perry Creek I could hear a casual conversation between two boats about 150 yards away.

 

"I hope my generator wasn't bothering you", with real concern from boat number 1. 

 

Then from boat #2 who ran his engine for an hour earlier, "Oh no, no no. I could hardly hear it". 

 

It had the tone of a conversation between loved ones, such as "Do these pants make my rear end look too big?",..."Oh no honey, you look great" 

 

It wasn't all that annoying to me (with diagnosed hearing loss) but it made me think I may have heard an increase in engines in anchorages in 2021. Probably just me who - living in a village that gets quite busy in season - is aware of noise pollution. 

 

These folks made about the same amount of decibels for an hour in Somesville in mid August, but it was enjoyable to me. Maybe not to everyone though. 

707030807_GuiterbongosSomesville.thumb.jpg.ee09a3d6048a0aa71b37319ba6a02f34.jpg

 

 

 

Noise pollution comes in all forms. My generator may be offensive to some, but it runs only for a given period of time.

I’ve shared anchorages around the world with howling wind generators that run whenever there is wind. We used to consciously anchor as far away from them as possible.

Solar panels make good neighbors.

Perry Creek is a great little amphitheater, amplifying every sound.

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6 minutes ago, accnick said:

Solar panels make good neighbors.

Especially when combined with lithium batteries. The alt charges the lithium banks quickly on the way or once you get to the anchorage and the panels top them up every day while at anchor. My mantra (up here at 48 North) is that you can never have enough solar. With lots of solar, even the cloudy days and the late fall days can get you a full charge or, at least, slow the net drain enough that you can have two or three days at anchor without having to burn dinosaurs.

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3 hours ago, Elegua said:

Charging batteries is a fraught thing.....The demands of modern electrical systems make it hard not to be, "that guy", and the quieter the ambient noise level, the worse it is.  One of the things I really treasure about the more remote anchorages is the relative absence of human generated sound, and even then there is the odd airplane or lobsterboat with a loud engine. You have to go a long way to escape humans. So I feel the guilt strongly when I shatter the silence, burning dinosaurs to generate a few meagre amps to power my fridge. I try to avoid sunrise and sunset, and I don't like motoring while sailing, so that leaves maybe an hour after dinner while washing up  -  after dark so it's more difficult to identify the miscreant, (though in reality it's obvious). 

When we have to run the engine to charge, we try to do it mid-afternoon, when there is usually a lot of other activity going on. Never at dawn or dusk, although evening is when the big powerboats like to run their gensets while they are drinking themselves into a coma watching TV or listening to loud shitty music. Really aggravating is when rafted boats alternate running instead of doing it simultaneously. 

 

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30 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

When we have to run the engine to charge, we try to do it mid-afternoon, when there is usually a lot of other activity going on. Never at dawn or dusk, although evening is when the big powerboats like to run their gensets while they are drinking themselves into a coma watching TV or listening to loud shitty music. Really aggravating is when rafted boats alternate running instead of doing it simultaneously. 

 

Noon-ish is a good time. The ones that grind my gears are the ones that fire up the generator and then go "inside". 

Let's go camping and bring Kareoke! 

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6 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Noon-ish is a good time. The ones that grind my gears are the ones that fire up the generator and then go "inside". 

Let's go camping and bring Kareoke! 

The worst I have seen is to put a cheap generator on the swim platform and then fuck off in the dinghy for three hours.

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31 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Too bad the legend of the sirens is not real. They would have a hayday luring annoying boats into the rocks. 

895117205_ScreenShot2021-09-29at4_23_05PM.thumb.png.da44e88359faff42ffecd41ba3afeb58.png

Probably wouldn't be heard over the generator...

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Few things, are more unnatural looking than a sailboat.

A floating hull with a big stick in the middle held up by a spider web of wires. 

Yet tidied up and moored, in the right setting, there is something organic in their form. 

 

1649653101_Thoroughfaredusk2021.thumb.jpg.30b79e0ba4b1ea687775438af248701b.jpg

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Few things, are more unnatural looking than a sailboat.

A floating hull with a big stick in the middle held up by a spider web of wires. 

Yet tidied up and moored, in the right setting, there is something organic in their form. 

 

1649653101_Thoroughfaredusk2021.thumb.jpg.30b79e0ba4b1ea687775438af248701b.jpg

Give an ancient Phoenician an hour on one of these, and they would probably figure out how most of it worked.

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Daybreak in Camden maine. Noisy, touristy, yet I listened to loons this dawn.
   The only background noise was the waterfall a hundred yards away.

We moved here 22 years ago and spent the first summer living out here on a float aboard our 28’ cape dory. 
 

It’s changed a lot, and it has changed very little. 
1F7B5DE6-FFC7-44CC-A4F0-D613BEFB240C.thumb.jpeg.ab9015f27c223384011998ba4eb41baf.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Daybreak in Camden maine. Noisy, touristy, yet I listened to loons this dawn.
   The only background noise was the waterfall a hundred yards away.

We moved here 22 years ago and spent the first summer living out here on a float aboard our 28’ cape dory. 
 

It’s changed a lot, and it has changed very little. 
1F7B5DE6-FFC7-44CC-A4F0-D613BEFB240C.thumb.jpeg.ab9015f27c223384011998ba4eb41baf.jpeg

Listening to the Loons.  Caney Creek Lake has changed so much, yet also changed so little.  And yes, we listen to our loons.  So far away, so very different yet so much the same.

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Are you on LM’s green cone float? We spent a few nights on it several weeks ago.

We called it a season today: hauled out at Atlantic Boat in Brooklin this morning.

Now I have four days to put the boat to bed before we head down 95 to our home in Vero Beach, FL.

We were ready for this season to end.

it was good to meet you in NE Harbor this summer.

Have a good winter.

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10 hours ago, accnick said:

Are you on LM’s green cone float? We spent a few nights on it several weeks ago.

We called it a season today: hauled out at Atlantic Boat in Brooklin this morning.

Now I have four days to put the boat to bed before we head down 95 to our home in Vero Beach, FL.

We were ready for this season to end.

it was good to meet you in NE Harbor this summer.

Have a good winter.

I'm on a friends private float (who has hauled). It was very nice meeting you, too.

That seems long ago. Summers, though short in Maine, are dense. 

377992816_RowingNortheastHarbordawn.thumb.jpg.0b16746a47423d127a1b8c49df7dc487.jpg

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11 hours ago, accnick said:

Are you on LM’s green cone float? We spent a few nights on it several weeks ago.

We called it a season today: hauled out at Atlantic Boat in Brooklin this morning.

Now I have four days to put the boat to bed before we head down 95 to our home in Vero Beach, FL.

We were ready for this season to end.

it was good to meet you in NE Harbor this summer.

Have a good winter.

Welcome back to Floriduh! The traffic both on the ICW and the streets has increased markedly. 

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I actually like rowing, even rowing our inflatable. The one thing that drives me crazy is facing backwards. So, I will row backwards for longer distances and turn the dinghy around and row forwards when I'm just sliding down the shore taking pictures or annoying the wildlife.

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3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I actually like rowing, even rowing our inflatable. The one thing that drives me crazy is facing backwards. So, I will row backwards for longer distances and turn the dinghy around and row forwards when I'm just sliding down the shore taking pictures or annoying the wildlife.

I row backwards quite a bit, by myself. If the boat is big enough not to drag it's rear through the water, it'll go backwards surprisingly well. With one rower on the middle thwart, no matter how heavy, the stern is just out of the water enough so it slides along nicely in flat water (no good in a chop, obviously). 

It's my favorite way to take photos. It helps you frame the shot. 

Rowing lessons: 619845974_RowinglessonsintheCreek.thumb.jpg.1b4ee12bee54365578659d6d305cba08.jpg

 

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No sunset pic's this trip, but great company and good food. Some decent sailing too, but I'm the only one of my cruising buddies who takes photos. We had a bone-rattling ride back across the straits. 

DSC_0425.jpeg

DSC_0467.jpeg

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13 minutes ago, cyclone said:

Best stretch of weather all year other than the light winds

Concur. Chasing a wind that wouldn’t be yesterday, I was about to give it. 
 

Then a totally un-forecast wind sent us on a beautiful tack to where are now. 
 

We dropped anchor and the mysterious wind went away. 

 

 

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We sailed in company yesterday, with the $1 dollar boat. My son on the left, boat partner Harry on the right, and Tony, my daughters boyfriends dog. They were onboard as well.

that’s me in the background trying to catch them, which may be why they were laughing. 
 

they all went to Warren island and pitched a couple tents as more were coming on the ferry. 
7AECD395-3E42-4A3D-B962-9836C749E19E.thumb.jpeg.54a8e703120bd95c9bfe187ca5cb4f1f.jpeg

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I almost packed it in and furled sails. I had said to the kids on the dock, “are you ready for a lesson?”. And then couldn’t catch them! How embarasing
 

But then the wind found me and I nicely restored my honor. 
 

I’m proud to say, they stuck it out and sailed another hour and a half or more into Warren island in mostly very light wind. 
 

They are natural sailors that love to sail. 
 

son and daughter

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On 10/5/2021 at 7:37 AM, Elegua said:

Welcome back to Floriduh! The traffic both on the ICW and the streets has increased markedly. 

The traffic was insane on the drive home: two hours of delay on day 2  of our trip (Newport to Rocky Mount, NC). Day 3 was heavy traffic, but few delays.

It was good to get back home, even if it is Floriduh.

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FB reminds me that it was exactly 6 years ago today that we gave our son the title to the $1 sailboat in Rome as he was receiving the Premio America award. 

275173242_PremioAmerica.thumb.jpeg.b684c45908d60ed642fce4f6a8cf8e25.jpeg

The kids are still squeezing every penny out of that boat. We have no idea the age of these sails. 

492549142_NAMO2021crop.thumb.jpg.580f17b2618492f89e853bedb92d49cf.jpg

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I love the color, Ochre. Nothing does ochre better than Rockweed at low tide, especially in October light. 

661731261_XmasLasell2021.thumb.jpg.a07515fe70475bb23999bb780b065b96.jpg

Ochre and reds emerge from the trees in October. Come to think of it, ochre shows up in wood when it is in its final stage, cut into planks and timbers and protected with little more than wood oils and resins. 

1976898608_RockportHarborfoliage.thumb.jpg.238f9420496a8330725681453a9e9fd0.jpg

Almost forgot. Ochre, and vivid reds, show up in a trees last act: 

 

 

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Our harbor is deep. Not just below the surface - which is about 50' just off the shore - but above the surface.

Hauled boats heading to storage have about 60-70 feet to ascend to Mainstreet, a couple hundred feet from the waters edge. 

IMG-3303.thumb.jpg.16543026be5d321f67707ab0293a691a.jpg

SENSHIN is a Center Harbor 31 (I believe). 

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Kris, your picture doesn’t really capture how steep that hill really is.

 

You’re right about Senshin by the by. 

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9 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Our harbor is deep. Not just below the surface - which is about 50' just off the shore - but above the surface.

Hauled boats heading to storage have about 60-70 feet to ascend to Mainstreet, a couple hundred feet from the waters edge. 

IMG-3303.thumb.jpg.16543026be5d321f67707ab0293a691a.jpg

SENSHIN is a Center Harbor 31 (I believe). 

You one likes what one sees of the CH 31, there are currently two, (2), dos, for sale at well below the price of a custom build at Brooklin Boat Yard...

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4 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

i do love @Kris Cringle photos.  The finest MainePorn.

However, they do give the impression that the weather in Maine is 97% windless calm, with glassy water .. and 3% a blustery force 1 ;) 

It is usually calm in the evening and morning, particularly in the sheltered anchorages that many of us frequent. More often than not, there is a seabreeze of some type during the day.

 

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This has been (so far), an odd-ish season for weather in my experience. Weather is my thing working outside most of my life, and living, and sailing here on the coast. Living long enough to witness the effects of climate change first hand, weather looms over our shoulders. 

 

We expect warmer summers here: We got that with 2021.

We don't expect wet summers: We got that in 2021, but there's no record or trend evident of this. 

But did we get less settled systems that resulted in lower, flukey, perhaps less predictable wind patterns in 2021?

We count on those patterns to settle and hold for spells of time. Predictable.

It's likely my timing this season of 40+ days and nights on the water - so far has me wondering about this. I can't remember this lack of the moderate sailing winds I'm accustomed to sailing here. 

I intend to query sailors in my region (both in person and the large base of Maine sailors internet group), about their sailing conditions in 2021. 

971009466_SunsetLasell2021.thumb.jpg.834e25d0c2bbba18006b8e4f41b14d72.jpg 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

This has been (so far), an odd-ish season for weather in my experience. Weather is my thing working outside most of my life, and living, and sailing here on the coast. Living long enough to witness the effects of climate change first hand, weather looms over our shoulders. 

 

We expect warmer summers here: We got that with 2021.

We don't expect wet summers: We got that in 2021, but there's no record or trend evident of this. 

But did we get less settled systems that resulted in lower, flukey, perhaps less predictable wind patterns in 2021?

We count on those patterns to settle and hold for spells of time. Predictable.

It's likely my timing this season of 40+ days and nights on the water - so far has me wondering about this. I can't remember this lack of the moderate sailing winds I'm accustomed to sailing here. 

I intend to query sailors in my region (both in person and the large base of Maine sailors internet group), about their sailing conditions in 2021. 

971009466_SunsetLasell2021.thumb.jpg.834e25d0c2bbba18006b8e4f41b14d72.jpg 

 

It was most certainly an odd summer in Maine. I have never seen a wetter summer, and the fact that we had fog at times throughout the summer was unusual.

Since we now have a powerboat, we look for calmer days rather than  windier days. There were plenty of days this summer when the wind didn't come up until much later in the day than normal, and seemed to die off earlier.

There seemed to be fewer days when it blew more than 15 kt or so, even in Penobscot Bay, which tends to be a bit of a wind funnel for both southerlies and northerlies

I always use the PB forecast for determining the highest winds I am likely to see between Schoodic and PB, which  covers a lot of our summer cruising grounds most years.

The other thing I noticed was unusual stability in barometric pressure. We just didn't have much in the way of fronts to generate significant gradient winds.

There was a lot of cloud cover this summer, which reduces the generation of the seabreeze in places like Penobscot Bay.

This is just anecdotal. Since we are not passagemaking, I am not as obsessive about logging weather conditions as I used to be when we were sailing offshore.

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One of the things I really enjoy about cruising mid-coast Maine is the typical wind pattern.

You get a light north-ish shore breeze in the am, sometimes bearing fog, that lasts until about mid-morning that can take you out of the river or whatever bay you are in and then it shifts to the SW and builds to the SW giving you champagne sailing conditions for most of the day until late afternoon / early evening when it is time to anchor and it goes back to a nice North-ish shore breeze for the evening. By happy coincidence this seems to line up with most of the rivers and anchorages which tend to run NE/SW. 

So many days you wake up, have breakfast and a cup of coffee, if there is fog you might have two, and then you ghost out of the anchorage. By the time the wind shifts and builds, everything is put away and you have a good sail for most of the day and by the time you arrive at your destination and the boat is put away and it's time for dinner, it's calm and quiet again. 

This Summer was different in that there were many fewer days with that pattern. A lot more easterlies and westerlies, according to my log. This year there was so much heavy rain, so much more wind out of the East and West, but we did have some great sails. 

 

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9 hours ago, Elegua said:

One of the things I really enjoy about cruising mid-coast Maine is the typical wind pattern.

You get a light north-ish shore breeze in the am, sometimes bearing fog, that lasts until about mid-morning that can take you out of the river or whatever bay you are in and then it shifts to the SW and builds to the SW giving you champagne sailing conditions for most of the day until late afternoon / early evening when it is time to anchor and it goes back to a nice North-ish shore breeze for the evening. By happy coincidence this seems to line up with most of the rivers and anchorages which tend to run NE/SW. 

So many days you wake up, have breakfast and a cup of coffee, if there is fog you might have two, and then you ghost out of the anchorage. By the time the wind shifts and builds, everything is put away and you have a good sail for most of the day and by the time you arrive at your destination and the boat is put away and it's time for dinner, it's calm and quiet again. 

This Summer was different in that there were many fewer days with that pattern. A lot more easterlies and westerlies, according to my log. This year there was so much heavy rain, so much more wind out of the East and West, but we did have some great sails. 

 

Ah, the trusty Monitor at work. Our last sailboat was Calypso, and her Monitor was named "Brave Ulysses." (you will need to be a serious late-1960's hard rock aficionado to understand that particular reference.)

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3 minutes ago, accnick said:

Ah, the trusty Monitor at work. Our last sailboat was Calypso, and her Monitor was named "Brave Ulysses." (you will need to be a serious late-1960's hard rock aficionado to understand that particular reference.)

Cream? I’m not a serious late-60s hard-rock fan. 
my father did/does have a best of cream cd though…

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1 minute ago, mgs said:

Cream? I’m not a serious late-60s hard-rock fan. 
my father did/does have a best of cream cd though…

Well, yes. 

Warning: if you listen to this, especially Clapton's solo starting at around 2:56, you may give up trying to play rock guitar. 

Cream - Tales of Brave Ulysses LIVE! - YouTube

Clapton may be a miserable human being and a full-blown conspiracy theorist, but he can play guitar pretty well.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

Well, yes. 

Warning: if you listen to this, especially Clapton's solo starting at around 2:56, you may give up trying to play rock guitar. 

Cream - Tales of Brave Ulysses LIVE! - YouTube

Clapton may be a miserable human being and a full-blown conspiracy theorist, but he can play guitar pretty well.

~60 years of being a rock star must do something to one's brain.....

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30 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

~60 years of being a rock star must do something to one's brain.....

It's the first five that are the worst. If you survive those, you can be either a legend or an example.

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2 hours ago, accnick said:

Ah, the trusty Monitor at work. Our last sailboat was Calypso, and her Monitor was named "Brave Ulysses." (you will need to be a serious late-1960's hard rock aficionado to understand that particular reference.)

Good name, but possibly there were more fans of classic rock than you might imagine. Or at least during HS. 

I tried to name ours Loick, but my daughter added some artwork and he became Mr. Happy. He's very diligent, if sometimes misguided. It came with the boat and now I can't believe I sailed for so many years without one. 

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19 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Here's to old: Faded, scratched, tattered, dog eared. Musty, dusty, chipped, dinged; here's to old. 

 

194069329_Portlightlamp.thumb.jpg.418230554c2f7280b04f32c009b8e7c3.jpg

"Old" would be us. Beats the alternative, however.

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23 hours ago, accnick said:

"Old" would be us. Beats the alternative, however.

True but I was into 'things' old, as I repaired this 200 year old window sash that day: 

A squirrel (my guess) must have been trapped in this room long before my clients owned the house. Painters just paint over problems. That worked for a few decades.

Then little kids come along (little kids come and go in houses every 2-3 decades), and cracked some panes. 

IMG_3325.thumb.jpeg.ec33b7b66da1e6bf0c063e96dc8aa269.jpeg

New window? No, I'm a preservationist and have replaced too many 'new windows' in my life (many of which I installed myself). 

 Besides, it's Covid world now. I'd have to have something built and that could take a year, or never happen. And how would one oddball look in a house full of these beautiful windows that last centuries? It would hurt my eyes. 

 

IMG_3326.thumb.jpeg.7b624cdeb11adda6331f98a1bc4af418.jpeg

It's not a Stratovarius. It doesn't have to look 'like new'. The muntins just have to be strong again....

 

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Then a little putty, not too much, still want it to look worn all around. What I look for is for nobody to notice (they'll be made aware by my invoice). 

IMG_3334.thumb.jpeg.16f73e00a1710043aa07d119c57f78b0.jpeg

Anyway, this inspired my toast to old stuff (and the photograph of the old port over a hanging locker in our old sailboat). 

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My son and his .50c boat partner moved their new ride onto the public landing today. FREYA is a 33' Pearson Vaguard. Another Philip Rhodes design. This is the first I've laid eyes on the boat. But I was queried and a good friend and co-dad to these boys looked it over and I trust his sailboat experience as much as my own. 

 

Owned by a fisherman that took Freya to Fla and back, 4 times. FREYA has been out of the water for the last 4 years and was trucked up from Freeport, about 2 hours south. 

 

Dirty and worn cosmetically but mostly sound. Good points: a Yanmar 3 cylinder with 2000 hours. 2 almost unused sails. No deflection of the deck mast step (a problem with the design). No major core problems, although the aft deck flexes a little overall. New cutlass, new battery (they need one more). Rig looks good and has been well stored. Refrigeration (I told them to tear that out as I pointed out the belt dust all over the Yanmar), good cushions, working wiring, pressure hot/cold water and a seawater galley pump. Newish head and holding/plumbing, smooth bottom, no blisters, decks dirty but painted and will clean up. 

The wood on deck is in rough condition. The PO I think was more of an engine mechanic but a total wood butcher. Thankfully, Pearson used little wood and except for toe rails, the pieces like coamings are flat and easy to replace with a good mahogany look alike that's about $10 a board foot. 

 

The dreadful 60's faux wood Formica on the bulkheads (the interior is stick built) paints well and the overhead liner is in amazing condition and I told the boys it could also be painted (they want to spruce it up some). 

 

6'5" headroom, a real galley with large sink and ample counters all to starboard. The only thing missing is no cooker. I think the PO was on hydraulics. 

 

All this, including the 5 jack stands, for 5K. She's nearly a sail-away, dressed as a fixer upper.

Here's son young Tom, smiling as Harry fits a stand. 

IMG_3363.thumb.jpeg.a5b862d7d63fce9cde49987328302a6c.jpeg

So does this mean it's time to write the "Dear NAMO" letter? 

No! During this sail when I took this photo of NAMO out a few weeks ago, the negotiations were under way. NAMO's new owner is our daughter Mary Jane, waving in the photo. Finally,  NAMO will get a good cleaning and some needed love. 

1631801119_NAMO2021crop.thumb.jpg.b2b9c1e045dfb92fb213a854be030e42.jpg

 

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29 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

My son and his .50c boat partner moved their new ride onto the public landing today. FREYA is a 33' Pearson Vaguard. Another Philip Rhodes design. This is the first I've laid eyes on the boat. But I was queried and a good friend and co-dad to these boys looked it over and I trust his sailboat experience as much as my own. 

 

Owned by a fisherman that took Freya to Fla and back, 4 times. FREYA has been out of the water for the last 4 years and was trucked up from Freeport, about 2 hours south. 

 

Dirty and worn cosmetically but mostly sound. Good points: a Yanmar 3 cylinder with 2000 hours. 2 almost unused sails. No deflection of the deck mast step (a problem with the design). No major core problems, although the aft deck flexes a little overall. New cutlass, new battery (they need one more). Rig looks good and has been well stored. Refrigeration (I told them to tear that out as I pointed out the belt dust all over the Yanmar), good cushions, working wiring, pressure hot/cold water and a seawater galley pump. Newish head and holding/plumbing, smooth bottom, no blisters, decks dirty but painted and will clean up. 

The wood on deck is in rough condition. The PO I think was more of an engine mechanic but a total wood butcher. Thankfully, Pearson used little wood and except for toe rails, the pieces like coamings are flat and easy to replace with a good mahogany look alike that's about $10 a board foot. 

 

The dreadful 60's faux wood Formica on the bulkheads (the interior is stick built) paints well and the overhead liner is in amazing condition and I told the boys it could also be painted (they want to spruce it up some). 

 

6'5" headroom, a real galley with large sink and ample counters all to starboard. The only thing missing is no cooker. I think the PO was on hydraulics. 

 

All this, including the 5 jack stands, for 5K. She's nearly a sail-away, dressed as a fixer upper.

Here's son young Tom, smiling as Harry fits a stand. 

IMG_3363.thumb.jpeg.a5b862d7d63fce9cde49987328302a6c.jpeg

So does this mean it's time to write the "Dear NAMO" letter? 

No! During this sail when I took this photo of NAMO out a few weeks ago, the negotiations were under way. NAMO's new owner is our daughter Mary Jane, waving in the photo. Finally,  NAMO will get a good cleaning and some needed love. 

1631801119_NAMO2021crop.thumb.jpg.b2b9c1e045dfb92fb213a854be030e42.jpg

 

The Vanguard was a decent boat in her day. Pearson's construction was solid if not innovative in any way.

Curious about the relationship between the belt dust on the engine and the reefer. Is it a 12v reefer, with the belt dust from a lot of charging? If so, a better battery set-up and alternator might solve that.

Boats from that era generally have poorly-insulated iceboxes that don't lend themselves to easy or efficient conversions  to refrigeration. I've designed some retrofits to add inside insulation with polyiso sheet foam, with thin sheets of G-10 glass bonded on the inside of that to form a new liner over the additional insulation. You then do epoxy fillets in the corners and paint it out if you are so inclined.

This is not an easy or cheap solution, but it works a treat.

I am eying the big 5 cu ft free-standing Frigibar 110v reefer/freezer in the cockpit of my downeast powerboat with the goal of adding  2-3" of additional inside insulation to reduce capacity to about 2-2.5 cu ft of well-insulated freezer, with new custom holding plates and a 12v compressor.

Like I need more boat projects or house projects....

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

My son and his .50c boat partner moved their new ride onto the public landing today. FREYA is a 33' Pearson Vaguard. Another Philip Rhodes design. This is the first I've laid eyes on the boat. But I was queried and a good friend and co-dad to these boys looked it over and I trust his sailboat experience as much as my own. 

She sounds like a great find, and with a bit of TLC she will be a real beaut.

Now with 3 yachts in the family, you have a fleet.

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

The Vanguard was a decent boat in her day. Pearson's construction was solid if not innovative in any way.

Curious about the relationship between the belt dust on the engine and the reefer. Is it a 12v reefer, with the belt dust from a lot of charging? If so, a better battery set-up and alternator might solve that.

Boats from that era generally have poorly-insulated iceboxes that don't lend themselves to easy or efficient conversions  to refrigeration. I've designed some retrofits to add inside insulation with polyiso sheet foam, with thin sheets of G-10 glass bonded on the inside of that to form a new liner over the additional insulation. You then do epoxy fillets in the corners and paint it out if you are so inclined.

This is not an easy or cheap solution, but it works a treat.

I am eying the big 5 cu ft free-standing Frigibar 110v reefer/freezer in the cockpit of my downeast powerboat with the goal of adding  2-3" of additional inside insulation to reduce capacity to about 2-2.5 cu ft of well-insulated freezer, with new custom holding plates and a 12v compressor.

Like I need more boat projects or house projects....

It's feels solid and very basic in the level of workmanship. Cockpit, square-basic, centerline companioway. The locker tops are stout and storage ample.  I wouldn't have picked this boat if dollar for dollar I had choices, but this one found them, and with a price they could afford. It's so small for 33', 9.5" beam, I love that!

Only young guys that have spent the last 10 years sailing in little 22-26' ancient CCA designed sailboats (so availalbe in the NE), could appreciate the feel and volume of this boat. And the speed of this slow design will take their breathe away from past boat performance. The wide decks (that close the interior down), they were smiling walking those decks. 

In a way, these guys are ahead of their time in this choice. No loans, they have the income to afford this. Who'd have thunk at 29 to be in this boat?

It's nice that that the interior is 'stick built'. But that also enabled the PO to fit a 'navigation desk' in the starboard quarter berth.

Totally useless, the nav. station, with the wide side decks, except for the Headless Horseman.

I had a good laugh. Next to the VHF, my son asked me what the gizmo next to it was. I said, "It's called an AM/FM radio with a CD player. Odds are there is a Buffet CD in it." 

Who knows, both working remotely, they'll have energy to burn and the tools (I'm one of those tools), for this project. 

But the rest is basically stock. The starboard galley, as you say, has a -tough to work on- icebox. It's not that big to start with. I didn't look to access for checking insulation.

I don't want the boys to think refrigeration will easily adapt to their use here, coastal sailing. A proper 12V reefer support system would just start with an alternator upgrade;then brackets, pulleys, belts, batteries and storage, etc.  

The PO motored the ICW 4 years in a row. That's the perfect application for refrigeration that is engine powered. 

Harry works for a solar firm and they already have a large panel to start with. These guys like to sail and won't be happy having to charge batteries via alternator, very often. They'll figure it out. Blocks of ice are available in their home harbor. 

 

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59 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

In a way, these guys are ahead of their time in this choice. No loans, they have the income to afford this. Who'd have thunk at 29 to be in this boat?

[...]

Who knows, both working remotely, they'll have energy to burn and the tools (I'm one of those tools), for this project. 

When that boat was new in about 1970, it would have cost well over a year's salary for a well-established member of the old professions, i.e. a family doctor or a small-town solicitor, probably in their 40s or 50s.  Now fifty years later these youngsters have this boat twenty years younger, fully paid for at probably less than a month's salary.

They will have some fettling to do, but if they are canny they will able to do most of that very cheaply.  DIY work while accepting imperfection, and used fittings and secondhand sails will go a long way.  The only big ticket item waiting for them will be possibly new standing rigging if they plan to go offshore, but if they keep her on a mooring and do their own antifouling, she will be cheap to run -- probably for much less than it costs to stay competitive in say a 470 or a Fireball.

You raised 'em canny, Kris.

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

IMG_3363.thumb.jpeg.a5b862d7d63fce9cde49987328302a6c.jpeg

I was driving through Rockport today and saw that red hull. Stands out it does. 

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7 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

My son and his .50c boat partner moved their new ride onto the public landing today. FREYA is a 33' Pearson Vaguard. Another Philip Rhodes design. This is the first I've laid eyes on the boat. But I was queried and a good friend and co-dad to these boys looked it over and I trust his sailboat experience as much as my own. 

 

Owned by a fisherman that took Freya to Fla and back, 4 times. FREYA has been out of the water for the last 4 years and was trucked up from Freeport, about 2 hours south. 

 

Dirty and worn cosmetically but mostly sound. Good points: a Yanmar 3 cylinder with 2000 hours. 2 almost unused sails. No deflection of the deck mast step (a problem with the design). No major core problems, although the aft deck flexes a little overall. New cutlass, new battery (they need one more). Rig looks good and has been well stored. Refrigeration (I told them to tear that out as I pointed out the belt dust all over the Yanmar), good cushions, working wiring, pressure hot/cold water and a seawater galley pump. Newish head and holding/plumbing, smooth bottom, no blisters, decks dirty but painted and will clean up. 

The wood on deck is in rough condition. The PO I think was more of an engine mechanic but a total wood butcher. Thankfully, Pearson used little wood and except for toe rails, the pieces like coamings are flat and easy to replace with a good mahogany look alike that's about $10 a board foot. 

 

The dreadful 60's faux wood Formica on the bulkheads (the interior is stick built) paints well and the overhead liner is in amazing condition and I told the boys it could also be painted (they want to spruce it up some). 

 

6'5" headroom, a real galley with large sink and ample counters all to starboard. The only thing missing is no cooker. I think the PO was on hydraulics. 

 

All this, including the 5 jack stands, for 5K. She's nearly a sail-away, dressed as a fixer upper.

Here's son young Tom, smiling as Harry fits a stand. 

IMG_3363.thumb.jpeg.a5b862d7d63fce9cde49987328302a6c.jpeg

So does this mean it's time to write the "Dear NAMO" letter? 

No! During this sail when I took this photo of NAMO out a few weeks ago, the negotiations were under way. NAMO's new owner is our daughter Mary Jane, waving in the photo. Finally,  NAMO will get a good cleaning and some needed love. 

1631801119_NAMO2021crop.thumb.jpg.b2b9c1e045dfb92fb213a854be030e42.jpg

 

Of course, the Vanguard has a (slightly) offset companionway, so we know the boat is a deathtrap...

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35 minutes ago, accnick said:
48 minutes ago, TwoLegged said:

Clearly, the Gods love Kris's family.

Either that, or they are setting them up for an Icarus-like fall.

I intended that comment to be read as a reference to "those whom the gods love die young".   I probably should have linked or something.

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7 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I intended that comment to be read as a reference to "those whom the gods love die young".   I probably should have linked or something.

As a superstitious (old) sailor, I don't like that sort of reference...

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