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Rowing out to the boat today to change the oil, I come upon this. Fekkin' kids,...

IMG_3418.thumb.jpeg.4dcaea5cf740c41adaa735f2f6bb8106.jpeg

Whenever they screw up, I always remind myself of my screw-ups at this age. I'll never tell them but I have them beat in all departments. 

And I remind myself, what it is Dad's are really for. 

IMG_3419.thumb.jpeg.ceb0f37553dfe530fb754f38eb1eed99.jpeg

To help you it when you screw up.  

Just as I finished up the oil change, a heard a lobsterboat roaring out of the harbor. Only he was in the inner harbor!

 He went by throwing a 5' deep wake that took me broadside. No mast, we roll like a barrel as I held 2 jugs of used oil. 

Instead of getting PO'd at the fisherman , I think the same thing as I do with kids: It's not a malicious act but ignorance on his part.

He thinks there is no one in the harbor so he can ignore the no wake rules. 

Of course this is what caused the kids mast cock-up,...or at least sped it along(not that this is any excuse,...).  

 

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No sunset pic's this trip, but great company and good food. Some decent sailing too, but I'm the only one of my cruising buddies who takes photos. We had a bone-rattling ride back across the straits. 

Just a bit north and east of you, I always aim to haul out shortly after Remembrance Day (Veterans Day in USA). This year, haulout is on the 15th. By that time I am one of the very last sailboats on m

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Rowing out to the boat today to change the oil, I come upon this. Fekkin' kids,...

IMG_3418.thumb.jpeg.4dcaea5cf740c41adaa735f2f6bb8106.jpeg

Whenever they screw up, I always remind myself of my screw-ups at this age. I'll never tell them but I have them beat in all departments. 

And I remind myself, what it is Dad's are really for. 

IMG_3419.thumb.jpeg.ceb0f37553dfe530fb754f38eb1eed99.jpeg

To help you it when you screw up.  

Just as I finished up the oil change, a heard a lobsterboat roaring out of the harbor. Only he was in the inner harbor!

 He went by throwing a 5' deep wake that took me broadside. No mast, we roll like a barrel as I held 2 jugs of used oil. 

Instead of getting PO'd at the fisherman , I think the same thing as I do with kids: It's not a malicious act but ignorance on his part.

He thinks there is no one in the harbor so he can ignore the no wake rules. 

Of course this is what caused the kids mast cock-up,...or at least sped it along(not that this is any excuse,...).  

 

We share Northeast Harbor with a lot of lobstermen. In summer, of course, they leave at or before dawn, and are generally pretty good leaving the harbor.

Coming back in early afternoon is a mixed bag. They are anxious to finish the day, and after running flat out between pots for six hours or so, a few don't always appreciate that the throttle is a variable control until they are ready to put the boat on a float or mooring.

Generally, however, there is a reasonable level of respect--or at least tolerance--for those of us there on pleasure boats. Besides, there is a harbormaster, and he knows that most of the town's revenue comes from mooring and dock rentals by pleasure boats.

Stonington is another story. We spent almost two weeks at an inside dock at Billings Diesel having main engine work done in late September/early October. A fair number of sailboats came and went on the moorings just outside Billings, and the lobstermen could--and often did--make their lives miserable, sometimes seemingly intentionally.

We made sure we were as far inside as we could get, having spent a couple of hours on one of those moorings earlier in the summer trying to set up a work appointment. My wife stayed on the boat while I went ashore to talk to the service manager. When I got back to the boat, she said, "I don't care where we go, but we're leaving here NOW!" And she meant it.

 

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46 minutes ago, accnick said:

We share Northeast Harbor with a lot of lobstermen. In summer, of course, they leave at or before dawn, and are generally pretty good leaving the harbor.

Coming back in early afternoon is a mixed bag. They are anxious to finish the day, and after running flat out between pots for six hours or so, a few don't always appreciate that the throttle is a variable control until they are ready to put the boat on a float or mooring.

Generally, however, there is a reasonable level of respect--or at least tolerance--for those of us there on pleasure boats. Besides, there is a harbormaster, and he knows that most of the town's revenue comes from mooring and dock rentals by pleasure boats.

Stonington is another story. We spent almost two weeks at an inside dock at Billings Diesel having main engine work done in late September/early October. A fair number of sailboats came and went on the moorings just outside Billings, and the lobstermen could--and often did--make their lives miserable, sometimes seemingly intentionally.

We made sure we were as far inside as we could get, having spent a couple of hours on one of those moorings earlier in the summer trying to set up a work appointment. My wife stayed on the boat while I went ashore to talk to the service manager. When I got back to the boat, she said, "I don't care where we go, but we're leaving here NOW!" And she meant it.

 

They also make a game of running at high speed early AM thru the anchorage at McGlathery, IIRC.

When I actually talk to lobster guys, such as pointing out that "if you drop that there it will be under my boat, and noisy, when the current/wind changes". Pretty often we end up with a lobster transaction and craft beer exchange. 

I find that discussing things in a friendly way has no downside.

Right in front of  Billings can be exciting as hell with a little breeze during the Camden-Brooklin feeder race. 

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6 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

They also make a game of running at high speed early AM thru the anchorage at McGlathery, IIRC.

When I actually talk to lobster guys, such as pointing out that "if you drop that there it will be under my boat, and noisy, when the current/wind changes". Pretty often we end up with a lobster transaction and craft beer exchange. 

I find that discussing things in a friendly way has no downside.

Right in front of  Billings can be exciting as hell with a little breeze during the Camden-Brooklin feeder race. 

You're right about McGlathery. Friends of mine had a serious confrontation with a lobsterman there. They carry, but so do a lot of lobstermen.

It could have ended very badly.

Reminded me of some of the squid fishermen in the South China Sea and the Straits of Malacca. They run straight at you in the middle of the night with no running lights, and sheer off at the last minute. Apparently, it is a way to ward off some form of evil spirits, or at least that's what I've been told.

Whatever the reason, it generated an unbelievable amount of stress, at least for us.

My wife got very good at dodging them on watch, while I was often melting down into a puddle of anxiety.

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Stonington have a well deserved reputation. Some lobster men/women you can talk to, some you can't.  One guy had a beautiful wooden one and when I complimented him he followed me to 10min telling me all about it. 

I spend the last part of one China Sea Race doing a sustained 15kts under spinnaker approaching Subic dodging fish attraction devices. Experiences like that kind of put me off cruising boats that plane. 

Yeah, in some places they cut you off to strip bad luck.  Most squid boats in action are lit like bridges. 

The "office" of a Taiwanese fishing boat. It was hard to see out due to the spray. 

IMG_0697.thumb.JPG.aae1871be147587020c2f2cbc36b0722.JPG

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2 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Stonington have a well deserved reputation. Some lobster men/women you can talk to, some you can't.  One guy had a beautiful wooden one and when I complimented him he followed me to 10min telling me all about it. 

I spend the last part of one China Sea Race doing a sustained 15kts under spinnaker approaching Subic dodging fish attraction devices. That experience kind of puts me off cruising boats that plane. 

Yeah, in some places they cut you off to strip bad luck.  Most squid boats in action are lit like bridges. 

The "office" of a Taiwanese fishing boat. It was hard to see out due to the spray. 

IMG_0697.thumb.JPG.aae1871be147587020c2f2cbc36b0722.JPG

The squid boats are lit like bridges, but they rarely display running lights so you can actually tell what they are doing. 

This was way before AIS. Maybe things are better now.

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23 minutes ago, accnick said:

The squid boats are lit like bridges, but they rarely display running lights so you can actually tell what they are doing. 

This was way before AIS. Maybe things are better now.

I was told that technically you have to have it on, but AIS just tells the <insert country here> coast guard that you're in their waters illegally, so no.  

Oh, you wanted to know where they were going.  :D  Yeah, good luck with that. 

Don't worry. The fire hazard keeps them safe. 

AM-JKLVT3kgUk5fyNiuvWRcEOYGIZuNFvhrWpqYQ

The ergonomic wheeled office chair and artwork keeps them alert and on watch. 

AM-JKLVJbEBAmrCrfgQm2ZUqJUGWkY_50hzgjRVp

 

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Speaking fishing dangers, this Kalik 40 was lost in Scotland over the weekend. 

720240820_Kalik40.thumb.jpeg.ffa6122ec7da21005164ad23742c1f3e.jpeg

Same dangers we deal with here, lobster trap warp and buoys. Here's a sticky bottom (we talk about all the dangers of certain designs, but never the hazard of an underbody that grabs fishing warp): 

1539605410_Kalik40propwrap.jpeg.af1724deb2d8967162a4126b1fe45229.jpeg

They had an assist from a life boat but it was in a tight-ish entrance. Things happened fast: 

1827621211_Kalik49sterndamage.jpeg.784df143c2a14ebc8f229250ad7dd377.jpeg

And the keel ripped off as well. 

1043022802_Kalik40keelgone.jpeg.cb6a7217b951c2829991cc742ecdbcf8.jpeg

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11 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Speaking fishing dangers, this Kalik 40 was lost in Scotland over the weekend. 

720240820_Kalik40.thumb.jpeg.ffa6122ec7da21005164ad23742c1f3e.jpeg

Same dangers we deal with here, lobster trap warp and buoys. Here's a sticky bottom (we talk about all the dangers of certain designs, but never the hazard of an underbody that grabs fishing warp): 

1539605410_Kalik40propwrap.jpeg.af1724deb2d8967162a4126b1fe45229.jpeg

They had an assist from a life boat but it was in a tight-ish entrance. Things happened fast: 

1827621211_Kalik49sterndamage.jpeg.784df143c2a14ebc8f229250ad7dd377.jpeg

And the keel ripped off as well. 

1043022802_Kalik40keelgone.jpeg.cb6a7217b951c2829991cc742ecdbcf8.jpeg

It can all go wrong terribly quickly.

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Same dangers we deal with here, lobster trap warp and buoys. Here's a sticky bottom (we talk about all the dangers of certain designs, but never the hazard of an underbody that grabs fishing warp): 

Like saildrives, P-struts, t-bulbs and twin rudders? 

That moment of doubt when the pot goes under and you hear it clunking on the bottom until it pops out the back....Or that lurch as it catches for a moment?  I've never had a line cutter. I've only done in-shore at night under power once when I had no choice because I blew the house fuse. We rotated standing on the bow. If I'm moving at night I try to be far offshore, then you just have fewer, but not zero, pots. 

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6 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Speaking fishing dangers, this Kalik 40 was lost in Scotland over the weekend. 

720240820_Kalik40.thumb.jpeg.ffa6122ec7da21005164ad23742c1f3e.jpeg

Same dangers we deal with here, lobster trap warp and buoys. Here's a sticky bottom (we talk about all the dangers of certain designs, but never the hazard of an underbody that grabs fishing warp): 

1539605410_Kalik40propwrap.jpeg.af1724deb2d8967162a4126b1fe45229.jpegHoley1043022802_Kalik40keelgone.jpeg.cb6a7217b951c2829991cc742ecdbcf8.jpeg

Holy Sh*t.

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Is everyone OK?

I guest that, in hindsight, disaster was inevitable.

Offset.thumb.jpg.4dcbefa955b6c04ee0e56793dd2bf4e7.jpg

Apparently everybody is fine. Last I checked, there were 65 posts asking about it. It happened last weekend and the owner has only owned the boat for 4 weeks. Boat was insured but the owner hasn't heard for insurer, yet. 

Quite interesting to hear the Scotland sailor feedback. Some question as to the fishermans liability if the buoy was infact in a channel (which is against UK laws, it sounds). 

People are pretty PO'd about it and the amount of support for the fisherman, seems less than here. 

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Apparently everybody is fine. Last I checked, there were 65 posts asking about it. It happened last weekend and the owner has only owned the boat for 4 weeks. Boat was insured but the owner hasn't heard for insurer, yet. 

Quite interesting to hear the Scotland sailor feedback. Some question as to the fishermans liability if the buoy was infact in a channel (which is against UK laws, it sounds). 

People are pretty PO'd about it and the amount of support for the fisherman, seems less than here. 

I have had issues with the pro fishermen around here, from cutting us off at the harbour entrance, to making rushes at us in an anchorage because he wanted the whole space for crab traps. Assholes.

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4 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I have had issues with the pro fishermen around here, from cutting us off at the harbour entrance, to making rushes at us in an anchorage because he wanted the whole space for crab traps. Assholes.

Are you in the Pacific Northwest, Ishmael? It's good to get these comparisons on fishing 'rights'. Gear seems to be a growing problem, even here. 

Right now, the owner that lost the boat is looking for a marine lawyer in the Scotland Sailing Cruising FB group. He only has 'third party coverage' which I take to mean liability only, not hull insurance. Some in that group think he may be entitled to compensation from the fisherman. Fisherman with insurance? Not likely. 

I'd say he's cooked but I'll follow along. 

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2 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Are you in the Pacific Northwest, Ishmael? It's good to get these comparisons on fishing 'rights'. Gear seems to be a growing problem, even here. 

Right now, the owner that lost the boat is looking for a marine lawyer in the Scotland Sailing Cruising FB group. He only has 'third party coverage' which I take to mean liability only, not hull insurance. Some in that group think he may be entitled to compensation from the fisherman. Fisherman with insurance? Not likely. 

I'd say he's cooked but I'll follow along. 

Yes, PSW. Vancouver Island.

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Pretty sure commercial fishermen are obliged to carry 3rd party (liability) insurance in Canada. Pretty much any vehicle that could do bodily harm is required to carry liability insurance. They wouldn't be able to stay at government docks, haul at shipyards, etc.

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On 11/7/2021 at 6:18 PM, Elegua said:

I was told that technically you have to have it on, but AIS just tells the <insert country here> coast guard that you're in their waters illegally, so no.  

Oh, you wanted to know where they were going.  :D  Yeah, good luck with that. 

Don't worry. The fire hazard keeps them safe. 

AM-JKLVT3kgUk5fyNiuvWRcEOYGIZuNFvhrWpqYQ

Is that a fireplace to keep the sex toys warm????? It's played hob with the ceiling.  

Weird shit in Asia.

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22 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Is that a fireplace to keep the sex toys warm????? It's played hob with the ceiling.  

Weird shit in Asia.

You need a god on board to keep afloat.  B644C3AA-0120-4274-88CD-B72EEA64F051_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.b5acc4fab03e5dc58a4b13894eebd47d.jpeg

The Winter NE Monsoon makes for rough conditions. Good for windsurfing, bad for fishing. Note the channel marker.

BA22E1D1-85E1-40AF-BDCD-3222A82DE372_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.0750e91949548ce1b3625bab2f565dad.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Is that a fireplace to keep the sex toys warm????? It's played hob with the ceiling.  

Weird shit in Asia.

It's just a shrine. You burn enough candles and incense however, and it gets a bit warm and smoky.

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On 11/7/2021 at 7:08 PM, Elegua said:

Stonington have a well deserved reputation. Some lobster men/women you can talk to, some you can't.  One g

In a way I think Stonington is a sad place. The cultural war (much like that going on in our country) there takes away a lot of the potential of the little harbor village. The polarized effect leaves the town a little sterile or something. 

I tie up to the public docks these days (warily,....) to get ice, provisions. Well, ice and wine actually, as you couldn't find anything(really, nothing) that's palpable unless you'll eat Lucky Strikes, Twisted Tea or lottery tickets.

Not the total fault of the store(s). They have tried but most of the locals drive to Ellsworth. Good shops come and then quickly due to lack of support after Labor day. 

Many won't (or likely don't even see their effect) support the local businesses. Partly the businesses fault as coastal communities try to raise prices and goods for the summer season. You gotta give a little from either side. 

A friend sent me this screen shot a few winters ago as she was trying to connect to the internet in Stonington.

In fact, none of wifi stations were connected to internet, even Fuck-off 5G. Like 60's East Berlin in winter. 

1525246364_StoningtonWifi.thumb.jpg.e92a27c75dcdbe9d020ade8da87f0f7c.jpg

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14 hours ago, Ishmael said:

I have had issues with the pro fishermen around here, from cutting us off at the harbour entrance, to making rushes at us in an anchorage because he wanted the whole space for crab traps. Assholes.

So, these are American fishermen then?

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29 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

In a way I think Stonington is a sad place. The cultural war (much like that going on in our country) there takes away a lot of the potential of the little harbor village. The polarized effect leaves the town a little sterile or something. 

I tie up to the public docks these days to get ice, provisions. Well, ice and wine actually, as you couldn't find anything(really, nothing) that's palpable unless you'll eat Lucky Strikes, Twisted Tea or lottery tickets.

Not the total fault of the store(s). They have tried but most of the locals drive to Ellsworth. Good shops come and then quickly due to lack of support after Labor day. 

Many won't (or likely don't even see their effect) support the local businesses. Partly the businesses fault as coastal communities try to raise prices and goods for the summer season. You gotta give a little from either side. 

A friend sent me this screen shot a few winters ago as she was trying to connect to the internet in Stonington.

In fact, none of wifi stations were connected to internet, even Fuck-off 5G. Like 60's East Berlin in winter. 

 

I recall my trepidation with Stonington pre-dates the culture wars. Most Lobsterman will treat you like that slightly retarded cousin that's come to visit. Stonington lobsterboats are like little warships trying to create an exclusion zone.  I can't say I am completely unsympathetic when I have to deal with some of these people from away, even though really I myself am from away. In the end though, it's an own goal. You need the new blood to keep things going.  

I bought my Subaru (which I still have) in Ellsworth, which is a long way to drive from the Boothbay Region.  That's when I discovered an in-land boatyard near Belmont. Totally weird coming around a hilly bend to see a huge barn and sailboats in the middle of farm fields. 

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4 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I recall my trepidation with Stonington pre-dates the culture wars. Most Lobsterman will treat you like that slightly retarded cousin that's come to visit. Stonington lobsterboats are like little warships trying to create an exclusion zone.  I can't say I am completely unsympathetic when I have to deal with some of these people from away, even though really I myself am from away. In the end though, it's an own goal. You need the new blood to keep things going.  

I bought my Subaru (which I still have) in Ellsworth, which is a long way to drive from the Boothbay Region.  That's when I discovered an in-land boatyard near Belmont. Totally weird coming around a hilly bend to see a huge barn and sailboats in the middle of farm fields. 

I had my transmission rebuilt in Stonington a few years ago and had to travel there by road for the first time. It's more isolated by highway than by water, I swear.

As a fishing state, we make a pathway from middle school to making decent money, fishing. You can skip all the rest,  high school - maybe college, and 'do fine'. But like all generalizations, this is only a generalization. 

Two girls working hard in Pulpit Harbor in late October: 

183183907_RockMeBaby_.thumb.jpg.e757c8440242990c8d232c5587709ef7.jpg

 

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32 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

In a way I think Stonington is a sad place. The cultural war (much like that going on in our country) there takes away a lot of the potential of the little harbor village. The polarized effect leaves the town a little sterile or something. 

I tie up to the public docks these days (warily,....) to get ice, provisions. Well, ice and wine actually, as you couldn't find anything(really, nothing) that's palpable unless you'll eat Lucky Strikes, Twisted Tea or lottery tickets.

Not the total fault of the store(s). They have tried but most of the locals drive to Ellsworth. Good shops come and then quickly due to lack of support after Labor day. 

Many won't (or likely don't even see their effect) support the local businesses. Partly the businesses fault as coastal communities try to raise prices and goods for the summer season. You gotta give a little from either side. 

A friend sent me this screen shot a few winters ago as she was trying to connect to the internet in Stonington.

In fact, none of wifi stations were connected to internet, even Fuck-off 5G. Like 60's East Berlin in winter. 

1525246364_StoningtonWifi.thumb.jpg.e92a27c75dcdbe9d020ade8da87f0f7c.jpg

We spent about two weeks in late September on a dock at Billings (Moose Island, on the edge of Stonington and right on Deer Isle Thoroughfare) having engine work done. It is a long walk from there to the village, and as you say, "downtown" is pretty sparse when it comes to any kind of provisions.

Stonington, like a lot of small Maine towns, has a good food co-op anyone can shop at, but it is a drive of several miles from downtown.

Billings loaned us the yard pickup truck to go food shopping or just to drive around, so we were OK on fresh stuff while we were there.

Deer Isle (where Stonington is) is still pretty isolated, despite the bridge connecting to the mainland. The closest real supermaket is in Blue Hill, about a 45 minute drive, and if you want the big box stores (multiple supermarkets, Walmart, Home Depot), Ellsworth is an hour's drive or more.

Winters can be long and hard, and in summer, they have to put in long days on the water to make a living. 

The biggest event there in the summer is the lobster boat racing weekend, which has a bit of the frenzy,  political correctness, and family-friendliness (irony font here) of the Sturgis motorcycle rally.

But if you need work on any kind of big diesel engine, the Billings mechanics are the best, for a reason. You gotta keep those lobster boats fishing to keep the Stonington economy moving.

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Billings re-built my transmission. I can't complain about the time, cost or quality. 

1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

As a fishing state, we make a pathway from middle school to making decent money, fishing. You can skip all the rest,  high school - maybe college, and 'do fine'. But like all generalizations, this is only a generalization

Although the demographics and economics are stacked against them, the towns like I know better like Boothbay, Newcastle, Edgecomb and Damariscotta really put a lot of effort into breaking the cycle through the schools, YMCA...etc... For a small town, Edgecomb puts a lot of money and resources into the Eddy School.  Even I took some classes at USM in Portland to fill in some missing maths classes before I went off to do my graduate degrees. It was inexpensive and the instruction was great. 

Actually, becoming a lobsterman isn't so easy. My unofficial and probably garbled understanding is: First you have to come from the right family first to get access to certain grounds, then you need to do an long apprenticeship and then you need to get a license for which there is a long waiting list.  Then you get a yuuuge loan for a max trap sized boat and truck. Then you spend the next 20 years trying to pay off said loan / declare bankruptcy or both.  You may or may not pick up a substance abuse habit along the way.  

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The job itself is hazardous. Lobstermen work exposed to the ocean. Chesapeake crabbers work in a more confined environment and the season ends in December.

My (also garbled) understanding is that people pursue this profession for a few main reasons- Independence, romance, and possibly money.  I can certainly understand the independence aspect of it even with the pressure of wondering if you'll meet next month's bills.

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Maybe I'm delusional but we seem to get along great with lobstermen, first they find out I'm from Texas, not Boston or NY. That seems to make a difference. We sometimes offer beers. That makes a difference. But what really seemed to bridge the gap was that this summer we had my wife's niece from San Antonio with us a lot. Her first time on a sailboat, she struck up conversations in every port, makes friends effortlessly with anyone. She LOVED the lobstermen and women, but then, she loves everyone. Such a sweetheart. 

Tasha.thumb.jpg.8afa797bcf8c902643f469269d13bd88.jpg

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Maybe I'm delusional but we seem to get along great with lobstermen, first they find out I'm from Texas, not Boston or NY. That seems to make a difference. We sometimes offer beers. That makes a difference. But what really seemed to bridge the gap was that this summer we had my wife's niece from San Antonio with us a lot. Her first time on a sailboat, she struck up conversations in every port, makes friends effortlessly with anyone. She LOVED the lobstermen and women, but then, she loves everyone. Such a sweetheart. 

Tasha.thumb.jpg.8afa797bcf8c902643f469269d13bd88.jpg

CL, I would call her an unfair advantage in dealing with your average lobsterman.

Lobstermen are basically cowboys riding horsepower rather than horses.

A pretty girl is almost always an icebreaker.

And yes, all my exes come from Texas.... 

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I don't have any trouble with lobstermen (some are friends) but then I don't hook much of their gear.

Fishing gear is a problem and I think that problem and danger is growing for rec boaters, globally in fact(and new sailboat design doesn't usually take this into account). 

 

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I didn't check the marine weather this am, I must be hauled out. 

There was smoke on the water yesterday morning as I rowed out to my mobo. 

1617714878_RockportHarbor11-9-21.thumb.jpg.96f552a845762b20d1ab2772feb1005b.jpg

The mooring business is in full swing right now, winterizing gear. 

1458043722_FieldsDiveservice.thumb.jpg.42e1373b58415a5f728f6e002628fc2e.jpg

I'm fully falling into the second week of November for my usual haul outs these last few years. The storms can be a problem but this year, all the blows were Southerly.

The temperature has been agreeable for these late haulouts . It popped into the low 60's as I drained and winterized the boat.

 Next week is a good time for our first snowfall too, but it never lasts. 

IMG_3426.thumb.jpeg.fc05cc89e6e42c25bcd5c4b003d6a6d1.jpeg

Winter, at least on the coast, comes in December. That's when we take our pumpkins down. 

828980008_JackOlantern.thumb.jpg.08cfbdf0f80c8ccb42173784f73130ad.jpg

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15 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm fully falling into the second week of November for my usual haul outs these last few years. The storms can be a problem but this year, all the blows were Southerly.

The temperature has been agreeable for these late haulouts . It popped into the low 60's as I drained and winterized the boat.

 Next week is a good time for our first snowfall too, but it never lasts.

Just a bit north and east of you, I always aim to haul out shortly after Remembrance Day (Veterans Day in USA). This year, haulout is on the 15th. By that time I am one of the very last sailboats on my bay. That means my boat will be placed accessibly in front of all the others in the yard (but I should also count on an early launch or listen to the grumbling of the yard crew).

Speaking of food, the last social event of the sailing season on my boat is the Annual Chili Sail. Sometime after the first hard frost, a crew is assembled and a large pot of chili con carne is prepared. We sail for a couple of hours, anchor or moor, eat the food, and sail home as the sun sets. This was last weekend:

 

Chili Sail 2021.jpg

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23 hours ago, Jim in Halifax said:

Just a bit north and east of you, I always aim to haul out shortly after Remembrance Day (Veterans Day in USA). This year, haulout is on the 15th. By that time I am one of the very last sailboats on my bay. That means my boat will be placed accessibly in front of all the others in the yard (but I should also count on an early launch or listen to the grumbling of the yard crew).

Speaking of food, the last social event of the sailing season on my boat is the Annual Chili Sail. Sometime after the first hard frost, a crew is assembled and a large pot of chili con carne is prepared. We sail for a couple of hours, anchor or moor, eat the food, and sail home as the sun sets. This was last weekend:

 

Chili Sail 2021.jpg

We have a pretty good blow arriving late today, with gusts to 45-50, right down the pike of our harbor. There's been a scurry to get some remaining boats out. 

We've been lucky, this fall has been mostly like this: 

IMG_3430.thumb.jpeg.fdc921e7faec077644667530b267e0ce.jpeg

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

We have a pretty good blow arriving late today, with gusts to 45-50, right down the pike of our harbor. There's been a scurry to get some remaining boats out.

That weather will be arriving here tomorrow, so I am taking the boat around to the marina this afternoon. I'll get the sails off while they're dry; cushions and everything else is already off. My mast gets pulled after the boat is on the hard, probably Wednesday. Enjoy your weekend, now that you won't be worrying about the gales...

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Jim in Halifax, I'm reading about your local realestate boom. This story, mostly on Newfoundland migrants, is startling. Big change. The world has changed in the last few years at a fast rate. 

512100276_ScreenShot2021-11-13at9_49_29AM.thumb.png.0d2177b1a7386a94fc65aa237cb7329d.png

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/13/world/canada/newfoundland-migrants.html

Having lived in Newfoundland for several years as a child, I would expect a reverse migration back to whence they came after a couple of years.

No disrespect at all to Newfoundland intended. It's just a bit harder than many people will be used to, particularly in winter.

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It's over.

My daughter helped me throw the cover on it yesterday (30X50', no small feat). It always looks like this in the off season (this was taken 2020).

The boat stays dry and well ventilated this way with all the hatches wide open, air flowing through the lockers and through the engine area.

But being a short walk away, I can check on things regularly. 

1058105546_Undercover2020.thumb.jpg.07c5a412be9d6351569f5b7cc5050b69.jpg

We do some things backwards. Instead of taking stuff off the boat in the fall (except for sails, perishables), my partner handed me a stack of clean bath towels and dish cloths, to take back to the boat. Plus there was a 60's plastic bowl or two from the galley, stuff that ends up home over the season. 

"Could you take these down to the boat if you're going?"  And then she added, "And there's a good bottle of red wine in the starboard pilot berth, locker." 

I'm glad she remembered that. I'd rather see a church burn than find that wine label on top of a pile of glass in the spring. 

2038597060_Bondedstoreslocker.thumb.jpeg.954e42778b89f40531bec5759a827895.jpeg

 

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3 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

It's over.

My daughter helped me throw the cover on it yesterday (30X50', no small feat). It always looks like this in the off season (this was taken 2020).

The boat stays dry and well ventilated this way with all the hatches wide open, air flowing through the lockers and through the engine area.

But being a short walk away, I can check on things regularly. 

1058105546_Undercover2020.thumb.jpg.07c5a412be9d6351569f5b7cc5050b69.jpg

We do some things backwards. Instead of taking stuff off the boat in the fall (except for sails, perishables), my partner handed me a stack of clean bath towels and dish cloths, to take back to the boat. Plus there was a 60's plastic bowl or two from the galley, stuff that ends up home over the season. 

"Could you take these down to the boat if you're going?"  And then she added, "And there's a good bottle of red wine in the starboard pilot berth, locker." 

I'm glad she remembered that. I'd rather see a church burn than find that wine label on top of a pile of glass in the spring. 

2038597060_Bondedstoreslocker.thumb.jpeg.954e42778b89f40531bec5759a827895.jpeg

 

My wife does the same thing with all the linens and bedding in the fall: wash and dry everything, then put it in plastic blanket bags and stow it aboard in  a well-ventilated location. Saves her a lot of time in the spring.

She's a lot smarter than I am. Most of the things I do in the fall cost me extra time in the spring.

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On 9/30/2021 at 9:46 AM, IStream said:

 My mantra (up here at 48 North) is that you can never have enough solar. 

How many kilowatts is your current array rated at and would 3 hours of day light be a good estimate for a short winter's day?

I'm plotting and scheming my own system and have been using the 3 hour daylight mark for planning.

 

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I do like this new Tripp design. It's been all test sailed and disassembled for storage/transport.

I was looking at the raising bulb keel. Nice tight tolerances through the hull. Shoal-ish draft at the touch of a button. 

Of course in that I sail along this lobster coast, with buoys and warp bouncing off my hull, if I lived in a Velcro loop lined house, would I wear a Velcro hook suit inside?

I don't think so, but I can still enjoy a well designed Velcro hook suit on a nice boat. 

IMG_3453.thumb.jpeg.ed9c51a1e4afbd47f971a66f13423b0b.jpeg

 

 

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I'm a drop-keel tech fan. My monohull designer friends laugh at me when I talk about how cool it would be to be able to let go of the keel if the boat was sinking. I tell them that if a drop keel can work then my idea can work too. I built the trunk for a Bieker designed drop-keel boat. It tapered at the bottom, so no way to let the lead go. I think I have photos of that.

DSC06945.jpeg

DSC06959.jpeg

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13 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I do like this new Tripp design. It's been all test sailed and disassembled for storage/transport.

I was looking at the raising bulb keel. Nice tight tolerances through the hull. Shoal-ish draft at the touch of a button. 

Of course in that I sail along this lobster coast, with buoys and warp bouncing off my hull, if I lived in a Velcro loop lined house, would I wear a Velcro hook suit inside?

I don't think so, but I can still enjoy a well designed Velcro hook suit on a nice boat. 

IMG_3453.thumb.jpeg.ed9c51a1e4afbd47f971a66f13423b0b.jpeg

 

 

That is a pot-catcher, for sure.

I have the same issue with IPS drives. Great for propeller efficiency, but....

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

1779520584_Kathsturkey.thumb.jpeg.f1392b3cd54c9351e920b04f3aec56ef.jpeg

So not sailing. Everybody at dinner today will be fully vaxxed, boosted, and acting like it is 2019(surreal, isn't it?). I'll be getting the tripod out and asking everyone to freeze and not move a muscle, for a 2 second exposure. They'll abide:

1716556205_Thanksgiving2018NobodyMove.thumb.jpg.3db94c1b0e6d74932aa1ce91ac3e4df7.jpg

 

 

 

there is always one cut up in the crowd (right side second from far end) :D

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As the cost -and value- of everything goes up around me, I realize our mooring fee hasn't changed in over 20 years. 988854908_ScreenShot2021-11-29at3_49_16PM.thumb.png.447f516c0d4777e5298ace96234f6f13.png

Storage on the public landing has doubled from $1 a sq. ft. to $2 in this time span. We don't get a lot with this space: A good water view and 50-60 knot gusts occasionally. But it is handy if you live in town. 

46505133_Cover2021.thumb.jpeg.cc905cacb2a7bb21a81939f117ad8d49.jpeg

Now, property values have risen so fast that a reassessment is in the works. The real world ends at the shoreline. 

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47 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

As the cost -and value- of everything goes up around me, I realize our mooring fee hasn't changed in over 20 years. 988854908_ScreenShot2021-11-29at3_49_16PM.thumb.png.447f516c0d4777e5298ace96234f6f13.png

Storage on the public landing has doubled from $1 a sq. ft. to $2 in this time span. We don't get a lot with this space: A good water view and 50-60 knot gusts occasionally. But it is handy if you live in town. 

46505133_Cover2021.thumb.jpeg.cc905cacb2a7bb21a81939f117ad8d49.jpeg

Now, property values have risen so fast that a reassessment is in the works. The real world ends at the shoreline. 

At least most of Maine recognizes what's really important. However, they do hammer you on property taxes on waterfront property.

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30 minutes ago, accnick said:

At least most of Maine recognizes what's really important. However, they do hammer you on property taxes on waterfront property.

You wouldn't say that if you lived in RI. My mom now pays more in yearly property taxes on her home than she originally paid for the home in 1960. 

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

You wouldn't say that if you lived in RI. My mom now pays more in yearly property taxes on her home than she originally paid for the home in 1960. 

Holy shit.

This is how people get evicted from homes that they actually own.

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On 11/29/2021 at 8:20 AM, Kris Cringle said:

My favorite sister in law is a great cook and my favorite bil is an artist. That is a good combination for feasting. 

2045371585_Thanksgivingdinner2021all2.thumb.jpg.37f7a12b8a8ece8a821952adf759c39e.jpg

 

Why does every damn thing you do look so wholesome, rustic and peaceful?  Your life is like an animated painting.

I showed my wife the photos of your dog wearing the hat, she nearly died laughing.

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6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

Why does every damn thing you do look so wholesome, rustic and peaceful?  Your life is like an animated painting.

I showed my wife the photos of your dog wearing the hat, she nearly died laughing.

I can't take any credit beyond putting the camera on a timer. My SIL is a designer/writer and my BIL is a half famous sculpture (this is their house in Rockport, they live in Brooklyn NY).

Say hello to your wife. I still remember our meet up in the harbor. It was great! 

http://www.stephenantonson.com/#landing

 

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36 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I can't take any credit beyond putting the camera on a timer. My SIL is a designer/writer and my BIL is a half famous sculpture (this is their house in Rockport, they live in Brooklyn NY).

Say hello to your wife. I still remember our meet up in the harbor. It was great! 

http://www.stephenantonson.com/#landing

 

Ah! A sculptor, rather than a sculpture. I was looking desperately at the photos to see what sculpture he might be. Thought there might be some sort of Pygmalion thing going here. 

Folks in Maine can develop odd obsessions over those long, cold winters...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, accnick said:

Ah! A sculptor, rather than a sculpture. I was looking desperately at the photos to see what sculpture he might be. Thought there might be some sort of Pygmalion thing going here. 

Folks in Maine can develop odd obsessions over those long, cold winters...

Sculptor, right. Well, in that room, the only piece of his plaster work are the sconces on the wall. He's a collector (near hoarder), of art, in all forms. 

 

Here's one of his larger pieces which was gifted to us (plaster chandelier), in our old house. 

It's a treasure, as well as this old oversized claw foot tub I took out of an old house.

This tub; with me, a glass of wine, perhaps company - in it, could qualify as an obsession during the lovely, crisp Maine winters.  

IMG_3465.thumb.jpeg.8b5f713da9e19c21e6bda43b0e4f9164.jpeg

 

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The 'wood' industry is huge. It includes everything from the building trades to furniture making.

I've met several highly skilled furniture crafts people and I'm struck by how hard it is to make a living at it.

Those that do are rare stars. Most move onto the periphery of the craft in teaching, opening schools, or even writing about this dilemma. 

I found with wood (restoring, building/changing housing), the more saw dust I made, the less $$ came from it. I stuck to big boards and fewer cuts, most of those cuts performed with no more than 1/8" accuracy. 

This furniture builder from the UK's book cover struck me as the perfect example of this 'wood' conundrum. I want to read it. 

 

600919380_ScreenShot2021-11-30at8_48_23AM.thumb.png.0e40aeb5d05b376396795b56b60e48db.png

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28 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

The 'wood' industry is huge. It includes everything from the building trades to furniture making.

I've met several highly skilled furniture crafts people and I'm struck by how hard it is to make a living at it.

Those that do are rare stars. Most move onto the periphery of the craft in teaching, opening schools, or even writing about this dilemma. 

I was struck by how the word 'food' could be substituted for 'wood' in your true statements. Very difficult to be a creator (chef, producer, farmer) on a small scale and make a good living at it. So many talented people work at it, and the lucky ones either scale it, or have a phenomenally successful small operation with a great local market, or move on to teach, write or film, etc. 

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On 11/21/2021 at 6:52 AM, Kris Cringle said:

if I lived in a Velcro loop lined house, would I wear a Velcro hook suit inside?

That was my idea for child care. But just one room lined with velcro, not the whole house.

With a stainless steel floor, sloping to a drain in the corner. You just hang the child on the wall and hose off the child when it's icky.

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On 11/21/2021 at 7:08 AM, Russell Brown said:

It tapered at the bottom, so no way to let the lead go.

If it's a bulb keel, explosive bolts in just the bulb. 

For launching the space shuttle it was held down with a number of 4" bolts (20 or 24?). They cracked the nuts with explosive charges (2 on opposite sides of the nut) rather than broke the bolts. Even if one charge failed the crack in the nut pretty much ensured the shuttle would go when the time came.

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When the designers at Alden Yacht located the Simpson Lawrence fireplaces on the head bulkhead, they had another idea in mind. 

2020575001_Birchinthefireplaceandagoodbook._.thumb.jpg.f3bf02d4b5114bd20234adab5e76a9f9.jpg

They cut the bulkhead out in the area of the firebox and mounted a bronze grill. This killed two birds with one stone: removing the flammable material and allowing heat into the head. 

The idea works. The head is the warmest place below when the stove is burning. 

725828686_Fireplaceheadvent.thumb.jpeg.9bde231a0255a56be0ae1d76e48d4acb.jpeg

 

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40 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

When the designers at Alden Yacht located the Simpson Lawrence fireplaces on the head bulkhead, they had another idea in mind. 

2020575001_Birchinthefireplaceandagoodbook._.thumb.jpg.f3bf02d4b5114bd20234adab5e76a9f9.jpg

They cut the bulkhead out in the area of the firebox and mounted a bronze grill. This killed two birds with one stone: removing the flammable material and allowing heat into the head. 

The idea works. The head is the warmest place below when the stove is burning. 

725828686_Fireplaceheadvent.thumb.jpeg.9bde231a0255a56be0ae1d76e48d4acb.jpeg

 

Field guides for the head wall...great idea! So much better than reading the CP bottle label for the umpteenth time.

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23 hours ago, Zonker said:

That was my idea for child care. But just one room lined with velcro, not the whole house.

With a stainless steel floor, sloping to a drain in the corner. You just hang the child on the wall and hose off the child when it's icky.

That was a little like how it worked when we lived in town in the 60s.  At least in the summer.  Kids just lived in swim suits and ran around outside getting dirty all day.  Before being admitted to the house, they were hosed off on the front step.  

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No joke. When living aboard our 30' boat our 11 month old daughter got covered with blueberries while eating them. She was a blue sticky mess.

My wife put her on the dock and hosed her off. The neighbours were of course horrified. 

It was summer so all good.

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I thought every kid got hosed off growing up!  There were 4 of us, and when we went to the beach we weren't allowed in the house until we had all been hosed off outside. We would fight to be first, in order to get the sun-warmed water in the hose before it turned cold.

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I was in a baptismal pool today, for the first time.

It's beneath the stage (in a big space that once was the church) of an old building I care for. Originally built as a Baptist church in 1850's, the 9,000sq. ft building has been a gallery for many decades.

The formal church fizzled at the turn of the last century (history I found) but there may have been a church here since but I'm not sure the date. 

The walls and most of the bottom appear to be zinc but the lowered pan is copper. All the seams are soldered with ample solder, mostly lead perhaps. This sort of metal work craft/skill is ancient (roofing mostly) so that doesn't help much. And the material has been protected from the elements. 

It doesn't look that old but then again, why would it? It's certainly hasn't been used since the 40-50's, if that. The base is in a crawl space so I haven't been able to inspect the outside. 

How old do you think it is? 

IMG_3475.thumb.jpeg.b87c09c462d1a9e9d1d5c78ab611fb44.jpeg

 

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Cheesiz, you mention anything about a boat in here, and you get a hundred opinions, even if you don't ask for one. 

I post a baptismal pool, and you fekkers disappear! 

Curiosity sent me into the crawl space to see if I could find some dating. The pool would weigh a lot to be full enough for the full monty dunk that the Baptists say they need (I've been doing my research). 

Here's a clue: The builders used 2 old sections of RR track as I-beams, with thick planks laid on the tracks, as the foundation on stone, to support the weight of pool. 

IMG_3480.thumb.jpeg.e4761b9fadac8cdcb9fe02b12b98aa7b.jpeg

 

This is telling because Rockport had a narrow gauge RR that moved lime to kilns along the harbor to waiting schooners. The lime business had a long run but ended at the turn of the last century and miles of track were removed. Ready made I-beams c.1900. 

Any idea of what made that ragged cut?

Even though the original baptist church ended here at about the same time (1900), what has gone on since, is hazy. But it's clear that someone used this pool after 1950, about when the Grundfos Pump company started up. Had to be baptisms; would anyone use that as a hot tub? 

 

Any plumbing from here is long gone. I would love to see the original set up that may have heated water via a coal furnace. 

 

IMG_3478.thumb.jpeg.c6f27b7e6551d636148e44f9a83af2a9.jpeg

Ok, back to pepper grinders,...

 

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There is or was something similar in the old church in our town.  Ca. 1890's, I think.  No idea about the construction, haven't laid eyes on it in fifty years.  That part of the "basement" was crawlspace over native basalt with enough pockets and gullies in it to make some little "rooms." Kids used to say it was the way to Hell.  I seem to recall they had to go to some effort to stabilize the structure since then.  

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24 minutes ago, WillyT123 said:

My bet on the railroad tie is oxy-acetylene torch

Quite possibly, but flame cutting with oxy-acetylene was only developed in the early 1900s. I believe using electric arcs with DC electric supply was common prior to 1900. It kind of depends when Kris' bizzarereligiousritual tub was installed...

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