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Multihulls - What's your Favorite Flavor?


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So after a lengthy absence (closing in on a decade) of posting to this illustrious anarchistic cloud-based diatribe, I notice that there seems to be no absence of pessimistic comments about some multihulls.  I'm not saying that isn't without merit, as that is being discussed elsewhere.

However, my point is where are the anarchists talking about their favorite multihulls?  Yes, sprinkled here and there, you might find a gem of a comment; but scattered they are.  So let’s hear from you hedonistic types anchored in remote shallow waters…

So, I'll start.  Although I am fond of the French Marsaudon Composites Group (TS/ORC whatever your favorite acronym is), I think others are in better position to comment on them.  But their resume is impressive (I saw Mouse Trap once at Rob-the-Rich). 

So my first offering is the Stealth Design line out of Asia Catamarans.  I like some of the subtleties that Alan and Roger put into their work.  I particularly like how they don't spell out all of their features on the website (kind of a secret sauce thing to protect their IP).  So you have to have a bit of a keen eye.  One of the better ones I like is the completely retractable outboard system they have (no nacelle) that I’ve recently also noticed on a Schionning.  And I do think the mast bulkhead geometry is unique, not your typical right-angle arrangement.  They might not have originated these aspects in modern boats, but they are using them.  Oh, yes and they are fast to boot!
 

Phantom-Asia.jpg

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36 minutes ago, Ruminator said:

So my first offering is the Stealth Design line out of Asia Catamarans.

But I heard here recently that their "Rudder connection system sucks.":

 

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Good point, thanks for bringing it up.  A pointer/shortcut/link to a recent thread is always good too.  Might be some more gems in the vast library contained here.

 

32 minutes ago, ProaSailor said:

But I heard here recently that their "Rudder connection system sucks.":

... "On 8/4/2021 at 4:57 PM longly said:

Yes, Asia catamarans. Very well concieved/built boats (expect for this one issue).  Most have a fair bit of owner customization. They don't use this cross system any more (may have been just this boat) I'd buy on for myself."

 

Cheers!

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13 minutes ago, martin 'hoff said:

Love Tres Simple. A TS-42 or a TS-5.

Hard to argue with the successes on these hulls!  What are your thoughts on the 57?  Or would you prefer to withhold judgement until October (current published launch time frame)?

Also, any thoughts on the new branding?  I think everyone is currently on Holiday, but if anyone from Marsaudon reads this: "ORC branding is not your friend".  Might just be me... probably is.

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11 hours ago, ProaSailor said:

But I heard here recently that their "Rudder connection system sucks.":

They use a different (better) system for more than 7 years already.

What I like about the Stealth cat is the high build quality, the new retractable outboard system with ‚3D plug’, and it is super light at just 3.5to (Stealth 13). These are designed for warmer climates (great ventilation), TS-42 and TS-5 more for the Atlantic circle. Both companies have a strong focus on racers. Let‘s not forget the Dazcats, but very expensive.

Two Tillers vs. two wheels - I like both systems. One of the few things I don‘t like about the TS is the completely unprotected steering position (very wet) … and It can be painful doing business with french guys.

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Favorite Flavor?

I would prefer more "complex flavor",  not just the boat appearance (design)! 

At least higher grade (better) construction materials + experienced/reliable Yard is what ALSO "must be served" to me!  

Sure this all together gives less choices, but final one goes much better balanced!

 

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Great boats,  great bang for buck due to cheaper Asian cost to build.

Hard to compare with other boats because each boat is owner customised. I raced extensively on a recent boat and found many of the systems too light in the interest of speed.  Lots of lashings,  soft shackles, felt like string theory.  The retractable outboard system was messy and helped cause a bit of damage to the boat when we couldn't get motors going fast enough when shit got real. 

But oh so comfortable to cruise/race, and in a blue water race doing 26.6 knots upwind double reefed with no jib in 35 knots of wind was pretty special. 

I would buy one in a heartbeat,  with very specific demands. 

 

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More details please ^^^ especially about the 26.6 kts upwind!!

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5 hours ago, steelmadesteamer said:

I would prefer more "complex flavor",  not just the boat appearance (design)! 

At least higher grade (better) construction materials + experienced/reliable Yard is what ALSO "must be served" to me!  

Sure this all together gives less choices, but final one goes much better balanced!

With these criteria set, who meets this goal for you?

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4 hours ago, plywoodboy said:

felt like string theory.

Both quite humorous and an illustrative comment! 

I presume that during said experiences the vessel was lightly loaded (?).  And as such do you recall the bridge deck clearance?

Thanks!

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15 hours ago, Ruminator said:

With these criteria set, who meets this goal for you?

Starting of classic Lerouge followed by Schionning/Grainger boats built by any of a very few my favorite Yards in this  or Southern Hemisphere wud be fine for me.  

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51 minutes ago, Max Rockatansky said:

Mojo…

Nice call. 

Great designer + great build team = great multihull.

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7 minutes ago, Justaquickone said:

If I won the lottery a Banalus MC60sq would push all my buttons .

Another good call.

But don't lie to a fellow (if you won the lottery) that 90 would bear your name!

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On 8/7/2021 at 2:24 PM, Ruminator said:

I particularly like how they don't spell out all of their features on the website (kind of a secret sauce thing to protect their IP).

Barf. Build quality at the factory is much more important than keeping some "ip" secret lol. 

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7 hours ago, Justaquickone said:

 Banalus MC60sq would push all my buttons .

 

Agree!

Also with Banuls / MC in mind and because of age (?)  I would be able to exchange extra (cat) room for a better (tri) performance. 

53' FINN could fit then!

 

 

 

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Actual title response-my favorite flavor of multihull is a small trailerable trimaran set up for single handing.  Something easy and quick to setup, points well to weather, roller furling jib and spinnaker, tow weight small enough for a typical SUV.  Boomless and self tacking jib are a nice addition.   

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On 8/8/2021 at 3:14 AM, Mordoc said:

They use a different (better) system for more than 7 years already.

What I like about the Stealth cat is the high build quality, the new retractable outboard system with ‚3D plug’, and it is super light at just 3.5to (Stealth 13). These are designed for warmer climates (great ventilation), TS-42 and TS-5 more for the Atlantic circle. Both companies have a strong focus on racers. Let‘s not forget the Dazcats, but very expensive.

Two Tillers vs. two wheels - I like both systems. One of the few things I don‘t like about the TS is the completely unprotected steering position (very wet) … and It can be painful doing business with french guys.

I think the TS/ORC boats are also oriented for the tropics as AFAIK the default is for a fabric rear to the bridgedeck same as the Asia Cats. I can see the idea but to me it is risky  if you don't have watertight doors to the hulls as you could get water, criminals, bugs, or other invaders into the boat. I'm not sure if either have a Seawind style trifold door which I'm a big fan of as well.

Both lines to me are pretty nice. You get a lot of customization, they're proven quick, they seem to be good value for the $$, they're both attractive to me.

I prefer the transverse bunk orientation, the use of outboards of the Stealths

I prefer the watertight doors of the TS42

The Stealths are amazingly light, I wonder what ISO Category they fall under?

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Stealth cats have a three panel door which folds up against the ceiling when full open. Very light, one person operation. In rough weather, door down, use either side opening door to get in/out.

Don't know who used this system first.

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On 8/12/2021 at 2:33 AM, Speng said:

I think the TS/ORC boats are also oriented for the tropics as AFAIK the default is for a fabric rear to the bridgedeck same as the Asia Cats. I can see the idea but to me it is risky  if you don't have watertight doors to the hulls as you could get water, criminals, bugs, or other invaders into the boat. I'm not sure if either have a Seawind style trifold door which I'm a big fan of as well.

Both lines to me are pretty nice. You get a lot of customization, they're proven quick, they seem to be good value for the $$, they're both attractive to me.

I prefer the transverse bunk orientation, the use of outboards of the Stealths

I prefer the watertight doors of the TS42

The Stealths are amazingly light, I wonder what ISO Category they fall under?

Agree......but as said above they have a great hinge up door now......... throw in the Dazcats... and Schioning G series boats..... but bang for buck on a new boat would go to the Asia Cats
If semi rich... TS5 for me

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My first multihull was a Hobie 16. My first Trimaran was a Tremolino.  I became a devoted Newick fan because that boat was so fun to sail.  Sailing on two different Vals and a Tricia only deepened my devotion to all things Newick.  I know that they are very old designs but, to me, they are classics that won't ever go out of style.

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On 8/11/2021 at 8:20 AM, MultiThom said:

Actual title response-my favorite flavor of multihull is a small trailerable trimaran set up for single handing.  Something easy and quick to setup, points well to weather, roller furling jib and spinnaker, tow weight small enough for a typical SUV.  Boomless and self tacking jib are a nice addition.   

 

2 hours ago, unShirley said:

My first multihull was a Hobie 16. My first Trimaran was a Tremolino.  I became a devoted Newick fan because that boat was so fun to sail.  Sailing on two different Vals and a Tricia only deepened my devotion to all things Newick.  I know that they are very old designs but, to me, they are classics that won't ever go out of style.

MultiThom,   I couldn't agree more about a trailerable tri.

unShirley,   Russell worked with Newick on different projects and Dick's Tremolino influence can be seen in Russell's small tri build. It is a very old design but, to me, it is a classic that won't ever go out of style.

Russell's Trimaran.jpg

Russell's tri 2.jpg

KIMG0031 (1280x960).jpg

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A lighter boat makes for a more pleasurable sail on any multihull (well, OK, makes the chop harder to get through).  Newicks are light for their length, Humdinger is light for its length.  Amazing to do this "back then".  Production multihulls seem to glom on the gelcoat for a "pretty" finish at the detriment for sailing enjoyment.   Makes sense for production companies, they are selling toys and folks don't want ugly toys.  

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11 hours ago, vokstar said:

Was very surprised that GB48's weren't mentioned.. Especially since there is one for sale too. Not my boat so you don't get to see my norks. 

https://au.yachtworld.com/yacht/2008-gunboat-48-7930213/

There is plenty of love for the GB's, HH's and Chris White designs on these forums. They are all great boats in their own unique way. Unfortunately, most are out of the budget of even the moderately wealthy. The GB48 posted above is probably the closest to reality for the 1.5%, but still a pretty penny and in the "dream boat" category for most of us!

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17 hours ago, vokstar said:

Was very surprised that GB48's weren't mentioned.. Especially since there is one for sale too. Not my boat so you don't get to see my norks. 

https://au.yachtworld.com/yacht/2008-gunboat-48-7930213/

this GB is as good as it gets..... I felt the poster was talking about lower end ($500k - $1m) performance production boats like Asia Cats that are bordering on racer - cruiser .... BTW... GB's are arguably No. 1 ... HH has tried to be GB but they have had some serious build issues (de lam) and for me they are not as pretty.... Chris White are not in the same performance bracket.....  I'd go cruising on 888 888.profile.thumb.jpg.4fc796c7071f1ce5ee592cd6b2c3f6dc.jpg

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Both SA built GB's I viewed getting worked on at Westerly (California) had 10's of de-lam repairs per hull. On boat was finished & sailed out of SA, the other was a hull& deck left unfinished when Gunboat SA went bust. Comments from most involved were these were common issues.

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Ok, I was not aware of these..... In saying all this, de-lam issues is a worry but they are building lightweight structures that are likely to get pushed harder than the average production cat in a regatta environment at times...... 
I will say it again.... these Stealth cats are excellent bang for buck 

 

 

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I had a part in bringing "GaleForce' (as seen in vid) to SoCal. Purchase price was mid 200K, shipping another 80K, upgrades/repairs once here about 30K.

 I have no idea what a new one costs.

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On 8/16/2021 at 5:06 PM, Ruminator said:

Thus far no votes for GunBoat, HH, Chris White, etc. 

Interesting...

Not sure about HH, but CW and GB both have fwd cockpits. No.

The CW ( IIRC an A42) that I have been aboard didn’t appeal to me at all (interior layout sucked and didn’t like its anchor setup), and I’ve been aboard a couple GB at the Miami shows and didn’t like them either (things like lines run under panels, giant windows)

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I like the helm set up on the Alibi 54.

Articulating wheels/binnacles on port/starboard, each with three positions...outboard seated at the rail, standing middle position on deck, and inboard protected down on the cockpit floor (looking through the cabin). Balance cats seem to have gone for the articulating set up in some models, though with one wheel.

One of the semi customized boats on the market beats some of the above mentioned in the looks department, at least to my eye.

Their were 11 built, and most of the owners swapped the retractable rudders and the original electric engines for diesels.

I also like the rather unique bow dinghy launching system, which clears up clutter from the stern, both giving people a well earned view at sundowners time and keeping the stern sexy for onlookers.

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22 hours ago, fufkin said:

I like the helm set up on the Alibi 54.

A lot of good design aspects (probably before their time...) with the Alibi.  Always wanted that forward tender nacelle to work, but I always thought it might a.) slam in rough seas and b.) be the 'terror' to disembark (even while sober).  Love the hidey-hole hatch between the skippers berth and the saloon (as shown in that 2011 model that recently sold).  In fact, that 2011 unit cleaned up nice and was really looking sharp!

I always thought it humorous/interesting that certain folks associated with the Balance Catamaran Group claimed to have 'invented' the articulating binnacle for the multilocation helms, when obviously it was in the public domain long before Balance came to the market....

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OK, let's stir the pot, then I'm off to enjoy some 'crispy' Southern Florida weather (outside, against my wishes, not on a boat, etc.) this Saturday afternoon.

McConaghy Boats: moths, mono's and cats wooo-hooo baby!  Or not wooo-hooo?...  

Since I never placed a price $$$ limit on your vision of a perfect multihull when I started this thread - what are the thoughts on McConaghy bigger cats?

I really think the MC60 is perhaps the best looking cat with a fly bridge.  Perhaps not perfect, but a very, very nice offering.  Although I must admit the MC90 is the swagger.  If they made that twin helm version in a 60-70ft version I buy it (after some inheritance or robbing a bank).

 

Happy Weekend SA ruffians!

MC60.JPG

MC90.JPG

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3 hours ago, Ruminator said:

I really think the MC60 is perhaps the best looking cat with a fly bridge.

Differing opinions are great, it reeeeallly doesn't do it for me though, I would say I find it hideous! All the sharp bits sticking out and "stepped" lines really don't work for me!
I find the GB68 to be the best looking big cat out there (no flybridge though but the 72 still looks good, especially if you lowered the gooseneck a couple of feet to only have standing headroom at the back). It would still look really clean if chopped of 6ft of bow and a couple feet from the back! The MC-90 looks a lot better...

I always like the Alibi and it seems like it was ahead of its time when you look at the latest performance oriented cats out there, not sure how the tender storage would pan out in "real-life", but it seems like a neat solution. Curious how how much it would risk getting plowed through green water and ripped away (although maybe it just gets pushed up and "wedged in place", as long as it doesn't get swamped it's probably ok? I wondered if you could use the dinghy as an "outboard sled" as emergency propulsion (when the all electric system craps out...)

I find the stern arrangement of the MC-60 really scary from a seaworthiness point of view though: there's a tender lift that is level with the aft deck and goes right up to the transom so there is literally nothing stopping a following breaking wave from slamming in the rear sliding doors and there is no stern sticking out to start lifting the back of the boat, and it's really not high above the water to start with! This dinghy is going to end up in the "living room" (with the wave that carried it) sooner rather than later either in heavy weather or just going through a bar/pass with following swell!


McConaghy-60-multihull-in-Cannes-2018-9.

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5 hours ago, Airwick said:

Differing opinions are great,

I am WITH that as well. 

Thing shifted a bit from building a boat to designing a "wow-effect" creature. WHY NOT, really? Guests are guaranteed to feel happy while a short time aboard! :)

I would only wish Owners of "new style" boats to remain clever enough not testing them offshore when some winds are expected. 

 

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Way under budget compared to most of the cats in this thread, but I’ve always had a fondness for Shuttleworth designs since seeing a new Tek 35 on our first cruise in 92.

8AD739A1-F0E9-4E4E-9187-B71BE8E8BFE4.png

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3 hours ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

I completely missed this Alibi 54.... It's could be my dream boat with some added features 

Those first Alibi days days and months I was totally sunk in its pictures and videos trying to study every smallest detail. I fell head over heels in love with her (pictures). Until one day is was onboard. This shower was really cold. I found what my imagination can do with me. What I touched by my hands in reality killed my love completely. Just good memory of Alibi pictures remains somewhere deep  inside of me. Thanks PIL66 for refreshing my sweet memories!

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Interesting that there are only cats noted.  For the wife and I, at this stage in our life, while we used ti own cats, we have now picked a tri (over a cat).  Love the tri.  Would be hard to go back but as life changes its possible.  But for now the tri has everything we want and nothing we don't.

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5 hours ago, Wess said:

while we used ti own cats, we have now picked a tri (over a cat).  Love the tri.  Would be hard to go back 

Starting with smaller dinghies and shifting to a larger cruising monos (together with changes in life), years later moving to cats and feeling totally happy with that, these days (and age) my thoughts are deeper and deeper ... on a tri! 

1-2-...3 seems logical! :)

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5 hours ago, steelmadesteamer said:

Starting with smaller dinghies and shifting to a larger cruising monos (together with changes in life), years later moving to cats and feeling totally happy with that, these days (and age) my thoughts are deeper and deeper ... on a tri! 

1-2-...3 seems logical! :)

There are a lot of benefits to tris, especially to the Corsairs.  We have a big one and love it.  Honestly don't think there is any other boat that can do what our tri can...

  * Fun and responsive to sail; does 20 knots plus

  * Sleeps 4 easily in two separate staterooms

  * Standing headroom, hot and cold pressure water, functional head and shower, nice galley (fridge and freezer) and salon.

  * Self sustaining and can live on hook indefinitely (until you run out of food)

  * When bored with the east coast, fold it up, put it on a trailer, and drive it to the west coast

  * Unsinkable

  * All in for under $200K

The funny thing is we had a 7 figure budget for a new (to us) performance cruising catamaran.  Turns out we needed far less money to have far more fun and function.

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5 hours ago, Wess said:

There are a lot of benefits to tris, especially to the Corsairs.  We have a big one and love it.  Honestly don't think there is any other boat that can do what our tri can...

  * Fun and responsive to sail; does 20 knots plus

  * Sleeps 4 easily in two separate staterooms

  * Standing headroom, hot and cold pressure water, functional head and shower, nice galley (fridge and freezer) and salon.

  * Self sustaining and can live on hook indefinitely (until you run out of food)

  * When bored with the east coast, fold it up, put it on a trailer, and drive it to the west coast

  * Unsinkable

  * All in for under $200K

The funny thing is we had a 7 figure budget for a new (to us) performance cruising catamaran.  Turns out we needed far less money to have far more fun and function.

You got me on the trailer ability but our all in was under $100k. Don’t get me wrong the trailer ability is something I frequently think about, especially during hurricane season!

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On 8/17/2021 at 7:20 PM, PIL66 - XL2 said:

GB's are arguably No. 1 ... HH has tried to be GB but they have had some serious build issues (de lam) and for me they are not as pretty.... Chris White are not in the same performance bracket..... 

Disagree with this post. The GB's have the most fan following because of the camaraderie amongst the various owners. I think that's a real positive for the brand. Some of the build quality has some hiccups, but the French built boats are adhering to quality IMHO. CW boats have the same camaraderie, they just don't make videos and post them. They're just out sailing and grinning. Two years ago you had 7 CW's leave outta Newport and sail to Bermuda. Good natured bantering followed everyone's arrival into port.

I disagree on the performance bracket piece and here's why. Most of the times when I GB or an HH is turbo-up they've got folks manning the main and the jib. Do the same with a 57 and you'll get the same if not better performance. The fastest 57 out there is Cerulean because she's damn light, HEKLA most probably right behind her.

I will tell you that the most important thing to watch on the performance side is hull layup, too much faring and the boat gets heavy quickly. 

For speed I'll take Skylark (72) over all. That boat is wicked quick. 

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Some of my favourite boats in no particular order.

Seacart 30 image.thumb.png.b69a8a5c99745216b6ae14928a70e18d.png

All thre Multi 50's image.thumb.png.716be782bb23bbe8bf6c6a5b35803384.png

Formula 40's image.png.170f934d12305a295e2e6ea570758e36.png

This thing image.png.4c79ae78b908a52c1535dd1ac8ab165c.png

Venom Grainger 42 image.thumb.png.6263428e8e7bdc7a5d37f2f963d5863d.png

Black Marlin image.png.ad4744162c319245af202c8e97a30dd6.png

Morpheus Sailing and Yachting Photo Gallery

Gunboat From Sailing's Hallowed Arena - #NYYC175 on VaiVai | Gunboat

Paradox

image.png

Extreme 40

image.png

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  • 1 month later...

I noticed that while quite a few bigger cats were mentioned, there seems to be a lack of bigger tris that are appealing to the audience.
Anything out there in the performance cruising camp other than Finn and Venom ? Throw in the Rapido 60 …

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On 8/7/2021 at 2:24 PM, Ruminator said:

So after a lengthy absence (closing in on a decade) of posting to this illustrious anarchistic cloud-based diatribe, I notice that there seems to be no absence of pessimistic comments about some multihulls.  I'm not saying that isn't without merit, as that is being discussed elsewhere.

However, my point is where are the anarchists talking about their favorite multihulls?  Yes, sprinkled here and there, you might find a gem of a comment; but scattered they are.  So let’s hear from you hedonistic types anchored in remote shallow waters…

So, I'll start.  Although I am fond of the French Marsaudon Composites Group (TS/ORC whatever your favorite acronym is), I think others are in better position to comment on them.  But their resume is impressive (I saw Mouse Trap once at Rob-the-Rich). 

So my first offering is the Stealth Design line out of Asia Catamarans.  I like some of the subtleties that Alan and Roger put into their work.  I particularly like how they don't spell out all of their features on the website (kind of a secret sauce thing to protect their IP).  So you have to have a bit of a keen eye.  One of the better ones I like is the completely retractable outboard system they have (no nacelle) that I’ve recently also noticed on a Schionning.  And I do think the mast bulkhead geometry is unique, not your typical right-angle arrangement.  They might not have originated these aspects in modern boats, but they are using them.  Oh, yes and they are fast to boot!
 

Phantom-Asia.jpg

Can you give a bit more details on that outboard arrangement on the Stealth? It seems intriguing...

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There are a few photos of an Asia Cat (or 2) on the recently run St Helena Cup facebook page if you have time to kill... here's one, I did see one from astern too, but not sure which site. This one seemed to have simple slides with the OBs being raised vertically. 

No photo description available.

 

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A couple of strings to pull here:

1.  There is this video (a bit dry) but Alan talks about their "3D plug" and he starts to make some motions with his hands, but then never shows it or completely describes it either.  Asia Catamarans - Interview with Alan Carwardine - Behind the Beams Ep5 - YouTube

2.  I think longy perhaps has seen this feature (see his posts above).  You might try sending him a PM.

3.  I have also heard that some previous editions had a hull section similar to a bow thruster.  The pic is of a Schionning, but like the Seawind tri-fold door - it's hard to know for sure who did it first.  Strong cross-pollination in Oceania there seems to have been.

 

Schionning ob.jpg

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7 hours ago, Happy Wolf said:

there seems to be a lack of bigger tris that are appealing to the audience.

Kinda an open-ended statement.  Are you looking for more examples?  Or were you wanting to promote some examples or design features?  If so, type away!

BTW: Shockwave is a Marsaudon masterpiece, but Mr. Grainger's Venom is also rightfully excellent as well.

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Amazing machine.

Peter Aschenbrenner's 63' trimaran Paradox is blasting round the course of the RORC Caribbean 600 photo copyright RORC / Tim Wright / www.photoaction.com taken at Royal Ocean Racing Club and featuring the Trimaran class

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Still looking for the perfect multi for Hawaii's rough seas and strong winds.  Started out on a Hobie 16, but that's just not something for the open ocean IMO.  Was looking for a bigger cat, to get outside the reef, when I stumbled on my Horstmann 31 Tri.   Lots right  Lele for this location.  Huge freeboard, huge reserve boyancy in the AMAs, tough as nails, inexpensive enough that you don't need a loan or any insurance other than what the state requires, and not too expensive for a slip, though since it is not folding, it cannot be just any slip.   Big enough to camp if you want to, and big enough to go inter-island, though I doubt I would go further than that on it.  Small enough to single hand easily. Downside: faster would be a lot better.  Not just because fast is fun, but because I would really need a week to go Kauai and back.  If that could truly be cut in half it could be done on a long weekend and become a ton more viable.   Also, 31 feet is just enough for inter island, I think, but not long distance voyaging.  If I could go just a bit bigger and a lot faster while remaining rough ocean capable it would be very appealing.  I watching the development of the small Rapido with interest.  But the big motivation would be extra speed, and I'm not sure I really believe I would see that much more speed.  On the Horstmann I am often more limited by ocean conditions than anything else, so I am looking forward to finding out what the small Rapido can really do in rough seas.  Not looking for folding because I try to get out once a week or so, and any extra time with setup and teardown would be a problem.  I can start my motor, throw off the lines, be away from the dock in a few minutes, and sort out sail covers, bumpers etc while heading towards the channel.  Would not want to give that up.

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Alan/Stealth has done several different installs that I am aware of. On the smaller boats, outb'd is on tracksrunning across stern step. Slide aft, than rotate down. On the 13m model, install like the Schionning - vertical in an hull well, with a hull close off panel attached to the bottom of the motor. My client wanted a instant use/less hassle option, his boat has Yanmar's with saildrives

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