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7 hours ago, estarzinger said:

yes.

I would suggest 'the answer' is not to go shorter, but to go offshore, no stops, less traffic, is overall much easier/faster mileage and go further - nicer, more reward.

I know that is not for everyone - but is worth a try because someone might then discover it actually works for them.

2 weeks vacation is unfortunately difficult to work with - awkward timeframe.

That was one of our big challenges before we left cruising - two weeks isn't nearly enough, never mind a week.

It took years of convincing to get my wife to take a two week block off in the summer. She didn't like all the lead-up to leaving for one week, in her case it meant a lot of (medically appropriate) inductions before she left, and when she got back a bunch of women who were practically standing on their heads with their legs crossed to keep from delivering when their favorite doctor was away. That, and a four-foot stack of charts from patients who called while she was gone. Two weeks would mean she'd almost certainly miss deliveries, since she usually had 15-20 in any given month.

When I finally convinced her to take two weeks is when we finally got to Maine. Two weeks was a massive transformation in our cruising range, because you could spend a couple of days getting there and still enjoy being there. It still wasn't long enough, but it was a start. If memory serves, we sailed RI to Onset, then to P-Town, then straight up to Maine from there, stopping first in Tenant's harbor then making our way to Mt. Dessert Island by way of Vinalhaven.

Coming from the Chesapeake, you're going to need two+ weeks, I think even if you go offshore. Even to do southern New England justice.

But coming down south once we started cruising, we sailed from Block Island to the C&D canal nonstop, and finally dropped anchor just outside the canal after dark. That didn't waste much time at all.

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Just now, Elegua said:

It only take me a morning to get down the river and I'm at my destination and I find two weeks to be tight. Just when everyone is into the routine, time to stop. 

 

Was out three weeks this summer - about 6 months too short, really.  2 1/2 weeks in, I’m finally getting into the groove.  The kid had to be back to work coaching sailing after a week into our little 3 week outing, so we had to be somewhere logistically easy, not some remote-ish island, for her to get back home from at the end of a week.  So, then we had two weeks on our own, the two of us - barely enough time for much of anything interesting. Next year, we’ll  allot four weeks to get up to Haida Gwaii and back.  Just enough time? (Kid has graduated now, won’t necessarily want to come with us?  So will have a freer schedule.). Year after that, I’ll take off several months for Hawaii and back (ideally via San Fran).  (Time.  There’s never enough of it. You know that lyric from the old David Bowie song, “Time takes a cigarette, puts it in your mouth /
You pull on your finger, then another finger, then your cigarette”)

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10 hours ago, estarzinger said:

My parents had 2 (full size) vermont barns.  And they were literally filled floor to hay loft with ... stuff. Some of it very nice, some of it 'historic' but of no use, some of it very beat up but could have been very nice with refinishing/rebuilding, very little pure junk. 

I called my sister and told her to come up and take whatever she wanted.  She came up thinking she would send a few boxes back to her home - but she started accumulating a pretty big stack and asked me how she was every going to get it back to NYC - I took her to U-Haul and rented her a medium size truck and gave her two hours of truck driving lessons, she filled it pretty much right up and managed to get back to NYC without an accident.  I have no idea what she did with it all because she has a one bedroom condo.

Then I called an estate sale place, and told them to take anything/everything they would give me at least a dollar for.

Then a dozen trips to local goodwill sort of places until they told me to stop, for anything that was still functional/useful.

Books were a serious problem - no-one wanted them anymore - my father was a college prof (and a climber) and had a world class collection of 1st edition political science and mountain books.  Those were the only thing I put in a shed and worked on finding homes for - could not bear to toss them - ultimately found a London rare book dealer who flew over and took quite a bit of them.

Then I lost count, but 8+ dumpsters.

hmmm . . .oh, I lied, yea we still have a shed of stuff my sister said she would find homes for but never has.

It was a full summer project.  The only saving grace was that my father was VERY organized - everything was neatly stored and labeled, much of it (like the books) with original receipts inside the dust jackets.

I am trying very hard not to replicate this outcome for Beth and I - we at least dont have shed and barns full of stuff we dont use.

My first wife's parents. House is filled, garage is filled. Inherited the family home (father was an only child). It's filled. The garage there is filled. They're in their late 80's.

I'm still on quite good terms with first wife. Somehow I have this nasty sinking feeling that when the time comes, I'm going to get sucked into the vortex. Which I'm prepared to do, but only if I get to do it my way.

Which probably won't happen on past experience, so I'll go home and there will be a lot of bad feelings. I can just see it coming and I don't like it at all.

Might be time to go sailing somewhere totally out of reach of modern comms... assuming I can GET home sometime soon. This State border control thing is getting old. Very, very old.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Was out three weeks this summer - about 6 months too short, really.  2 1/2 weeks in, I’m finally getting into the groove.  The kid had to be back to work coaching sailing after a week into our little 3 week outing, so we had to be somewhere logistically easy, not some remote-ish island, for her to get back home from at the end of a week.  So, then we had two weeks on our own, the two of us - barely enough time for much of anything interesting. Next year, we’ll  allot four weeks to get up to Haida Gwaii and back.  Just enough time? (Kid has graduated now, won’t necessarily want to come with us?  So will have a freer schedule.). Year after that, I’ll take off several months for Hawaii and back (ideally via San Fran).  (Time.  There’s never enough of it. You know that lyric from the old David Bowie song, “Time takes a cigarette, puts it in your mouth /
You pull on your finger, then another finger, then your cigarette”)

It takes me about a week just to turn off, "work mode". Next year we plan to be full-time. My son loves all sorts of sailing, (as does his GF), so I expect to see him/them if works permits and we go somewhere interesting.  My daughter is a good sailor but sailing is not her thing. We might see her, but more likely on trips home. 

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Was out three weeks this summer - about 6 months too short, really.  2 1/2 weeks in, I’m finally getting into the groove.  The kid had to be back to work coaching sailing after a week into our little 3 week outing, so we had to be somewhere logistically easy, not some remote-ish island, for her to get back home from at the end of a week.  So, then we had two weeks on our own, the two of us - barely enough time for much of anything interesting. Next year, we’ll  allot four weeks to get up to Haida Gwaii and back.  Just enough time? (Kid has graduated now, won’t necessarily want to come with us?  So will have a freer schedule.). Year after that, I’ll take off several months for Hawaii and back (ideally via San Fran).  (Time.  There’s never enough of it. You know that lyric from the old David Bowie song, “Time takes a cigarette, puts it in your mouth /
You pull on your finger, then another finger, then your cigarette”)

The main reason we left when we did - at age 46 - was to have our kids (then 12 & 15) with us for a while. We tried to get out a year earlier, but there was much freaking out when my wife announced her retirement and they convinced us to stay another year.

Getting the kids with us, even for only three years with our oldest, was absolutely worth it. Waiting a decade, sure we would have had a lot more money in the bank. But you can't use that money to buy back the experience we'd have missed with the kids, nor the good things it did for our relationship with them.

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On 8/13/2021 at 3:04 PM, T sailor said:

So, I didn’t want to hijack Ajax’s thread, but am having similar feelings after just finishing our month long sojourn around Maine and New England.  First, thanks to all who shared advice and suggestions as we planned for this trip (accnick, Cruisin Loser, Kris Cringle, Elegua and others).  I think I have concluded that Maine may be the best cruising on the East Coast, at least for my tastes. I see how some people just leave their boats there for the winter.  Not to mention Nova Scotia and New Foundland are within reach if something new is needed....
 

This trip went better than expected with my whole family wishing we had more time on the boat.  Now I am trying to figure out what next???   Can’t afford the time off to do this again anytime soon and cruising the Chesapeake just doesn’t hold the same appeal.  
 

A Bermuda race is on the horizon (probably 2024) but that doesn’t involve the family like this did.  Maybe next summer I could take 2 weeks off but can’t get too far from here in that time...  maybe do the Chesapeake early before it is too hot but I have a hard time getting excited about that.  I would love to do Bahamas but figure I would need 3 months for that.  Probably can’t manage something like that for several more years...  

I am venting more than looking for advice but at least wanted to give thanks to all who offered suggestions on my trip.

Do the Halifax race then  a Canada cruise 

I prefer Canada to Maine ….  Nova Scotia and the gulf of st Lawrence are very good for family cruising  

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4 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Do the Halifax race then  a Canada cruise 

I prefer Canada to Maine ….  Nova Scotia and the gulf of st Lawrence are very good for family cruising  

Lake Winnipeg is supposed to be quite nice, and Lake Diefenbaker is fun. Not much in Alberta, but once you get to BC it's excellent.

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12 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Do the Halifax race then  a Canada cruise 

I prefer Canada to Maine ….  Nova Scotia and the gulf of st Lawrence are very good for family cruising  

No lobster pots in the summer. The Bras D'Or are magic. 

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12 hours ago, Elegua said:

It takes me about a week just to turn off, "work mode". Next year we plan to be full-time. My son loves all sorts of sailing, (as does his GF), so I expect to see him/them if works permits and we go somewhere interesting.  My daughter is a good sailor but sailing is not her thing. We might see her, but more likely on trips home. 

Yeah, but your son and his GF will be sailing with ME!!! :lol:  

They're now part of the cult of Restive

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1 minute ago, Cruisin Loser said:

No lobster pots in the summer. The Bras D'Or are magic. 

There can be deep sea lobster pots off the southern edge of Nova Scotia on the direct path between Halifax and Maine.

I’ve spent time attached to one delivering a boat back to the US after a Marblehead-Halifax race.

Let’s just say the water is very cold.

 

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I was friggin' STUNNED to see pot buoys in 300 feet of water.  The helm must be vigilant a long way from shore.

@Elegua It took me 13 days to switch off "work mode."  I kept waiting with a sense of dread for texts or a phone call from work about some problem or other. Thankfully, that never occurred and I was very grateful.

I clearly remember the moment that my relief valve popped.  We were anchored off Monroe Island and had just hiked around and found a path that led down to the water. The sun was intense even though it wasn't that hot. I waded into the cold water and sat down on a rock, silently watching my boat at anchor only a few dozen yards away. It finally dawned on me that I had made it to Maine and without anything bad happening.

After that, I was very relaxed and in full "fuck-off mode" for the rest of the trip.  My wife could see the difference.

Here's a deeper peek into my psyche than you probably care to see:  For months when family, friends or co-workers would ask about my summer plans and I would say "I'm sailing alone, to Maine"  I felt guilty as if I was telling a huge lie.  I didn't really think I'd make it. I thought some circumstance would prevent me or that I would chicken out for some reason.

Having actually completed the trip successfully however graceless (lots of motoring, endless vomiting, lousy nighttime sailing) has been an enormous confidence booster. I won't feel like a liar when I say "I'm sailing alone, to Bermuda."

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43 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, but your son and his GF will be sailing with ME!!! :lol:  

They're now part of the cult of Restive

You have no idea....I've been spammed all Summer with: "Look at this cool boat", "Yeah, we had grilled steaks on <insert famous boat>".  "Too bad you're not here Papa..." Little @$#^@!^ bastard!   :D

 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

 

Here's a deeper peek into my psyche than you probably care to see:  For months when family, friends or co-workers would ask about my summer plans and I would say "I'm sailing alone, to Maine"  I felt guilty as if I was telling a huge lie.  I didn't really think I'd make it. I thought some circumstance would prevent me or that I would chicken out for some reason.

Funny, I had similar feelings leading up to my departure.  That feeling that something was going to come up and blow up my plans.  Cynicism runs deep in me!  It had me proceeding with some hesitation, waiting for the bad news to come... low and behold, some shit did hit the fan at work but my plans remained intact and we made it to Maine.  Still feels hard to believe that it happened.  
Like you, it took me a couple weeks to switch off.  When I finally did, I started sleeping better and my headaches went away...

Since we have been home my wife and I have had some serious discussions about our future plans.  While another trip like this is not in the immediate plans, retirement and second career planning has kicked into high gear as well as some plans to knock off some other big life goals.  

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I was friggin' STUNNED to see pot buoys in 300 feet of water.  The helm must be vigilant a long way from shore.

@Elegua It took me 13 days to switch off "work mode."  I kept waiting with a sense of dread for texts or a phone call from work about some problem or other. Thankfully, that never occurred and I was very grateful.

I clearly remember the moment that my relief valve popped.  We were anchored off Monroe Island and had just hiked around and found a path that led down to the water. The sun was intense even though it wasn't that hot. I waded into the cold water and sat down on a rock, silently watching my boat at anchor only a few dozen yards away. It finally dawned on me that I had made it to Maine and without anything bad happening.

After that, I was very relaxed and in full "fuck-off mode" for the rest of the trip.  My wife could see the difference.

Here's a deeper peek into my psyche than you probably care to see:  For months when family, friends or co-workers would ask about my summer plans and I would say "I'm sailing alone, to Maine"  I felt guilty as if I was telling a huge lie.  I didn't really think I'd make it. I thought some circumstance would prevent me or that I would chicken out for some reason.

Having actually completed the trip successfully however graceless (lots of motoring, endless vomiting, lousy nighttime sailing) has been an enormous confidence booster. I won't feel like a liar when I say "I'm sailing alone, to Bermuda."

I love those “aha” moments. One of mine was anchoring off Papeete some 20 years ago after finishing the long trip from Panama.

We put on the mainsail cover and sat in the cockpit looking at the bustling South Pacific city. My one thought was “if I died tomorrow, at least I  built a boat and sailed it to Tahiti.”

Now I get a similar feeling sitting on my boat in Maine with a glass of wine in hand, looking at granite, spruce trees, ospreys, seals, and calm water in a protected anchorage, even when we share it with other boats.

Pleasures are simpler and goals less ambitious the older I get.

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1 hour ago, T sailor said:

Funny, I had similar feelings leading up to my departure.  That feeling that something was going to come up and blow up my plans.  Cynicism runs deep in me!  It had me proceeding with some hesitation, waiting for the bad news to come... low and behold, some shit did hit the fan at work but my plans remained intact and we made it to Maine.  Still feels hard to believe that it happened.  
Like you, it took me a couple weeks to switch off.  When I finally did, I started sleeping better and my headaches went away...

Since we have been home my wife and I have had some serious discussions about our future plans.  While another trip like this is not in the immediate plans, retirement and second career planning has kicked into high gear as well as some plans to knock off some other big life goals.  

If you discover any brilliant career moves, let me know.

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We just got back from our longest cruise yet, 6 weeks starting in San Diego, up to Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara, and then Catalina.  Most of the time it was the five of us, plus our two dogs, plus at least two guests (max was nine total).  Added a hammock in the v-berth and all were comfy.  Our trawler was just about perfect for the trip, with almost zero opportunities for meaningful progress under sail.  

I've got the wife fully hooked now.  I've shifted the Overton Window for the kids - they still don't want a year-long sabbatical like I do, but love having their friends aboard & now think of 3 weeks as a "short" cruise.  

Santa Cruz island and Santa Barbara were definite highlights, though Catalina is always nice and easy (stay out of Avalon from Thurs-Sun).  I'm still lobbying for a sabbatical, maybe on a 43-47' catamaran down the entire Pacific Coast, but if unsuccessful next year I want to explore the outer Channel Islands.  Wife is discussing how we can work out retirement on a boat so I'm high as a kite.  Kids are 7-13.

When is Starlink gonna be available for boats... hurry up Elon.  Was pushing the boundaries for maintaining sufficient cell service to keep up appearances with clients.  

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10 hours ago, Ajax said:

Here's a deeper peek into my psyche than you probably care to see:  For months when family, friends or co-workers would ask about my summer plans and I would say "I'm sailing alone, to Maine"  I felt guilty as if I was telling a huge lie.  I didn't really think I'd make it. I thought some circumstance would prevent me or that I would chicken out for some reason.

This is why, in the years I was building my boat, when people would ask me what I planned on doing/going once I'd finished, I'd tell them the big plan was to circumnavigate Bruny Island.

The Tasmanian locals here will get the joke.

My philosophy - set low goals then consistently fail to achieve them...

FKT

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On 8/13/2021 at 12:32 PM, T sailor said:

Haven’t chartered yet, but was looking into BVi’s next year.  A lot of uncertainty with COVID however.  If COVID doesn’t throw too many curves than I think that is probably the best idea for next year.  Thanks for reinforcing that.
 

I just cancelled a long weekend in MEX as I cannot afford to get stuck there to quarantine if I somehow test positive.  I was optimistic that things were going to continue to improve but alas not do much...
 

Don't forget about the Pacific NW.  Charter a boat in Anacortes and do the San Juan Islands.  Quite a bit to see and all in the US.  I'd book early judging by how many charter boats I saw out there this summer...

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On 8/23/2021 at 7:50 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

This is why, in the years I was building my boat, when people would ask me what I planned on doing/going once I'd finished, I'd tell them the big plan was to circumnavigate Bruny Island.

The Tasmanian locals here will get the joke.

My philosophy - set low goals then consistently fail to achieve them...

FKT

Don’t kid yourself. Properly failing takes no small talent and effort. 

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1 hour ago, Beer fueled Mayhem said:

Don't forget about the Pacific NW.  Charter a boat in Anacortes and do the San Juan Islands.  Quite a bit to see and all in the US.  I'd book early judging by how many charter boats I saw out there this summer...

Don't cross the border, we shoot interlopers on sight.

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On 8/20/2021 at 7:28 AM, Ajax said:
On 8/20/2021 at 6:41 AM, Jim in Halifax said:

.And then there's hammer wrenches. I developed a dislike of them during 40 years in the oil patch.

TitanStrikingWrench_sm.jpg

Expand  

Expand  

I actually have one of those. I use it to remove the giant castle nuts when replacing the torque rod bushings for the rear suspension of my 5-ton truck. It's the only tool that will fit in the space. I wrap a tow strap around it and connect it to my other truck and drive forwards a few inches to break the nut free.

I have a fairly extensive set of them

Called "slugging wrenches" in the boiler trade.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

I have a fairly extensive set of them

Called "slugging wrenches" in the boiler trade.

FB- Doug

I've actually made up 10,000 psi rated wellheads with those things. Not for amateurs to do it right.

For 10 and 15 M BOPs, best to call a nipple-up crew with hydraulic wrenches.  Don't forget to Yellow Jacket the BOP while the nipple-up crew is still there. 

Going to get on the boat tomorrow, this time with my bride. That's the best sailing in the world, with her.

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17 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:
1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

... Called "slugging wrenches" in the boiler trade.

 

I've actually made up 10,000 psi rated wellheads with those things. Not for amateurs to do it right.

For 10 and 15 M BOPs, best to call a nipple-up crew with hydraulic wrenches.  Don't forget to Yellow Jacket the BOP while the nipple-up crew is still there. 

Going to get on the boat tomorrow, this time with my bride. That's the best sailing in the world, with her.

I don't know that those middle sentences mean, but it's certainly true that mis-use of slugging wrenches can easily and quickly ruin any assembly held together with threaded fastenings. As much fun as it is to beat hell out of big iron thingabobs with a short-handled 8lb sledge, I've found you need to keep track of each 1/12th turn (half a flat) if you want it up to spec. We used to joke about taking various stuff, beating it flat into tinfoil, crumpling it up and beating it flat again.... actually did this with a few discarded items like an old bunker oil burner assembly.

Hope you all have some great sailing days up there.... it's hot as blazes here, I don't even want to go outside after 8:30am even if it's to play in the sprinklers

FB- Doug

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cheese and rice, I can't even get near my boat now that I'm back home!

5 days of camping with Dirt People, car repairs, yard work, job! Sheesh! 

I'm hauling out on Monday to replace the cutlass bearing. That'll take care of the last of the vibrations.  The weather during the camping trip was gorgeous for sailing. Abnormally cool, low humidity. What a waste! 

The only upside is that the Conowingo dam was opened, which pretty much ruins the upper/middle bay for sailing. The water is disgusting, large dangerous debris comes running down the bay along with a really foul current. Hopefully I'm caught up and can dive into the fall sailing season.

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On 8/22/2021 at 5:38 AM, estarzinger said:

My parents had 2 (full size) vermont barns.  And they were literally filled floor to hay loft with ... stuff. Some of it very nice, some of it 'historic' but of no use, some of it very beat up but could have been very nice with refinishing/rebuilding, very little pure junk. 

I called my sister and told her to come up and take whatever she wanted.  She came up thinking she would send a few boxes back to her home - but she started accumulating a pretty big stack and asked me how she was every going to get it back to NYC - I took her to U-Haul and rented her a medium size truck and gave her two hours of truck driving lessons, she filled it pretty much right up and managed to get back to NYC without an accident.  I have no idea what she did with it all because she has a one bedroom condo.

Then I called an estate sale place, and told them to take anything/everything they would give me at least a dollar for.

Then a dozen trips to local goodwill sort of places until they told me to stop, for anything that was still functional/useful.

Books were a serious problem - no-one wanted them anymore - my father was a college prof (and a climber) and had a world class collection of 1st edition political science and mountain books.  Those were the only thing I put in a shed and worked on finding homes for - could not bear to toss them - ultimately found a London rare book dealer who flew over and took quite a bit of them.

Then I lost count, but 8+ dumpsters.

hmmm . . .oh, I lied, yea we still have a shed of stuff my sister said she would find homes for but never has.

It was a full summer project.  The only saving grace was that my father was VERY organized - everything was neatly stored and labeled, much of it (like the books) with original receipts inside the dust jackets.

I am trying very hard not to replicate this outcome for Beth and I - we at least dont have shed and barns full of stuff we dont use.

When my parents died we filled two 14 yard dumpsters just with the "saved" crap that wasn't even fit to donate.

I agree about the books - it feels almost immoral to trash them.

I sent this to my son just the other day.

image.jpeg.e3bf38e0ede4b9c3125b33ff223ab3b1.jpeg

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  • 1 month later...

Ok, here's the preliminary plan for 2023:

Between now and that time, I want to replace the standing rigging. I will also evaluate any other needed, major repairs as they arise.  If my group of sailing friends can't/won't take a cruising vacation with me to southern New England, then I intend to sail to Bermuda, alone, by sextant.

If I do sail to Bermuda, I'm not racing. Racing forces you to cross the Gulf Stream on the race's schedule, without regard to weather or sea conditions. I will do this on my schedule, according to my decisions, not the race committee's.

I want to get the chart plotter running, then snap the cover in place and not look at it again, until I arrive. I'll carry the usual host of redundant electronic navigation devices as backup.

I'm using a Davis Mk25 plastic sextant. I think that if I practice with it enough, and apply all the corrective factors, I can get my latitude down to 3-5 miles of accuracy. 3 miles would be great. I might pay to have my compass swung before I depart, or even buy a new one. I need to practice calculating set and drift to enhance my DR skills.

Of course, I could do all of this celestial stuff on a trip to New England as well but there's something enticing about doing it on a trip to Bermuda. I'm not going "full Amish" though, I intend to invest in an InReach or Iridium GO and download weather data frequently.

If any of you have read the thread about my trip to Maine or this thread and you haven't taken a long-ish sailing voyage, I encourage you to do it.  Tomorrow is not guaranteed. There are too many people dying all around me (not even related to COVID) and I recently found out that I may have glaucoma.  I'm only 49.

Get busy livin' or get busy dyin'.

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On 9/7/2021 at 5:22 PM, SloopJonB said:

When my parents died we filled two 14 yard dumpsters just with the "saved" crap that wasn't even fit to donate.

I agree about the books - it feels almost immoral to trash them.

I sent this to my son just the other day.

image.jpeg.e3bf38e0ede4b9c3125b33ff223ab3b1.jpeg

I dealt with this 40 years ago with my grandmother's stuff, then with my parents' stuff - twice.  Once in awhile my wife and I will watch Antiques Roadshow, and she will give me a sidelong look as if to say "I'm certain you gave one of those away."

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13 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ok, here's the preliminary plan for 2023:

Between now and that time, I want to replace the standing rigging. I will also evaluate any other needed, major repairs as they arise.  If my group of sailing friends can't/won't take a cruising vacation with me to southern New England, then I intend to sail to Bermuda, alone, by sextant.

If I do sail to Bermuda, I'm not racing. Racing forces you to cross the Gulf Stream on the race's schedule, without regard to weather or sea conditions. I will do this on my schedule, according to my decisions, not the race committee's.

I want to get the chart plotter running, then snap the cover in place and not look at it again, until I arrive. I'll carry the usual host of redundant electronic navigation devices as backup.

I'm using a Davis Mk25 plastic sextant. I think that if I practice with it enough, and apply all the corrective factors, I can get my latitude down to 3-5 miles of accuracy. 3 miles would be great. I might pay to have my compass swung before I depart, or even buy a new one. I need to practice calculating set and drift to enhance my DR skills.

Of course, I could do all of this celestial stuff on a trip to New England as well but there's something enticing about doing it on a trip to Bermuda. I'm not going "full Amish" though, I intend to invest in an InReach or Iridium GO and download weather data frequently.

If any of you have read the thread about my trip to Maine or this thread and you haven't taken a long-ish sailing voyage, I encourage you to do it.  Tomorrow is not guaranteed. There are too many people dying all around me (not even related to COVID) and I recently found out that I may have glaucoma.  I'm only 49.

Get busy livin' or get busy dyin'.

Shit's gettin' real now!  Good on ya!

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17 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ok, here's the preliminary plan for 2023:

Between now and that time, I want to replace the standing rigging. I will also evaluate any other needed, major repairs as they arise.  If my group of sailing friends can't/won't take a cruising vacation with me to southern New England, then I intend to sail to Bermuda, alone, by sextant.

If I do sail to Bermuda, I'm not racing. Racing forces you to cross the Gulf Stream on the race's schedule, without regard to weather or sea conditions. I will do this on my schedule, according to my decisions, not the race committee's.

I want to get the chart plotter running, then snap the cover in place and not look at it again, until I arrive. I'll carry the usual host of redundant electronic navigation devices as backup.

I'm using a Davis Mk25 plastic sextant. I think that if I practice with it enough, and apply all the corrective factors, I can get my latitude down to 3-5 miles of accuracy. 3 miles would be great. I might pay to have my compass swung before I depart, or even buy a new one. I need to practice calculating set and drift to enhance my DR skills.

Of course, I could do all of this celestial stuff on a trip to New England as well but there's something enticing about doing it on a trip to Bermuda. I'm not going "full Amish" though, I intend to invest in an InReach or Iridium GO and download weather data frequently.

If any of you have read the thread about my trip to Maine or this thread and you haven't taken a long-ish sailing voyage, I encourage you to do it.  Tomorrow is not guaranteed. There are too many people dying all around me (not even related to COVID) and I recently found out that I may have glaucoma.  I'm only 49.

Get busy livin' or get busy dyin'.

You might think about getting good a used sextant. They can be had at reasonable-ish prices. You might find the plastic ones wander a bit too much with temperature. I conducted some experiments off my balcony. This was with the, not as good as the MK25, MK15 model, but the dispersion was huge compared to the 40yr old Plath. 

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14 minutes ago, Elegua said:

You might think about getting good a used sextant. They can be had at reasonable-ish prices. You might find the plastic ones wander a bit too much with temperature. I conducted some experiments off my balcony. This was with the, not as good as the MK25, MK15 model, but the dispersion was huge compared to the 40yr old Plath. 

Yes, I've read that the materials expand/contract more with the plastic units. The reason I think it'll work out is because the temperature will be fairly consistent along a route to Bermuda.  Moving north towards Maine, across greater temperature ranges might cause problems.

My issue with buying a used sextant is that you don't know the history and the arc could be bent. I've read a lot of cautionary tales about buying used sextants. I know that the Astra IIIB is the affordable, accurate unit. It's made in China.

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36 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ok, here's the preliminary plan for 2023:

Between now and that time, I want to replace the standing rigging. I will also evaluate any other needed, major repairs as they arise.  If my group of sailing friends can't/won't take a cruising vacation with me to southern New England, then I intend to sail to Bermuda, alone, by sextant.

If I do sail to Bermuda, I'm not racing. Racing forces you to cross the Gulf Stream on the race's schedule, without regard to weather or sea conditions. I will do this on my schedule, according to my decisions, not the race committee's.

I want to get the chart plotter running, then snap the cover in place and not look at it again, until I arrive. I'll carry the usual host of redundant electronic navigation devices as backup.

I'm using a Davis Mk25 plastic sextant. I think that if I practice with it enough, and apply all the corrective factors, I can get my latitude down to 3-5 miles of accuracy. 3 miles would be great. I might pay to have my compass swung before I depart, or even buy a new one. I need to practice calculating set and drift to enhance my DR skills.

Of course, I could do all of this celestial stuff on a trip to New England as well but there's something enticing about doing it on a trip to Bermuda. I'm not going "full Amish" though, I intend to invest in an InReach or Iridium GO and download weather data frequently.

If any of you have read the thread about my trip to Maine or this thread and you haven't taken a long-ish sailing voyage, I encourage you to do it.  Tomorrow is not guaranteed. There are too many people dying all around me (not even related to COVID) and I recently found out that I may have glaucoma.  I'm only 49.

Get busy livin' or get busy dyin'.

Good on you for making plans and goals like that!  I have found that if I don’t have a goal in mind, it gets easier to deprioritize that activity and do something else that is not nearly as rewarding (yard work,etc…).  I have accepted that next years sailing will only be local save for doing a charter in the BVI’s.  That has always been a “someday” goal but we decided to get on it now.  2023 we will do A2N again and then a weeklong cruise around that area after.  The big goal will be Bermuda in 2024.  That is a big enough goal that it will help shape plans for the time leading up to it.  

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4 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Yes, I've read that the materials expand/contract more with the plastic units. The reason I think it'll work out is because the temperature will be fairly consistent along a route to Bermuda.  Moving north towards Maine, across greater temperature ranges might cause problems.

My issue with buying a used sextant is that you don't know the history and the arc could be bent. I've read a lot of cautionary tales about buying used sextants. I know that the Astra IIIB is the affordable, accurate unit. It's made in China.

This was just in my FL house and an airconditioned 75 degrees. You have to buy one from a decent shop or have it worked over at a place like this:

https://www.robertwhite.com/sextants They used to have a nice consignment I would occasionally browse. 

I'm sure others know more about sources. 

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33 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Yes, I've read that the materials expand/contract more with the plastic units. The reason I think it'll work out is because the temperature will be fairly consistent along a route to Bermuda.  Moving north towards Maine, across greater temperature ranges might cause problems.

My issue with buying a used sextant is that you don't know the history and the arc could be bent. I've read a lot of cautionary tales about buying used sextants. I know that the Astra IIIB is the affordable, accurate unit. It's made in China.

If you haven't already, check in with Maryland Nautical:

https://mdnautical.com/396-sextants

They won't steer you wrong. ^_^

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Yes, I've read that the materials expand/contract more with the plastic units. The reason I think it'll work out is because the temperature will be fairly consistent along a route to Bermuda.  Moving north towards Maine, across greater temperature ranges might cause problems.

My issue with buying a used sextant is that you don't know the history and the arc could be bent. I've read a lot of cautionary tales about buying used sextants. I know that the Astra IIIB is the affordable, accurate unit. It's made in China.

Join the FB group Practical Celestial Navigation.  You’ll get info and encouragement (the opposite of what some here provide re: cel nav :-) ) 

Astras are plenty accurate, as are plastic ones.  (See David Burch’s book specifically on using plastic sextants).

E0EC9187-06F2-43F9-A154-31A137491552.png

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7 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Jud, I appreciate the advice. I'm steering clear of Facebook and most other social media.  I'm also staying away from Astra sextants.

That cel nav FB page is not “social media” per se .  Well  it is.  An example of normal people around the world normally sharing ideas and experience in a normal way without any drama or bullshit (unlike just about everything else on FB).   Anyway, it’s a useful (and private, so not open to bullshit/spammers/ads) group.

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8 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That cel nav FB page is not “social media” per se .  Well  it is.  An example of normal people around the world normally sharing ideas and experience in a normal way without any drama or bullshit (unlike just about everything else on FB).   Anyway, it’s a useful (and private, so not open to bullshit/spammers/ads) group.

This is social media, an antique of social media. My kids refer to sailing forums as "Dad's chatrooms". 

 

You can read and share the content in the group, just not post. I see this group has 5K members! Big group. A few are pretty militant 'olde ways' guys. I didn't quite get this post. Can someone explain? 

image.png.066edfa0872462fef3c8bd3b37ce0d92.png

 

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6 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

This is social media, an antique of social media. My kids refer to sailing forums as "Dad's chatrooms". 

 

You can read and share the content in the group, just not post. I see this group has 5K members! Big group. A few are pretty militant 'olde ways' guys. I didn't quite get this post. Can someone explain? 

image.png.066edfa0872462fef3c8bd3b37ce0d92.png

 

Your kids never watched Ninja Turtles? Never did mine.... Old master raises the kids, who now take care of him. 

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14 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

This is social media, an antique of social media. My kids refer to sailing forums as "Dad's chatrooms". 

 

You can read and share the content in the group, just not post. I see this group has 5K members! Big group. A few are pretty militant 'olde ways' guys. I didn't quite get this post. Can someone explain? 

image.png.066edfa0872462fef3c8bd3b37ce0d92.png

 

It can simply useful to browse and read, as a learning tool.  I’ve zero interest in engaging with annoying or militant people anywhere about anything.

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6 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I've slowly twigged to the fact that most things labelled "Bluewater" is for suckers. 

In terms of physical products sold for yachts or in terms of people who use the word?

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

Your kids never watched Ninja Turtles? Never did mine.... Old master raises the kids, who now take care of him. 

I didn't even recognize that those were turtle shells. So was this a support meme, or derogatory of Sextant? 

 

I had to help my 30 yr old daughter with a facebook gizmo. She's on FB these days for the same reason I got on it, Business. I had to join years ago to do some internet writing. Now she's administering a biz FB page. It's a good source for me though. I belong to many of the private (to post) groups that are mostly based locally. Sailing, islands, local food, art, markets,etc. These have administrators to block dumb stuff and also all the Youtube channels people are peddling.

 

Our kids (mine and many of their friends we co-parented) sort of hopped over FB and settled more on Instagram.

I think it's mostly the boomer gen that falls for the misinformation that has had some effect on culture, politics, climate. Later gens are more internet savvy at a young age and know how to make cyber work for them.

 

Milenials take on FB says a lot! 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I didn't even recognize that those were turtle shells. So was this a support meme, or derogatory of Sextant? 

 

I had to help my 30 yr old daughter with a facebook gizmo. She's on FB these days for the same reason I got on it, Business. I had to join years ago to do some internet writing. Now she's administering a biz FB page. It's a good source for me though. I belong to many of the private (to post) groups that are mostly based locally. Sailing, islands, local food, art, markets,etc. These have administrators to block dumb stuff and also all the Youtube channels people are peddling.

 

Our kids (mine and many of their friends we co-parented) sort of hopped over FB and settled more on Instagram.

I think it's mostly the boomer gen that falls for the misinformation that has had some effect on culture, politics, climate. Later gens are more internet savvy at a young age and know how to make cyber work for them.

 

Milenials take on FB says a lot! 

 

 

FB is for boomers for sure. My kids wouldn't be caught dead on it.  Making wild, over-broad assumptions....I've also found Boomers to be a bit more susceptible to internet misinformation. Boomers grew up with and read more books. I believe they assume that the rules that apply to the written word in books also applies to the internet. 

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18 minutes ago, Elegua said:

FB is for boomers for sure. My kids wouldn't be caught dead on it.  Making wild, over-broad assumptions....I've also found Boomers to be a bit more susceptible to internet misinformation. Boomers grew up with and read more books. I believe they assume that the rules that apply to the written word in books also applies to the internet. 

Fuck, I sure DON'T.

But I worked for the organisation (CSIRO Division of Computing Research) that set up the first real WAN in Australia and was there when it was connected to the USA internet via university links. I still remember the first spam mail I ever got. I promptly emailed the sender a core dump from my Sun workstation. My cynicism score is pretty high.

Anyway, fuck Fauxbook, it's been toxic from the start and that's a feature of it, not a bug.

FKT

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1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Fuck, I sure DON'T.

But I worked for the organisation (CSIRO Division of Computing Research) that set up the first real WAN in Australia and was there when it was connected to the USA internet via university links. I still remember the first spam mail I ever got. I promptly emailed the sender a core dump from my Sun workstation. My cynicism score is pretty high.

Anyway, fuck Fauxbook, it's been toxic from the start and that's a feature of it, not a bug.

FKT

FKT: I’d never lump you with the average Boomer. I hope to make it to Hobart by boat  to say “Hi” some day. 

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55 minutes ago, Elegua said:

FKT: I’d never lump you with the average Boomer. I hope to make it to Hobart by boat  to say “Hi” some day. 

Yeah well the world is slowly opening up again, Australia is going to be accepting fully vaxed visitors before too long.

If you get this far, you'll be welcome. I've moorings that can handle up to a 20m vessel out the front of my place.

Currently making a new smaller mainsail in the shed. I decided that for the 2 of us, we were way over-canvassed for our local conditions and sailing ability. Why sail with 2 permanent reefs in the main when you can just make a smaller one.

FKT

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14 hours ago, Elegua said:

FB is for boomers for sure. My kids wouldn't be caught dead on it.  Making wild, over-broad assumptions....I've also found Boomers to be a bit more susceptible to internet misinformation. Boomers grew up with and read more books. I believe they assume that the rules that apply to the written word in books also applies to the internet. 

At first that sounds a simplistic generalization, but you might be on to something. 

 

I quizzed my 29 year old son if any periodicals or good books are how he has progressed so quickly through his latest passion; flying fishing and tying. He searched his head and said 'he didn't think there were any'. 

 

Sure there is but not like when I was growing up and engaged in similar pursuits. I had monthly periodicals and great books that were professionally built, edited and tested. These were the experts in the field. Misinformation was long weeded out before publication unless you searched out obscure stuff. 

 

He gets all his reference info online. I guffawed as I when I search for help - especially Youtube, I waste an enormous amount of time on useless info/advice/experience. Then my computer picks up that I've become a sucker and starts sending in the clowns. 

 

He gave me his sympathetic dad look and explained that it is easy to find the 'good stuff'. 

 

I get his meaning(don't have his skill though). These kids grew up using online sources. He went through college in Italy rarely even buying textbooks, (he found them online), and ultimately excelled in his studies. 

He's not likely to be duped by Fox or MSNBC algorithm rabbit holes that so many boomers have fallen into. Boomers have built their own rabbit warren online. 

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8 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

At first that sounds a simplistic generalization, but you might be on to something. . 

Maybe better to broaden it to those who haven’t grown up with, or aren’t aware of the algorithm and how it works. 

There are channels that are as well researched as a book might be for example, Greg’s Airplanes and Automobiles uses primary resources for piston powered warplanes better than most written material.  Drachenifiel covers naval history better than most books.  These are outliers and you need to have some familiarity with the underlying material to tell the difference. Watch a video and a lot of bad history comes up. 

Still, I’ll rarely work on my car without first consulting YouTube though I might have to watch a couple before I find one that fits the task at hand and seems reliable.

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Hm. I wanted to take my first real sun sight today but that seems impossible when anchored in a small cove where a tree line obscures the horizon. 

I guess I'll need to get out into the bay proper to get a horizon. 

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26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Hm. I wanted to take my first real sun sight today but that seems impossible when anchored in a small cove where a tree line obscures the horizon. 

I guess I'll need to get out into the bay proper to get a horizon. 

Try a bubble horizon, Ajax: https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095533298


https://www.celestaire.com/product/practice-bubble-horizon/

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I picked up a Davis artificial horizon for around ten bucks on fleabay.  

BTW, I have a Davis Mk 25 (also fleabay) and just repeatedly zeroing the thing through the day gave me some idea of the instrument variability.  Sad to say I don’t recall the actual value, but it was about one gradation.  I worked through the Starpath manual a couple of winters ago but haven’t touched the thing since.  

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On 8/23/2021 at 7:50 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

This is why, in the years I was building my boat, when people would ask me what I planned on doing/going once I'd finished, I'd tell them the big plan was to circumnavigate Bruny Island.

The Tasmanian locals here will get the joke.

My philosophy - set low goals then consistently fail to achieve them...

FKT

I resemble that remark. 

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49 minutes ago, toddster said:

I picked up a Davis artificial horizon for around ten bucks on fleabay.  

BTW, I have a Davis Mk 25 (also fleabay) and just repeatedly zeroing the thing through the day gave me some idea of the instrument variability.  Sad to say I don’t recall the actual value, but it was about one gradation.  I worked through the Starpath manual a couple of winters ago but haven’t touched the thing since.  

Cool,  I'll scrounge one up. 

My Mk25 came with a spare set of mirrors and a cool gizmo that eliminates the need to swing the arc. It's just a little prism that splits the horizon of you aren't perfectly level. 

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On 10/23/2021 at 12:17 PM, Ajax said:

Cool,  I'll scrounge one up. 

My Mk25 came with a spare set of mirrors and a cool gizmo that eliminates the need to swing the arc. It's just a little prism that splits the horizon of you aren't perfectly level. 

Also, may be of interest (brand new/just published):

 

3775AA54-A299-4B6A-8DA5-8F3BC1FFD65B.jpeg

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