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https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/08/20/1029628471/highly-vaccinated-israel-is-seeing-a-dramatic-surge-in-new-covid-cases-heres-why

Highly Vaccinated Israel Is Seeing A Dramatic Surge In New COVID Cases. Here's Why

August 20, 202111:01 AM

 

3-Minute Listen

gettyimages-1234689760_custom-31dcd83488
 

Medics in Jerusalem transfer a COVID-19 patient to Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem. Many hospitals in Israel are at full capacity following a sharp increase in coronavirus infections.

Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

Israel was the first country on Earth to fully vaccinate a majority of its citizens against COVID-19. Now it has one of the world's highest daily infection rates — an average of nearly 7,500 confirmed cases a day, double what it was two weeks ago. Nearly one in every 150 people in Israel today has the virus.

What happened, and what can be learned about the vaccine's impact on a highly vaccinated country? Here are six lessons learned — and one looming question for the future of the pandemic.

1. Immunity from the vaccine dips over time.

Israel had fully vaccinated slightly over half its population by March 25. Infections waned, venues reopened to the vaccinated and the prime minister told Israelis to go out and have fun. By June, all restrictions, including indoor masking, were abolished.

But Israel paid a price for the early rollout. Health officials, and then Pfizer, said their data showed a dip in the vaccine's protection around six months after receiving the second shot.

2. The delta variant broke through the vaccine's waning protection.

It was a perfect storm: The vaccine's waning protection came around the same time the more infectious delta variant arrived in Israel this summer. Delta accounts for nearly all infections in Israel today.

 

"The most influential event was so many people who went abroad in the summer — vacations — and brought the delta variant very, very quickly to Israel," said Siegal Sadetzki, a former public health director in Israel's Health Ministry.

3. If you get infected, being vaccinated helps.

The good news is that among Israel's serious infections on Thursday of this week, according to Health Ministry data, the rate of serious cases among unvaccinated people over age 60 (178.7 per 100,000) was nine times more than the rate among fully vaccinated people of the same age category, and the rate of serious cases among unvaccinated people in the under-60 crowd (3.2 per 100,000) was a little more than double the rate among vaccinated people in that age bracket.

The bad news, doctors say, is that half of Israel's seriously ill patients who are currently hospitalized were fully vaccinated at least five months ago. Most of them are over 60 years old and have comorbidities. The seriously ill patients who are unvaccinated are mostly young, healthy people whose condition deteriorated quickly.

Israel's daily average number of infections has nearly doubled in the past two weeks and has increased around tenfold since mid-July, approaching the numbers during Israel's peak in the winter. Deaths increased from five in June to at least 248 so far this month. Health officials say that currently 600 seriously ill patients are hospitalized, and they warn they cannot handle more than 1,000 serious infections at the same time.

 

4. Israel's high vaccination rate isn't high enough.

The country jumped out ahead of all other countries on vaccines, and 78% of eligible Israelis over 12 years old are vaccinated.

But Israel has a young population, with many under the eligible age for vaccination, and about 1.1 million eligible Israelis, largely between the ages of 12 and 20, have declined to take even one dose of the vaccine.

That means only 58% of Israel's total citizenry is fully vaccinated. Experts say that's not nearly high enough.

"We have a very large fraction of our population who are paying the price for a small fraction of the population who did not go to get the vaccine," said Eran Segal of the Weizmann Institute of Science, who advises the Israeli government on COVID-19.

Unvaccinated people helped fuel the rapid spread of the virus while the country remained open for business in recent months with few serious restrictions.

"That will lead to mass infection, which is exactly what we are seeing now," said Segal.

5. Vaccinations are key, but they are not enough.

Israel is trying to slow the wave without resorting to a new lockdown, which Prime Minister Naftali Bennett says would take an economic toll and "destroy the future of the country." The country is placing caps on gatherings, increasing hospital staff and pleading for unvaccinated people to get immunized.

On Israel's doorstep, the vaccination rate is much lower in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Only around 8% of Palestinians have been fully vaccinated. Palestinians are wary of certain brands of vaccine in ample supply, like AstraZeneca's, while Pfizer-BioNTech's vaccine is in shorter supply for Palestinians. But the Palestinian population is not a source of transmission in Israel. Only vaccinated Palestinians are given permits to enter Israel and Israeli settlements.

As for the low rate of vaccination in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, "we don't have a shortage of vaccine. It is the hesitancy," said Randa Abu Rabe, a local World Health Organization official working in the Palestinian territories.

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An Israeli health worker administers a third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine at a vaccination center in Jerusalem. Israel is the first country to launch a national booster campaign for the Pfizer vaccine.

Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

6. Booster shots offer more protection — if you are one of the world's lucky few to get them.

Israel is the first country to offer a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine in a nationwide booster campaign. Preliminary research in Israel suggests booster shots significantly increase protection against the coronavirus a week after a person receives the third dose.

Israeli national HMO Maccabi Healthcare Services, which conducted the preliminary study of 149,144 Israelis who received three Pfizer shots, said for Israelis above age 60, a Pfizer booster shot reduced the chances of infection by 86% and reduced the chances of severe infection by 92%.

The early data reflects studies by vaccine-makers Pfizer and Moderna and provides a glimpse at boosters' effects in a real-world setting.

After reviewing data on breakthrough infections in Israel, the U.S. announced a booster shot campaign beginning in late September for anyone eight months after their second shot. The U.K. has promised boosters soon, and Turkey is offering Pfizer shots to those immunized with the Sinovac vaccine to help citizens planning to travel, since some countries will not recognize the Chinese vaccine.

Israel has lowered the minimum age for boosters to 40. "The triple dose is the solution to curbing the current infection outbreak," Anat Ekka Zohar of Maccabi said in a statement.

Boosters are not being offered in the Palestinian territories yet, and the World Health Organization has called on countries to stop giving COVID-19 booster shots in order to help poorer countries get vaccinated.

"Israel very much respects the World Health Organization but acts according to local considerations and the interests of Israeli citizens. We help the world a lot," an Israeli health official told NPR, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the issue. "If the U.N. didn't secure enough vaccines for Chad, Mali, Myanmar and Guatemala, that doesn't mean that Israel shouldn't seek to prevent a pandemic from happening here."

Experts warn if countries do not vaccinate their populations, more variants will develop, threatening even vaccinated nations.

Looming question: Will we need COVID-19 vaccines every several months? We don't know.

The Cinema City movie theater complex in Jerusalem teems with young children and parents, but steps from the box office is a makeshift vaccination station where dozens of mostly older residents wait their turn to get booster shots.

More than a million Israelis have received a Pfizer booster shot in the last several weeks. They are being watched around the world, as Israel is the first nation to give a third dose of Pfizer on a mass scale, just as it was ahead of the curve on the first round of shots.

"They make the test of us," said Etti Ben Yaakov, sitting in a vaccination booth with her brother as he got a booster shot. "But in the first [round], it was the same. So I don't feel it's something wrong. I think it's good."

She predicts the coronavirus, like the flu, will mean shots every year. "We will have to live with the corona," she said.

Ido Hadari, of HMO Maccabi, which led the preliminary booster shot study, questioned whether regular shots will become the norm.

"I don't know of any disease where we are vaccinated every six months, and to be honest, I don't think the public will come to get vaccinated every six months," Hadari said. "But you cannot predict anything with this disease."

Correction Aug. 20, 2021

 

An earlier version of this story misspelled the Weizmann Institute of Science as the Weitzmann Institute of Science.

 

Draw yer own arguments

or not

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The Vaccine Scientist Spreading Vaccine Misinformation

The Atlantic · 10 min

Robert Malone claims to have invented mRNA technology. Why is he trying so hard to undermine its use? Robert Malone—a medical doctor and an infectious-disease researcher—recently suggested that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines might actually make COVID-19 infections worse.

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11 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

Isn't quite the same as

Maybe a little undermining.

was there once a point intended to be a part of that ???

Deal T8A steel round knife toothless saw blade cutting cloth stainless  steel steel wire hose spon - YouTube

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18 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

 

Not sure why you think consequences (loss of job, loss of ability to partee at some bars, etc, is the same as forced. I think you mistake the word "forced" for what it really is, Consequences of your own actions. 

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6 hours ago, dyslexic dog said:

Tro, not sure what you are trying to say. Comparing nazi to getting your shots? Please explain how that is anyway comparable. This should be good. 

Not just Nazis, but throw in Imperial Japan and get the whole WWII Axis.   Jew killers, women rapers, storm troopers, kamakazis, vaccinators...lump them all in there!

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34 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

Screenshot_20210826-162325_Facebook.jpg

 

14 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Not sure why you think consequences (loss of job, loss of ability to partee at some bars, etc, is the same as forced. I think you mistake the word "forced" for what it really is, Consequences of your own actions. 

HA HA HA

He said .... " I think you mistake the word "

while mistaking a word

Likely just the same as effort to understand the topic

Just taking sides w/o understanding what yer going on about is SCARRY 

 

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21 hours ago, dyslexic dog said:

Tro, not sure what you are trying to say. Comparing nazi to getting your shots? Please explain how that is anyway comparable. This should be good. 

comparing nazis to forcing people to get the shots/mandating vaccine "passports" = vaccinazis...

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15 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

 

HA HA HA

He said .... " I think you mistake the word "

while mistaking a word

Likely just the same as effort to understand the topic

Just taking sides w/o understanding what yer going on about is SCARRY 

 

I’m “going on about” simple math

vaccinated, some catching Covid, few with major issues

non-vaxxed, death rates like the last spike but this time, on 1/2 the number of people who can get very sick. Go ahead and give Darwin a hand. He appreciates it.

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10 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I’m “going on about” simple math

vaccinated, some catching Covid, few with major issues

non-vaxxed, death rates like the last spike but this time, on 1/2 the number of people who can get very sick. Go ahead and give Darwin a hand. He appreciates it.

WTF does That have to do with the post you said I missed a word

 

Have You had one yet ???

Sounds like you Need one Bad

Be it Forsed or not :lol:

Your reading comprehension SUCKS !!!

Go back and ask someone else to read it to you !!!

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39 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

WTF does That have to do with the post you said I missed a word

 

Have You had one yet ???

Sounds like you Need one Bad

Be it Forsed or not :lol:

Your reading comprehension SUCKS !!!

Go back and ask someone else to read it to you !!!

Yer cougars are gonna have "must be vaxx'ed" in their dating profiles. Is that "forced?"

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3 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Yer cougars are gonna have "must be vaxx'ed" in their dating profiles. Is that "forced?"

Still can't Read eh

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12 hours ago, Trovão said:

comparing nazis to forcing people to get the shots/mandating vaccine "passports" = vaccinazis...

Wtf are you trying to say? I don’t see your analogy. How old are you? 15? Do you have any idea what life under German rule in 1937-1945 was like? Asking society to get a vaccine to keep people from spreading death to others has nothing to do with a fascist state. Read and study history. Sorry for the rant. 

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On 8/28/2021 at 12:40 AM, dyslexic dog said:

Wtf are you trying to say? I don’t see your analogy. How old are you? 15? Do you have any idea what life under German rule in 1937-1945 was like? Asking society to get a vaccine to keep people from spreading death to others has nothing to do with a fascist state. Read and study history. Sorry for the rant. 

"Asking" is something completely different from forcing or forbidding to go into the supermarket, like in France, for example.

The point is not the vaccine is the compulsority...

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9 hours ago, Trovão said:

"Asking" is something completely different from forcing or forbidding to go into the supermarket, like in France, for example.

The point is not the vaccine is the compulsority...

So if shoes and shirt are required to go into a store they are being Nazis? No one is forcing you to get a shot. It's simply if you do not get one, then you can't do other things. Stay home, don't go out in public. Gawd, I get pissed at the ignorance. 

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1 hour ago, dyslexic dog said:

So if shoes and shirt are required to go into a store they are being Nazis? No one is forcing you to get a shot. It's simply if you do not get one, then you can't do other things. Stay home, don't go out in public. Gawd, I get pissed at the ignorance

We can agree on that... Over.

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https://invest.srnola.com/pfizer-board-member-warns-policymakers-natural-immunity-needs-to-be-included-in-covid-mandate-plans/

 

GettyImages-664917690-700x420.jpg?itok=d

Pfizer Board Member Warns Policymakers: “Natural Immunity” Needs to Be Included In COVID Mandate Plans

 

Authored by Jack Phillips via The Epoch Times,

Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, who is a Pfizer board member, noted that “natural immunity” gained from a prior COVID-19 infection needs to be included in discussions about policies and mandates.

“The balance of the evidence demonstrates that natural immunity confers a durable protection,” Gottlieb said during a Monday morning TV interview, referring to a landmark new preprint Israeli study that found prior COVID-19 infection confers much more protection against the virus than any vaccine.

“It’s fair to conclude that,” he said.

Although Gottlieb said he would “be careful” about concluding whether natural immunity provides better protection against transmitting the virus, officials “should start assimilating that into our policy discussions.”

“Natural infection confers robust and durable immunity,” he said, citing the Israeli study and others.

However, whether natural immunity or vaccines are better than one another “isn’t that material” when it comes to policy discussions, Gottlieb added.

Last week, researchers from Maccabi Healthcare and Tel Aviv University said that individuals who recovered from COVID-19 had superior protection against the Delta variant of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus than those who received the Pfizer mRNA vaccine, the most commonly used shot in Israel.

“This analysis demonstrated that natural immunity affords longer-lasting and stronger protection against infection, symptomatic disease, and hospitalization due to the Delta variant,” the study concluded, noting their findings came from the “largest real-world observational study” in the world. Their study, which hasn’t yet been peer-reviewed, noted outcomes for a period between June 1 and Aug. 14 of this year.

When researchers compared cases of prior infection that occurred between March 2020 and February 2021 with vaccinations between January and February 2021, they found that the vaccinated cohort was 5.96 times more likely to contract the Delta variant and 7.13 times more at risk for symptomatic disease compared to those previously infected.

The results suggest that natural immunity gained from having survived a previous infection of COVID-19 may wane over time against the Delta variant, the authors wrote.

Those vaccinated were at a greater risk of COVID-19-related hospitalizations compared to those who were previously infected, the authors noted. They said that being 60 years of age or older increased the risk of infection and hospitalization.

The authors of the research paper said they only observed protection against the Delta variant and not other strains. Meanwhile, they only observed the Pfizer vaccine and didn’t look at other vaccines or the effects of a booster shot.



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^^^^

Woody, I do not know if this is a trustworthy information source... but for the sake of the discussion, let's assume it is.

 

If I understand well, it states that people who got COVID in the past, fair much better against the delta variant, than people who got the vaccine, and never contracted the disease in the first place. And therefore, the recommendation is : take into account whether the patient has had COVID before, when you decide if a third shot is warranted.

Did I get that right?

 

So are you suggesting that we should innoculate the disease ("original variant") to those who have not gotten it yet, to make them better prepared for the delta variant???

 

What that article does NOT cover is: what happens to the people who have not contracted Covid in the past, and are not vaccinated yet? Isn't the best option for them to be vaccinated in the first place???

 

Personnaly, I am vaccinated, and I have not had the disease (so far...). I know because I had a blood test to confirm it. If I am offered a third jab, I will take it wholeheartidly. I don't see how the fact that it may not protect me as well as someone who contracted the disease in the past should make me hesitate to take the shot.

 

 

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On 9/2/2021 at 8:17 AM, Laurent said:

^^^^

Woody, I do not know if this is a trustworthy information source... but for the sake of the discussion, let's assume it is.

 

If I understand well, it states that people who got COVID in the past, fair much better against the delta variant, than people who got the vaccine, and never contracted the disease in the first place. And therefore, the recommendation is : take into account whether the patient has had COVID before, when you decide if a third shot is warranted.

Did I get that right?

 

So are you suggesting that we should innoculate the disease ("original variant") to those who have not gotten it yet, to make them better prepared for the delta variant???

 

What that article does NOT cover is: what happens to the people who have not contracted Covid in the past, and are not vaccinated yet? Isn't the best option for them to be vaccinated in the first place???

 

Personnaly, I am vaccinated, and I have not had the disease (so far...). I know because I had a blood test to confirm it. If I am offered a third jab, I will take it wholeheartidly. I don't see how the fact that it may not protect me as well as someone who contracted the disease in the past should make me hesitate to take the shot.

 

 

my OPEN Mind on the issue is as someone Who Did get the CORONA Virus

I was Asymptomatic

What does that mean for the future ??

 

Everyone is Guessing at this point

WE ARE THE LAB RATS for this Scientific Experiment

 

Those saying Bla Bla Bla Is Science so you MUST Believe

likely are the same ones saying "Their" Bible is the Gospel so you MUST Believe

 

I'm waiting to see what comes of this after a little more time

Wish I made a product EVERYONE was Required to consume on a reoccurring basis

 

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1 hour ago, NeedAClew said:

Well if you are happy to keep catching it every year or so, just keep masking and distancing so as not to give it to someone who would prefer not to get it,

no one is offering ANYTHING to keep you from getting it or passing it along

jury is OUT on it passing through a mask like Hot Air through a screen-door

Vaccine is intended to make you Asymptomatic WHEN you Do Get it

if you are Asymptomatic naturally or b/c of the vaccine you are the SAME

we can stay away from eachother

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Ok.  Best wishes for being asymptomatic next time(s). I don’t think that's guaranteed each time. 

PS not all masks are like screen doors 

Edited by NeedAClew
Add well wishes and mask
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  • 1 month later...

Just got the Moderna booster, at the VA because they'd boost spouses even if they weren't 65 yet.

Walked the dog in the woods a few miles and fully intended to come home, clean the chimney and get the leaves out of the gutters.

I'm going to bed instead.

I feel like I've been through the thagomizer.

The nurse said the Moderna booster is a half dose, unlike the Pfizer, and the Moderna has proven to be roughly 2.5 times more efficacious, so I'm good with a little thagomification.

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

Ide saye keepe mooveng, I wente golfeng, then wifey dragged my asse all overe shoppeng.  When it wase time, I slepte, gotte up and wente hiking.          :)

if you had SEX (that included yer wifey) you could skip the shoppeng and morning hike

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16 hours ago, Irrational 14 said:

Today is Tuesday. Looks like your Meds Reminder is off again...

PA Forum is down the hall, not here.

meds reminder.jpg

If you think getting vaxxed is political, you may be a Republican.

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On 9/2/2021 at 8:17 AM, Laurent said:

^^^^

Woody, I do not know if this is a trustworthy information source... but for the sake of the discussion, let's assume it is.

 

If I understand well, it states that people who got COVID in the past, fair much better against the delta variant, than people who got the vaccine, and never contracted the disease in the first place. And therefore, the recommendation is : take into account whether the patient has had COVID before, when you decide if a third shot is warranted.

Did I get that right?

 

So are you suggesting that we should innoculate the disease ("original variant") to those who have not gotten it yet, to make them better prepared for the delta variant???

 

What that article does NOT cover is: what happens to the people who have not contracted Covid in the past, and are not vaccinated yet? Isn't the best option for them to be vaccinated in the first place???

 

Personnaly, I am vaccinated, and I have not had the disease (so far...). I know because I had a blood test to confirm it. If I am offered a third jab, I will take it wholeheartidly. I don't see how the fact that it may not protect me as well as someone who contracted the disease in the past should make me hesitate to take the shot.

 

 

You are reasoning with Woody……now that right there is some seriously funny shit.

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Due to some medical conditions, my body response to the first two jabs of Pfizer vaccine was poor. About 8 weeks after the second jab, antibody count was only 26.2 U/mL... A positive response is considered achieved above 0.8 U/mL, but most people are in the hundreds or even thousands... and no doctor will tell you what the minimum level is to be considered well protected. It is much more complicated than that...

So I took a third shot of the same vaccine. 4 weeks later, my antibody count is > 2,500 U/mL !!!

So, yeah, the third jab was a good thing for me.

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14 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Due to some medical conditions, my body response to the first two jabs of Pfizer vaccine was poor. About 8 weeks after the second jab, antibody count was only 26.2 U/mL... A positive response is considered achieved above 0.8 U/mL, but most people are in the hundreds or even thousands... and no doctor will tell you what the minimum level is to be considered well protected. It is much more complicated than that...

So I took a third shot of the same vaccine. 4 weeks later, my antibody count is > 2,500 U/mL !!!

So, yeah, the third jab was a good thing for me.

Nice! After the 2nd Moderna I was at 58 and pleased about that in spite of some immune compromise problems that had me wonder how robust my response would be. >2500! Excellent. I will be getting the third as well but have to toss a little URI first that is just hanging on.

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  • 2 months later...

MOVE OVER COVID yer so 2020/1

and we AIN'T geared Up for this shit too

 

Tuberculosis Case Reported at Sycuan Casino

 

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Health

Tuberculosis Case Reported at Sycuan Casino

An arm with a TB test Image Credit: CDC
 
By Katie Cadiao, County of San Diego Communications OfficeJan. 3, 2022 | 5:35 PM
 

A person at Sycuan Casino was recently diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) and may have exposed patrons and employees, the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency announced today.

The dates of exposure were from April 1, 2021 to December 9, 2021. HHSA is working with Sycuan Casino officials to notify those who were potentially exposed.

Tuberculosis is transmitted from person to person through indoor air during prolonged contact with an infectious person. The exposure risk for patrons was low due to COVID-19 safety measures like masks, social distancing and divider walls in place at the casino.

“While many people exposed to tuberculosis do not become infected, some will be, and an early infection may not show any symptoms,” said Cameron Kaiser, M.D., M.P.H., County deputy public health officer. “Although we don’t think this is a high-risk exposure, testing is recommended for employees who may have been exposed to the infected individual for a significant period of time.”

Symptoms of infectious tuberculosis include persistent cough, fever, night sweats and unexplained weight loss. People with symptoms of TB, or who are immune-compromised and may not show obvious symptoms, should consult their medical provider to be evaluated for the bacteria. Tuberculosis can be cured with an extended course of specific antibiotics.

People who would like more information on this potential exposure should contact the San Diego County TB Control Program at (619) 692-8621.

Tuberculosis is not uncommon in the San Diego region and, although decreasing since the early 1990s, case counts have stabilized in recent years. In 2020, 192 cases were reported in San Diego County. Last year’s TB case numbers have not been finalized yet, but so far, 164 cases have been reported in 2021.

Learn more about TB and how to treat it by watching the below testimonial from a tuberculosis survivor.

 
Related: sycuan casino tb casetbtuberculosis
cnc-login-logo-180x180.pngKatie Cadiao is a communications specialist with the County of San Diego Communications Office. Contact
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