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Dinghy davit, solar & wind farm, and a focus on anchoring? Is that rig chopped? Sheesh. Confused owner. The Mac65 can be an interesting ride in the original trim. Not fun as this abomination. May not be a good choice for offshore work. 
 

I think they are dream crushers as I have never seen one well cared for. 

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Roger MacGregor used aircraft fuselage design traits to keep construction costs low. Consequently,  where traditionally built designs have longitudinal stringers, bulheads and deck hull joints bonded in; the MacGregors rely upon an interior liner and a mechanically fastened deckhull joint with a neoprene gasket. 

The result was a relatively low cost to build boat that is very flexible. You couldn't put more than 1800 pounds on the backstay. Today the max load for the headstay tension on the boat I'm racing on is 6 tons. So, while there were a few points of sail that they are very quick in. The sleds were a much better all around design with very similar operating costs.

We campaigned hull #2 from 1984 through 1990. Now, while I have some real fun hand me down gear from some of the other race programs I sail for. The focus of the budget has been on comfortable reliable coastal cruising. 

We're getting ready for our annual fall run to Catalina at the end of the month. Still getting a lot of bang for the buck all these years later.

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The burgundy velour upholstery is long gone. But, we still have the cheesey little chandelier over the sette. And, the smoke plexiglass is fading to a light purple. 

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4 hours ago, Locus said:

There are 2 in Seattle. Both go out occasionally. One used to race but not in years. 

One has the newer "stacked" coach roof, the other the older more traditional spaceship looking one

The race version in Seattle is probably Joss. She was definitely the best example of a true race optimized Big Mac. When they purchased her new the owners had the deck hull joint FRP bonded the entire perimeter.  The headstay was moved aft and some mini stringers and bulkheads were bonded in. So, she was the stiffest of the racing MacGregors.

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The MacGregor 65 is the boat for which the term "Flexible Flyer" was coined. Emphasis on the word "Flexible".

What do you think of the build quality of the MacGregor 26M? Same deal here.

MacGregor thought he could build something that was as good as a Santa Cruz 70 for half the cost. Didn't happen. When you tighten the backstay, the whole boat turns banana-shaped. They don't make good racers and they don't make good cruisers.

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6 hours ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

The race version in Seattle is probably Joss. She was definitely the best example of a true race optimized Big Mac. When they purchased her new the owners had the deck hull joint FRP bonded the entire perimeter.  The headstay was moved aft and some mini stringers and bulkheads were bonded in. So, she was the stiffest of the racing MacGregors.

and Joss seemed to be relatively competitive in the 80's when there was cheetah and a few other  and not a ton of SC70's. it had a sugar scoop iirc. i believe they even won a mexico race? you would know better than me.

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15 hours ago, pironiero said:

yes

i just wanted some info on this boat, cus it looks nice

So, maybe this is because you are in Russia and you don't have search engines, but if you do you can find a ton of information including on this very forum. Just search on google for "Macgregor 65 problems." No need to bother us to ask for links and information just because you think a boat looks nice and just want some info. 

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26 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

So, maybe this is because you are in Russia and you don't have search engines, but if you do you can find a ton of information including on this very forum. Just search on google for "Macgregor 65 problems." No need to bother us to ask for links and information just because you think a boat looks nice and just want some info. 

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I did a demo sai on one of the early ones in the 80s. The amount of movement below deck in small waves was remarkable and a bit disconcerting. 

Now at the time the decor was fresh and relavent but probbaly didn't age well. Very Miamii vice. 

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On 9/6/2021 at 9:30 AM, The great unwashed said:

The two I have looked over were lined with gray monkey fur and had chrome tube / smoked plexi accents.  With the addition of a small disco ball and some polyester double knit sailing togs, you’d be all set.

Chrome? Monkey fur?? Disco ball??? Now we're talking, baaayyybeee!

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19 hours ago, bigrpowr said:

and Joss seemed to be relatively competitive in the 80's when there was cheetah and a few other  and not a ton of SC70's. it had a sugar scoop iirc. i believe they even won a mexico race? you would know better than me.

You mean the PV record that stood for 20 years until Magnitude finally beat it!  That was our first offshore race on Lean Machine.  We were the last boat to beat the previous record holders time.

 

 

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There's one at RVYC in Vancouver with a big sugar scoop on the back that currently holds an assortment of paddleboards and kayaks. FastTrack. It was away from the dock for a bit but I'm not aware of it participating in any races.

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1 hour ago, climenuts said:

There's one at RVYC in Vancouver with a big sugar scoop on the back that currently holds an assortment of paddleboards and kayaks. FastTrack. It was away from the dock for a bit but I'm not aware of it participating in any races.

Mc Fastrack I believe - or at least it was in 2007: http://retiredandonthemove.blogspot.com/2007/07/some-of-you-have-asked-about-our.html

Not the ideal boat for racing in our area since even LD races require upwind work for a good part of the race.  Probably okay when wind is aft of the beam.

Like others have said, a real banana boat.

I recall racing against her when she was brand new. Might have been an Entrance Island race, I can't exactly recall.  I was on a Peterson 35 and about halfway across the strait on one of those long starboard tacks the Mac 65 appeared about 100 yards off our weather hip.  She may have had a touch more boat speed but couldn't point with us.  Eventually they drove under our stern.  We carried our tack the entire way.  We crossed them when they eventually tacked back.  Conditions were I would have guessed about 8-10 kts upwind in flat water.  Which I would think would have been ideal for a boat like that.  Certainly no where near the limit of our No. 1.

It may have been that they hadn't sorted the boat out as it was new - but I was shocked that any half boat almost twice as long as a P35 couldn't get by with ease.

Anyway, for those interested, below is a rather poor quality image of Mc Fastrack with the huge stern extension.

McFastrack - Sydney Spit.JPG

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2 hours ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

You mean the PV record that stood for 20 years until Magnitude finally beat it!  That was our first offshore race on Lean Machine.  We were the last boat to beat the previous record holders time.

 

 

ahh that was it. impressive to say the least.

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On 9/6/2021 at 6:44 AM, pironiero said:

Does anyone still sails these? are they any good?(at 150k$ price) any stories about them? Looks like a nice cutter, IMO hasn't aged too bad...

Used Macgregor 65 for Sale | Yachts For Sale | Yachthub

no slapping noise going through swells with one of these

should find a 75' stretch model for less

MERCURY Coming out with a BY-TURBO 1,200 hp OB for QUAD-MODE Sailing

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I put the rigs in 3 (?) of those new during commissioning. Tighten the backstays under the interior doors jammed, then back off until they could function. Standing joke was that every time resin pricing went up, a layer of laminate was removed from build schedule.

Macgregor built their own spars for a while, they were a joy to assemble. Masthead assemblies welded on backwards, spreader roots at different angles to each side stand out as oopsies. We were always just told to assemble what was delivered.

Another of my long list of missed jobs: met with a 65 owner who wanted to install a new spar with longer, swept spreaders, new chainplates bolted thru topsides, and deeper keel with bulb.  I asked who had done the laminate design & who was going to install the new ring frame & floors to support all this. He refused to believe any of this was needed. I left. A year later, boat was at Westerly Marine getting these new structures added, so I must have installed some level of thought into his mind. However, I was never called back on any part of the project.

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4 hours ago, longy said:

I put the rigs in 3 (?) of those new during commissioning. Tighten the backstays under the interior doors jammed, then back off until they could function. Standing joke was that every time resin pricing went up, a layer of laminate was removed from build schedule.

Any idea of the number of dismastings and hull structure failures that have occurred over the years? It appears that a lot of sea miles have been put on these boats...

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I've never heard of a dismasting. The rigs were not very high tech.

I do know of one that sank in the Med called Rapid Loche.

Then there was a laminate failure on Fast Track during the Coastal Cup. She survived that. Roger built the hulls with woven roving and used a lighter cloth below the gel coat to hide the weave patterns. Fast Exit was berthed bow in at a concrete bulkhead. Apparently, the were some dings in the bow. The water pressure sailing at 18 knots off Point Conception pealed the cloth off the woven roving. Several years later I had the same thing happen on the same race on Rag Time. Except it was a 4'X8' sheet of Marui Ply. Good thing they built her with 2-layers. 

And, the only other near catastrophe they I recall was Joss flexed a patched repair of a knot meter thru-hull location on a delivery back up from Cabo. The Coast Guard had to drop the big pumps to them.

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17 hours ago, 12 metre said:

Mc Fastrack I believe - or at least it was in 2007: http://retiredandonthemove.blogspot.com/2007/07/some-of-you-have-asked-about-our.html

Not the ideal boat for racing in our area since even LD races require upwind work for a good part of the race.  Probably okay when wind is aft of the beam.

Like others have said, a real banana boat.

I recall racing against her when she was brand new. Might have been an Entrance Island race, I can't exactly recall.  I was on a Peterson 35 and about halfway across the strait on one of those long starboard tacks the Mac 65 appeared about 100 yards off our weather hip.  She may have had a touch more boat speed but couldn't point with us.  Eventually they drove under our stern.  We carried our tack the entire way.  We crossed them when they eventually tacked back.  Conditions were I would have guessed about 8-10 kts upwind in flat water.  Which I would think would have been ideal for a boat like that.  Certainly no where near the limit of our No. 1.

It may have been that they hadn't sorted the boat out as it was new - but I was shocked that any half boat almost twice as long as a P35 couldn't get by with ease.

Anyway, for those interested, below is a rather poor quality image of Mc Fastrack with the huge stern extension.

McFastrack - Sydney Spit.JPG

The reports I hear are that she does have the advantage (in our area) of being very quick under motor (due to long waterline), so she makes a pretty good summer cruiser in the PNW.

I remember working on the spinnaker for Mc Fastrack at the loft.  That was a VERY large sail!!!

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I’m going to assume that I am the only former MacGregor employee on this web site.  I’ll be happy to answer any and all questions pertaining to the build quality of MacGregor products.  Bear in mind I only worked there for 3 days. I was 20 years old. And I was smoking a lot of weed at the time. 

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2 hours ago, Al Paca said:

Let’s just say I wasn’t management. 

Weed is for the plebs. Management snorts coke. 

So help me God, I think the 65 is a good looking boat. If its bones were as good as its looks, I might be tempted.

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Great thread. My boat was built in a weed smoke infused chicken coop (SC 50) but somehow did not turn out like the 65. So …

The Mac 65 could be a fun fling … but only if one knew the reality. Kinda like a whore-filled Bangkok disco … fabulous in the moment … not so impressive in the 7 am sunshine. 
 

If the price is right…

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14 minutes ago, Borracho said:

Great thread. My boat was built in a weed smoke infused chicken coop (SC 50) but somehow did not turn out like the 65. So …

The Mac 65 could be a fun fling … but only if one knew the reality. Kinda like a whore-filled Bangkok disco … fabulous in the moment … not so impressive in the 7 am sunshine. 
 

If the price is right…

The Santa Cruz 50 is Singapore's Grand Hyatt club Brix compared to that bangkok disco...

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On 9/7/2021 at 8:34 AM, Somebody Else said:

The MacGregor 65 is the boat for which the term "Flexible Flyer" was coined. Emphasis on the word "Flexible".

What do you think of the build quality of the MacGregor 26M? Same deal here.

MacGregor thought he could build something that was as good as a Santa Cruz 70 for half the cost. Didn't happen. When you tighten the backstay, the whole boat turns banana-shaped. They don't make good racers and they don't make good cruisers.

Why not just build the boats with less rocker and use back-stay to control that?

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There is one locally that seems to consistently pop up in the auctions for some ridiculously low amount. It would disappear the re-emerge, disappear then re-emerge. The time gap between purchases and relisting for auction was quick enough where it never moved off the auctioneers dock. It was still there a good two years later. 

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12 hours ago, Al Paca said:

I’m going to assume that I am the only former MacGregor employee on this web site.  I’ll be happy to answer any and all questions pertaining to the build quality of MacGregor products.  Bear in mind I only worked there for 3 days. I was 20 years old. And I was smoking a lot of weed at the time. 

ok i'll go first, do you think hotrod would have done better using 2 of these hulls and brigedecking them rather than the ply of flyin hawiian ?

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1 hour ago, Caecilian said:

There used to one in Auckland, I'll have to admit I never actually saw it in 4th mode but if a tree falls in the forest and nobody hears it, does it make a sound?

 this could be what you had in mind re forest, however that  AK boat  wasn't lightspeed was it ?

c saw.jpg

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49 minutes ago, 167149 said:

ok i'll go first, do you think hotrod would have done better using 2 of these hulls and brigedecking them rather than the ply of flyin hawiian ?

Of course. All MacGregors were built to very rigorous maritime engineering standards. Not one front has ever fallen off. 

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12 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

Of course. All MacGregors were built to very rigorous maritime engineering standards. Not one front has ever fallen off. 

I think the smaller ones had cardboard derivatives... maybe some cello tape... but they're not the main topic here!

FB- Doug

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On 9/6/2021 at 3:56 PM, pironiero said:

yes

i just wanted some info on this boat, cus it looks nice

looks can be deceiving .. 

Boob job, $4000 Forgetting to tuck in your nuts, PRICELESS - )

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On 9/6/2021 at 6:44 AM, pironiero said:

Does anyone still sails these? are they any good?(at 150k$ price) any stories about them? Looks like a nice cutter, IMO hasn't aged too bad...

Used Macgregor 65 for Sale | Yachts For Sale | Yachthub

you get what you pay for

 

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On 9/6/2021 at 10:16 AM, Locus said:

There are 2 in Seattle. Both go out occasionally. One used to race but not in years. 

One has the newer "stacked" coach roof, the other the older more traditional spaceship looking one

The guy with the older one loves it. Chatted with him a bit out at Friday Harbor this summer. Not really sure how it sails. He said good things, and I have heard good things about the sailing ability of this design, but no frist hand knowledge.

 

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and what.. 8' beam? or thereabouts? my RIB is wider than that... 

 

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Somewhere there is a great pic from an old Southern Straits, about '92 or '93, of a couple of Newport 41s duking it out upwind under a scary dark cloud, and in the background is McFastrack, still behind after 8 hours of sailing...

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14 minutes ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

and what.. 8' beam? or thereabouts? my RIB is wider than that... 

 

Road trailer legal!! Easy deliveries!!

One amazing thing is that on the boats I worked on, they all had a full B&G top end electronics/sailing install, and most had SSB also.  Dreams of cruising

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Come on Longy you just replaced our standing rigging about 4 years ago. And, yes we have B&G now. But, only Triton and Zeus. Oh and the old SSB got lots of use back in the 80's. I don't think we've turned it back on since the early 90's.

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back in the late 90s early 2000s we had one here on West/Rhode River that use to try to do our wed night races.. you wanted to be as far away from them as possible at the start as they projected their own weather system about 150 around the boat at all times. Whichever side of the line they were trying to start on, it paid to be as far towards the other end of the line as you could get. I don't recall them ever finishing in front of another boat in our/their class... but they did come out an sail, so I'll give em that!

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47 minutes ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

Come on Longy you just replaced our standing rigging about 4 years ago. And, yes we have B&G now. But, only Triton and Zeus. Oh and the old SSB got lots of use back in the 80's. I don't think we've turned it back on since the early 90's.

Are you certain of this? I haven't worked on a M 65 in decades. Is my stunt double doing work & not paying the proper baksheesh?

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The Macgregor 65 is designed for worldwide cruising and racing. It is claimed to be the fastest production cruising yacht ever built. Its ultra high performance is the result of its long waterline and narrow,easily driven hull. The 65's have been throughly proven through thousands of miles of offshore cruising and racing. It can be routinely sailed single handed or with a crew of two.

Fast Safe Fun, 8 to 12 knots any day any time, Capable of over twenty knots, A fast voyage is a safe voyage, Two double berth staterooms, Great cockpit, US Coast Guard certified for 12, Make Money$

Time and tide wait for no one!

Such prose, it bought a tear to my eye

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32 minutes ago, longy said:

Nope. Ran a fair bit of biz past Allen and Allen but never worked there.

Sorry my bad

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Was the NZ one Dances wih Wolves? Went to OZ? Lightspeed was a Wylie 60. Went to New Calefonia I think.

There is a 1995 Bridgedeck version on Aus site Yachthub that looks like it has had some love. AUD$275k. Plus an older one. Loved - not so much.

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10 hours ago, 167149 said:

ok i'll go first, do you think hotrod would have done better using 2 of these hulls and brigedecking them rather than the ply of flyin hawiian ?

If the only thing you considered were the rutters, ol' HotRod would have been miles ahead of the game. The layup, rig, fit-out would have all been improved as well...

 

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9 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

It is a big cheap boat. The maintenance will be in line with other big boats, slips, bottom jobs, etc. are sold by the foot.

 

nice to have a boat where you can crank the backstays and save $$$$$$ on By the Foot Slip Fees

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Since they are such trash, can anyone explain why the vast majority of them are still sailing?

I think they are very simply constructed, which in a weird way is better for long life. They have no core to get saturated and they don't get flexible with age, they started out that way. Also with relatively shallow draft and very narrow beam, I am guessing rigging loads are low, there is a lot of give in the system.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Since they are such trash, can anyone explain why the vast majority of them are still sailing?

Because the keels don’t fall off? 

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