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Anybody know this story on this old beast in Fort Lauderdale?


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That's Apple's "new" high efficiency image format; photo was probably taken with a newer iPhone. No browser currently supports it in a production version. If you're running a recent version of Windows 10, you might get away with saving it to your desktop and opening it from there.

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I’m sure there’s an interesting story behind that one.

We lived in Lauderdale for a year. You find some amazing things tied up back in the canals. 

Often, the only way to spot them is from the water. 

 

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Members here talk about neglected boats being money pits - that thing would set a new standard.

And you'd still end up with an ugly boat.

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There are a few large, apparently neglected vessels moored around our area that are said to belong to certain regional business moguls.  Even if they don't have time (or crew?) to use them, the moorage cost is probably tiny compared to say, the monthly landscaping around one of their 14 movie theaters, or 12 car lots.  Maybe easier to understand than the typical 30-footer in the zombie fleet which presumably belongs to someone of more modest means.  

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23 hours ago, M@AYC said:

...and thanks for posting it.  That slip is probably at least $600-800 a month, so somebody is apparently paying to keep it there? crazy.

As with every boat decaying year to year in a yard, on a hook or in a marina, The Dream Dies Hard.  

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4 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

As with every boat decaying year to year in a yard, on a hook or in a marina, The Dream Dies Hard.  

It’s hard to give up the dream. My ex-wife and her boyfriend had a big steel ketch rotting in a boatyard in the Carolinas. He died, as did their dream. She finally signed it over to the boatyard, which scrapped it. 

I got no joy out of that, even though we parted on pretty awful terms.

 

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14 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

As with every boat decaying year to year in a yard, on a hook or in a marina, The Dream Dies Hard.  

As long as they own the boat the dream doesn't die.

I've observed that it's usually the owner who dies and then the dream gets disposed of by those left behind.

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14 hours ago, accnick said:

It’s hard to give up the dream. My ex-wife and her boyfriend had a big steel ketch rotting in a boatyard in the Carolinas. He died, as did their dream. She finally signed it over to the boatyard, which scrapped it. 

I got no joy out of that, even though we parted on pretty awful terms.

 

Well you felt sorry for the boat, right ;)

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10 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Well you felt sorry for the boat, right ;)

It was one of those boats you look at and say “that must have been nice when it was new”. From the pictures I saw of it, it had been a lot of years since it was nice.

Not every old boat deserves to be saved. 

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