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Winterizing Yanmar 2YM15


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This will be my first time winterizing my Yanmar 2YM15. The manual says to simply drain water from the raw water passages. In my power boat inboard, I just let it suck pink anti-freeze until I see it coming out the exhaust. 
 

What do you guys do to your sail drives to winterize them?

 

Also, do you use a de-scaler?

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I read that with my Yanmar too and then promptly did the anti-freeze instead.

Theoretically the impeller is the lowest point of raw water in the engine, so by opening the cover you drain it all out...  but It made me nervous.

As for the sail drive you're supposed to change the oil yearly or every 250hrs. I don't do more than 250 a year so it's an annual change before storing it for the winter.  As for the water pickup - my assumption was that any water in the intake will drain out freely when the boat comes out of the water, the manual doesn't call out anything specific.

 

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In my opinion an appropriate antifreeze would be a better option than draining as it would inhibit corrosion better than air. I personally haven't ever winterized my engine because it sits in the water year round and I keep the interior of the boat from freezing.

I'd only use descaler if you think you have an issue. I definitely wouldn't leave it in there for the winter.

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4 hours ago, Zonker said:

God no - on leaving descaler in place for more than 24 hours or whatever the container says.

Sorry, I never bent to imply that descaled would be left in for the winter. 

But, it did prompt me to read the directions for the de-scaler. They want you to re-circulate it for 1-4 hours then flush. Probably easy enough to do, but maybe a project for spring. 

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Re-circulating is best but if you don't have a little pump you can pour some in, let it soak for a few hours, drain, and repeat.

back to your original question, no harm in using anti-freeze IF it has corrosion inhibiting chemicals in it i.e. the green/orange/purple stuff you put in your cooling system, not the pink non-toxic stuff you put in your fresh water system.

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8 hours ago, Zonker said:

Re-circulating is best but if you don't have a little pump you can pour some in, let it soak for a few hours, drain, and repeat.

back to your original question, no harm in using anti-freeze IF it has corrosion inhibiting chemicals in it i.e. the green/orange/purple stuff you put in your cooling system, not the pink non-toxic stuff you put in your fresh water system.

you can have both - you still want to use non-toxic if you're just letting it dump into the water thru the exhaust.  Just ensure you get the stuff that is made for engines as well (per Zonker there is the water system only stuff at places like Walmart that you don't want to use in your engine)

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine---60-f-engine-water-system-antifreeze-gallon--3556610?recordNum=2

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16 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

As I understand it, the stuff for water systems is ethylene glycol; propylene glycol is for motors. 

 

Sound Right?

NO

Ethylene Glycol is poisonous and toxic to marine life.  It will kill a dog with one spoonful for example.  NEVER use it for fresh water systems.

It is typically used in automotive coolants and on the closed side of your engine cooling system.  It is NOT intended to be released into the environment and should be recycled at an appropriate facility.

Propylene Glycol is non-toxic and safe for the environment.  It can be used in your fresh water system and the raw water side of your engine.  There are multiple styles of propylene glycol anti-freeze, the ones that work in the engine have additional corrosion inhibitors.  They are safe for both the fresh water system and the engine.  The ones without the corrosion inhibitors should only be used in the fresh water system.

Keep it simple - buy the stuff from west marine that says "safe for engines and fresh water systems" and decide what minimum temp you need based on where you are.  It's not expensive.

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Really depends on how quickly you can shut it off when you see it coming out of the exhaust!

I usually fill up a 5 gallon bucket with 3-4 gallons and that's enough, especially if i have a second person watching the exhaust to see when it starts flowing out.

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If it's a raw water cooled engine you'll need to make sure the engine is hot and under some load when flushing to ensure the thermostat is open and it's not just bypassing straight to the exhaust. If it's fresh water cooled you don't need to worry about it.

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3 hours ago, SimonGH said:

NO

Ethylene Glycol is poisonous and toxic to marine life.  It will kill a dog with one spoonful for example.  NEVER use it for fresh water systems.

It is typically used in automotive coolants and on the closed side of your engine cooling system.  It is NOT intended to be released into the environment and should be recycled at an appropriate facility.

Propylene Glycol is non-toxic and safe for the environment.  It can be used in your fresh water system and the raw water side of your engine.  There are multiple styles of propylene glycol anti-freeze, the ones that work in the engine have additional corrosion inhibitors.  They are safe for both the fresh water system and the engine.  The ones without the corrosion inhibitors should only be used in the fresh water system.

Keep it simple - buy the stuff from west marine that says "safe for engines and fresh water systems" and decide what minimum temp you need based on where you are.  It's not expensive.

Propylene Glycol is also used as a bowel-cleansing agent in preparation for colonoscopies. I wish I didn't know that little factoid.

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2YM15 is a closed coolant engine with a raw water heat exchanger.  There is no thermostat on the raw side.  The heat exchanger is the equivalent of a radiator on a car, the seawater is the same as the air flowing over the radiator.

You don't touch the engine side.  All you do is pull the pipe going to the saildrive seacock (obviously make sure it's off!), put the hose in a bucket of antifreeze (the west marine stuff linked), and start the engine.  Wait until it's coming out of the exhaust, then turn off the engine.  Reconnect the hose to the seacock and leave it closed.  Then I typically put tape over the start button to remind me the seacock is closed and the system winterized.  Thats it.

I also typically do my oil changes in the fall too - sail drive and engine.  And I fill the fuel tank to minimize condensation.

 

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