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Can anyone recommend a good cruising guide for SE Alaska, also any other books to read for info to plan a few months in the area  I have the Waggoners guide on order.  Trying to find some sailing blogs from boats  currently cruising SE Alaska.   I have found losts on the inside passage canada and Puget sound. 

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Presumably the rocks and anchorages are the same.

Alaska and the BC coast have sooo many anchorages to choose from that a cruising guide probably isn't that vital. 

 

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I have a 3 year old Waggoners  that doesn't cover Se AK.   This will be our first time  cruising in SE Ak.   I am  looking for any tips and fun things to see and do.   Where to get fuel and  provisions.  Trying to find some blogs from people who have done it.       

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3 hours ago, SUbsailor said:

I have a 3 year old Waggoners  that doesn't cover Se AK.   This will be our first time  cruising in SE Ak.   I am  looking for any tips and fun things to see and do.   Where to get fuel and  provisions.  Trying to find some blogs from people who have done it.       

I think “Waggoner” is a publishing company that publishes not only the Waggoner guide to Puget Sound/Georgia Strait (Salish Sea) and BC coast, but they also publish the Hemingway-Douglas book on SE Alaska.

Tips on fun things to do and see: fish and crab.  Climb and/or ski local coastal mountains en route.  Dare to get closer to small grounded icebergs than you should and chip off very old ice for a cocktail.  Whale watch everywhere.  Go to Hydaburg for a massive totem pole raising ceremony and be invited by the local native community to hang and feast with them.  Watch large grizzly bears at their salmon-feeding grounds and from a safe distance.  (Khutzeymateen) Watch rare coastal marine wolves and the elusive, white and quite rare “spirit bear” in its very limited habitat on a wilderness tour with a local native guide (Gribbell Island, Princess Royal Island).  Sail the outside/west coasts of Dall Island and Haida Gwaii.  Sail to Haida Gwaii and explore there and Gwaii Hanas National Park.  At all costs, avoid cruise ships and related to those awful monsters as much as possible.  Fish and crab some more, but this time further north, in Alaska, for king crab and big halibut (after going for Dungeness and salmon on the Canadian coast).  Explore lots of hot springs up and down the coast.  Check out the local music scene in Sitka.  Glacier Bay kayaking in the arms/fjords where all motorized vessels are prohibited.  Watch seals and their pups there on ice floes.  Sail.  Glacier climb/hike.  Try to get a stint as a deckhand on a commercial fish boat for a few weeks just for the unique local experience.  More hot springs.  Dare to enter Lituya Bay.  Try to sail as much as possible in the Inside Passage by timing the winds and tides.  Hot cinnamon buns at Echo Cove, first entry point in Alaska. The incredibly fine sandy Pacific Ocean beach at the end of Kwakahua Channel near the Surf Islands.  Getting to know more about coastal indigenous cultures.  More fishing and crabbing.  After Lituya Bay, figuring out if you have the weather, skills and preparation to get up to Yakutat.  Planning a ski ascent of Mt. Fairweather where you drop off the mountain party at the head of Tarr Inlet, where they begin their ascent, and pick them up a week or so later near Cross Sound after their descent and their 20 or so mile, multi-day, truly wilderness beach walk along the Pacific coast.  Alaska ferry trip from Juneau to Haines and then driving trip to Whitehorse, Yukon.  Lots to do...
 

My god, man, the possibilities are endless.  :-) Ya don’t really need a guidebook for any of that stuff -just imagination.  Guidebooks and blogs useful for logistics and related info.

Endless possibilities... https://bikepacking.com/routes/bikerafting-alaska-lost-coast/

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We used "Exploring the North Coast of British Columbia" and "Exploring Southeast Alaska" almost exclusively.  They are very thorough and cover most nooks and crannies.  "The Inside Passage Route Planning Map" (North and South Portion) are great resources for planning each day's leg.  They are not a nautical chart per se but give a good feel for distances and surrounding terrain.  Also, you don't want to leave home without "Ports and Passes" tide/current guide. Cell service is often usually non-existent so you can't rely on data for tides.

You can visit our blog: gadaboutlife.com if you want to see some of the places we visited (Alaska is at the beginning).  Keep in mind, it was written more as a travelogue for friends and family rather than for sailors.

Finally, over the last five years we sailed from Alaska down to Panama, to the Galapagos, across the Pacific to New Zealand and we still haven't found anywhere that touched us as deeply as SE Alaska.  It is a trip worth making.

 

 

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I love Joe Upton's "Alaska Blues" and "Journeys Through the Inside Passage" - great travelogs for the area, written by a commercial fisherman who fished there in the 70s.   The first almost reads like poetry, the second juxtaposes his trips with the history of the area.

I also enjoyed Jonathan Raban's "Passage to Juneau", which interleaves his sail up from Seatle with Vancouver's voyage to the same area.

None are practical guides, all three make great reads to prep you for your trip. 

I've done it on the Ferry, can only dream of doing it on a small boat one day.

 

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16 hours ago, sailor-cfn said:

I love Joe Upton's "Alaska Blues" and "Journeys Through the Inside Passage" - great travelogs for the area, written by a commercial fisherman who fished there in the 70s.   The first almost reads like poetry, the second juxtaposes his trips with the history of the area.

I also enjoyed Jonathan Raban's "Passage to Juneau", which interleaves his sail up from Seatle with Vancouver's voyage to the same area.

None are practical guides, all three make great reads to prep you for your trip. 

I've done it on the Ferry, can only dream of doing it on a small boat one day.

 

" Alaska blues" was a stunning read and very well illustrated, one of the major reasons I went there in the mid 80's

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47 minutes ago, 167149 said:

" Alaska blues" was a stunning read and very well illustrated, one of the major reasons I went there in the mid 80's

And one of the reasons we ended up trolling in SE for 35 years.

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Jud-SV Sputnik  and Wagsea6b  Thanks what you provided is exactly what I am looking for, we like to meet the locals.      We did a small boat (82 pax) cruise in Alaska many years ago and want to do on our boat on our schedule. I have just order Exploring SE Alaska from Waggoners web site.  We will not be going up the inside passage we will be starting from Sitka after a pacific crossing from Hi.  Don't want a schedule but do want to know distances and what is available at various locations plan on being self sufficient as much as possible.  Trying to figure out where to leave boat for the winter.  Need to figure out all of the rules for a non resident to fish.  Looking at two possible three summers in the area SE Alaska/Inside passage/ West Coast of Vancouver Island before spend a year in Washington.                                       1                       I will have to try to find Alaska Blues and Journey through the Inside passage.  I will take a look at your blog wagsea5b again thanks to all    

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The recent Waggoners covers some of SE Alaska and is most up to date. The Douglas guides cover almost every nook and cranny, but without much detail in many cases and are out of date on facilities. But the two together are really all you might need. I have a couple of others like Charlie's Charts, but they do not fill any gaps left by the aforementioned two. 

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Which, if any of these guides are available as Ebooks?  Given two equivalent volumes, I'm likely to lean toward the one that takes up none of the limited shelf space on board.  

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6 hours ago, SUbsailor said:

Jud-SV Sputnik  and Wagsea6b  Thanks what you provided is exactly what I am looking for, we like to meet the locals.      We did a small boat (82 pax) cruise in Alaska many years ago and want to do on our boat on our schedule. I have just order Exploring SE Alaska from Waggoners web site.  We will not be going up the inside passage we will be starting from Sitka after a pacific crossing from Hi.  Don't want a schedule but do want to know distances and what is available at various locations plan on being self sufficient as much as possible.  Trying to figure out where to leave boat for the winter.  Need to figure out all of the rules for a non resident to fish.  Looking at two possible three summers in the area SE Alaska/Inside passage/ West Coast of Vancouver Island before spend a year in Washington.                                       1                       I will have to try to find Alaska Blues and Journey through the Inside passage.  I will take a look at your blog wagsea5b again thanks to all    

Have a look at this Swiss couple’s site - I just remembered it (came across it a few weeks ago while looking for info on winter marina fees in Cordova/Homer/etc Alaska ports with the idea of sailing north to the Aleutians/Bering area during a summer or two, and leaving boat there for a winter instead of trying to make it all the way back in a season.)

These folks have “been around” - Russia, Japan, NW Passage, and have some specific notes on Alaska that you may find useful.  Their site is largely French, so there’s a reason to learn to read French you can’t.  But here’s some English documents/info.  There’s also a section of their site covering Haida Gwaii to San Francisco - accessible from the homepage.

https://www.chamade.ch/russia-and-aleoutians-cruising-notes/

Homepage:

https://www.chamade.ch (Click on the British flag for English translation/version of their entire site, I think)

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14 hours ago, toddster said:

Which, if any of these guides are available as Ebooks?  Given two equivalent volumes, I'm likely to lean toward the one that takes up none of the limited shelf space on board.  

The Waggoners is available as a e-book or pdf. And it is very useful in that form as you can search it. However, a couple of years ago they chose to separate each section (describing a subregion of the area) into a separate pdf and this defeats the search as you must know which file it is in before you start. Also, about half of the printed version is filler of various sorts (educational articles, advertisements, etc.) and this is repeated in EACH section of the pdf. I get why they do this (it is ad supported to some extent) but it does make it less useful. The solution is to use a pdf editor to remove the fluff (or at least all but one copy of the fluff) and paste the sections back together into one searchable pdf file. 

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