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Everglades Challenge 2022


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On 10/3/2021 at 12:25 PM, Dex Sawash said:

Are there any crazy filters in UFC like a portage?

100+ miles up the St Mary’s river, 40+ mile portage from the St Mary’s river to the Suwannee river, 200+ miles (really way, “way down the Suwannee river, far far away”) to the Gulf of Mexico.  
 

- Stumbling 

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A friend of mine, who has been to the beach for the start with me in the past, has gone from Speck Tater mode to participant. Or plans to anyway, in 2023. He bought a Tandem Island a month or so ago. It's in my driveway at the moment because he had to go to Miami so he dropped in to sail it in Charlotte Harbor. I was headed out fishing and would have gotten some nice drone pics of him sailing it, but my fishing boat broke and we aborted the trip.

His name's Bill and he looks like a middle aged computer dweeb. Looks are not deceiving. When I met him in 1981, he had a personal computer in his college dorm room. Profoundly weird at the time.

Don't misunderestimate him. As far as I've ever seen, he doesn't know how to quit. Also, an ex-foredeck guy, started sailing not long after he was done with diapers.

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You don't see all that many small sailboats equipped with a crash helmet in the cockpit. And then there are Watertribers...

Scamp2Helmet.jpg

That's SCAMP #2, an extensively modified boat with a storied history in its young life. Lots of good info/stories in the Welsford Facebook group.

Everything about it, including the helmet, has been considered carefully.

Hee hee. After careful consideration, I should have a helmet!

Reminds me of a time many years ago when we encountered a SeaCraft 23 out in the middle of the Gulfstream. They were rated for 500 hp and this one had twin 200's, which was considered a lot at the time. We were fishing, it was hauling ass in the direction of Bimini. As it went by, I saw that the driver was wearing a helmet. Just like this one, pretty funny, but really not a bad idea.

 

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2 hours ago, TBW said:

That looks like Howard Rice's SCAMP he took to Tierra Del Fuego?

Yes, that's the one.

2 hours ago, TBW said:

Helmets have their place on small sailboats.  I wear one on my beach cat sometimes.  

I prefer to watch people who need helmets. I think if I had a helmet, I'd put it on a shelf with a note on it saying, Reminder: you're too old to do stuff that requires a helmet!

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On 10/19/2021 at 6:29 AM, Lochnerian Tom said:

As far as I've ever seen, he doesn't know how to quit.
 

 

Having done 6 Everglades Challenges and an UFC in a Krueger, I can attest that is the key to finishing.   An EC will drain your energy and then kick you squarely in the nuts.  Those that do well suck it up and keep going.

 

The UFC is 5 times harder as you can expect at least one cold front.   So pack some heaters and know to use them on key arteries.   Then of course there is the portage….  And the length, and for paddlers the grind of paddling- even if there is a sail, you end up paddling 6-8 hours a day.
 

Best of luck in the UFC. Feel free to message me if you want more info.

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On 12/24/2021 at 9:42 AM, Lochnerian Tom said:

Yes, that's the one.

I prefer to watch people who need helmets. I think if I had a helmet, I'd put it on a shelf with a note on it saying, Reminder: you're too old to do stuff that requires a helmet!

Please don't go iceboating without one...seriously.  And you're young enough to iceboat.

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  • 2 weeks later...
15 hours ago, sail10338 said:

AndyMan and NateDog are going with a SuperCat 19 for our 4th attempt this year. 4.91 MB · 0 downloads

Don't think she's all that faster than our G Cat 21, but draws less and is a tad lighter..

Who hears the drums?

654449076_Moondance(2).jpg

Out of the barn and smelling the salt breeze!

Stumbling

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Having entered a SuperCat20 in the Worrell 1000, I highly endorse the SuperCat 19 for your 4th attempt. Tough boat but don't fall to the temptation to add too much extra complexity and sail area like we did with the 20.

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2 hours ago, fastyacht said:

5 year plan. Must do ec.

Should I sail a 10sqmtr or a 505? Hahaha

Might be tricky building a race legal 10 sqmtr.  Thinking gear storage.  

Could probably throw a couple reef points on a 505, not sure why you would want to.   I'd take a Hobie 16 over a 505.

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On 1/5/2022 at 1:05 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Having entered a SuperCat20 in the Worrell 1000, I highly endorse the SuperCat 19 for your 4th attempt. Tough boat but don't fall to the temptation to add too much extra complexity and sail area like we did with the 20.

Ras,

Really impressed with how solid the SC 19's build is, I repaired the various ouchies she had and beefed up the transoms, that was it.

Kept it pretty simple, added a mast rotator, diamonds and a roller boom. Mainsail is a slightly shorter luff dacron square-top, jib is a dacron Tornado on a roller.

Kite is a 21sqm F 18 deal out on a Sunfish spar, going to have a 10 knot max on the kite, we have a "butt on the boat" policy for the EC, risk vs reward, ya know.

Hope we don't regret not using the big G Cat, she was a freight train last year in open water, but her draft is a liability that we feel could prevent us from breaking the 2 day mark, our goal. 

Our plan eventually is to slow down and "smell the roses" eventually, hopefully after we break 2 days....

The Everglades Challenge has become something of a obsession for Nate and I, (myself more than Nate) I was so burned out on fleet racing, the EC is a amazing kick in the pants, THANK YOU CHIEF!

AndyMan

 

Screenshot_20210913-100431 SuperCat.jpg

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Occasionally, I doodle my 'ideal' boat for the R2AK or the Texas 200,  the Everglades Challenge... not so much.

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Ok, I was going to ask just one question, now @Veeger has forced two. 

First.  What is Spawn? 

What is the Texas 200? Too lazy to search (now). Edit: Nevermind. Found it.

 

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9 hours ago, Veeger said:

Occasionally, I doodle my 'ideal' boat for the R2AK or the Texas 200,  the Everglades Challenge... not so much.

I think Hobie already made it. Pretty funny to look back to when the Adventure Island was new and talk on the beach was, "Consumer toy" or, "this course will break that tupperware" and similar. I already owned one and knew it was a course beater. Now there are dozens on the beach each year.

This race is interesting to me because it's done with my kind of boats in my back yard. Come up with a plan to play with my boats in my back yard and I can do it! Um... except maybe what these lunatics came up with. I'm pretty confident I could finish in my AI because it's so well-suited to the course. Thing is, I enjoy the AI for a few hours at most and I don't enjoy cold water or drysuits at all, ever.

Get into something where I could do it while staying warm and dry and I start to doubt I could actually finish.

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1 hour ago, Lochnerian Tom said:

I think Hobie already made it. Pretty funny to look back to when the Adventure Island was new and talk on the beach was, "Consumer toy" or, "this course will break that tupperware" and similar. I already owned one and knew it was a course beater. Now there are dozens on the beach each year.

This race is interesting to me because it's done with my kind of boats in my back yard. Come up with a plan to play with my boats in my back yard and I can do it! Um... except maybe what these lunatics came up with. I'm pretty confident I could finish in my AI because it's so well-suited to the course. Thing is, I enjoy the AI for a few hours at most and I don't enjoy cold water or drysuits at all, ever.

Get into something where I could do it while staying warm and dry and I start to doubt I could actually finish.

You need another project, here it is:

Core Sound 17 Mk III partially finished (Port Charlotte, Fl)

length overall (LOA): 17
propulsion type: sail

Partially finished Core Sound 17 Mk III. Built from cnc kit from B&B Yacht Designs. It is just about to the point where it is ready to flip and start the fiberglass on the outside. Health issues prevent me from finishing the boat. I would rather sell it to someone that will finish it than have it become a fixture in the garage.

If you are not familiar with the Core Sound 17 you can go to: https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/cs17mk3 for more information.

I have the boat kit, the foils kit, the mast kit. I also have SailRite kits for the sails.

The picture of the finished boat is another boat and is just for reference.

$3,000 or best reasonable offer. If the ad is still up, it is still for sale.

https://fortmyers.craigslist.org/chl/boa/d/port-charlotte-core-sound-17-mk-iii/7402282268.html

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On 1/7/2022 at 6:35 AM, Fat Point Jack said:

You need another project, here it is:

I'm a big fan of the design but really don't need another project.

I see that one has been on the market for two months. Problem is, it's too far along for those who want to build one but it's far from finished for those who want that.

If he gives up on selling it and donates it to the Sailing Center, it's going to wind up being my project, but that's the only way.

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On 1/7/2022 at 6:35 AM, Fat Point Jack said:

You need another project, here it is:

Besides, there's a 1964 International 110 in Haines City for just a couple grand more...

I went to FB trying to SELL a 5hp Tohatsu but somehow boat ads catch my eye.

International110.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/12/2022 at 5:32 AM, Pertinacious Tom said:

And a real bargain on a Pacific Seacraft 25 centerboarder up in Tallahassee. Sorry, I'll stop now. Or try.

PacificSeacraft25.jpg

Shouldn't need much more than a tractor or small bulldozer to push that off the beach :)

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On 1/12/2022 at 3:43 AM, Pertinacious Tom said:

I'm a big fan of the design but really don't need another project.

I see that one has been on the market for two months. Problem is, it's too far along for those who want to build one but it's far from finished for those who want that.

If he gives up on selling it and donates it to the Sailing Center, it's going to wind up being my project, but that's the only way.

Saw on FB yesterday someone bought it. I want one bad, and considered it for about 5 minutes. But I don't have the workshop space at the moment to take it on. 

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thought about that in my beachcomber it only needs a 1 ft but is 5200 lbs

has an el winch and I do have a 100 lbs fancy danforth but that is far too much work

to dry it out and back in just for a rule

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8 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

Saw on FB yesterday someone bought it. I want one bad, and considered it for about 5 minutes. But I don't have the workshop space at the moment to take it on. 

Yes, and sold his Sun Cat. I think I would have waited on selling the Sun Cat until that one is a lot more complete, but maybe my wife has more tolerance for boats laying around than his does.

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23 hours ago, sail10338 said:

Dovekie,  the ultimate EC boat!

Screenshot_20201226-121530_Chrome.jpg

Um, no. I mean, there are opinions, and there is objective reality:

 

Sizzor.thumb.jpg.df819c1b85123093790c0d1ef36b3e07.jpg

Synergy on the beach.jpg

UC2018 Stump Pass.jpeg

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I don't think there really is an ultimate EC boat.  Different teams, different goals.  Fast multihull might be a good option for best over all time, but to get a gator tooth for example, you need a different kind of boat entirely.  

Gator tooth is on my to do list, but so far I no luck.

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12 minutes ago, TBW said:

Fast multihull might be a good option for best over all time

Even that is viewpoint-dependent. It's unlikely I'll ever switch from Speck Tater to participant, but if I did, I would make sure to reach each checkpoint and the finish within an hour of deadline. Hey, I paid good money for this experience, so "best" would be longest-lasting, right?

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28 minutes ago, Pertinacious Tom said:

Even that is viewpoint-dependent. It's unlikely I'll ever switch from Speck Tater to participant, but if I did, I would make sure to reach each checkpoint and the finish within an hour of deadline. Hey, I paid good money for this experience, so "best" would be longest-lasting, right?

I wish.  

But if there is a North wind blowing, I go, go, go.  Because I know sooner or later, I am going to be going uphill to the finish.

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My goals for the ECs I've done: 

1) Finish

And that's enough. But I do prefer finishing within 4-5 days so I can spend a couple of days hanging out in KL with my wife since I don't have unlimited time off. 

Not racing this year, will be running a checkpoint again like last year. But I've already lined up my team for 2023. 

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4 hours ago, TBW said:

I wish.  

But if there is a North wind blowing, I go, go, go.  Because I know sooner or later, I am going to be going uphill to the finish.

That's my philosophy also. There will always be uphill somewhere. 

 If you are who I think you are and were in the catamaran with the red top main, I think you passed us in the last bay before the finish in 2020. 

 

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I am in awe of everyone who has done EC, regardless of path. What an incredible level of preparation, what an adventure, and what an effort!

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6 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Speed isn't everything.

I don't believe Randy has ever had a good omelette aboard Sizzor

- DSK

Randy and I were talking about doing Baja Ha Ha, Randy on his F25C Yo!, and me on my Olson 40 Euphoria. For certain, the major meals would be created by my wife, the chef, aboard the Olson!

IMG_6564.jpeg

IMG_6764.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

You could probably figure a way to get that Olson 40 up and down the beach. Wouldn't be a great boat to cross the flats in, though.

- DSK

A spring tide might get an O40 into the first checkpoint, but you'd need to time your arrival with a tsunami to get into Chokoskee or Flamingo! 

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11 hours ago, MisterMoon said:

That's my philosophy also. There will always be uphill somewhere. 

 If you are who I think you are and were in the catamaran with the red top main, I think you passed us in the last bay before the finish in 2020. 

 

I don't think it was me.  I dropped out after about 150 miles in 2020.  I was going for that Alligator tooth in a kayak, but I ran out of beans with the head wind.  Re thinking my strategy, will try again.

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I love distance sailing my beach cat. I've got family on the water just south of checkpoint 1 in Charlotte Harbor. Would it be totally frown upon if I hoped in the start skipped the 1st checkpoint and just continued on to Charlotte Harbor? 

I have great interest in this event, one of the reasons I had a reef point installed on my new main sail, but outright participation would be on the bottom half of my sailing to do list.

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On 1/25/2022 at 7:20 AM, TBW said:

I don't think there really is an ultimate EC boat.  …

Gator tooth is on my to do list, but so far I no luck.

Just do the Ulimate Florida Challenge to get the Gator tooth. It’s how I got two.

I agree with MisterMoon with finishing in 4-5 days. There is sizable welcoming committee already, so no need to source a cold beer, and there are two-three days left to unwind, catch up with friends and just enjoy Keys. 
 

I also believe that I have the perfect boat, since I don’t need think hard about logistics. Over years I flew to the start or from the finish, once I fit it inside of a rental subcompact, I can sleep on it, I still can finish in 4 days…

credits for the pic go to https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/profile/34046-pertinacious-tom/

4D0C53C0-BB3A-44CD-A5FD-A1E53DFE97D7.jpeg

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On 1/25/2022 at 9:40 AM, MisterMoon said:

Not racing this year, will be running a checkpoint again like last year. But I've already lined up my team for 2023. 

Which checkpoint?

I continue to hope to fly my drone around Stump Pass. Weathered out the last two years and this year isn't looking good. My brother has cancer and it's bad and I'm his primary caregiver.

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3 hours ago, Pertinacious Tom said:

Which checkpoint?

I continue to hope to fly my drone around Stump Pass. Weathered out the last two years and this year isn't looking good. My brother has cancer and it's bad and I'm his primary caregiver.

First checkpoint at Cape Haze Marina, only a couple of miles down from Stump. We'll be there from about 1030 on Saturday until late Sunday afternoon. 

 

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On 12/24/2021 at 6:48 AM, Pertinacious Tom said:

You don't see all that many small sailboats equipped with a crash helmet in the cockpit. And then there are Watertribers...

I wonder if the Chesapeake Challenge will ever come back to Watertribe?

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Hey, that's 'my' lake!

Having spent a lifetime on Tampa Bay, Florida, moved up here to north Alabama 5 years ago. Fine sailing lake with some dinghy competition, but mostly small keelboats. 

Sadly, I don't have a boat suitable for the EC any longer. Sigh

Dave Ellis

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10 hours ago, sailwriter said:

Sadly, I don't have a boat suitable for the EC any longer. Sigh

Solved. I have two Adventure Islands and you can borrow one. You'll have to think up some other reason!

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This year I'm on the Race Committee at Charleston Race Week. 

Should have entered the EC when I had a Raider Turbo. Slept in it on the night before the 2018 Mug Race start. Comfortable. (And won on handicap the next day.)

Dave Ellis

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/25/2022 at 12:34 PM, MisterMoon said:

That's my philosophy also. There will always be uphill somewhere. 

 If you are who I think you are and were in the catamaran with the red top main, I think you passed us in the last bay before the finish in 2020. 

 

I think that was me

arriving.jpg

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1 hour ago, sail10338 said:

Those are some sweet boots!

AndyMan

Those were all I could buy in Everglades City after I lost my shoe at Chockoloski. They were a little too warm for Key Largo

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3 hours ago, CatFive said:

Those were all I could buy in Everglades City after I lost my shoe at Chockoloski. They were a little too warm for Key Largo

I remember!

See you soon my friend!

 

AndyMan

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I did some quick math about entries.  I may be off by a boat or two here or there, but this is the rough break down this year.

I count roughly 91 boats entered.

Class One (Expedition kayaks and Canoes): I count 24 entries including two Stand Up Padlle Boards.

Class Two (Racing Canoes and Kayaks):  Only one entry, a racing kayak.

Class 3 (Sailing Canoes):  4 sailing canoes, 3 solo and a tandem.

Class 4 (mono hull Sailboats):  21 mono hulls.

Class 5 (multi hulls): 41 including 17 TIs/AI's.

It seems to me class five just keeps getting bigger and faster.  Decent number of kayaks this year too. 

I see at least two inflatable boats.  A catamaran and an inflatable SUP. 

 

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16 hours ago, TBW said:

I did some quick math about entries.  I may be off by a boat or two here or there, but this is the rough break down this year.

I count roughly 91 boats entered.

Class One (Expedition kayaks and Canoes): I count 24 entries including two Stand Up Padlle Boards.

Class Two (Racing Canoes and Kayaks):  Only one entry, a racing kayak.

Class 3 (Sailing Canoes):  4 sailing canoes, 3 solo and a tandem.

Class 4 (mono hull Sailboats):  21 mono hulls.

Class 5 (multi hulls): 41 including 17 TIs/AI's.

It seems to me class five just keeps getting bigger and faster.  Decent number of kayaks this year too. 

I see at least two inflatable boats.  A catamaran and an inflatable SUP. 

 

It's a bummer Chaos and SewSew are not in with the NACRA Carbon 20, those two aren't human, so fun to watch. 

So on paper it appears that Gamera and Chainsaw on the turbo Tornado are the scratch cat.

Less than 2 weeks out and it is already tempting to start looking at long range forcasts....

12.5 k from the West and 75 degree days for the week please!

AndyMan

 

112702405_Moondance(2).jpg

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If I do it again, I’d run a side bet based on elapsed time underway instead of non stop. The camping is half the fun so why make it painful? You can still race hard while underway so it would be more like a race week than an offshore race. You can easily score it based on the spot tracking 

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17 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

If I do it again, I’d run a side bet based on elapsed time underway instead of non stop. The camping is half the fun so why make it painful? You can still race hard while underway so it would be more like a race week than an offshore race. You can easily score it based on the spot tracking 

Meh. That would disproportionately favour more expensive boats. Racing, managing winds, tides, and the need to rest makes for a more strategic event and an opportunity for the tortoise to compete with the hare.

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Think that format would eliminate the night navigation. Successful night navigation can get you a long way, and I kind of like it.  

Single handing a boat, while navigating unfamiliar water, with alligators?  Good times.

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1 minute ago, TBW said:

Think that format would eliminate the night navigation. Successful night navigation can get you a long way, and I kind of like it.  

Single handing a boat, while navigating unfamiliar water, with alligators?  Good times.

There were alligators?!?

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I like that it's impossible to completely tear down the outside in any boat. It makes it far more difficult for a sailboat but I wouldn't want to see it set up any other way

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 I have participated in this event 7 times.  Of all the racing I have done over 30 years this is hands down the most memorable.  The course that Chief has set up is a combination of sadistic, challenging, beautiful and fulfilling to a degree that nothing else I have done can match.  When one finishes you immediately think "been there done that" but as soon as you catch some sleep you begin thinking about the next time. The process of selecting and setting up a boat for this is pure fun.  My first was a modified sea kayak that I will admit was ill conceived albeit full of memories that I will never lose and will always cherish.  The Turbo Tornado that ChainSaw and I put together was a process that was similarly challenging and fun.  

It is impossible to convey everything that this event throws at you to anyone who hasn't done it.  Really great too that you "race what you brung", period, (and it's not just a race).  Some do it purely to be first and set records, but everyone is in it to participate and simply doing that and maybe even finishing are both enough and a serious accomplishment.  Suggest anyone who can visit the beach on Friday and watch the start on Saturday...you might just get hooked (that is a warning).

My days sailing in this event are behind me but this year my wife (RingMaster) and I will be volunteers helping at the start and then serving as Checkpoint 3 Captains on Tuesday through Friday, staying our renovated Airstream.  Also will be rooting for my long time sailing partner Chainsaw and our good friend Gamera sailing the Turbo Tornado.  These guys are as smart and tuff as they come and I can't wait to see what they do.

SwampMonkee

 

IMG_0065.JPG

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Could one of you Original Gangsters of this event explain how you approach the navigation?  Seems like the biggest challenge is shallow water?  Do you take a motorboat pre-race and set waypoints for yourself or..?  What are the mileage differences and risks of shotrcuts?  How do tides factor in?  Thanks

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28 minutes ago, mundt said:

Could one of you Original Gangsters of this event explain how you approach the navigation?  Seems like the biggest challenge is shallow water?  Do you take a motorboat pre-race and set waypoints for yourself or..?  What are the mileage differences and risks of shotrcuts?  How do tides factor in?  Thanks

I am by no means an OG, but I have done the event a couple of times.  Some details:

I had never been to South Florida before my first EC.  My first time south of Tampa on the Florida coast, was as I was sailing down the coast.  So no, there was no pre race scouting.

In addition to recreational sailing I had worked as a ships navigator for close to 20 years prior to my first EC, so navigating in unfamiliar water was routine for me.

I spent hours, maybe dozens of hours, consulting electronic charts, paper charts, google earth and tide charts in the months before the event. 

Primary nav tool for my first EC was a Garmin GPS Map 78 SC.  Second EC I switched to a cell phone/Navionics type system and brought a Garmin as a spare.

In practice, in spite of months of route planning, I took the head out into the Gulf of Mexico and turn left approach.  Sailed over night one night and half of another night.  So there was night navigation.

I created custom charts on my home printer and laminated them at home to create a chart binder.  I find having the custom paper charts handy.

Finding suitable camp sites and rest stops was the most difficult part of navigation, I think this is where native Floridians who know the area have a big advantage.  

 Boat navigation is boat navigation.  If you know how to navigate, the process doesn't change.  The EC is not the place to learn small craft or wilderness navigation.  This is a skill that should probably be well developed before considering an event.

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6 hours ago, mundt said:

Could one of you Original Gangsters of this event explain how you approach the navigation?  Seems like the biggest challenge is shallow water?  Do you take a motorboat pre-race and set waypoints for yourself or..?  What are the mileage differences and risks of shotrcuts?  How do tides factor in?  Thanks

I talked to a lot of people and read a bunch of accounts before my first attempt and studied the charts and satellite imagery to get a feel for how to approach the course. 
 

The shallows and channels in Florida Bay are pretty easily visible on Google Earth satellite imagery. I plotted courses there and exported them as GPX files into my GPS software. Also the NPS recently put up new markers for all the channels and helpfully posted all their coordinates in the last two years.  Even with all that, it’s only just now after a couple of times across FL Bay in the daylight hours that I’d trust my routes and waypoints enough to go over at night. 
 

Course prep isn’t just routes however. You need to a slow think about alternates, rest or bad weather stopping points, tides and currents, and timing. If you’re a nerd like me, the hours of prep is a lot of fun in and of itself. And the time you spent prepping makes your time on course even more rewarding as your plan unfolds perfectly or you expertly adapt to changes as they come. 

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I'm blessed to be a native, so scouting is very helpful. In fact, TwoBeers and I went to Stump Pass today to inspect the dredging operations, and we went all the way into CP1 and now have the peace of mind of visualizing the way in.

We have also run Caxambas Pass all the way into Chockoloskee this month and learned a lot with that trip, the sand bars South of Marco Island are constantly on the move.

NateDog and my first year we went across Florida Bay at night after doing quite a bit of homework, chart review, word of mouth, etc.  We did a lot of Jamaican bobsledding thru the mud, (we actually have yet to cross from Flamingo to Key Largo without substantial amounts of pushing).

Wind and tides consume you in this event, having a contingency for every variable is a must, even if that means doubling back or beaching for rest.

The "clean run" has escaped us, perhaps this is the year, or maybe we crash and burn, we are about to find out!

AndyMan

 

 

 

 

 

 

florida-bay-map.jpg

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My first crossing of Florida Bay was done in the dark.  I have never actually seen Florida Bay in the day light aside from being on land looking out from the Pelican Cottages.  Florida Bay is tough navigation, we had rain and lightning squalls through the night, so nothing in the way of moonlight.  We used our headlamps to pick out the stakes in the mud and used our kick up rudders like curb feelers and of course our waypoints from our google earth research.

It worked out not too badly.  8 hours to make good 31 miles.  Distance travelled through the water was probably about 40 or so.  Figure 4 knots made good, 5 knots average sailing speed.

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18 minutes ago, TBW said:

My first crossing of Florida Bay was done in the dark.  I have never actually seen Florida Bay in the day light aside from being on land looking out from the Pelican Cottages.  Florida Bay is tough navigation, we had rain and lightning squalls through the night, so nothing in the way of moonlight.  We used our headlamps to pick out the stakes in the mud and used our kick up rudders like curb feelers and of course our waypoints from our google earth research.

It worked out not too badly.  8 hours to make good 31 miles.  Distance travelled through the water was probably about 40 or so.  Figure 4 knots made good, 5 knots average sailing speed.

fb.thumb.png.54d46026acb14954bf697955f5dc902e.png

That's a beautiful crossing!

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Outstanding!  You guys are illuminating what makes this such a challenging event.  It makes the accomplishment of a finish (especially a fast one) all the more impressive.  

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