Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Cause there is oil there and they have leases that allow them to get it?  CA doesn't have nearly enough green power to run the state's power grid, so unless you're gonna NIMBY off the problem to somewhere else, we still need it for now.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fuck again, how clever to locate an anchorage area over a pipeline. 

I anchored somewhere around there myself, years ago, but did not pull up anything!

Don't have a windlass either. :)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, port of Long Beach will keep operating. Interesting. What do they do in the marinas, boom them off? I know when we had the ship hit the bay bridge  a decade back, oil got in the marinas and the insurance of the ship took care of all the coat cleaning needed. As of yesterday they still didn’t know the pipeline operator, they must by now?

Link to post
Share on other sites

A freighter dumped some bunker oil into Lake Michigan around 1976, it came into Belmont Harbor putting a ring-around-the-collar on everything - moorings, boats, pilings, lines dangling in the water, dinghies, the wall, etc.  Took me about 3 hours to get the ring off the Cal 40.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Crash said:

Cause there is oil there and they have leases that allow them to get it?  CA doesn't have nearly enough green power to run the state's power grid, so unless you're gonna NIMBY off the problem to somewhere else, we still need it for now.

Caligornia is nimby central. Do that is why I wonderred at the ironu

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Raz'r said:

So, port of Long Beach will keep operating. Interesting. What do they do in the marinas, boom them off? I know when we had the ship hit the bay bridge  a decade back, oil got in the marinas and the insurance of the ship took care of all the coat cleaning needed. As of yesterday they still didn’t know the pipeline operator, they must by now?

It appears most if not all of the spill is south of both of the ports and the current would move any spillage even further from the ports.  The first marina that would have issue is Newport.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing new. There are places close by where heavy oil / tar comes bubbling up naturally, but not all at once like this. Definitely some damage here, but I wonder if those oil rigs can be closed down safely??

Link to post
Share on other sites

They’ve built a dam across River Jetties and lots of work going on in the wetland. Damn this is a sorry mess.

Air Show attendees (1.5 mill) gotta be bummed.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Drip in the bucket for S Cal. 128,000 gallons? 

 

BP spill in Gulf of Mexico

 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA   On April 20, 2010, an explosion at the BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig released over 130 million gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. It was the biggest oil spill ever in U.S. waters and remains one of the worst environmental disasters in world history.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Raz'r said:

As of yesterday they still didn’t know the pipeline operator, they must by now?

Beta Energy owns the Ella platform, Beta is owned by Amplify Energy out of Houston who are bummed out because their stock is taking a beating.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Parma said:

Nothing new. There are places close by where heavy oil / tar comes bubbling up naturally, but not all at once like this.

As a kid going to the southern California beaches in the '50s, my parents would spend time washing the "beach tar" off of us with paint thinner before getting in the car for the ride back home.

Yeah... "beach tar" = "crude oil".

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Somebody Else said:

As a kid going to the southern California beaches in the '50s, my parents would spend time washing the "beach tar" off of us with paint thinner before getting in the car for the ride back home.

Yeah... "beach tar" = "crude oil".

This recent mishap not withstanding, in general the more oil wells the less beach tar. The natural seeps let a lot more oil loose if the wells are shut down.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Crash said:

Cause there is oil there and they have leases that allow them to get it?  CA doesn't have nearly enough green power to run the state's power grid, so unless you're gonna NIMBY off the problem to somewhere else, we still need it for now.

Petroleum has so little to do with generating electricity in California, or most other places for that matter, it doesn't even make it onto the pie chart for California.

image.png.637e8bee0d1c89f3800e028b451c466a.png

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Petroleum has so little to do with generating electricity in California, or most other places for that matter, it doesn't even make it onto the pie chart for California.

image.png.637e8bee0d1c89f3800e028b451c466a.png

 

 

 

Huh, what do you know?  Learn something new every day!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Somebody Else said:

As a kid going to the southern California beaches in the '50s, my parents would spend time washing the "beach tar" off of us with paint thinner before getting in the car for the ride back home.

Yeah... "beach tar" = "crude oil".

Bermuda resorts always kept turp towelettes. Tar from WWII still washes up. I've had to towel the stuff off. But that was decades ago. NEed to go back and see if still coming in

Link to post
Share on other sites

On my way home from work today I saw a boom cleanup boat off Laguna beach so it makes sense it is now down to Dana Point. The harbor entrance to Newport Beach is closed off with a double oil boom and the harbor is "closed" until further notice. 

IMG_6976.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Evan Fullerton said:

On my way home from work today I saw a boom cleanup boat off Laguna beach so it makes sense it is now down to Dana Point. The harbor entrance to Newport Beach is closed off with a double oil boom and the harbor is "closed" until further notice. 

IMG_6976.jpg

If I were trapped in or out the oil well owner would be getting a bill from me!

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Crash said:
15 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Petroleum has so little to do with generating electricity in California, or most other places for that matter, it doesn't even make it onto the pie chart for California.

image.png.637e8bee0d1c89f3800e028b451c466a.png

 

 

 

Expand  

Huh, what do you know?  Learn something new every day!

So maybe next time get the facts before you go blaming the NIMBYs?

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

This recent mishap not withstanding, in general the more oil wells the less beach tar. The natural seeps let a lot more oil loose if the wells are shut down.

Really!!? Or are you just making that up?

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Parma said:

Really!!? Or are you just making that up?

No - really. There are natural oil seeps off the California coast. They seep more when the wells are shut down.

https://www.whoi.edu/oilinocean/page.do?pid=52296&tid=201&cid=54634&ct=362#

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oilseep.html

If memory serves, after some spill the wells were all shut down for a time and these seeps increases their leakage rate. Also remember crude oil is a natural thing - organic if you will - and there are microbes that eat it. A small amount of the stuff is just part of the food chain.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

No - really. There are natural oil seeps off the California coast. They seep more when the wells are shut down.

https://www.whoi.edu/oilinocean/page.do?pid=52296&tid=201&cid=54634&ct=362#

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oilseep.html

If memory serves, after some spill the wells were all shut down for a time and these seeps increases their leakage rate. Also remember crude oil is a natural thing - organic if you will - and there are microbes that eat it. A small amount of the stuff is just part of the food chain.

afaik, oil seeps not really a thing in Huntington Beach. Santa Barbara, quite far to the north, yes. However, I am a bit dubious that offshore oil reservoirs are shallow enough for this to be true.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, IStream said:

So maybe next time get the facts before you go blaming the NIMBYs?

Good and fair point.  I should have done my research to properly frame the discussion.  California oil production vs. oil consumed from 1982 to 2018...

California's dependence on foreign oil continues to grow.

Oil production in California has declined steadily since the 1980s, partly because of tough environmental standards. But government data shows the state remains the seventh-biggest U.S. crude oil producer, second-biggest oil consumer, and home to a tenth of U.S. refining capacity.

 

Yet the Governor wants to end oil drilling by 2045.  Still seems a NIMBY issue to me, even with the real and honest gains being made in Solar, Wind, etc.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, floater said:

afaik, oil seeps not really a thing in Huntington Beach. Santa Barbara, quite far to the north, yes. However, I am a bit dubious that offshore oil reservoirs are shallow enough for this to be true.

I have no idea if there are natural seeps right where this leak is, but they are around someplace.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

No - really. There are natural oil seeps off the California coast. They seep more when the wells are shut down.

https://www.whoi.edu/oilinocean/page.do?pid=52296&tid=201&cid=54634&ct=362#

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oilseep.html

If memory serves, after some spill the wells were all shut down for a time and these seeps increases their leakage rate. Also remember crude oil is a natural thing - organic if you will - and there are microbes that eat it. A small amount of the stuff is just part of the food chain.

 

2 hours ago, Irrational 14 said:

Seen this happen during a regatta in Santa Barbara a few years back. Globules floating around and sticking to the boat. Was told it happens from time to time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Oil_Point_seep_field

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, floater said:

afaik, oil seeps not really a thing in Huntington Beach. Santa Barbara, quite far to the north, yes. However, I am a bit dubious that offshore oil reservoirs are shallow enough for this to be true.

From NOAA Office of Response and Restoration:

How Much Do Seeps Leak?

A 2003 report from the National Research Council(link is external) estimates that, on average, approximately 160,000 tonnes of petroleum enter North American waters through natural seeps each year. The waters off southern California are one area in particular which host hundreds of known, naturally occurring oil and gas seeps. These seeps contribute about 5 million gallons of oil to the ocean annually, with wide year to year variation. They likely have been leaking for thousands of years. Although their rate of release may vary over time, the locations of seeps are consistent and predictable. Slicks from many larger seeps are visible by satellite, and some are persistent enough to be features on navigation charts.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

I was once picking out a spot for a picnic lunch in an LA park - oops don't sit there - tar oozing right out of the grass! (guess which park?).

LA basin is one of the largest oil fields in the world.

18 hours ago, blunderfull said:

Downtown HB:

 

AC5ADDF0-62BE-4868-B124-C45F2A2F1185.jpeg

Main St. - with the rigs that drilled those holes:

Huntington_Beach_Oil_Field_1370.jpg&ehk=

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, floater said:

I was once picking out a spot for a picnic lunch in an LA park - oops don't sit there - tar oozing right out of the grass! (guess which park?).

Hancock Park next to Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

Jelly Bowl beach in Carpinteria, tar all the time, in fact its visible seeping out of the cliff on the mini point there. Olive oil works well just takes a little longer.

the first humans there used the tar to make boats watertight

Jelly Bowl in Carpinteria | Photo of the Day - Noozhawk.com

The pier in this picture is used by the service boat fleet which goes back and forth to all the offshore platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel. Invisible under the water is a confluence of pipes which brings the pumped oil from at least some of the platforms to a pumping station. There must be another pipeline down the coast to a refinery.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I have no idea if there are natural seeps right where this leak is, but they are around someplace.

Once upon a time just north of the Huntington Beach pier....

 

2851365540_77f7572eaf_b.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Except oil is not made from dinosaurs. Neither is coal ;)

Birds ARE made from dinosaurs though B)

Pelicans taste like Chicken, if you put enough ketchup on them!  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, kent_island_sailor said:

How do you get them to hold still?

I was going to try Dawn, but apparently it’s just for Ducks and Penguins!  What wine goes with Pelican? 
 

image.jpeg.a8c647fc09b637dbdc3c720a14934149.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, silent bob said:

Pelicans taste like Chicken, if you put enough ketchup on them!  

 

12 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

How do you get them to hold still?

My wife caught a Pelican while fishing off the headboat out of Marathon. The Mate made him hold still to get the hook out. Flew over to the port side and proceeded to get hooked again ten minutes later.

They aren't "chicken of the sea" though; the locals call them "Keys Turkeys."

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

 

My wife caught a Pelican while fishing off the headboat out of Marathon. The Mate made him hold still to get the hook out. Flew over to the port side and proceeded to get hooked again ten minutes later.

They aren't "chicken of the sea" though; the locals call them "Keys Turkeys."

I was just talking to a retired Baywatch captain.  He was at the Marina del Rey station when an Asian fisherman comes running up to him. Pelican dove and got his bait on the hook.  Couldn’t get airborne with the rod and reel.  Captain hops on a paddle board and chases the pelican down the channel, finally catching it.  He grabs the rod, and gently winds the bird in.  As the bird gets about 10’ from the board, it regurgitates the bait and hook. The captain returned the rod and reel, bait still attached, to the fisherman!   

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Crash said:

From NOAA Office of Response and Restoration:

How Much Do Seeps Leak?

A 2003 report from the National Research Council(link is external) estimates that, on average, approximately 160,000 tonnes of petroleum enter North American waters through natural seeps each year. The waters off southern California are one area in particular which host hundreds of known, naturally occurring oil and gas seeps. These seeps contribute about 5 million gallons of oil to the ocean annually, with wide year to year variation. They likely have been leaking for thousands of years. Although their rate of release may vary over time, the locations of seeps are consistent and predictable. Slicks from many larger seeps are visible by satellite, and some are persistent enough to be features on navigation charts.

I remember in the 60's and 70's on the Ventura County Coast natural slicks and oil tar. The beaches were really bac.
Relieving the pressure has helped a lot but the Natural release still occurs.

Those fucking freighters are piling up nd causing a real issue. Those Long Shoremen better get they lazy fucking asses in gear. I know a few and they make a shit ton of $$ for what they do. Covid is no longer the issue

15 hours ago, silent bob said:

Pelicans taste like Chicken, if you put enough ketchup on them!  

I would not eat anything that lives within 20 miles of any coast

Link to post
Share on other sites

From scanning the news reports:

1) The CG was informed by several people of a massive oil spill on the late afternoon of the break, but did not investigate until the next day because hey, it was late and getting dark.

2) The company running the ruptured pipeline had an alarm go off informing them of the rupture, but did not turn off the flow for several hours, and then did not report the spill until the next day, two hours after the CG belatedly began investigating, and after booms were already being deployed around marinas, etc.

Let’s hear it for the professionals.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh great, another one for my engineering ethics professor to ramble on for two hours about. I'm not sure that coffee is going to have enough caffeine in it to get me through this one...

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2021 at 12:23 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

Except oil is not made from dinosaurs. Neither is coal ;)

Birds ARE made from dinosaurs though B)

How many sailboats is that much oil? Not counting sails etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

I remember in the 60's and 70's on the Ventura County Coast natural slicks and oil tar. The beaches were really bac.
Relieving the pressure has helped a lot but the Natural release still occurs.

Those fucking freighters are piling up nd causing a real issue. Those Long Shoremen better get they lazy fucking asses in gear. I know a few and they make a shit ton of $$ for what they do. Covid is no longer the issue

I would not eat anything that lives within 20 miles of any coast

Getting the Ports to increase throughput doesn’t solve the problem if you can’t move material out of the Port.

infrastructure across the board needs to be addressed (rail and road access).  Also looking at under utilized ports.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2021 at 9:01 AM, fastyacht said:

Why are there still wells off the CA coast?

Because you want fiberglass or carbon fiber boats, and fast sails.  You travel on airplanes.  You want your food packaged in a safe and sanitary manner.  You like avocados from Chile and lobster from Maine.  Your cheap 70" TV came from China and is mostly polymers and plastic.  You appreciate 21st century healthcare and healthcare devices are made up of tons of unique polymers.  Oil and gas is never going away., but oil is going to $200 a barrel, so enjoy $1500 electric bills and $16 a gallon gas.  Diesel cost will triple your grocery bill.  I guess we could get a horse a carriage to ship groceries to Whole Foods. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2021 at 10:07 AM, Crash said:

Cause there is oil there and they have leases that allow them to get it?  CA doesn't have nearly enough green power to run the state's power grid, so unless you're gonna NIMBY off the problem to somewhere else, we still need it for now.

More to the point, if you want to eliminate oil you need to build enough generation and transmission to replace the power it currently provides for industry, agriculture and transportation.  Until you have electric tractors and trucks and the power to run them going off oil would just result in mass starvation.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Spinsheet said:

Because you want fiberglass or carbon fiber boats, and fast sails.  You travel on airplanes.  You want your food packaged in a safe and sanitary manner.  You like avocados from Chile and lobster from Maine.  Your cheap 70" TV came from China and is mostly polymers and plastic.  You appreciate 21st century healthcare and healthcare devices are made up of tons of unique polymers.  Oil and gas is never going away., but oil is going to $200 a barrel, so enjoy $1500 electric bills and $16 a gallon gas.  Diesel cost will triple your grocery bill.  I guess we could get a horse a carriage to ship groceries to Whole Foods. 

Only about 10% of oil production is used for manufacturing. Oil's not going away but we should, and will, stop burning it. It's far too valuable and damaging to do so.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Spinsheet said:

Because you want fiberglass or carbon fiber boats, and fast sails.  You travel on airplanes.  You want your food packaged in a safe and sanitary manner.  You like avocados from Chile and lobster from Maine.  Your cheap 70" TV came from China and is mostly polymers and plastic.  You appreciate 21st century healthcare and healthcare devices are made up of tons of unique polymers.  Oil and gas is never going away., but oil is going to $200 a barrel, so enjoy $1500 electric bills and $16 a gallon gas.  Diesel cost will triple your grocery bill.  I guess we could get a horse a carriage to ship groceries to Whole Foods. 

I

I don,t own a tv but thanks for that

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, IStream said:

Only about 10% of oil production is used for manufacturing. Oil's not going away but we should, and will, stop burning it. It's far too valuable and damaging to do so.

the fact that gallon of gas is cheaper than a gallon of milk never ceases to amaze me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2021 at 1:03 PM, Somebody Else said:

Hancock Park next to Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

right, and next to the fenced off tar pits. Living in a city makes one think that nature has been tamed, but it looks like they can't really keep up with the natural seeps in their nicely landscaped park (although it was a pretty neat feature all on its own and well worth the price of admission :). It may be worth mentioning that digging below grade anywhere in LA is potentially disastrous. I was surprised that Musk was able to dig a tunnel without an explosion. Every now and then, a random building blows up in LA because gas accumulation in the basement.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, floater said:

the fact that gallon of gas is cheaper than a gallon of milk never ceases to amaze me.

Well, until you factor in the percentage of your US taxes that goes towards military operations in the Middle East...But that's probably a topic for PA.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, floater said:

the fact that gallon of gas is cheaper than a gallon of milk never ceases to amaze me.

Not sure why. Drill a hole and refine resulting fluid in a still and sell it.

OR

Buy a cow. Buy or rent a bull to get the cow pregnant. Feed the cow. Take the cow to the vet or the vet to the cow. Milk the cow every day or the cow will not be happy with you. Collect the milk. Process it it. Bottle it. Sell it. It amazes me milk is as cheap as it is.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Not sure why. Drill a hole and refine resulting fluid in a still and sell it.

OR

Buy a cow. Buy or rent a bull to get the cow pregnant. Feed the cow. Take the cow to the vet or the vet to the cow. Milk the cow every day or the cow will not be happy with you. Collect the milk. Process it it. Bottle it. Sell it. It amazes me milk is as cheap as it is.

I suppose the problem is that I have a degree in economics - and all that college educatin just knocked all the common sense straight outta me.

otoh. one is the very definition of a non-renewable resource, and just like all that dope I got in the habit of smokin in school once you burn it, its gone. The other - as renewable as rain. so yeah. rainwater more expensive than dope. I just don't get it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, floater said:

I suppose the problem is that I have a degree in economics - and all that college educatin just knocked all the common sense straight outta me.

otoh. one is the very definition of a non-renewable resource, and just like all that dope I got in the habit of smokin in school once you burn it, its gone. The other - as renewable as rain. so yeah. rainwater more expensive than dope. I just don't get it.

In the same vein as one apple plus one tangerine equals a triangle… the example was price not renew ability 

Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, sailman said:

In the same vein as one apple plus one tangerine equals a triangle… the example was price not renew ability 

and that's the point exactly. for some (inexplicable) reason, the free market does not correctly value a non-renewable resource. Oil is way too cheap for what it is - simply because they aren't making any more of it, and its reserves are finite. also, I happen to have studied geology too (lol) so that aspect of this equation doesn't escape me either.

you can poke a hole most anyplace in the world and strike water. oil, not so much.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, floater said:

and that's the point exactly. for some (inexplicable) reason, the free market does not correctly value a non-renewable resource. Oil is way too cheap for what it is - simply because they aren't making any more of it, and its reserves are finite. also, I happen to have studied geology (lol) so that aspect of this equation doesn't escape me either.

you can poke a hole most anyplace in the world and strike water. oil, not so much.

It's a well studied phenomenon. Tragedy of the Commons is one manifestation. We can't seem to price in externalities.  @Excoded Tom and the jizz-kid would say "too fucking bad, drill baby drill!"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, floater said:

and that's the point exactly. for some (inexplicable) reason, the free market does not correctly value a non-renewable resource. Oil is way too cheap for what it is - simply because they aren't making any more of it, and its reserves are finite. also, I happen to have studied geology too (lol) so that aspect of this equation doesn't escape me either.

you can poke a hole most anyplace in the world and strike water. oil, not so much.

Actually more the reverse. We have oil fields that are not profitable to drill in because oil is too cheap. Many areas of the world are critically short of water.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

It's a well studied phenomenon. Tragedy of the Commons is one manifestation. We can't seem to price in externalities.  @Excoded Tom and the jizz-kid would say "too fucking bad, drill baby drill!"

You do realize that your boat is made mostly of Petrochemicals, don't you?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, silent bob said:

You do realize that your boat is made mostly of Petrochemicals, don't you?  

Of course, my boat is made of frozen snot. What does that have to do with market pricing not dealing with common areas (air, water, etc) or non-renewable resources? Why do you think we needed the Clean Air & Water Act? Why are some gov'ts putting carbon taxes in place? 

 

Answer: the market doesn't price externalities like pollution or long-term availability very well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like boats coming in my marina with the smudge...

Protocols are being taken to have Decontamination Sites setup to get boats cleaned up and minimize the spread of goo around the marina.

Two marinas to the south are now closed and boomed off.

 

244398755_10225710317534859_5764003946528426439_n.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

 Why are some gov'ts putting carbon taxes in place? 

$$$$!  Nothing else, it's just a money grab.  It has nothing to do with "controlling carbon emissions"!  Who exactly do you pay Carbon Taxes to?  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, floater said:

and that's the point exactly. for some (inexplicable) reason, the free market does not correctly value a non-renewable resource. Oil is way too cheap for what it is - simply because they aren't making any more of it, and its reserves are finite. also, I happen to have studied geology too (lol) so that aspect of this equation doesn't escape me either.

you can poke a hole most anyplace in the world and strike water. oil, not so much.

non-renewables are always super cheap because many of them you simply gather them up. Oil flows in pipes. I mean, you can't dream up a cheaper form of useful material in scaled bulk.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We're already moving away from oil from a combustion standpoint. The list of reasons to buy a car with an internal combustion engine (as opposed to an electric vehicle) gets shorter every year. More and more mainstream car manufacturers (as opposed to just Tesla) are coming out with EVs. It is only a matter of time (and given how much development is going into EVs, not all that much time) before buying a car that runs on petroleum starts to look foolish.

Oil will remain in use for synthetic polymers for quite a while, but I expect that in time we will see more and more alternative options coming to market and replacing petroleum-based products as the cost of oil goes up.

Not all of this is political, in fact most of it isn't. Environmental issues aside, the economics of certain industries change with time.

Link to post
Share on other sites