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The chicken-jibe, in a race. How'd it go?


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I thought I'd "invented" the name, but it would seem I didn't. I'd never heard that name when I first did it, it just seemed like discretion is the better part of valor, so chicken it out, and alter by 320 degrees and make it, rather than 40 and you don't.

I teach it, letting students know that if it's screeching downwind, and you have to alter course and change tacks from one broad reach to the other, you don't have to risk losing the rig or get into a wilpeout broach and end up on your ear.  What's a little extra time and distance when you have all day to get there?

But racing, it's a touger choice.  I only ever did it once, long ago.  Marblehead Race week, in the very large fleet of "Townies", a 16-foot half-dory type with small jib and big main, with that long boom and no backstay, just some lower shrouds that weren't that high up on the spruce mast.

I was leading, so I really remember it.  Nice weather at start became a squall on the second leg of the triangle course, blowing about 30 I guess, though it felt like more.  I intended to be brave and skillful, and jibe her at the wing mark from starboard tack broad reach to the same on port tack, I was damned if I was going to give up a 7-8 boatlength lead.  

But...once I bore off  I couldn't trim the boom in at all with both hands, the wind was that strong, I guess it had picked up some.  So I "chickened out" and rounded back up, and had to go that long way round in that right-hand circle hated it,  seemed like it took forever, and it cost most of my lead, and second boat, a crafty and tough competitor, I could see was going to jibe it.  Damn, what a chicken I am, I'll never live this down, wah wah...

I couldn't look, he was only a couple of boatlengths behind now,too painful, so I just headed down towards the next mark I was trying to see in the rain and sea. So,  it was my crew who said damn, he just broke his mast!   After which, all the rest of the fleet did the long-way-round no-jibe just as I had.  I hung on and won the race.  And at a post race party, I got thanks from quite a few for tacking it the long way, so they could justify doing it too.

Wondering if and when you had to decide the same brave-or-chicken choice, and how it worked out.  And I'll accept that someone must've "named it" before me.

Anyway, that's my chicken-jibe story.  How'd it work out for you when you tried it?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Eh... it doesn't work so well when you have a kite up, since taking it down is usually scarier than gybing. Usually if it's windy enough that I can't survive a very carefully executed gybe, I'm probably screwed already.

-If it's an E-scow, A-scow or I-20, we have the kite up because going downwind in heavy conditions without a kite is suicidal on those boats. Taking that bugger down and putting it back up is a lot scarier than gybing the boat with it up.

-If it's a keelboat, we also probably have the kite up, and again, taking it down is probably sketchier than gybing.

-If it's a cat-rigged boat like an MC scow, it starts to make sense, but usually by the time that gybing gets too dangerous I've already tipped over or gone in.

I have been known to trim the main in almost all the way before gybes in really heavy air, then dump the mainsheet as the boom comes across. I usually trim directly from the block on the boom, rather than the ratchet block. 

 

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At the other end of the spectrum (boat size wise), I have read somewhere a long time ago that some of the Vendée Globe skippers admitted that they had done it in the Southern Ocean... Having all stay sails on furlers, may help, in heavy conditions to make this decision.

I do not know if this is still valid with the latest generation of boats/skippers, and if the guys who chickened out were top performers or part of "the rest of the pack"...

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2 hours ago, nolatom said:

I thought I'd "invented" the name, but it would seem I didn't. I'd never heard that name when I first did it, it just seemed like discretion is the better part of valor, so chicken it out, and alter by 320 degrees and make it, rather than 40 and you don't.

I teach it, letting students know that if it's screeching downwind, and you have to alter course and change tacks from one broad reach to the other, you don't have to risk losing the rig or get into a wilpeout broach and end up on your ear.  What's a little extra time and distance when you have all day to get there?

But racing, it's a touger choice.  I only ever did it once, long ago.  Marblehead Race week, in the very large fleet of "Townies", a 16-foot half-dory type with small jib and big main, with that long boom and no backstay, just some lower shrouds that weren't that high up on the spruce mast.

I was leading, so I really remember it.  Nice weather at start became a squall on the second leg of the triangle course, blowing about 30 I guess, though it felt like more.  I intended to be brave and skillful, and jibe her at the wing mark from starboard tack broad reach to the same on port tack, I was damned if I was going to give up a 7-8 boatlength lead.  

But...once I bore off  I couldn't trim the boom in at all with both hands, the wind was that strong, I guess it had picked up some.  So I "chickened out" and rounded back up, and had to go that long way round in that right-hand circle hated it,  seemed like it took forever, and it cost most of my lead, and second boat, a crafty and tough competitor, I could see was going to jibe it.  Damn, what a chicken I am, I'll never live this down, wah wah...

I couldn't look, he was only a couple of boatlengths behind now,too painful, so I just headed down towards the next mark I was trying to see in the rain and sea. So,  it was my crew who said damn, he just broke his mast!   After which, all the rest of the fleet did the long-way-round no-jibe just as I had.  I hung on and won the race.  And at a post race party, I got thanks from quite a few for tacking it the long way, so they could justify doing it too.

Wondering if and when you had to decide the same brave-or-chicken choice, and how it worked out.  And I'll accept that someone must've "named it" before me.

Anyway, that's my chicken-jibe story.  How'd it work out for you when you tried it?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the wind is up I frequently put the bow thru the wind to Jibe 

the last race...force 7 and 8 ... dead downwind to the finish . Our competitor jibed, wiped out and broke the boom 

A heavy air jibe is very difficult for an amateur   crew  on a clunky racer cruiser 

Good idea to practice this bow thru the wind maneuver  

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Yep, right back from the days of laser sailing (45 years ago ) doing a true gybe round a buoy,

at the bottom of a long fast run,

at a 90 degree bend in the river,

with a wacking great steel hull and glass windowed fake paddle steamer moored 30ft from the buoy

it was not an option.. 

So bear 90 degrees off to Starboard, tack 180 through the wind and come back the other way..

I wasn't the only one to do it many others did and still do, in a variety of boats

Generally called it a double tack, once for the 180, once for the buoy.

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nolatom,

 

I've aways found that in order to finish first, first you must finish. None my granny tack was a drop and reset of the kite and it increased our lead 

 

I remember doing a race sailing the inside of Fraser Island, Australia  in a trailer sailor race the Bay to Bay and most of the fleet were 16 -30 feet in size. This race fleet is in 6 divisions and about 120 -150 boats all up both mono's and multi's. I was sailing a Farr 7500

 

So we were reaching in 20 knots sailing up towards some cliffs and the turning mark in a narrow channel and the that you had to bear away to down wind and then you needed to jib within 500 - 600 meters from the mark. The problem was the wind was sending 30 plus knot bullets right where we needed to jib and the 6 divisions were all starting to mix so you new that carnage was about to happen and the cowboys that were carrying the mast head kites were in trouble. 

 

As a crew we all talked through our options and the call was to drop and reset the kite after watching the wild broaches. So the time to jib came and that's what we did a drop and reset and off we went still in the lead under control and watching the carnage of wild jibs, broaches and broken masts. The best bit of the day for us was seeing our sister ship broach about 100 behind us and their keel was clear of the water. I'd never seen a Farr 7500 broach that bad. 

 

We ended up winning our class.

 

Pulpit

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, nolatom said:

I thought I'd "invented" the name, but it would seem I didn't. I'd never heard that name when I first did it, it just seemed like discretion is the better part of valor, so chicken it out, and alter by 320 degrees and make it, rather than 40 and you don't.

I teach it, letting students know that if it's screeching downwind, and you have to alter course and change tacks from one broad reach to the other, you don't have to risk losing the rig or get into a wilpeout broach and end up on your ear.  What's a little extra time and distance when you have all day to get there?

But racing, it's a touger choice.  I only ever did it once, long ago.  Marblehead Race week, in the very large fleet of "Townies", a 16-foot half-dory type with small jib and big main, with that long boom and no backstay, just some lower shrouds that weren't that high up on the spruce mast.

I was leading, so I really remember it.  Nice weather at start became a squall on the second leg of the triangle course, blowing about 30 I guess, though it felt like more.  I intended to be brave and skillful, and jibe her at the wing mark from starboard tack broad reach to the same on port tack, I was damned if I was going to give up a 7-8 boatlength lead.  

But...once I bore off  I couldn't trim the boom in at all with both hands, the wind was that strong, I guess it had picked up some.  So I "chickened out" and rounded back up, and had to go that long way round in that right-hand circle hated it,  seemed like it took forever, and it cost most of my lead, and second boat, a crafty and tough competitor, I could see was going to jibe it.  Damn, what a chicken I am, I'll never live this down, wah wah...

I couldn't look, he was only a couple of boatlengths behind now,too painful, so I just headed down towards the next mark I was trying to see in the rain and sea. So,  it was my crew who said damn, he just broke his mast!   After which, all the rest of the fleet did the long-way-round no-jibe just as I had.  I hung on and won the race.  And at a post race party, I got thanks from quite a few for tacking it the long way, so they could justify doing it too.

Wondering if and when you had to decide the same brave-or-chicken choice, and how it worked out.  And I'll accept that someone must've "named it" before me.

Anyway, that's my chicken-jibe story.  How'd it work out for you when you tried it?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gov Cup running hard under chute in 25+: It is pretty much taking 100% of my effort to keep the boat under the chute. When it came time to gybe, the Foredeck Union threatens a labor action unless we did a chicken gybe, which to us meant to drop the chute on deck, move the pole over, and rehoist it. I felt like an idiot sailing along under main in a race while they did all that, but in the end we gained several places when a few other boats gybing at the same time ended up in a shredded chute tangled mess.

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Doesn’t cost as much when you time it to coincide with a kite peel that you wanted to do anyways. Spike the old sail away into a letterbox drop, tack around, get the new kite rigged and let her rip.

In a short course race or a one design fleet this is costlier but on any race longer than 300 miles you’re usually safer going slow. 

 

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Discretion is the better part of valor. 

Have never regretted a chicken gybe. Have often regretted not doing one. 

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300 miles? WTF

Have done a couple. One memorable one in the Gulfstream. Blowing over 30 and when I came on deck and said it was time to gybe, the owner had a look on his face that prompted me to suggest we do a chicken gybe. He was grateful. Off watch watch captain came on deck and chided us and was asked to go back below......

Next up wearing the ship......

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8 hours ago, Laurent said:

At the other end of the spectrum (boat size wise), I have read somewhere a long time ago that some of the Vendée Globe skippers admitted that they had done it in the Southern Ocean... Having all stay sails on furlers, may help, in heavy conditions to make this decision.

I do not know if this is still valid with the latest generation of boats/skippers, and if the guys who chickened out were top performers or part of "the rest of the pack"...

Jean le Cam saif that he never once gybed n the 2004 Vendee, chicken gybe every time. Now, with better carbon battens, better pilots, faster hydraulics it is a different matter.

 

For the other extreme, Dee Caffari tells the story of being unable to tack in the Southern Ocean when going the wrong way round, as the waves kept pushing her bow back. SO she put another reef in, and gybed all the way round...the peace and tranquillity as she turned downwind made her want to go the right way ever since....

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In kitesurfing we use the term "chicken gybe" to describe the situation where you are riding out from shore and facing a wave that is about to break and you are not confident you can jump over it, so you chicken gybe and head back inshore to try again. 

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The closest I've come in a race was up in Manchester a few years ago. Blowing stink and steep seas. We set the kite at the windward mark and stayed deep and fast on starboard until we approached the layline. Doused the kite and then gybed and two-sail reached into the mark. Pretty much everyone in our class did the same - the risk of gybing the kite definitely did not meet the reward.

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Done it numerous times in dinghy races, especially when wind combines with chop to make gybing on constrained course risky. Are we discussing heavy-air gybe techniques here? There are lots of ways to do it, other than the classic "pull the tiller away from the sail, duck your head, wait for the crash then sail straight on" used by so many.

When it's very likely that competitors will be capsizing at the gybe mark, it pays off to NOT capsize.

FB- Doug

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7 race regatta in dinghies, 25-30kts TWS, we chicken jibed ever single time and won every single race. One wipeout meant last place in those conditions so we payed it really conservatively, with only 1 or 2 tacks up wind and only one tack (it's really not a jibe, is it!) downwind. Like I said straight bullets, although it did get harder as the other boats started to identify our tactics.

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I think the key to whether to gybe or wear round is how the exit route around and after the mark looks … if there are lots of capsized boats around the mark, you might not be in control of your exit route, likewise if there is an obstruction such as a mudbank in way of your exit then both of these would be a good justification for wearing round.

The key to pulling it off is to sail far enough past the mark that the bear off after the tack leaves you enough room to thread past the mark and any detritus floating around in the mark area.

There are some classes of dinghy where this makes absolute sense, others where you can usually reach to reach gybe without the kicker on, and not lose as much distance as a chicken gybe.

I don’t think there is much need to consider it except at a mark, a strong hand on the tiller and enjoy the ride, until you can pick your spot … waves help

 

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We did one on my 37 a couple years ago in a ~40 mile race when big thunderstorm cell came through (did a write-up on that race that Scot posted).  We had gotten the kite down before the big wind got to us.  Elected to tack instead of gybe when the wind machine said 53.  We were going to run out of race course/water without a turn.  One of the crew said you are going to do what?  I just said my wife would be mad if I went home without a mast.  One boat had a rudder blowup, numerous shredded sails.

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We chicken jibe as a regular part of our racing arsenal.  And it's been a term for decades, where ever I've sailed in NA.  In France it's called a "Coup de Coq."*

But timing is everything and we typically do it where we can jib reach into the mark at speed after the tack.  In a biggish boat, you must have a jib up before the kite comes down.  Otherwise you may not be able to bear off after the tack.  With a light boat and a fathead main it's:  jib up, kite down behind jib and main - letterbox if needed in breeze, look for flat water behind you and spin a tack as fast as the runner people can get the runners set, spin the bow down with the main very soft, trim then ease the jib to pull the bow down and bring the main on as the crew hikes.   

In the ocean, if you can't find a wave big enough to get planed off long enough for your jibe, then the chicken jibe with a kite re-hoist probably means it was time for a smaller kite anyway.

 

* No it's not.  I made that up.

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8 minutes ago, trisail said:

In my part of the world we call it a Granny Tack.

Or just a granny.

I sail high performance skiffs and we sometimes do it even in them.

But it can be an each way (losing) bet. Grannying means two passes through the power zone, which is a skiff can sometimes be worse than a gybe. 

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7 hours ago, ROADKILL666 said:

Just send it and cry later.

 

yeah, no. 

15-20 years ago when my crew and I were younger and money seemed to grow on trees, I was a lot less risk averse. It rarely paid off. Every now and then we'd get lucky in situations like these and nobody got hurt and maybe we didn't break something on the boat that would have been very useful later. 

I became a lot more cognizant of something called risk management as time and my experiences accumulated.

There's a whole section on one of my pickle dish shelves devoted to podium finishes that would not have happened if I let my crew talk me into some hairbrained maneuver. 

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9 hours ago, quod umbra said:

Have done a couple. One memorable one in the Gulfstream. Blowing over 30 and when I came on deck and said it was time to gybe, the owner had a look on his face that prompted me to suggest we do a chicken gybe. He was grateful. Off watch watch captain came on deck and chided us and was asked to go back below......

The exact same thing on So. Cal. Mexico races. 1st time wind was mid 30s with large seas for 2 directions and we were barely keeping things under control just going straight. And it was dark. The first time I called for this, it had never occurred to the others on board. Everyone was very relieved to not have to jibe in those conditions.

If we had pulled off a perfect jibe, it would have saved us a good 3 minutes over douse/tack/set. But it we had fuct it up it would have been at least half an hour lost.

Those 3 minutes did not affect our standing in the race.

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Once read an Uffa Fox story, from when he sailed Skerry Cruisers, he came up with the opposite of a chicken gybe.  He worked out that if he turned the boat through the gybe fast enough, with the mainsheet still at max ease, he could spin the boat far enough that the apparent wind would be forward the beam of the new gybe, so the wind would stop the boom crashing against the mainsheet or the stays.  Try it, it's fun, just look out for those loops of mainsheet.

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3 hours ago, maxstaylock said:

Once read an Uffa Fox story, from when he sailed Skerry Cruisers, he came up with the opposite of a chicken gybe.  He worked out that if he turned the boat through the gybe fast enough, with the mainsheet still at max ease, he could spin the boat far enough that the apparent wind would be forward the beam of the new gybe, so the wind would stop the boom crashing against the mainsheet or the stays.  Try it, it's fun, just look out for those loops of mainsheet.

Also called the North River Gybe.

I would not have guessed that it would work on a Skerry Cruiser type, long and narrow. I have done it on a lot of boats including some racing dinghies, and one failure in a full-type that would not turn fast enough and brought up with  CRASH sounding like the ring of doom.

FB- Doug

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We Chicken Jibed in the 2016 Pac Cup, we did this right after a Chinese gybe.   We were surfing hard with A2.5 up, full main in about 24 TWS, of course its about 2 am.   I am down in my bunk getting some much needed rest after 3 hour on the helm.   A puff hits and its a lift, bad news when we were sailing pole back and running, kite rotates to weather, and down we go.   I woke up to the "oh shit" call from on deck, instantly the boats on its side mast in the water held down by the A2.5 now turned into a sea anchor.   I get to the hatch and the main comes flying over slamming into the water, no time to get kited up I jump on deck and start working on the mess that is the A2.5, halyard down boat pops up.   Spend 5 minutes pulling the kite out of the water, this seemed like 20 minutes.   

Now we are on the wrong gybe, so as we get all of the strings  sorted out so we can set the A5 we chicken jibe.  I think given the mess the boat was in tacking around was the right call.   

Still to this day I don't know how the mast stayed up and the pole didn't break, when that pole hit the water we were going at least 12 knots the force on the pole and mast were huge.   I know we must have been going 12 knots because this is the 24 hours (8am to 8am) that we ticked off 240 miles.  

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Is this on the Moore? I remember the Green boat from Dana when I was a kid. That thing never moved from it's trailer all those years since new but it was always well maintained. Hell of a score to get that boat.

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On 10/6/2021 at 8:36 PM, nolatom said:

I thought I'd "invented" the name, but it would seem I didn't. I'd never heard that name when I first did it, it just seemed like discretion is the better part of valor, so chicken it out, and alter by 320 degrees and make it, rather than 40 and you don't.

I teach it, letting students know that if it's screeching downwind, and you have to alter course and change tacks from one broad reach to the other, you don't have to risk losing the rig or get into a wilpeout broach and end up on your ear.  What's a little extra time and distance when you have all day to get there?

But racing, it's a touger choice.  I only ever did it once, long ago.  Marblehead Race week, in the very large fleet of "Townies", a 16-foot half-dory type with small jib and big main, with that long boom and no backstay, just some lower shrouds that weren't that high up on the spruce mast.

I was leading, so I really remember it.  Nice weather at start became a squall on the second leg of the triangle course, blowing about 30 I guess, though it felt like more.  I intended to be brave and skillful, and jibe her at the wing mark from starboard tack broad reach to the same on port tack, I was damned if I was going to give up a 7-8 boatlength lead.  

But...once I bore off  I couldn't trim the boom in at all with both hands, the wind was that strong, I guess it had picked up some.  So I "chickened out" and rounded back up, and had to go that long way round in that right-hand circle hated it,  seemed like it took forever, and it cost most of my lead, and second boat, a crafty and tough competitor, I could see was going to jibe it.  Damn, what a chicken I am, I'll never live this down, wah wah...

I couldn't look, he was only a couple of boatlengths behind now,too painful, so I just headed down towards the next mark I was trying to see in the rain and sea. So,  it was my crew who said damn, he just broke his mast!   After which, all the rest of the fleet did the long-way-round no-jibe just as I had.  I hung on and won the race.  And at a post race party, I got thanks from quite a few for tacking it the long way, so they could justify doing it too.

Wondering if and when you had to decide the same brave-or-chicken choice, and how it worked out.  And I'll accept that someone must've "named it" before me.

Anyway, that's my chicken-jibe story.  How'd it work out for you when you tried it?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learned the expensive way not to let being in a race in the decision loop of going survival mode. Surprising how high one finishes in the standings in gear busters simply by maintaining control and finishing anyway. 

  To the topic, a tack instead of a jibe, I suppose there might be some conditions which warrant the move, but I'm hard pressed to imagine any modern boat that couldn't pull off a jibe in conditions in which one has a main up not deep reefed if any main up at all. Probably a good idea to mention it, in the spirit of getting people thinking outside of a certain box, but practice it? Probably not practicable in any condition but the real thing anyway. Everybody knows how to tack an bear off. 

 As far as racing around cans goes, if it's blowing hard enough to require that kind of "jibe" I'm no longer racing. 

 

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On 10/7/2021 at 6:31 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

Gov Cup running hard under chute in 25+: It is pretty much taking 100% of my effort to keep the boat under the chute. When it came time to gybe, the Foredeck Union threatens a labor action unless we did a chicken gybe, which to us meant to drop the chute on deck, move the pole over, and rehoist it. I felt like an idiot sailing along under main in a race while they did all that, but in the end we gained several places when a few other boats gybing at the same time ended up in a shredded chute tangled mess.

Not a true chicken gybe, but on one incredibly breezy day sailing a 41 footer/early IMS hull we were in the lead at the weather mark and decided to not to hoist the chute downwind. Others behind us did and many had problems. Then a J-35 rounded popped the chute and came blazing down the course after us. We got to the turning mark first, gybed and then set our own chute. He gybed and wiped out. We carried on to the bottom mark as that was the only gybe required. We continued this strategy all day and basically won the regatta on points that day. Sometimes it pays to be cautious.

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I just cannot even imagine chicken jibing in a venue like the the double dam in the Columbia River Gorge. You would be there all week. Sometimes you just have to go for it, and speed (plus warm water) is your friend. 

Guess that's why the t-shirts say "Let's take your boat".

 

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I hadn't heard the term "chicken jibe" when I called for it at night offshore in the '90s. I called it "wearing ship" -- a take on how square-rigged ships tacked.

As far as inshore racing, I would tend to go with what the competition was doing, tempered by their successes or failures. But in the presence of other boats and close to shore, and with able crew... generally I'd go for it. It's how you develop. You do it in 40 knots, suddenly doing it in 30 knots feels like a walk in the park.

Here's a shot from 48 years ago. We hadn't installed bailers yet so I'm forward pumping the bilge. I turned over the downwind legs to the late John Ross-Duggan who had the touch driving fast down wind. John's quote of the day: "Once they get up to this speed, they all steer the same."

Fun day! There were beached Finns from Huntington Beach to Laguna Beach! Super-Henry had the foresight to beach at 8th Street, right across the street from the club. Later at the club he was talking about sitting blissfully on the beach, gazing out to sea, buzzed with endorphins!

I miss being young!

on_the_wind_soling.in.50.knots.jpg

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On 10/10/2021 at 12:07 PM, Mark K said:

Learned the expensive way not to let being in a race in the decision loop of going survival mode. Surprising how high one finishes in the standings in gear busters simply by maintaining control and finishing anyway. 

  To the topic, a tack instead of a jibe, I suppose there might be some conditions which warrant the move, but I'm hard pressed to imagine any modern boat that couldn't pull off a jibe in conditions in which one has a main up not deep reefed if any main up at all. Probably a good idea to mention it, in the spirit of getting people thinking outside of a certain box, but practice it? Probably not practicable in any condition but the real thing anyway. Everybody knows how to tack an bear off. 

 As far as racing around cans goes, if it's blowing hard enough to require that kind of "jibe" I'm no longer racing. 

 

We generally have had a rule that over 33 knots TWS we are no longer racing, you are "sailing fast in a prescribed direction".  After that it's more "arrive alive" than "get there in first". 

However, our current boat is so ridiculously overpowered that over 25K, maneuvers are getting dicey and keeping the rig together is first thing on our minds.  We'd consider a chicken jibe, but then bearing off after a chicken jibe ain't all that easy.  It seems that jibing in the puffs is the way to go.  

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1 hour ago, Left Shift said:

We generally have had a rule that over 33 knots TWS we are no longer racing, you are "sailing fast in a prescribed direction".  After that it's more "arrive alive" than "get there in first". 

However, our current boat is so ridiculously overpowered that over 25K, maneuvers are getting dicey and keeping the rig together is first thing on our minds.  We'd consider a chicken jibe, but then bearing off after a chicken jibe ain't all that easy.  It seems that jibing in the puffs is the way to go.  

Raises the question of the super-chicken jibe: Round to weather, take the main down, tack, bear away, jibe....go home...  

  

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We won Pacific Cup overall with only one manuever after leaving the GG. That was a bare headed chicken jibe 600 + miles out. Sometimes safe is better than sorry.

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10 minutes ago, Mark K said:

Raises the question of the super-chicken jibe: Round to weather, take the main down, tack, bear away, jibe....go home...  

  

That would be the "Duck, Duck, Go" maneuver.  

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2 hours ago, Mark K said:

Raises the question of the super-chicken jibe: Round to weather, take the main down, tack, bear away, jibe....go home... 

During a series lasting a few months, I was once the only one in my class to start in sporty conditions, after which I tacked back around the committee boat and declared, "We withdraw". That simple DNF bought me quite a few places against all the DNCs.

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5 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

During a series lasting a few months, I was once the only one in my class to start in sporty conditions, after which I tacked back around the committee boat and declared, "We withdraw". That simple DNF bought me quite a few places against all the DNCs.

During our winter six month series for single handers, I did that about 40 years ago, just enough added points to win the trophy a couple of weeks later.. (more persistence, than being any good..)

Which reminds me, Snowflakes winter series starts this Sunday..

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Team racing and a huge gust came down the course which wiped every other boat out except us. All we had to do to win the race for our team was finish so we chicken gybed. No brainier under those circumstances!

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I was on a canting keel Cookson 50 in the Sydney to Hobart, we had full main, furled SS and A4 in 35-40knots, 3-4metre swell, happily getting along with it. Then came a driver change, during which each driver decided not to do their job and we rolled into a Chinese Gybe, canting keel the wrong way, leeward runner pinned on, many men mostly under water on the new leeward side, we had a bit on. 

Some neat crew work had the A4 down, and we decided to tack around and use the SS once we were head to wind to get the bow away. Just as the bow came down, Bang the SS fell into bits, so we left it there and hoisted the A6, and off we went, all up we lost 10mins.  5minute Average speeds with the A4 was 26.5knots and A6 was 23.5knots. Fun times that was. 

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On 10/7/2021 at 7:31 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

Gov Cup running hard under chute in 25+: It is pretty much taking 100% of my effort to keep the boat under the chute. When it came time to gybe, the Foredeck Union threatens a labor action unless we did a chicken gybe, which to us meant to drop the chute on deck, move the pole over, and rehoist it. I felt like an idiot sailing along under main in a race while they did all that, but in the end we gained several places when a few other boats gybing at the same time ended up in a shredded chute tangled mess.

First time I did this I was sailing 3 up on  J24 in a PHRF race.  David Flynn had just started his sail making career with Horizon sails, (I was about 14 at the time doing bow) and he walked us through this.  I thought it was a great heavy air tactic.  There was an X shaped patch on the chute.  Before we jibed it was blowing so hard the patch blew off and propellered away from the chute from the air pressure that was behind it on the small hole it was covering.  Funny the detail your mind can hang onto for years... 

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7 hours ago, The Q said:

During our winter six month series for single handers, I did that about 40 years ago, just enough added points to win the trophy a couple of weeks later.. (more persistence, than being any good..)

Which reminds me, Snowflakes winter series starts this Sunday..

lol,  last year our frostbite series was done with 60+*  temps...     and when it finished , we got hit with 2 weeks of 10*'s

as for a chicken gibe,    hell yeah,  in check writing weather and a 50+ year old stick,  you bet..   sometimes in 20+mph it's hard to get that boom over casually..

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3 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Very few boats can do a controlled maneuver  and  sheet the main in before the jibe

Even downwind in VMG mode these boats sail with the main well sheeted. When it becomes too hairy, they basically depower by bearing away to stall their sails. Also you will notice that both daggerboards are up to help the boat sail downwind. Most boats with twin rudder and a flatish stern bear away easily, the trouble is 1980s boats which were designed at a time when people thought that weather helm was a good idea!

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22 hours ago, Left Shift said:

That would be the "Duck, Duck, Go" maneuver.  

 The weird thing was we took the main down because it had started to rip near the leach, sailed back under a #3 alone, and passed two boats going up wind. It was a one-design fleet.  Lulls were about 35k, most of the time 40-44k. Mains so flattened and luffing most of the time were more windage than help. I wondered if the race could have been won with that 3 alone. Decided that to be something I didn't need to find out. 

 

   

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I did it recently in my elliott 7 sport boat. Middle of the night, blowing around 30kn with the kite up and rapidly running out of water. Just had a big wipe out and had a hard time getting the kite back in the boat.

I only had half height lifelines and with a mostly new crew that hadn't really sailed anything other than dinghies during the day. I wasnt overly keen to lose the one design class rig which is unobtainable (rigged with no backstay or runners) loose crew over the side or get hit by the low boom.

I do not regret my decision.

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