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Class 30 April 2021 to now


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https://www.boatsnews.com/story/36774/launch-of-the-30-one-design-class-a-newcomer-to-ocean-racing

Call for applications from architects

Architectural firms are invited to apply to propose solutions and designs on the planned features of the class:

  • Overall length between 30 and 32 feet (9 m and 9.60 m),
  • Minimum headroom of 1.75 m for one meter in front of the drop,
  • Draft limited to 2.20 m for a fixed keel (or 2.40 m for a lifting keel), with the possibility of reducing the draft during storage on land,
  • Cockpit for 5 to 6 adults,
  • Simple rigging with aluminium mast on the deck,
  • Basic set of sails: a mainsail equipped with 2 reefs, a genoa on snap hooks, a stormjib and a symmetrical or asymmetrical spinnaker on bowsprit,
  • No electronics in basic configuration (use of a waterproof tablet),
  • Furnishings: 4 simple benches on counter-mould,
  • Central lifting point by strap.

Architects and construction sites wishing to express their interest can do so until May 6 by e-mail at class30@uncl.com

https://www.boatsnews.com/story/37732/the-class30-is-a-simple-and-fun-boat-for-crewing-offshore-or-day-sailing

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2 September · 
 
 The / Multiplast association wins the International Call for Projects competition around Class 30, a future new monotype designed to bring the sailboat race school offshore tomorrow.
The Multiplast teams are very proud to have been chosen alongside their VPLP neighbors from over 25 applications, thus helping to put offshore race learning at the core of practice.
The VPLP/Multiplast association has won the international call for projects for the Class 30, the future new one-design boat designed to create the international ocean racing school boat of the future.
The Multiplast teams are very proud to have been chosen alongside their VPLP neighbors from among more than 25 applications, and to be taking part in putting the learning of ocean racing back at the heart of the practice. 
Giorgio Old / VPLP Design
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1 hour ago, solosailor said:

The worst decision.   

Looks like they are following cost control measures similar to the Mini Series boats.  Are carbon rigs coming down in cost comparable to aluminum?  Honest question, I have no idea, I sail a 35 year old boat.

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Looks like they are following cost control measures similar to the Mini Series boats. 

But these are not "series" boats....   its a box rule like the Proto Minis, which use carbon rigs.   It's hard to find a race boat does NOT use a carbon rig.

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32 minutes ago, solosailor said:

But these are not "series" boats....   its a box rule like the Proto Minis, which use carbon rigs.   It's hard to find a race boat does NOT use a carbon rig.

I was under the impression it’s a one design class. I believe the design competition is just for the initial design. 

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6 hours ago, solosailor said:

Ah, either way.....   who wants a new 30ft'er with an aluminum rig?

 

Carbon rigs certainly make for a much more well behaved boat, especially short handed.  If it's about keeping cost down, I'd be happier with a compromise between series mini hull laminate restrictions and Class 40 spar allowances than the other way around. 

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20 hours ago, solosailor said:

Ah, either way.....   who wants a new 30ft'er with an aluminum rig?

Depends on how many others are on the start line.

Every single exotic 30 foot box rule post half-tonner has flopped because too few were interested. A successful class could be the best development in decades. 

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As a sailor I'd like to see a carbon rig, as a boat owner I'd like to see an alu rig :lol::lol:

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Do you guys think that OD 30-32ft class is the way to go or its better to have BOX rule for same sizes?

IMO box rule is better cus it allows to develop hull making tech and shapes and stuff

on the other hand OD ensures that everyone have same instruments for the race and that the most skilled sailor wins, thats cool as well but personally i think that we have enough OD classes for sailors to show of their capabilities and not enough development in hull technology

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On 10/25/2021 at 4:56 PM, JonRowe said:

As a sailor I'd like to see a carbon rig, as a boat owner I'd like to see an alu rig :lol::lol:

Having priced up all of this recently for a similarly-sized boat, it's realistically a £10-15k additional cost on a £200k finished boat cost. Alu is not cheap enough to make it a worthwhile area of savings. You'd make greater lifetime cost savings by mandating Dacron mains...

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I'm really interested to see how this develops. I had a Cork 1720 and this would have been a very natural progression after that. For me, an aluminium rig is not an issue but I'm only really likely to be a club sailor, I've not got GP ambitions.

Cheers 

Andrew 

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1 hour ago, Snowden said:

Having priced up all of this recently for a similarly-sized boat, it's realistically a £10-15k additional cost on a £200k finished boat cost. Alu is not cheap enough to make it a worthwhile area of savings. You'd make greater lifetime cost savings by mandating Dacron mains...

Original comment was firmly tongue in cheek, but thats still 5-7.5% of the cost, and is a jib and a main at least in terms of sail away price. Plus as much as I love carbon sticks they do need finishing / painting and that does need maintaining over the life of the boat, plus any metal fittings carry a corrosion risk which in my mind is higher than that of an alu rig.

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6 hours ago, pironiero said:

Do you guys think that OD 30-32ft class is the way to go or its better to have BOX rule for same sizes?

There's no sign, in the post-IOR era, that there are enough owners interested in a box rule in this size range to make it work. There have been several attempts, all failed.

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2 hours ago, solosailor said:

I had more corrosion on my aluminum rigs than my carbon one.    

I just had it drilled into me that the galvanic reaction is intense so use a tonne of teff gel :lol:

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8 hours ago, nogetwe said:

Someone recently argued in another thread that a carbon mast should have better longevity than alu.

Not sure about better, but as Solo mentioned, aluminum masts have plenty of problems with dissimilar metals.  Titanium is not super expensive right now and better than stainless for corrosion, and there are many ways to isolate stainless steel. The biggest difference between the two is mainsail luff attachment.  Carbon luff tracks definitely have a history of being more problematic.  Also, don't clear coat them.  Prime and paint makes a happier owner.  Fine, there are some issues.

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I do think carbon is generally a better choice, but like everything there are trade offs, and I think, rightly or wrongly, that aluminium rigs are easier for amateurs to look after, and they are certainly cheaper.

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4 hours ago, r.finn said:

 Also, don't clear coat them.  Prime and paint makes a happier owner.

100% this. Although the clear coat weave look is kinda cool for the first few seasons, when it's peeling from UV you'll wish you painted it.

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