Jump to content

Somebody Doesn't Know Shit About Tools


Recommended Posts

And that would be me, sometimes...   

So I've been considering getting a compound miter saw (?) for casual chopping up of pieces of wood.  Up to this point I've used a handheld circular saw for cutting 1x12"s down to size (for work-holding fixtures) and building small stuff that needs square or miter cuts.  I've done OK and haven't lost any fingers, but I would like to have my cuts be a bit truer, cleaner, and safer. 

So is a compound miter saw a reasonable addition to my collection, and what might be a decent non-junk brand / model?  I'm not doing fine cabinetry, but want something I won't have to fight.

 

And here's a quick rant.  I hate Chinese screws!  I've had them snap way too easy, and the head gets reamed out even when I am using the correct driver (not always, yesterday I used the tip of my pocket knife to get a screw out.)  There's a reason they call that metal "Chinesium".

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 232
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Mrs PB shot down my first attempt at remodel plans……..

My wife is an intelligent woman with questionable taste in men.

An oscilloscope probe is (part of) an instrument.  A soldering iron is a tool.  Of course an instrument can also be considered to be one of the "tools of the trade". This is my latest instrument

Posted Images

2 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

s-l500.png

Ryobi 12" Sliding Compound Miter Saw (TSS121)

I belive in Ryobi stuffe.                                           :)

I have that same Miter Saw and have been very happy with it. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Budget?

If money is less of a concern, Bosch makes a nice unit that uses a pantograph rather than sliding rails. It's less vulnerable to dust and crap gumming up the works and it lets you use it right up against a rear wall, which can be handy at times. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got the smaller 7 1/4" Ryobi sliding compound miter saw and have been very happy with it - hard to beat for the money.  We really have enjoyed the portability as it's gotten used on the porch, in the garage, and have taken it over to a friends place a few times to help build some picnic tables.

Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, valis said:

So is a compound miter saw a reasonable addition to my collection,

Absolutely. Craigslist can be your friend. The original Hitachi’s are great. Mine is 27 years old.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, IStream said:

Budget?

If money is less of a concern, Bosch makes a nice unit that uses a pantograph rather than sliding rails. It's less vulnerable to dust and crap gumming up the works and it lets you use it right up against a rear wall, which can be handy at times. 

Festool's has the sliders in front and lets you push it up against the wall as well.  The first time I saw one I thought "Brilliant!  And such an obvious thing to do, why aren't they all like this?" 

Of course it's probably 2X the price of the Bosch but hey, it's not my money. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to have to stomp on the cat, but.... Ryobi is crap.

 Get a DeWalt 12" or a Rigid 12".

 I prefer the DeWalt, but the Rigid is good too. I don't like the laser guides, and put a piece of tape over them because they're almost always slightly wrong. For rough framing, they'd be fine.

Festool, Bosch,.... You're wasting money better spent on better wood.

 Spend $120 and buy a 60-80 TPI carbide blade. I like Amana, but DMT, and Freud make decent all purpose blades. If you cut a lot of PT SYP get a Freud. They seem to take more abuse, but still deliver a fairly decent cut. Do not get a thin kerf blade.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Festool's has the sliders in front and lets you push it up against the wall as well.  The first time I saw one I thought "Brilliant!  And such an obvious thing to do, why aren't they all like this?" 

Of course it's probably 2X the price of the Bosch but hey, it's not my money. 

Got one on order.............its only money...........

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Got one on order.............its only money...........

Must be nice..... You earned it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, valis said:

 

So is a compound miter saw a reasonable addition to my collection, and what might be a decent non-junk brand / model?  I'm not doing fine cabinetry, but want something I won't have to fight.

 

 

go big, get a bosch  GCM12SD 

https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/boschtools-ocs/miter-saws-gcm12sd-33969-p/

gcm12sd-12-in-15-amp-axial-glide.jpg

 

and get a blade

https://www.forrestblades.com/miter-master-saw-blade-for-the-ultimate-in-miter-cuts/

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My go-to is Makita for power tools, but for the amount of tight work I do I use a manual saw. Silky smooth cuts, super accurate and no risk of cutting my fingers off. Lee Valley Nobex saw. 

01H0605-nobex-economical-miter-box-f-07.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

WTF is it with needing a 12" SCMS?

I use the 8 1/4" Makita for everything.

Cheap throw away blades, light compact tool.

How many fucking people really need a trim finish on a fucking 4x4?

SMH.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Must be nice..... You earned it.

NEVER Once, Gee wish I had one of those

ALWAYS , Ya I Got the Better, BIGGER, More Expensive one

once a thread of Tent Trailers w Pix of my new to me at the time Colman Pop-Up

1st thing to Pop-Up ........ Ya I Got a Really Big Bitchin MotorHome that Cost Alot

 

somethings NEVER change .... Swan like much of the time

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mrleft8 said:

Sorry to have to stomp on the cat, but.... Ryobi is crap.

 Get a DeWalt 12" or a Rigid 12".

 I prefer the DeWalt, but the Rigid is good too. I don't like the laser guides, and put a piece of tape over them because they're almost always slightly wrong. For rough framing, they'd be fine.

Festool, Bosch,.... You're wasting money better spent on better wood.

 Spend $120 and buy a 60-80 TPI carbide blade. I like Amana, but DMT, and Freud make decent all purpose blades. If you cut a lot of PT SYP get a Freud. They seem to take more abuse, but still deliver a fairly decent cut. Do not get a thin kerf blade.

The Bosch and the DeWalt are in the same price bracket...Ryobi makes decent tools if you're not making a living with them...I have tools I make a living with that get used most every day...and I have a handful of 18V Ryobis that get pulled out for shit that doesn't get done every day...the price point on them is perfect for that...1/2" impact wrench for tire changes/lag bolts/J-bolts/trailer shit, cordless finish nailer for when you wanna throw in a handful of nails without busting out a compressor, small jobsite/porch blower, r/o sander for touch-ups...and my favorite, the battery operated caulk gun which is the absolute fuckin' bomb for laying down beads of  NP-1 or other polyurethane sealants...big miter saw I have and like the Bosch which I use on trim jobs...but I've got a 7-1/4" Kobalt (Lowe's house brand) which weighs about a 1/3rd as much that I am more than happy to use on day to day basis for shit that doesn't need such tight tolerances...horses for courses...

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mrleft8 said:

Sorry to have to stomp on the cat, but.... Ryobi is crap.

 Get a DeWalt 12" or a Rigid 12".

This. I've had a DeWalt 12" sliding compound saw for 20 years. Built 2 houses and a big shed using it. One replacement set of brushes, a few blades. It's still tight and accurate.

Ryobi are the tools I buy to trash or lend, which often comes to pretty much the same thing.

For a smaller lightweight one, my old Hitachi 8" saw was brilliant. Unfortunately it was so good that some arsehole stole it.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cyclone said:

Absolutely. Craigslist can be your friend. The original Hitachi’s are great. Mine is 27 years old.

I second CL.

For stationary tools for handyman/hobbyist use it's hard to beat - always lots of selection too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ishmael said:

My go-to is Makita for power tools, but for the amount of tight work I do I use a manual saw. Silky smooth cuts, super accurate and no risk of cutting my fingers off. Lee Valley Nobex saw. 

01H0605-nobex-economical-miter-box-f-07.

Here’s my Ulmia 352. Got it at a yard sale for 30 bucks. I replaced the original blade with the Japanese style. Cuts really clean and accurately. You can still get them new, but pretty speedy. Makes beautiful miters though. 
https://www.pecktool.com/product/ulmia-352-miter-box-saw/

Don’t know why the pic is upside down 

887FCDEC-B124-4AC0-A50F-0E6CF34BA91C.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Grizz said:

Here’s my Ulmia 352. Got it at a yard sale for 30 bucks. I replaced the original blade with the Japanese style. Cuts really clean and accurately. You can still get them new, but pretty speedy. Makes beautiful miters though. 
https://www.pecktool.com/product/ulmia-352-miter-box-saw/

Don’t know why the pic is upside down 

887FCDEC-B124-4AC0-A50F-0E6CF34BA91C.jpeg

Looks like you have the saw in ass backwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bmiller said:
24 minutes ago, Grizz said:

Here’s my Ulmia 352. Got it at a yard sale for 30 bucks. I replaced the original blade with the Japanese style. Cuts really clean and accurately. You can still get them new, but pretty speedy. Makes beautiful miters though. 
https://www.pecktool.com/product/ulmia-352-miter-box-saw/

Don’t know why the pic is upside down 

887FCDEC-B124-4AC0-A50F-0E6CF34BA91C.jpeg

Expand  

Looks like you have the saw in ass backwards.

ist juste configiurred foire crowen mouldeng in the foto.                                                :)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, bmiller said:

Looks like you have the saw in ass backwards.

I'm using the Japanese style blade that cuts on the pull. With the saw in this orientation the teeth pull the workpiece toward the fence, which is desirable. I reverse it with the Western style blade. And i got the photo right-side up this time. It looks like the iPhone .HEIC picture file extension shows inverted on forum posts.

Miter.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just figured that you'd posted so that the Ozzies and Enzeders could see it....

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, justsomeguy! said:

Is that "teeth per inch"? ;)

I do like my old DeWalt.

Yeah.... My mistake. My mind was thinking band saw blade, but the rest of me was thinking circular blade.

Look for 60-80 teeth on a 10-12" blade and I also suggest a triple chip tooth design and 5-10 degree rake

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

 

Look for 60-80 teeth on a 10-12" blade and I also suggest a triple chip tooth design and 5-10 degree rake

Best/Only blade to cut Hardiebacker 

Has but 4 teeth (10")

 

Screenshot_20211020-080900_Chrome.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a cheapo Black & Decker chop saw that worked great for a lot of years, but it could not get thru a 2" x 6" because it didn't slide, and it also only beveled one way. I installed many laminate floors with that sucker, flipping the 7" wide planks.

I recently upgraded to a double bevel compound slider, and it is night and day to my old saw. My new one is a Kobalt from Lowe's, and like mentioned earlier, I disabled the laser...I like my new saw, and no it isn't a DeWalt or Rigid, but it works for this Harry Homeowner.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all!  Now I will begin my typical process of "analysis paralysis" in which I vacillate between "cheap and good enough" and "damn, that's nice", and all points in between.  For me price isn't a huge factor anymore, but I do have an aversion to getting the most expensive thing just because I can.  So, I usually settle on a mid-range gizmo and it's usually good enough.

By the way, this thread is available if anyone want's to post "don't know shit about tools" stuff.

r3z7l9qzken31.jpg

Remember, "If it smells like chicken, you're holding it wrong!"

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Ryobi 10" compound. It's good enough. If I had to toss it in the back of a truck every day to cart to a jobsite and abuse it it would not be good enough. The method of alignment for the 10" saw wouldn't handle that level of abuse well. 

For rough stuff (2x lumber) it's plenty good enough, the 12" would be better. For fine stuff it needs to be tuned, but once tuned it's good enough. If I need perfect angles they get done on the TS with custom jigs. For perfect trim, I cope that stuff anyway and often use a manual mitre box to start the cope. A 12" slider is overkill for most sized trimwork - the 8" saws are much more convenient for that. 

I'll use it for precision crosscuts if I've got the TS set up for rips - once again I've got it aligned well so a 90 is really a 90. Drawer boxes get ripped on the TS, dadoed on the router table, and crosscut on the slider. They come out square. 

Would I like a Festool? Yes. But I'd rather buy boat parts. I've had a hit/miss relationship with Dewalt so it's not for me anymore. And IIRC Rigid is Ryobi with slightly better specs. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, valis said:

Thank you all!  Now I will begin my typical process of "analysis paralysis" in which I vacillate between "cheap and good enough" and "damn, that's nice", and all points in between.  For me price isn't a huge factor anymore, but I do have an aversion to getting the most expensive thing just because I can.  So, I usually settle on a mid-range gizmo and it's usually good enough.

By the way, this thread is available if anyone want's to post "don't know shit about tools" stuff.

r3z7l9qzken31.jpg

Remember, "If it smells like chicken, you're holding it wrong!"

I've always thought of soldering irons as instruments rather than tools.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Grizz said:

I'm using the Japanese style blade that cuts on the pull. With the saw in this orientation the teeth pull the workpiece toward the fence, which is desirable. I reverse it with the Western style blade. And i got the photo right-side up this time. It looks like the iPhone .HEIC picture file extension shows inverted on forum posts.

Miter.jpg

I almost always clamp the work to the fence so it doesn't really matter which way the blade cuts. Gives a much smoother cut.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Grizz said:

Here’s my Ulmia 352. Got it at a yard sale for 30 bucks. I replaced the original blade with the Japanese style.

Can't you just put the blade in backwards to get "Japanese style"?

Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I almost always clamp the work to the fence so it doesn't really matter which way the blade cuts. Gives a much smoother cut.

I clamp mine most of the time too. With the Ulmia, flipping the saw around takes a couple of seconds, and it's just good practice to always have the cut draw the workpiece in towards the fence. YMMV...

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I've always thought of soldering irons as instruments rather than tools.

An oscilloscope probe is (part of) an instrument.  A soldering iron is a tool.  Of course an instrument can also be considered to be one of the "tools of the trade".

This is my latest instrument / tool: a 16-channel logic analyzer with a sample rate of up to 1 GHz.  It's the black box, and is used for debugging mostly hardware and occasionally software.  Here, I'm only using two of the sixteen channels, and working on a circuit board for a product I designed.  The beige box is a programmer for the FPGA (field programmable gate array) on the board.  The adhesive snot and green wires are to secure some test points.

LA.thumb.jpg.c466930fd7c857384a81af7e755a64b6.jpg

This is a case where I spent more money to get performance I don't need right now.  I could have spent half of what I did to get "good enough" but I do anticipate needing the enhanced performance in the near future.

Note the sailboat logo on the circuit board!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, valis said:

An oscilloscope probe is (part of) an instrument.  A soldering iron is a tool.  Of course an instrument can also be considered to be one of the "tools of the trade".

This is my latest instrument / tool: a 16-channel logic analyzer with a sample rate of up to 1 GHz.  It's the black box, and is used for debugging mostly hardware and occasionally software.  Here, I'm only using two of the sixteen channels, and working on a circuit board for a product I designed.  The beige box is a programmer for the FPGA (field programmable gate array) on the board.  The adhesive snot and green wires are to secure some test points.

LA.thumb.jpg.c466930fd7c857384a81af7e755a64b6.jpg

This is a case where I spent more money to get performance I don't need right now.  I could have spent half of what I did to get "good enough" but I do anticipate needing the enhanced performance in the near future.

Note the sailboat logo on the circuit board!

waiting for PB to come up w something to make you and the rest of us feel inadequate

??????????????

you know he just ordered one to replace his old one that was better than that one ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

That was fun.  I was invited to put something together for the MicroHAMS on-line conference, so I did this.  Looking "professional" though?  Not sure about that, and I could have used some more practice talking to a camera!  But now that I'm retired I get to play with stuff like this just because it interests me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, flyingdog said:

What was the guy's handle that owned a cabinet/finish carpentry shop?

Is he too banned? I'd think he'd chime in here.

If you mean El Mariachi, he became an un-person

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:
8 hours ago, flyingdog said:

What was the guy's handle that owned a cabinet/finish carpentry shop?  I'd think he'd chime in here.

Hatin' life?

Yes                                           :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, DA-WOODY said:

waiting for PB to come up w something to make you and the rest of us feel inadequate

??????????????

you know he just ordered one to replace his old one that was better than that one ;)

Thisse mabey moire of a statmente abote you then PB.   Juste sayeng............             :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, flyingdog said:

What was the guy's handle that owned a cabinet/finish carpentry shop?

Is he too banned? I'd think he'd chime in here.

"Hatin' Life" IIRC.

OOPS! I see I'm late to the party....

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, flyingdog said:

What was the guy's handle that owned a cabinet/finish carpentry shop?

Is he too banned? I'd think he'd chime in here.

He looked like he was headed for a meltdown here awhile back. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, hobot said:

That work he did in the house he bought was pretty darn cool!

 

a61m7jL_700b.jpg

Yeah….but have you ever looked for your iPhone using the flashlight that’s on your…….iPhone? I have. :blink:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, hobot said:

That work he did in the house he bought was pretty darn cool!

 

a61m7jL_700b.jpg

There's a reason I own maybe 10 tape measures. Increases the odds of actually finding one.

FKT

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

There's a reason I own maybe 10 tape measures. Increases the odds of actually finding one.

FKT

Same with reader glasses, I have a bunch, at home, in the car and at the office:-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, it's the environmental saturation strategy. I used to buy 3/32" ball end hex wrenches for the shop at work in onesy-twosy quantities as needed, but they just kept disappearing. Finally, I just ordered 50 and spread them around. You couldn't open a drawer or pass by a toolbox without running into one and they paid for themselves within a week just by keeping people from spending time searching. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

Same with reader glasses, I have a bunch, at home, in the car and at the office:-)

There is usually one perched on your head while you are looking for another one.....:ph34r:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, dolphinmaster said:

Same with reader glasses, I have a bunch, at home, in the car and at the office:-)

I gave up and now wear my glasses on a croakie-equivalent so they're always hanging around my neck.  Same thing with my sunglasses, so I often have them both on me (each with progressive lenses).  It's kind of a "librarian" thing to do, but it works for me.  But I still have spare drugstore-readers randomly strewn about, plus my previous set of prescription glasses always on hand.

I guess I like to see.  I could not read normal print or drive at night without them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Tunnel Rat said:

There is usually one perched on your head while you are looking for another one.....:ph34r:

4 days ago I put my glasses down for as long as it takes to take a 2 beer piss. I went back in to the garage to collect my grocery bag and hop in the truck. No glasses. I went inside to see if I'd put them down, and looked around. No glasses. I went back out to the garage, and there's the puppy with one of the lenses in his mouth. I found the frames and the other lens out in the yard.

 Yes I have them taped back together with duct tape. No the puppy did not get a ride to town that day.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Lowly Crew said:

So are you saying that you punished a puppy for your mistake. 

The puppy was providing a teachable moment to MrLeft

 

ah…. The puppy stage.  Love it and hate it all at the same time. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Have heard my partner ask her mum to hold on why she looked for her phone to look something up. When talking to her mum on the phone.

 

I'm lucky to have her.

In the sense that you're lucky she didn't just wander away one day and not come back? Shortens probate, if nothing else.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ishmael said:

In the sense that you're lucky she didn't just wander away one day and not come back? Shortens probate, if nothing else.

She does regularly wander away. Shopping is rather painful.

Luckily, she needs me, her designated driver, to get home.

But giving her directions to find me or hearing her descriptions of landmarks on the phone when she realises I'm not walking next to her are worthy of Abbott and Costello.

She's actually a keeper.

I couldn't say that about myself.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

She does regularly wander away. Shopping is rather painful.

Luckily, she needs me, her designated driver, to get home.

But giving her directions to find me or hearing her descriptions of landmarks on the phone when she realises I'm not walking next to her are worthy of Abbott and Costello.

She's actually a keeper.

I couldn't say that about myself.

You’re a good guy. Some folks skip those responsibilities. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, valis said:

I gave up and now wear my glasses on a croakie-equivalent so they're always hanging around my neck.  Same thing with my sunglasses, so I often have them both on me (each with progressive lenses).  It's kind of a "librarian" thing to do, but it works for me.  But I still have spare drugstore-readers randomly strewn about, plus my previous set of prescription glasses always on hand.

I guess I like to see.  I could not read normal print or drive at night without them.

Somewhat dangerous if you drive a vehicle with airbags.  No fun when it goes off.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, RedTuna said:

Somewhat dangerous if you drive a vehicle with airbags.  No fun when it goes off.

I see people riding around in the passenger front seat with their feet up on the edge of the dash all the time. I just shake my head. I have twice seen dislocated hips from the air bag deployment on a relatively minor collision. I’ve seen reports of fractured femurs as well but have not seen that personally. It’s always women riding passenger with the guy driving. The days of feet up on the dash are over if your air bag is armed. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

People are absolutely clueless about airbags.

My wife's niece - a 30 Y.O. at the time - was leaving our place some years ago without clipping her belt.

Laura called her on it and Caroline said "It's O/K, I have airbags". :rolleyes:

At that point I was called in for some tech education. She actually thought they were some sort of magic pillow, not just a last desperate hope against serious injuries or death.

I told her they were a bit like an ejection seat in a fighter that way and I think that woke her up.

Maybe showing schoolkids some of those vids of guys launching their buddies with an airbag might educate them. That along with some pics of real smashed faces from deployments and so forth.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If it were up to me, nobody would be allowed to show the typical time-lapse airbag inflation shot in their "our cars are so safe" ads. Everything would have to be real-time. That would dispel the "it's like a big comfy pillow" misconception right quick.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2021 at 9:06 PM, Snaggletooth said:

s-l500.png

Ryobi 12" Sliding Compound Miter Saw (TSS121)

I belive in Ryobi stuffe.                                           :)

I just got one of these in exchange for doing the baseboards on a friend's flipper house. It has worked fine so far. My finish nailer died in the process and he bought me a new one of those too. It's a Rigid. I consume consumer grade tools.

It has generally gone well. I have a Ryobi sawzall and circular saw from the 90's that I still use. OTOH, I bought the Dremel version of the Fein Multimaster. It didn't last long and wasn't as nice to run as the Fein that replaced it. Shoulda just gone that way in the first place. Oh well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been building stuff for over fifty years, never had a compound miter saw and never needed one. 
 

They remind me of radial arm saws, remember them?

 

Never used a nail gun either, 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

I have been building stuff for over fifty years, never had a compound miter saw and never needed one. 
 

They remind me of radial arm saws, remember them?

 

Never used a nail gun either, 

 

The only positive things about radial arm saws is you don't need as much room and you can rig them to cut your own head off.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

I have been building stuff for over fifty years, never had a compound miter saw and never needed one. 
 

They remind me of radial arm saws, remember them?

 

Never used a nail gun either, 

 

I had a radial arm saw. It was a gift from a friend.

Or perhaps he really didn't like me, dunno.

Anyway I sold it and both myself and the new owner were happy.

WRT nail guns, unfortunately I didn't come equipped with the 3rd arm so nailing things in awkward positions is difficult for me. And a nail gun is way, way faster if you're doing wall framing with semi-dried hardwood.

Come & visit, I'll challenge you to drive nails by hand into the wall studs of my barn...

FKT

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I had a radial arm saw. It was a gift from a friend.

Or perhaps he really didn't like me, dunno.

Anyway I sold it and both myself and the new owner were happy.

WRT nail guns, unfortunately I didn't come equipped with the 3rd arm so nailing things in awkward positions is difficult for me. And a nail gun is way, way faster if you're doing wall framing with semi-dried hardwood.

Come & visit, I'll challenge you to drive nails by hand into the wall studs of my barn...

FKT

I have predrilled a lot of hardwood, but swinging a hammer is really therapeutic…

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, olaf hart said:

I have predrilled a lot of hardwood, but swinging a hammer is really therapeutic…

Yeah. Until you break all 3 bones at the elbow and have it pinned/wired back together. And get ~60% of the function back after many months of physiotherapy.

I'll keep my nail guns.

FKT

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

There's a reason I own maybe 10 tape measures. Increases the odds of actually finding one.

FKT

I utilize this method with tapes (and pencils). Stanely FatMax 25' only please!

On my first nail banger job, mid 80's, the boss told me these simple rules:

Square, plum and level and never show up next to him without a tape and a minimum of 2 pencils....

 

39 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Never used a nail gun either, 

Wait, what!!??

So, you're a screw gun guy then!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, olaf hart said:

I have been building stuff for over fifty years, never had a compound miter saw and never needed one. 
 

They remind me of radial arm saws, remember them?

 

Never used a nail gun either,

I've used them and see the utility and the source of the name "chop saw." If you have one handy and just want a piece off a  board, it's great. Never quite wanted one badly enough to buy it but I like messing with baseboard and getting one while helping out a friend is a good deal.

The sliding mechanism on mine is suspiciously similar to a radial arm saw. That was the only tool I was not allowed to touch when I worked in a cabinet shop as a kid. I mostly keep it locked.

You don't know what you're missing with nail guns.

9 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

WRT nail guns, unfortunately I didn't come equipped with the 3rd arm so nailing things in awkward positions is difficult for me.

And in corners where the nail gun won't fit and you can't swing a hammer, my Senco palm nailer is awesome. Seldom used, but nothing else will work when I do use it.

d_1186.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Point Break said:

There are some very delicate nailing that require predrill and gentle hammer but really pretty rare in my world. I love ALL my nail/brad/staple guns. 

Round here the older house framing is all eucalyptus, very hard after it has dried, needs to be predrilled for nailing with a hammer…

Hopefully, I have completed my last home renovation, so I can remain untainted by nailers and chop saws, and just glory in using the same tools I built my first house with forty years ago.

I still have my Bosch 1/2” drill I bought in 1974, it works fine..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please forgive the orientation from my iphone

The Bosch is a two speed 1/2” drill from 1974 that is still good largely because it came with an overload cutoff switch …

B90C7B42-AEA6-4693-8FF7-F646E2443DFC.jpeg

BE482024-277E-43F4-819A-97419187D5B0.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites