Jump to content

Somebody Doesn't Know Shit About Tools


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 232
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Mrs PB shot down my first attempt at remodel plans……..

My wife is an intelligent woman with questionable taste in men.

An oscilloscope probe is (part of) an instrument.  A soldering iron is a tool.  Of course an instrument can also be considered to be one of the "tools of the trade". This is my latest instrument

Posted Images

12 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

We call them gum trees round here…

Your rose by any other name is still a:

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

 

Seriously, though: eucalyptus as structural framing???

 

8 minutes ago, Point Break said:

 

Caulk and paint, makes what a carpenter ain't!

I so, very much, do not like hanging drywall!

The number of times I've scribed the holes perfectly, tho backwards/opposite/wrong........

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Liquid said:

Your rose by any other name is still a:

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

 

Seriously, though: eucalyptus as structural framing???

 

Caulk and paint, makes what a carpenter ain't!

I so, very much, do not like hanging drywall!

The number of times I've scribed the holes perfectly, tho backwards/opposite/wrong........

you should give up a call 1950's guy

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Liquid said:

Are you sure about that, eucalyptus framing members, that are hard? How long does it take to season eucalyptus - 1K years? They failed at being rail road ties!!!

Eucalyptus should be considered an accelerant!

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

I lived next to/under a eucy stand in Mill Valley, CA = Fuckin' nightmare!!!

They're hard, all right. At least, the correct species is.

You know why we export Fosters beer to the USA? It's because no Australian will drink it.

Well, pretty much the same with the eucalypt species you guys have. We kept the good stuff. Ironbark, for example, generally masses around 1.2g/cm^3.

FKT

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Liquid said:

Your rose by any other name is still a:

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

 

Seriously, though: eucalyptus as structural framing???

Yep very common in Tasmania back in the day. Put it up semi-green while you can still nail it. After it's fully air dried, you aren't going to. And it'll last forever. Massively high structural strength.

Of course it'll also likely warp & twist while drying so renovating old houses is a challenge. Better have tungsten edged blades in the power planer.

FKT

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yep very common in Tasmania back in the day. Put it up semi-green while you can still nail it. After it's fully air dried, you aren't going to. And it'll last forever. Massively high structural strength.

Of course it'll also likely warp & twist while drying so renovating old houses is a challenge. Better have tungsten edged blades in the power planer.

FKT

The warping isn’t such a big problem though, they only started using spirit levels and framing angles twenty years ago…

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Liquid said:

 

Seriously, though: eucalyptus as structural framing???

 

..

Not just framing, kiln dried it is used for floors and trim.

I am looking at this as I post

 

 

image.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Not just framing, kiln dried it is used for floors and trim.

I am looking at this as I post

 

 

image.jpg

Your lighthouse is in the wrong place. Fucking Australians.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Liquid said:

Are you sure about that, eucalyptus framing members, that are hard? How long does it take to season eucalyptus - 1K years? They failed at being rail road ties!!!

Eucalyptus should be considered an accelerant!

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

I lived next to/under a eucy stand in Mill Valley, CA = Fuckin' nightmare!!!

clearly you've never worked with Jarra

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yep very common in Tasmania back in the day. Put it up semi-green while you can still nail it. After it's fully air dried, you aren't going to. And it'll last forever. Massively high structural strength.

Of course it'll also likely warp & twist while drying so renovating old houses is a challenge. Better have tungsten edged blades in the power planer.

FKT

mid 70's round noosa way it was all gum , checked in top and bottom plates and luckily still pretty green, built a bunch of houses in Weipa and that was all cut your own from a load of random lengths only saving grace was roof trusses.......... also hardwood and what seemed like a coupla mllion of those bloody triple grips followed by hook bolts over the rafter through everything to under the floor joists

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, olaf hart said:

It is French…

dont worry , black and decker made em too, had to use one way too often in early apprenticeship days

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Liquid said:

Are you sure about that, eucalyptus framing members, that are hard? How long does it take to season eucalyptus - 1K years? They failed at being rail road ties!!!

Eucalyptus should be considered an accelerant!

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

I lived next to/under a eucy stand in Mill Valley, CA = Fuckin' nightmare!!!

Being a very dense, hard wood, a length of ironbark is often used as a bug shoe on the bottom of a ship's skeg to protect it from shipworms.[4] Ironbark was widely used in the piles of 19th and early 20th century bridges and wharves in New Zealand.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ironbark

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 167149 said:

mid 70's round noosa way it was all gum , checked in top and bottom plates and luckily still pretty green, built a bunch of houses in Weipa and that was all cut your own from a load of random lengths only saving grace was roof trusses.......... also hardwood and what seemed like a coupla mllion of those bloody triple grips followed by hook bolts over the rafter through everything to under the floor joists

Yeah - cyclone standard fixing.

My barn is built like that. 125 x 40 stringybark studs 4.4m long checked into 125x50 top & bottom plates, cyclone strapping on every 2nd stud, trusses tied with steel strapping to the studs as well. I had the local mill cut all the timber for me, air dried it for ~3 months over winter then started building.

Hasn't gone anywhere yet.

We sawed a lot of the big blue gum trees up using a Lucas mill. That was hard work. Recovery wasn't great but it makes lovely dressed timber provided you're happy resharpening your thickness planer & jointer blades regularly.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yeah - cyclone standard fixing.

My barn is built like that. 125 x 40 stringybark studs 4.4m long checked into 125x50 top & bottom plates, cyclone strapping on every 2nd stud, trusses tied with steel strapping to the studs as well. I had the local mill cut all the timber for me, air dried it for ~3 months over winter then started building.

Hasn't gone anywhere yet.

We sawed a lot of the big blue gum trees up using a Lucas mill. That was hard work. Recovery wasn't great but it makes lovely dressed timber provided you're happy resharpening your thickness planer & jointer blades regularly.

FKT

Stuff's harder than the back of Christ's head....

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2021 at 8:06 AM, SloopJonB said:

People are absolutely clueless about airbags.

My wife's niece - a 30 Y.O. at the time - was leaving our place some years ago without clipping her belt.

Laura called her on it and Caroline said "It's O/K, I have airbags". :rolleyes:

At that point I was called in for some tech education. She actually thought they were some sort of magic pillow, not just a last desperate hope against serious injuries or death.

I told her they were a bit like an ejection seat in a fighter that way and I think that woke her up.

Maybe showing schoolkids some of those vids of guys launching their buddies with an airbag might educate them. That along with some pics of real smashed faces from deployments and so forth.

My father talks about seeing pictures of car crash victims when he went for his licence.

I don't think all the blood and gore would be so effective for the Facebook generation...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Point Break said:

It's not as easy, but there is some elegance in old tools and their use especially if you're not in a hurry. I still choose my more modern tools but....I get it........

Nothing feels better than a sharp Stanley no4.

In a woodworking context...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yeah - cyclone standard fixing.

My barn is built like that. 125 x 40 stringybark studs 4.4m long checked into 125x50 top & bottom plates, cyclone strapping on every 2nd stud, trusses tied with steel strapping to the studs as well. I had the local mill cut all the timber for me, air dried it for ~3 months over winter then started building.

Hasn't gone anywhere yet.

We sawed a lot of the big blue gum trees up using a Lucas mill. That was hard work. Recovery wasn't great but it makes lovely dressed timber provided you're happy resharpening your thickness planer & jointer blades regularly.

FKT

Have spent time in a high-end cabinet shop which did 90% Redgum.

 

Big money spent on big tools gets good results.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

My father talks about seeing pictures of car crash victims when he went for his licence.

I don't think all the blood and gore would be so effective for the Facebook generation...

You’re right but I’m not sure it so effective for ours either. During the drivers Ed class in high school (required back then to get DL at 16) they showed us gory movies to “prevent” us from driving stupid. I think the title was “Red Asphalt”. It didn’t work. I think the combination of testosterone, a youthful notion of invincibility, and a little peer pressure far outweighed any thought of risk. Those things happen to other people. Now include very realistic and graphic movies/video games and I think any impact those “horror scenes” of car crashes have lost any impact they might have had. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Point Break said:

Mrs PB shot down my first attempt at remodel plans……..

D87A7DD0-0A39-4891-B94F-606EAF403284.jpeg

Probably Not enough windows would be my guess.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Point Break said:

Mrs PB shot down my first attempt at remodel plans……..

D87A7DD0-0A39-4891-B94F-606EAF403284.jpeg

What?

Did she want the apartment on the mezzanine level?

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

They're hard, all right. At least, the correct species is.

You know why we export Fosters beer to the USA? It's because no Australian will drink it.

Well, pretty much the same with the eucalypt species you guys have. We kept the good stuff. Ironbark, for example, generally masses around 1.2g/cm^3.

FKT

Clearly, I had no idea!

The ex would sleep downstairs during big storms because the eucalyptus around the house seemed to be able to bend way, way to far over...

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Point Break said:

You’re right but I’m not sure it so effective for ours either. During the drivers Ed class in high school (required back then to get DL at 16) they showed us gory movies to “prevent” us from driving stupid. I think the title was “Red Asphalt”. It didn’t work. I think the combination of testosterone, a youthful notion of invincibility, and a little peer pressure far outweighed any thought of risk. Those things happen to other people. Now include very realistic and graphic movies/video games and I think any impact those “horror scenes” of car crashes have lost any impact they might have had. 

Have legal-age kids spend some time in a volunteer fire department.  It won't catch them before they get their drivers license, but might teach them a few lessons in time to make a difference.  Seeing the victims of a crash in person is hugely more impactful than watching a video or game.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Have spent time in a high-end cabinet shop which did 90% Redgum.

 

Big money spent on big tools gets good results.

Yeah. I used my Bridgeport milling machine with 4 flute solid carbide cutters instead of a router on ironbark and blue gum. Was tempted to rig the spare B/port milling head to the metal planer for slabs up to 4' long but so far I've resisted. Way flatter than a jointer though.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Liquid said:

Clearly, I had no idea!

The ex would sleep downstairs during big storms because the eucalyptus around the house seemed to be able to bend way, way to far over...

I cut all the ones down around my house & shed. The good trees, we processed into lumber. The rest went for firewood.

IME they don't usually snap off but in strong winds they can pull their root balls out of the ground and come down anyway. Plus they're so highly flammable that it's crazy to have them close to structures.

It's also possible the local climate where you are causes them to grow in ways that result in crappy trees. But around here, they're wonderful for structural and furniture applications. If you like working with very hard, dense wood that is.

Like Olaf, my floor is kiln dried polished eucalypt hardwood T&G planking. It'll outlast me. I've taken old boards, run them through the thickness planer and re-used them many times.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2021 at 1:46 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

I cut all the ones down around my house & shed. The good trees, we processed into lumber. The rest went for firewood.

IME they don't usually snap off but in strong winds they can pull their root balls out of the ground and come down anyway. Plus they're so highly flammable that it's crazy to have them close to structures.

It's also possible the local climate where you are causes them to grow in ways that result in crappy trees. But around here, they're wonderful for structural and furniture applications. If you like working with very hard, dense wood that is.

Like Olaf, my floor is kiln dried polished eucalypt hardwood T&G planking. It'll outlast me. I've taken old boards, run them through the thickness planer and re-used them many times.

FKT

I lost a very close friend who was stopped at a light in wet, windy conditions and the eucalyptus tree in the median uprooted and crushed her car.

I still miss her. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, pbd said:

I lost a very close friend who was stopped at a light in wet, windy conditions and the eucalyptus tree in the median uprooted and crushed her car.

I still miss her. 

Been to a couple of those. I always scratched my head and thought “wow, what are the odds”.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, pbd said:

I lost a very close friend who was stopped at a light in wet, windy conditions and the eucalyptus tree in the median uprooted and crushed her car.

I still miss her. 

Yep that's happened here too. We don't go walking along the tracks through the forest in high winds.

3 times I had my powerline taken down by trees off of my neighbour's place. They'd cleared most of the block and the remaining trees along the boundary had reached maturity in effectively a wind shadow. Their root systems weren't up to exposure to strong winds. Pretty much all those trees are gone now, unfortunately I was the bunny who had to clean the mess up and pay to have the powerline fixed. No assistance from the neighbours at all.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yep that's happened here too. We don't go walking along the tracks through the forest in high winds.

3 times I had my powerline taken down by trees off of my neighbour's place. They'd cleared most of the block and the remaining trees along the boundary had reached maturity in effectively a wind shadow. Their root systems weren't up to exposure to strong winds. Pretty much all those trees are gone now, unfortunately I was the bunny who had to clean the mess up and pay to have the powerline fixed. No assistance from the neighbours at all.

FKT

In a textbook case of closing the barn door after the horse has left, the city cut the trees that remained in the median down within a month or so.

Too little too late.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, pbd said:

In a textbook case of closing the barn door after the horse has left, the city cut the trees that remained in the median down within a month or so.

Too little too late.

Same here. A person got killed on the highway by a tree that came down in a wind storm. After that they cut the rest of the row down. Weren't going to do it before that - tree preservation, 'green' over lives.

There have been similar issues with bushfires and land clearing for fire breaks. Usually takes a disaster before common sense prevails. And it rarely lasts long.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Try the open plan with no dividing walls. It's the latest thing.

That would be great for entertaining.

(Gawd, I hate those real estate shows, but the wimmenfolk here watch them and I can't always run and hide.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, valis said:

That would be great for entertaining.

(Gawd, I hate those real estate shows, but the wimmenfolk here watch them and I can't always run and hide.)

Call me old-fashioned, but I do like something between me on the toilet and whoever is cooking in the kitchen.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2021 at 1:46 PM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

IME they don't usually snap off but in strong winds they can pull their root balls out of the ground and come down anyway. 

The last winter blaster before we moved out of Mill Valley, the ex bailed to go sleep down stairs. I proclaimed "we'll be fine!"

Next morning, two fully uprooted, ~12-15" diameter (small...) eucalyptus lay across the back yard with a bunch of smashed fencing!

Probably 20' from me... I didn't hear a thing! 

 

Back on topic:

That clean up was only the 2nd real experience jamming with a rental chainsaw, for hours!

I loved it, I wore my old flannel, plaid shirts for weeks afterwards!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that ukes are any worse than (say) firs or redwoods -- they all have a pretty shallow root structure.  I've had several firs, 2 to 4 ft in dia, come down in windstorms.  And once a 6-ft dia redwood came down across the road to my house, blocking both sides of a hairpin curve.  Anything underneath that would have been completely flattened.  To be fair to the redwood it was pretty close to the road cut, so perhaps that compromised the roots.

Tool talk:  I used to drive around with a chainsaw in my car/truck, but It took something bigger than I was carrying to carve up that redwood.

Newsflash:  Yesterday in Sonoma County over 8" of rain fell, with some strong winds.  Driving home last night I had to turn around because a pretty big tree was across the road.  I should have been carrying that chainsaw and tow-rope!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/25/2021 at 7:47 PM, valis said:

That would be great for entertaining.

(Gawd, I hate those real estate shows, but the wimmenfolk here watch them and I can't always run and hide.)

Ugh.  Live in a house with a 1200 sq ft great room.  Never again.....  There is no privacy.....  0...  I know this as my MIL camps out in front of the tv, on one side, or the fireplace, on the other side....  she is always there...  Gotta walk by her get to the kitchen, to let the dog out, to take a shit...  Constantly there.....  I currently must wear headphones to cook as the tv is blaring news 24/7.  I move from the office, to the bedroom and AVOID GREAT ROOM AT ALL COSTS...  so I am living in 400 ish sq ft of a 2,500 sq ft house... (Kid is in the basement so that is off limits atm)..  

Fuck open concept...  Winter is coming....  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, shaggy said:

Ugh.  Live in a house with a 1200 sq ft great room.  Never again.....  There is no privacy.....  0...  I know this as my MIL camps out in front of the tv, on one side, or the fireplace, on the other side....  she is always there...  Gotta walk by her get to the kitchen, to let the dog out, to take a shit...  Constantly there.....  I currently must wear headphones to cook as the tv is blaring news 24/7.  I move from the office, to the bedroom and AVOID GREAT ROOM AT ALL COSTS...  so I am living in 400 ish sq ft of a 2,500 sq ft house... (Kid is in the basement so that is off limits atm)..  

Fuck open concept...  Winter is coming....  

The other side of that is my MIL's original Craftsman house - still had knob & tube wiring.

1500 sq. ft. and had 20 doors. Most rooms had 2 and the living room had 5.

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The other side of that is my MIL's original Craftsman house - still had knob & tube wiring.

1500 sq. ft. and had 20 doors. Most rooms had 2 and the living room had 5.

Had some knob and tube in the old house..  Would take doors over most anything at this point.  Actually looking for a Japanese type screen for the middle of the damn room...  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2021 at 8:57 PM, valis said:

So is a compound miter saw a reasonable addition to my collection, and what might be a decent non-junk brand / model?  I'm not doing fine cabinetry, but want something I won't have to fight.

I've owned three of them.  Cabinetmakers kinda scoff at using them for fine woodworking but I find them useful.  My last purchase was a Makita LS1219.  I set it up for perfect 90 degree cuts and it hasn't lost that in the year or so I've owned it.

My first miter saw was a Makita 10" but no slider.  I sold that and picked up a reconditioned Bosch SCMS (slider).  I used that for over 15 years then sold it to my neighbor when I got the new one.

I've heard Dewalt owners sing the praises of their SCMS.  Most of my hand power tools are Dewalt but I read up on their SCMS and wasn't as impressed.  I almost bought the Bosch GCN12Sd but it didn't have a laser.

Any of those three brands should be fine.  A slider is great for wider boards and the 12" is great for thick lumber.  It's one of the most often tools used in my shop.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/27/2021 at 3:54 PM, shaggy said:

Had some knob and tube in the old house..  Would take doors over most anything at this point.  Actually looking for a Japanese type screen for the middle of the damn room...  

I made big shoji screens for my "great room" in the old place. Broke the room up nicely. Thing is, make sure you put big feet on them, because a light breeze can knock them over in a second, and as light as they are, they can wreak havoc with whatever they land on/in. I had some with Marimeko fabric. Beautiful, but deadly. Others I used Herculon Architectural Mylar. Better, but even more sail worthy. I did traditional rice paper. Too delicate for a New England summer thunderstorm gust.

So then I went with plain old very fine weave silk.....  It worked beautifully. And because it was industrial quality, not clothing material, it was cheap as shit.

 I have no idea at this point where I got it, but probably on-line somewhere.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2021 at 12:26 PM, Liquid said:

Are you sure about that, eucalyptus framing members, that are hard? How long does it take to season eucalyptus - 1K years? They failed at being rail road ties!!!

Eucalyptus should be considered an accelerant!

Smelly, shedding, oil spewing, worthless, invasive shit tree!

I lived next to/under a eucy stand in Mill Valley, CA = Fuckin' nightmare!!!

They failed at being railway ties because eucalyptus twists as it grows, particularly when grown close together. When it dries it straightens. The railway ties were milled and installed while wet, because it is difficult to work when seasoned. As they dried out they twisted and made the track unusable.

Haven't dealt with eucalyptus in a house, but did have a 160 year old house built from totara. Lucky to get a 3" nail in more than 1/4" without bending it. Alterations were a bitch.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Gissie said:

They failed at being railway ties because eucalyptus twists as it grows, particularly when grown close together. When it dries it straightens. The railway ties were milled and installed while wet, because it is difficult to work when seasoned. As they dried out they twisted and made the track unusable.

You're wrong. Sleepers were made out of eucalyptus for decades here in Australia. One of the properties I co-own was logged by sleeper cutters on at least 4 different occasions. The last time was some 40+ years back and the crowns & useless bits of the trees are still where they were felled. Great firewood if you've a carbide chain on your chainsaw or really enjoy re-sharpening chains.

Old growth ironbark. Termites won't touch it and it lasts for decades.

Plantation grown timber behaves very differently, sure.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

You're wrong. Sleepers were made out of eucalyptus for decades here in Australia. One of the properties I co-own was logged by sleeper cutters on at least 4 different occasions. The last time was some 40+ years back and the crowns & useless bits of the trees are still where they were felled. Great firewood if you've a carbide chain on your chainsaw or really enjoy re-sharpening chains.

Old growth ironbark. Termites won't touch it and it lasts for decades.

Plantation grown timber behaves very differently, sure.

FKT

My understanding is that the eucalyptus in the US was plantation grown for the job because of quick growing and hardness. Problem was when young the wood was soft and twisted and split when it dried.

The old growth is some serious stuff. There were ‘temporary’ bridges with gum piles that were still there 50+ years later in NZ when I was younger. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Gissie said:

My understanding is that the eucalyptus in the US was plantation grown for the job because of quick growing and hardness. Problem was when young the wood was soft and twisted and split when it dried.

Wouldn't surprise me at all. I got a batch of eucalyptus studs one time - E. nitens I think they were. Fast growth plantation timber. Thought they were rubbish, rather use pine. At least the pine stayed more or less straight.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, longy said:

They planted a shit load of euc on Hawaii when sugar cane plantations left. It's still there, still no economic use for it

Import some Koalas for the tourists.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Wouldn't surprise me at all. I got a batch of eucalyptus studs one time - E. nitens I think they were. Fast growth plantation timber. Thought they were rubbish, rather use pine. At least the pine stayed more or less straight.

FKT

One thing…….those eucs burn like an SOB! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Point Break said:

One thing…….those eucs burn like an SOB! 

Yep, they certainly do. In summer here you can see the haze given off and that eucalyptus oil goes up like a bomb. Massive crown fires. It's why I keep all the vegetation cut well back from all my built structures.

Good firewood though.

FKT

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Yep, they certainly do. In summer here you can see the haze given off and that eucalyptus oil goes up like a bomb. Massive crown fires. It's why I keep all the vegetation cut well back from all my built structures.

Good firewood though.

FKT

Great firewood! But those crown fires are something to see….and even harder to control. You get any wind pushing on a crown fire in eucalyptus and it’s gonna outrun you and kick your ass on the way. Combine that with the ribbon bark species we have around here (and some others) and those burning bark pieces get carried aloft by the thermals and spot miles ahead of the main fire. Miles ahead! The leaves fall like rain at certain times of the year and roofs and gutters are full with very receptive fuel to embers. Then factor in how fragile the big limbs get and are prone to dropping unexpectedly and working around them is really no fun. 

They’re the devils trees……

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/30/2021 at 7:49 PM, Point Break said:

Great firewood! But those crown fires are something to see….and even harder to control. You get any wind pushing on a crown fire in eucalyptus and it’s gonna outrun you and kick your ass on the way. Combine that with the ribbon bark species we have around here (and some others) and those burning bark pieces get carried aloft by the thermals and spot miles ahead of the main fire. Miles ahead! The leaves fall like rain at certain times of the year and roofs and gutters are full with very receptive fuel to embers. Then factor in how fragile the big limbs get and are prone to dropping unexpectedly and working around them is really no fun. 

They’re the devils trees……

There was a great rope (actually wire rope) swing in one of the canyons very close to the amazing UCSD library. It was a big Eucalyptus and the slope downhill from it was at last 45 degrees. I don't know who or how they got the rope way up into that crotch of the tree but apparently the school kept cutting it down because of the potential for serious injury. Eventually someone put up a decent diameter wire rope that defied the efforts of the campus nanny patrol. I think the authorities were more worried about the surfer/hippie/dirt bikers who loved hanging out at the swing would drop a lit joint in the dried bark and trees and set the whole canyon on fire than they were worried about us hurting ourselves. If Blacks Beach was flat on a given day then there would be a fun crowd at the rope swing later.

Geisel Library — California By Choice

 

   I never knew that the library is named the Geisel library after Dr Seuss until I just Googled this photo. Maybe because Hans was not dead yet when I was out there. 

   I inadvertently met the good Doctor up on Mt Soledad when I spun my buddy's Mini Morris into his driveway while rat racing. He was not amused...

 

Geisel library 1080P, 2K, 4K, 5K HD wallpapers free download | Wallpaper  Flare

 

This photo shows the beginnings of the eucalyptus groves to the right. Very inspiring building for a architect/industrial designer.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2021 at 1:52 AM, hard aground said:

Maybe draw in a closet on version 2 and you'll be good to go.

Change “Garage” to “Wardrobe” and it’s a racing certainty.

As is the immediate forfeiture of your mancard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2021 at 7:33 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

I showed this to my wife.  She just laughed and told me to not be an idiot, just go ahead and get it.  So I did, plus the rolling stand.  Then I made her a cup of tea.

What convinced me that I wanted this one was the cool "axial-glide" mechanism.  I'm a sucker for neatly articulating mechanical stuff (sort of like how I can stare for hours at my Monitor windvane when it's in action). 

I haven't ordered a fancy blade, for now I'm just going to use the included "Premium 12 In. 60-Tooth Carbide-Tipped Blade".

Thank you to everyone for your advice!  Now I can chop off my fingers with much greater accuracy and control.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need a fancy blade for fingers. The cheap ones work just fine. So you can save some $$ there. 

The mech on the Bosch is far superior to the "sliding rail" design. Nothing sticks out the back and hits stuff. Excellent choice.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, wajamamaj said:

That's how my walls are constructed. Built in 1952. We have a couple of those ugly arches too. The wife hints every few years that I should cut them out square.

our house dates to 1956, it uses what was refered to as "plaster lath".  it was board like drywall but harder, more "plastery" and then the wall recieved a thin coat of plaster over the board.  the result is a completely smooth wall that is really hard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, valis said:

I showed this to my wife.  She just laughed and told me to not be an idiot, just go ahead and get it.  So I did, plus the rolling stand.  Then I made her a cup of tea.

What convinced me that I wanted this one was the cool "axial-glide" mechanism.  I'm a sucker for neatly articulating mechanical stuff (sort of like how I can stare for hours at my Monitor windvane when it's in action). 

I haven't ordered a fancy blade, for now I'm just going to use the included "Premium 12 In. 60-Tooth Carbide-Tipped Blade".

Thank you to everyone for your advice!  Now I can chop off my fingers with much greater accuracy and control.

well done...   i picked up a couple of frued blades for the table saw,  couldn't afford the forrest's ...

 

https://www.forrestblades.com/miter-master-saw-blade-for-the-ultimate-in-miter-cuts/

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/31/2021 at 11:49 AM, Point Break said:

Great firewood! But those crown fires are something to see….and even harder to control. You get any wind pushing on a crown fire in eucalyptus and it’s gonna outrun you and kick your ass on the way. Combine that with the ribbon bark species we have around here (and some others) and those burning bark pieces get carried aloft by the thermals and spot miles ahead of the main fire. Miles ahead! The leaves fall like rain at certain times of the year and roofs and gutters are full with very receptive fuel to embers. Then factor in how fragile the big limbs get and are prone to dropping unexpectedly and working around them is really no fun. 

They’re the devils trees……

Aussie trees.

Of course they're trying to kill you....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Aussie trees.

Of course they're trying to kill you....

:lol:

Thanks for gifting them to us as well…….sharing………what’s next…..your giant spiders?

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, chester said:

our house dates to 1956, it uses what was refered to as "plaster lath".  it was board like drywall but harder, more "plastery" and then the wall recieved a thin coat of plaster over the board.  the result is a completely smooth wall that is really hard.

This is 'real' plaster lathe (below).  The narrow boards or 'lathe' are nailed horizontally to the studs with a small gap between each one.  Then the plaster is troweled over the lathe and forced through the narrow gaps.  The plaster sags down the back side of the lathe to lock the plaster in place.  

That stuff is a real pain in the ass to demo.  The only sane way to do it is to use a sawzall and cut the lathe on either side of the studs, and rip sections out.  Then you have to get the lathe and plaster off of the studs which are usually nailed in with ring shank nails. It is nasty hard work, plater dust everywhere and a ton of heavy, unwieldy material to get rid of.  Unless doing a major remodel it's best to leave it in place. 

In my experience, real plaster is much harder than gypsum board.  When I was around 12 years old my brother and I were wrestling around in my bedroom and my brother pushed me as I was backed up against my bed which was along a wall.  As the back of my knees hit the edge of the bed, I fell back toward the wall and slammed my head against the plaster and lathe wall, and it made quite a big boom on impact.  It felt like hitting a concrete wall.    I knocked out a piece of plaster about 2" around.  My father wasn't very happy and I had a bit of a headache afterward.  Had it been drywall, I probably would have just dented the wall.  Granted the paper on the drywall would have held the plaster beneath, but I've demoed a lot of drywall and it feels and breaks much softer than actual plaster.  

In most houses in Europe, the walls are made of clay or autoclaved concrete blocks.  After the block walls go up, a plasterer comes in and they spray about a 1/2" thick layer of plaster over the block, and then trowel it out smooth and flat.  Hanging anything on the wall here is a real treat.  The best way is just to drill, insert an expanding anchor and screw, a hammer and nail of any kind isn't going to get it done.

 

 

 

 

zircon-lath-and-plaster.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

This is 'real' plaster lathe (below).  The narrow boards or 'lathe' are nailed horizontally to the studs with a small gap between each one.  Then the plaster is troweled over the lathe and forced through the narrow gaps.  The plaster sags down the back side of the lathe to lock the plaster in place.  

That stuff is a real pain in the ass to demo.  The only sane way to do it is to use a sawzall and cut the lathe on either side of the studs, and rip sections out.  Then you have to get the lathe and plaster off of the studs which are usually nailed in with ring shank nails. It is nasty hard work, plater dust everywhere and a ton of heavy, unwieldy material to get rid of.  Unless doing a major remodel it's best to leave it in place. 

In my experience, real plaster is much harder than gypsum board.  When I was around 12 years old my brother and I were wrestling around in my bedroom and my brother pushed me as I was backed up against my bed which was along a wall.  As the back of my knees hit the edge of the bed, I fell back toward the wall and slammed my head against the plaster and lathe wall, and it made quite a big boom on impact.  It felt like hitting a concrete wall.    I knocked out a piece of plaster about 2" around.  My father wasn't very happy and I had a bit of a headache afterward.  Had it been drywall, I probably would have just dented the wall.  Granted the paper on the drywall would have held the plaster beneath, but I've demoed a lot of drywall and it feels and breaks much softer than actual plaster.  

In most houses in Europe, the walls are made of clay or autoclaved concrete blocks.  After the block walls go up, a plasterer comes in and they spray about a 1/2" thick layer of plaster over the block, and then trowel it out smooth and flat.  Hanging anything on the wall here is a real treat.  The best way is just to drill, insert an expanding anchor and screw, a hammer and nail of any kind isn't going to get it done.

 

 

 

 

zircon-lath-and-plaster.jpg

yes, i'm familiar...maybe i had the term they wre using wrong.  I think i also heard that the construction method in my '50's house was sort of a phase in...decades and decades of real plaster lath and the tradesmen who used it were transitioning to a new product 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, chester said:

yes, i'm familiar...maybe i had the term they wre using wrong.  I think i also heard that the construction method in my '50's house was sort of a phase in...decades and decades of real plaster lath and the tradesmen who used it were transitioning to a new product 

I did a lot of remodeling work in my younger days, I never ran across the stuff you described.  You sure won't score and snap it like you can with drywall! 

The old plaster and lathe walls will last almost forever and can take a beating (unless some young kid whacks his head really hard on it), so it had that going for it.

Speaking of which, does anybody remember the light swirl patterns that they would do on the plaster ceiling in older houses?  They sure looked nicer than the dreaded 'popcorn' ceilings of the 1970s.  Back in the day, craftsmen really took pride in their work and did a lot of time consuming things to make the ordinary look extraordinary.  Both of the houses I grew up in, one built in 1956, the other in 1947 had them.

 

Ceiling.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

This is 'real' plaster lathe (below).  The narrow boards or 'lathe' are nailed horizontally to the studs with a small gap between each one.  Then the plaster is troweled over the lathe and forced through the narrow gaps.  The plaster sags down the back side of the lathe to lock the plaster in place.  

That stuff is a real pain in the ass to demo.  The only sane way to do it is to use a sawzall and cut the lathe on either side of the studs, and rip sections out.  Then you have to get the lathe and plaster off of the studs which are usually nailed in with ring shank nails. It is nasty hard work, plater dust everywhere and a ton of heavy, unwieldy material to get rid of.  Unless doing a major remodel it's best to leave it in place. 

In my experience, real plaster is much harder than gypsum board.  When I was around 12 years old my brother and I were wrestling around in my bedroom and my brother pushed me as I was backed up against my bed which was along a wall.  As the back of my knees hit the edge of the bed, I fell back toward the wall and slammed my head against the plaster and lathe wall, and it made quite a big boom on impact.  It felt like hitting a concrete wall.    I knocked out a piece of plaster about 2" around.  My father wasn't very happy and I had a bit of a headache afterward.  Had it been drywall, I probably would have just dented the wall.  Granted the paper on the drywall would have held the plaster beneath, but I've demoed a lot of drywall and it feels and breaks much softer than actual plaster.  

In most houses in Europe, the walls are made of clay or autoclaved concrete blocks.  After the block walls go up, a plasterer comes in and they spray about a 1/2" thick layer of plaster over the block, and then trowel it out smooth and flat.  Hanging anything on the wall here is a real treat.  The best way is just to drill, insert an expanding anchor and screw, a hammer and nail of any kind isn't going to get it done.

 

 

 

 

zircon-lath-and-plaster.jpg

Oh I hated that shit. When pulling ceilings inside a house to gain access to an attic fire and you slam your hook into the ceiling that first time and get that “thud” and a tiny little hole…….you know you’re gonna have very sore shoulders by the time the job is done. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Point Break said:

Oh I hated that shit. When pulling ceilings inside a house to gain access to an attic fire and you slam your hook into the ceiling that first time and get that “thud” and a tiny little hole…….you know you’re gonna have very sore shoulders by the time the job is done. 

At least you didn't have to haul that shit out of the house afterward!  

I was doing a ceiling demo on a very old farmhouse.  The space between the roof and the ceiling was full of about a foot of loose insulation riddled with walnut shells, and copious amounts of squirrel shit and soaked with squirrel piss.  Nothing like pulling a piece of the ceiling loose and getting that rained down on your entire body!  It's a smell that I'll never forget.  Just typing this is making me a little nauseous.  That ceiling was probably home to many, many generations of squirrels  There were two huge black walnut trees in front of the house.  So the little fur nuggets had plenty of food and a nice big, warm place to nest and cuddle all winter.  

Link to post
Share on other sites