Jump to content

2021 Sydney to Hobart


Recommended Posts

37 minutes ago, mccroc said:

Yes, but wouldn't that be better than being back at the CYCA within 24 hours? Obviously not practical on a 100 footer, but on a 40 footer or so, the minute your main goes it's probably 2 hours or so to get another one up, but then hopefully you get to go into quarantine in Hobart. Everyone wins!

I would suggest you would do better taking gear suited to the trip rather than round the buoys would be smarter. 
Should the spares inventory also include a forestay a pair of running backs and a motor ?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.8k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY This is SPORTSMANSHIP SPORTSMANSHIP SPORTSMANSHIP MAYDAY SPORTSMANSHIP Our position is untenable We are beaten, battered, holed and sinking We are abandon

A good point. After every on-deck action, at every watch change, and in any case at every hour, I as watch captain (and this was the boat's standard practice) would call "Count off". My watch members

Posted Images

2 hours ago, Redreuben said:

Weight wise a spare main would feed the crew 3 sumptuous meals per day for the trip with wine and a port for desert. 
That’s why. 

Windward Passage swapped a main at night during one 1984 SORC race.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Jason AUS said:

These were taken by a mate, of a mate of a mate (to protect the guilty).

 

That’s Denali...

 

When those hit my text inbox my own sphincter snapped shut. I reckon the guys on board will be screaming themselves awake in the middle of the night for some months yet.

E89BB0D7-0575-466B-807E-AD8DFE05A214.jpeg

D6B2B690-507E-4661-BAEF-D2AC07368309.jpeg

that'll buff out..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

What is it with older s+s designs and hard windward conditions?

 Nothing like fine ends, plenty of inertia and a longer keel upwind in a blow. You pay for it downwind and in the lighter stuff.

it helps to have a (probably) generous handicap too……

FWIW, video camera at the narrows looking north, southern end of Marion Bay. Maria island  in the background out to the right (east):

https://tasmaritime.com.au/TMR/services/safety-camera

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Do we have any Anarchists in the Hobart area that can help Sailor Girl out?

I'm looking for a 7dbi 3/4g antenna, she uses this for her broadcast. The existing one just got trashed by Qantas. 

The chick does an amazing job for us yachties, I am hoping somebody in the area might be able to give one back for us all and  know of a local outlet we can source a mobile phone antenna? 

Thanks chaps,

SB

 

4g.png.79a376d344645d034d34613b7a8147b6.png

  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been barracking for Clogsie on the Disco Trooper in Two-handed, but how great would it be if a Two-hander corrected out better than a full crew for IRC and then having the CYCA explain again why they don't get the trophy! :lol:

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Meanwhile, in the other race to Hobart (http://yb.tl/L2H2021), the boats have hit a brick wall off the east coast of Tassie - may not affect the S2H if they stay offshore before they approach Storm Bay. Lead boats are doing 1 knt or so......

On the other comments made about carrying a spare main, in 2006 we lost our new three reef Doyle offshore main the first night, but coming from Tassie, we still had our delivery sails on board. The main was bricked and sat above the keel (unmeasured ballast!) and the old dacron rag ended up getting us a pickle dish at the finish!

image.png.d19d580cb21ea2255ce46e4c546c1e5e.png

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, random. said:

Each year that there is significant carnage/injuries/retirements or worse, rescues, I have this increasing cringe factor.  It looks like the competitors are not capable, the equipment not suitable or the organisation in question.

There is a difference between sport and just being stupid.  Clearly the individual's responsibility is failing here.

Yes, I think they should review what TF happened, to see if there are any patterns, things to be learned even if no one dies.

 

The analysis might be confronting....like...clubs cancelling races where the breeze exceeds 20kts (due to risk management!) means no training for uprange conditions (eg putting in /shaking out reefs....steering in waves..."managing" the boat for conditions etc)...and the biggest issue (IMHO)...the advanced average age of sailors competing...means lack of fitness, agility and increased fatigue... So, in the highly competitive handful of boats, they're taking inshore set-ups offshore and failing to manage the boats for the conditions...and the rest are aging weekend warriors....

So would any review want to hand down those findings to the sport?

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Do we have any Anarchists in the Hobart area that can help Sailor Girl out?

I'm looking for a 7dbi 3/4g antenna, she uses this for her broadcast. The existing one just got trashed by Qantas.  

I've got one here, but "here" is a long way from Hobart.

Hope someone can help her get it sorted... she does a great job!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shaggybaxter said:

Do we have any Anarchists in the Hobart area that can help Sailor Girl out?

I'm looking for a 7dbi 3/4g antenna, she uses this for her broadcast. The existing one just got trashed by Qantas. 

The chick does an amazing job for us yachties, I am hoping somebody in the area might be able to give one back for us all and  know of a local outlet we can source a mobile phone antenna? 

Thanks chaps,

SB

 

4g.png.79a376d344645d034d34613b7a8147b6.png

  

Try Jaycar in Hobart. 

03 6272 9955

Put it on Qantas bill.....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Fleetwood said:

So far 10 boats out with mainsail damage; that's beginning to look like a trend......

My guess is two causes

A. 40 knots squalls so lots of reefing and unreefing as the squall passes

B. Not attending to main leech lines, leech flutter will destroy the leech in a few hours

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, sledracr said:

I've got one here, but "here" is a long way from Hobart.

Hope someone can help her get it sorted... she does a great job!

 

3 minutes ago, HILLY said:

Try Jaycar in Hobart. 

03 6272 9955

Put it on Qantas bill.....

Thanks gents! 

It looks like we managed to pull a rabbit out of our arse, Jaycar at Kingston have one, it appears one of the locals have wangled a car and its full steam ahead again. 

Yep, Nic does do a great job, it always blows me away how much work goes on behind the scenes to make it all happen. 

A big thank you to Michael from Antenna Installation Specialists in Hobart, I woke him up at some god forsaken hour this morning and he couldn't have done more to try and assist. 

Fingers crossed Nic will be back to regular programming soon.

Cheers,

SB

  

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

So far 10 boats out with mainsail damage; that's beginning to look like a trend......

Part of me can't help but think this is from having a few years of abnormal conditions where it was reaching and running as akin to a 'normal' Hobart where you expect to get smashed in the face with strong southerlys. 

The worst wind opposing current sea state I have witnessed is in that neck of the woods, it felt like a near vertical drop off the backs of some of those waves. You didn't want to look at the rig, it would whipshaw around so much when you landed. 

Maybe this is a symptom of us getting too complacent with choice of sail cloth? Id be interested to hear from our Southern brethren, is this a bad one as far as Southerlys go?  

   

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Curious why so many of the faster boats would head off shore for more current in those conditions where more current means steeper waves - which means needing to slow down to avoid carnage.  Seemed the westerly route would have provided a smoother ride, better for pushing fast with lower risk.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Part of me can't help but think this is from having a few years of abnormal conditions where it was reaching and running as akin to a 'normal' Hobart where you expect to get smashed in the face with strong southerlys. 

The worst wind opposing current sea state I have witnessed is in that neck of the woods, it felt like a near vertical drop off the backs of some of those waves. You didn't want to look at the rig, it would whipshaw around so much when you landed. 

Maybe this is a symptom of us getting too complacent with choice of sail cloth? Id be interested to hear from our Southern brethren, is this a bad one as far as Southerlys go?  

   

Spot on SB....this is what we used to call a "typical" hobart....we've become used to downwind flyers...but on the nose with backless waves followed by becalment was pretty common "back in the day"

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, shaggybaxter said:

Maybe this is a symptom of us getting too complacent with choice of sail cloth? Id be interested to hear from our Southern brethren, is this a bad one as far as Southerlys go?  

On the face of it no, the weather maps all suggested that the change looked pretty benign, but out of the blue, we had a southerly front which ripped through our place that night and it was surprisingly violent, complete with horizontal rain.

Weather event severity has been predicted as part of climate change. Welcome to the new normal…..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, bwana said:

Wow. Appears LC just blew past BJ.

Not surprised, there are lots of big wind holes out there, especially at night and in the morning, until the land warms up and the local sea breeze gets established…..

Their relative speeds weren’t the only clue, there was nearly 50 degrees difference in their COG for boats almost alongside each other….

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, cbulger said:

Curious why so many of the faster boats would head off shore for more current in those conditions where more current means steeper waves - which means needing to slow down to avoid carnage.  Seemed the westerly route would have provided a smoother ride, better for pushing fast with lower risk.

Isn’t that exactly what Black Jack did, relative to the other 100 ft’ers and got the lead because of it?

Seems pointless to go out looking for 2-3 knots of favourable current when you have to slow the boat down 5 knots and get bashed to bits in the bargain.

Link to post
Share on other sites

MarineTraffic hasn’t had an update from LC in over an hour via AIS I think? Is the official tracer playing silly buggas again?

*edit* on my phone but that distance to leader doesn’t look right if they are in first place on line honours 

16F30FFE-D877-4E4E-BC2B-7AAC80FEDDED.jpeg

Edited by vokstar
Added cap
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Couta said:

The analysis might be confronting....like...clubs cancelling races where the breeze exceeds 20kts (due to risk management!) means no training for uprange conditions (eg putting in /shaking out reefs....steering in waves..."managing" the boat for conditions etc)...and the biggest issue (IMHO)

This old chestnut is just bullshit. There is nothing stopping crews going out in heavy weather to train, there does not have to be a race to go sailing.  Every other sports you train in non-competitive conditions.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Couta said:

Spot on SB....this is what we used to call a "typical" hobart....we've become used to downwind flyers...but on the nose with backless waves followed by becalment was pretty common "back in the day"

 

Like the man said

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

Well if they 'may' then why not? I know our boat didn't in '16 but the conditions out there this time were forecast were they not? Mark you we were carrying a brand new 3Di RAW offshore main and met no problems. Did all right too!

If you are on a boat that saves weight by cutting off the handles of the toothbrushes (or just having none at all) then "spare mainsails" is not actually a thing...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sledracr said:
15 hours ago, Jason AUS said:

These were taken by a mate, of a mate of a mate (to protect the guilty).

That’s Denali...

Holy shit!

That is the sort of thing of that engineers and NA's hate to see. That is a boat probably designed a little too close to the margins.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fleetwood said:

So far 10 boats out with mainsail damage; that's beginning to look like a trend......

wonder how many people kind of sort of needed a new sail but couldn't justify the cost if there was a chance the race would be called off.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cbulger said:

Curious why so many of the faster boats would head off shore for more current in those conditions where more current means steeper waves - which means needing to slow down to avoid carnage.  Seemed the westerly route would have provided a smoother ride, better for pushing fast with lower risk.

Angles...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TheUltimateSockPuppet said:

Well then they definitely need a new sail now

cheaper now, only have to pay excess and they still avoided going to the in-laws on boxing day, which is of course half the reason people do this race..

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Boatbeard said:

If you are on a boat that saves weight by cutting off the handles of the toothbrushes 

toothbrushes?  you get to bring toothbrushes?!?

(been there, done that.  one of my favorites was a boat where the rule was you could bring a pair of shoes, or a pair of boots, but not both.  Pretty sure one bad gibe would cost more than the weight of 7 pairs of shoes.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SCARECROW said:

cheaper now, only have to pay excess and they still avoided going to the in-laws on boxing day, which is of course half the reason people do this race..

Don’t know if insurance has changed in the last few years but whenever I did a Hobart racing damage to sails was excluded from cover

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, sledracr said:

toothbrushes?  you get to bring toothbrushes?!?

(been there, done that.  one of my favorites was a boat where the rule was you could bring a pair of shoes, or a pair of boots, but not both.  Pretty sure one bad gibe would cost more than the weight of 7 pairs of shoes.)

Everything but wet weather gear and a change of t-shirt (so you had a clean one at the end) went in the Ansett container!!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, TheUltimateSockPuppet said:

I don’t ever recall seeing so many deduced reports in a S2H ever. The old days with Mia Mia as radio relay vessel and HF worked just fine, drop the RRV and go to trackers no one knows where you are

JBW is the Radio Relay vessel and Young Endeavour is the back-up RRV.  Scheds have been going fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, TheUltimateSockPuppet said:

Don’t know if insurance has changed in the last few years but whenever I did a Hobart racing damage to sails was excluded from cover

Insurance companies will cover anything, you just have to be willing to pay the premium.  I over insure everything I can't afford to replace without having a noticeable effect on my bank account.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Jethrow said:

Wow, that's a hell of a hole! Where abouts on the hull is it?

Below taken from fb. I'm guessing around mid-ship

A Pan Pan call was made yesterday due to structural hull damage caused by a malfunction of the canting keel hydraulics. We were around 20nm East of Eden when we had to retire yesterday morning.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bill E Goat said:

Scallywag 2.2 knots headed for St Helens ?

SW wouldn't get anywhere near St Helens... few raceboats over 30' would.... It's been interesting watching the L2H boats relative to the S2H - last I checked the 45ish footers in the Launny were doing better inshore than the 100'ers offshore... won't last long, especially as the Launny boats need to go inside Maria. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, The Dark Knight said:

Zara - Retired - time constraints

Yeah, see that in Southport race etc, don't think I have ever seen that as a reason in a Hobart!

Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, TheUltimateSockPuppet said:

Yeah the issue now is what to do this afternoon! Poms couldn’t even make Australia bat again.

Hehehehe...comment on FB

"First time the Boxing Day Test has finished before the Hobart" 

nyuk nyuk nyuk

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, The Dark Knight said:

Zara - Retired - time constraints

They might have a pommy crew member who plays a bit of club cricket and just got a call from the England selectors.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cbulger said:

Curious why so many of the faster boats would head off shore for more current in those conditions where more current means steeper waves - which means needing to slow down to avoid carnage.  Seemed the westerly route would have provided a smoother ride, better for pushing fast with lower risk.

 

2 hours ago, Sidecar said:

Isn’t that exactly what Black Jack did, relative to the other 100 ft’ers and got the lead because of it?

Seems pointless to go out looking for 2-3 knots of favourable current when you have to slow the boat down 5 knots and get bashed to bits in the bargain.

 

1 hour ago, Boatbeard said:

Angles...

The high coming through the bight is factoring now, Gambles,angles and shenanigans forsure.

Either way its panning out to be an interesting race...Waaaay more Entertaining and competitive than 2020:-D

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, random. said:

non-sailors like seeing blood and carnage while they suck down another tinny on the worn out dog stinky sofa, grab the remote and switch back to the cricket.

And you are posting from the deck of Black Jack I imagine...

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cbulger said:

Curious why so many of the faster boats would head off shore for more current in those conditions where more current means steeper waves - which means needing to slow down to avoid carnage.  Seemed the westerly route would have provided a smoother ride, better for pushing fast with lower risk.

Because Expedition said so. 
 

What are wave polars?  Probably have to turn those way up, to even show alternate routing. And are you going to be the pussy who missed out on a 2kt current?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Controversial_posts said:

Because Expedition said so. 
 

What are wave polars?  Are you pussy who missed out on a 2kt current?

yep its the difference between having a navigator and a guy who has read the Expedition manual and doesn't get seasick downstairs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Boatbeard said:

If you are on a boat that saves weight by cutting off the handles of the toothbrushes (or just having none at all) then "spare mainsails" is not actually a thing...

Ah - the old Laurie Smith trick. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites