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2 hours ago, chum said:

it’s remarkable how seemingly intelligent people were so brainwashed over this. I saw something where a large percentage of people overseas actually think he shot 3 unarmed black guys.  Unbelievable,  the power of the press on everybody. 

You know where the only place I saw this was?  Right here with you repeating it.  Stop blaming "the Press" for everything and look in the mirror.

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Ha ha ha, Americanos and their gun nutz, your gun culture is fucked. 

I have to say that I regard anyone with a gun on their hip or slung over their shoulder walking around in public as being a threat to my life. I now include police in this generalization; I used to gi

This topic is a loser for libruls who don’t stop and consider facts. For all their pontificating about basing their opinions on evidence and being above politics, Kyle Rittenhouse demonstrates a

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12 minutes ago, animeproblem said:

It can't too far off that we see an endorsement deal/signature model AR for this little clown.

I can see it now: announcing are new AR 15-KR special edition, official tool of Patriotism! 

Please don't give those fools any ideas. I just read he may get a seven figure book deal.

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1 minute ago, badlatitude said:

I doubt it. Most of those statements came out of what was found in discovery.

What does that even mean?  He could hire 100 lawyers and they wouldn't have time to sue everyone that defamed him.

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26 minutes ago, badlatitude said:

Please don't give those fools any ideas. I just read he may get a seven figure book deal.

Complete with crayons?

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30 minutes ago, badlatitude said:

Please don't give those fools any ideas. I just read he may get a seven figure book deal.

Shit, just spotted the typo in my post (our), too late to fix, dang!

Had a horrible thought about the book deal loot, but I'll just keep it to myself, don't want to throw out any more ideas.

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3 minutes ago, animeproblem said:

Shit, just spotted the typo in my post (our), too late to fix, dang!

Had a horrible thought about the book deal loot, but I'll just keep it to myself, don't want to throw out any more ideas.

Don't worry, those ideas have been in the air since he was first charged.

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Just now, badlatitude said:

His under oath admissions probably negate any lawsuits. Besides, he'll be too busy fighting victim lawsuits.

 

He said he was a white supremacist under oath?  I missed that part of the trial.  

He is going to be a very wealthy man.

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1 minute ago, jzk said:

He said he was a white supremacist under oath?  I missed that part of the trial.  

He is going to be a very wealthy man.

That picture of him in the Proud Boys bar giving the White Power sign, will get all of those lawsuits alleging racism or White Power thrown out.

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1 minute ago, badlatitude said:

That picture of him in the Proud Boys bar giving the White Power sign, will get all of those lawsuits alleging racism or White Power thrown out.

That is ridiculous.  All of your favorite heros have used that sign.  Obama, Biden, Clinton and even Geraldo.

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Just now, jzk said:

That is ridiculous.  All of your favorite heros have used that sign.  Obama, Biden, Clinton and even Geraldo.

Sorry for the disappointment but that's the way it works. But don't worry about Kyle, he already has picked up $625,000 from a GiveSendGo account, there's the matter of the $2million bail which his lawyer is saying that he is entitled to, there is a speakers agency that is saying he can command anywhere from $2,500 to $25,000 a speech, Rod Blagojevich has talked to him about a podcast, and using the cameo app to send personalized messages at $100 a pop and $500 for business messages. Don't forget there is merchandise also.

But Libel suits especially against celebrity is a very hard road to walk, it is extremely doubtful he would prevail.

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2 minutes ago, badlatitude said:

Sorry for the disappointment but that's the way it works. But don't worry about Kyle, he already has picked up $625,000 from a GiveSendGo account, there's the matter of the $2million bail which his lawyer is saying that he is entitled to, there is a speakers agency that is saying he can command anywhere from $2,500 to $25,000 a speech, Rod Blagojevich has talked to him about a podcast, and using the cameo app to send personalized messages at $100 a pop and $500 for business messages. Don't forget there is merchandise also.

But Libel suits especially against celebrity is a very hard road to walk, it is extremely doubtful he would prevail.

I bet he has better legal advice than which you are giving.  He should go after Biden first.  He wasn't president when he defamed him.  

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22 minutes ago, badlatitude said:

It doesn't matter. People in the public eye are protected.

Hustler v. Falwell?  Nope.

Didn't work for Bill Clinton when Paula Jones went after and sued him, not going to work for Biden either - since the incidents happened prior to his taking office. 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, jzk said:

I bet he has better legal advice than which you are giving.  He should go after Biden first.  He wasn't president when he defamed him.  

I totally think this will happen and prevail.

I really do want him to be an intern for one of the Q nutjob congress people though.  When the Harvard and GW grad interns and staff, who actually do the work and want to be there, will totally accept him as one of their own.  The hot 22 year old girls and Alpha males will look at the 18 year old hillbilly, who is only there for the photo-op, won't contribute in any way, and only got there because he's an anti-hero, will treat him like a pariah behind the boss's back.  Then the group will be going to some DC beltway bar together and poor vigilante boy will be left out because he's not old enough and they don't want him there anyway.  Poor redneck will be sitting in his DC apartment with mom, talking to lawyers and shining Gaetz' loafers forever, shunned by the hill and back in his doublewide within a month after we've all moved on.

If you think he's going to come out of all this like a rockstar, you're fucking nuts.  He's a younger, dumber Zimmerman with assclowns controlling him.  But, by all means, send money to him Jizzy, I'm sure he's a good cause.

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11 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

Hustler v. Falwell?  Nope.

Didn't work for Bill Clinton when Paula Jones went after and sued him, not going to work for Biden either - since the incidents happened prior to his taking office. 

 

 

He still had celebrity, and I doubt they can find a jury that wouldn't acquit.

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3 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

Which makes it all the more liable.

Let me have you read Jonathan Turley for an expert answer.

 

Defamation

Rittenhouse does not have a viable claim for wrongful arrest or prosecution given the fatalities in the case and the reasonable disagreement of the need to use lethal force.

However, many commentators have suggested that he has a strong case for defamation against President Biden and many in the media for calling him a "white supremacist," "domestic terrorist" and "murderer."  

There is no question that Rittenhouse has been subject to false and harmful claims in the media. Indeed, many watching the trial were surprised by the sharp disconnect between what they had seen on the case in the media and what was being presented in court.

Such defamation cases however are notoriously difficult to win and the odds are against Rittenhouse in prevailing on these characterizations of prejudice or guilt. 

It is likely that Rittenhouse will be considered a limited public figure or public figure given the notoriety of the case and his public defenses. 

The Supreme Court has held that public figure status applies when  someone "thrust[s] himself into the vortex of [the] public issue [and] engage[s] the public’s attention in an attempt to influence its outcome."

 

A limited-purpose public figure status applies if someone voluntarily "draw[s] attention to himself" or allows himself to become part of a controversy "as a fulcrum to create public discussion." Wolston v. Reader’s Digest Association, 443 U.S. 157, 168 (1979).

If a court finds such a status, he would be subject to a higher standard of proof under New York Times v. Sullivan. This is precisely the environment in which the opinion was written, and he is precisely the type of plaintiff that the opinion was meant to deter. 

The Supreme Court ruled that tort law could not be used to overcome First Amendment protections for free speech or the free press. The Court sought to create "breathing space" for the media by articulating that standard that now applies to both public officials and public figures.

Moreover, courts are highly protective of "opinion" statements. People are allowed to reach a different conclusion from the jury in calling Rittenhouse a murderer or to characterize his actions as racist given the subject of the underlying protests. That does not mean that they are right or fair. There is no evidence that Rittenhouse is a White supremacist. However, courts give a wide berth to free speech in such public controversies.

Many cite the litigation by Nicholas Sandmann, a former high school student who was widely and unfairly accused of abusing a Native American at a pro-life event at the Lincoln Memorial. 

Reporters latched on to the fact that he was wearing a MAGA hat and called a racist and falsely accused of starting the confrontation. 

He sued and settled with some media outfits.  However, courts rejected his claims based on being labeled a racist. Where he prevailed was on statements that he "blocked" the activist at the scene.

There may be more specific false statements like those in Sandmann's case but the characterizations of his motivations or beliefs will be the most challenging to litigate. 

Bond claims

Finally, there is likely to be litigation over who receives the $2 million bond posted in the Kyle Rittenhouse. Now that he has been acquitted, the bond ordinarily goes to the defendant. However, his previous lawyer, Lin Wood, and his organization Fightback Foundation claim the money.

In a letter sent to Kenosha County Circuit Court Judge Bruce Schroeder, Kenosha attorney Xavier Solis wrote that the money should be returned to Fightback:

"These funds were transferred by the Fightback Foundation to the Pierce Bainbridge Law Firm’s trust account and paid by attorney John Pierce on behalf of, and as an agent for, the Fightback Foundation. 

Accordingly, the $2 million shall be returned to the Fightback Foundation, if and when such funds are released consistent with Wisconsin law and pursuant to court rulings releasing the bail money back to the individual or entity that posted the cash bail."

That presents a novel question. The court received the money on behalf of Rittenhouse. The family also claims that his mother raise a fair amount of the bail money. This could come down to a contractual dispute if Rittenhouse expressly agreed that this was a loan to be returned to the foundation. If not, the court could just return the money to Rittenhouse and have the lawyers sue to the family for recovery of owed funds.

What is clear is that the Rittenhouse case (like the Simpson and Sandmann cases) will continue for years. Indeed, Sandmann is still awaiting trial on some of his defamation claims. 

This is why Thomas Edison once remarked that "a lawsuit is the suicide of time."

This column is adapted from a post on the author’s blog: JONATHAN TURLEY/Res ipsa loquitur – The thing itself speaks.

 

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5 hours ago, Burning Man said:

No, it was actually a LWNJ @Raz'r who suggested that.   Keep your nutjobs straight.

I compared the 93 to bicep-guy. Running into danger at clear risk to themselves. Not to KR. Get yer facts straight.

(and now we know the “good guy with a gun” was another lie, cause gun owners are pussies who say to run away from shooters)

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3 hours ago, jzk said:
3 hours ago, Blue Crab said:

I've defamed the racist fuck myself! 

Yeah, but your assets disqualify you.  Better luck next time.

There's a slim possibility you weren't paying attention, but BC bought a new boat recently.

- DSK

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1 hour ago, badlatitude said:

Let me have you read Jonathan Turley for an expert answer.

 

Defamation

Rittenhouse does not have a viable claim for wrongful arrest or prosecution given the fatalities in the case and the reasonable disagreement of the need to use lethal force.

However, many commentators have suggested that he has a strong case for defamation against President Biden and many in the media for calling him a "white supremacist," "domestic terrorist" and "murderer."  

There is no question that Rittenhouse has been subject to false and harmful claims in the media. Indeed, many watching the trial were surprised by the sharp disconnect between what they had seen on the case in the media and what was being presented in court.

Such defamation cases however are notoriously difficult to win and the odds are against Rittenhouse in prevailing on these characterizations of prejudice or guilt. 

It is likely that Rittenhouse will be considered a limited public figure or public figure given the notoriety of the case and his public defenses. 

The Supreme Court has held that public figure status applies when  someone "thrust[s] himself into the vortex of [the] public issue [and] engage[s] the public’s attention in an attempt to influence its outcome."

 

A limited-purpose public figure status applies if someone voluntarily "draw[s] attention to himself" or allows himself to become part of a controversy "as a fulcrum to create public discussion." Wolston v. Reader’s Digest Association, 443 U.S. 157, 168 (1979).

If a court finds such a status, he would be subject to a higher standard of proof under New York Times v. Sullivan. This is precisely the environment in which the opinion was written, and he is precisely the type of plaintiff that the opinion was meant to deter. 

The Supreme Court ruled that tort law could not be used to overcome First Amendment protections for free speech or the free press. The Court sought to create "breathing space" for the media by articulating that standard that now applies to both public officials and public figures.

Moreover, courts are highly protective of "opinion" statements. People are allowed to reach a different conclusion from the jury in calling Rittenhouse a murderer or to characterize his actions as racist given the subject of the underlying protests. That does not mean that they are right or fair. There is no evidence that Rittenhouse is a White supremacist. However, courts give a wide berth to free speech in such public controversies.

Many cite the litigation by Nicholas Sandmann, a former high school student who was widely and unfairly accused of abusing a Native American at a pro-life event at the Lincoln Memorial. 

Reporters latched on to the fact that he was wearing a MAGA hat and called a racist and falsely accused of starting the confrontation. 

He sued and settled with some media outfits.  However, courts rejected his claims based on being labeled a racist. Where he prevailed was on statements that he "blocked" the activist at the scene.

There may be more specific false statements like those in Sandmann's case but the characterizations of his motivations or beliefs will be the most challenging to litigate. 

Bond claims

Finally, there is likely to be litigation over who receives the $2 million bond posted in the Kyle Rittenhouse. Now that he has been acquitted, the bond ordinarily goes to the defendant. However, his previous lawyer, Lin Wood, and his organization Fightback Foundation claim the money.

In a letter sent to Kenosha County Circuit Court Judge Bruce Schroeder, Kenosha attorney Xavier Solis wrote that the money should be returned to Fightback:

"These funds were transferred by the Fightback Foundation to the Pierce Bainbridge Law Firm’s trust account and paid by attorney John Pierce on behalf of, and as an agent for, the Fightback Foundation. 

Accordingly, the $2 million shall be returned to the Fightback Foundation, if and when such funds are released consistent with Wisconsin law and pursuant to court rulings releasing the bail money back to the individual or entity that posted the cash bail."

That presents a novel question. The court received the money on behalf of Rittenhouse. The family also claims that his mother raise a fair amount of the bail money. This could come down to a contractual dispute if Rittenhouse expressly agreed that this was a loan to be returned to the foundation. If not, the court could just return the money to Rittenhouse and have the lawyers sue to the family for recovery of owed funds.

What is clear is that the Rittenhouse case (like the Simpson and Sandmann cases) will continue for years. Indeed, Sandmann is still awaiting trial on some of his defamation claims. 

This is why Thomas Edison once remarked that "a lawsuit is the suicide of time."

This column is adapted from a post on the author’s blog: JONATHAN TURLEY/Res ipsa loquitur – The thing itself speaks.

 

Point taken... thanks

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10 minutes ago, roundthebuoys said:

I’m sure it was just trolling, but I still can’t believe jizzy said the kid would earn generational wealth off this.  I would love to see the Koch’s hand him a check for $300M no strings attached and see what happens.

I'm not sure the Koch boys would encourage the idea of armed peasants roaming the street even if they are "protecting property"

- DSK

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1 hour ago, badlatitude said:

Let me have you read Jonathan Turley for an expert answer.

 

Defamation

Rittenhouse does not have a viable claim for wrongful arrest or prosecution given the fatalities in the case and the reasonable disagreement of the need to use lethal force.

However, many commentators have suggested that he has a strong case for defamation against President Biden and many in the media for calling him a "white supremacist," "domestic terrorist" and "murderer."  

There is no question that Rittenhouse has been subject to false and harmful claims in the media. Indeed, many watching the trial were surprised by the sharp disconnect between what they had seen on the case in the media and what was being presented in court.

Such defamation cases however are notoriously difficult to win and the odds are against Rittenhouse in prevailing on these characterizations of prejudice or guilt. 

It is likely that Rittenhouse will be considered a limited public figure or public figure given the notoriety of the case and his public defenses. 

The Supreme Court has held that public figure status applies when  someone "thrust[s] himself into the vortex of [the] public issue [and] engage[s] the public’s attention in an attempt to influence its outcome."

 

A limited-purpose public figure status applies if someone voluntarily "draw[s] attention to himself" or allows himself to become part of a controversy "as a fulcrum to create public discussion." Wolston v. Reader’s Digest Association, 443 U.S. 157, 168 (1979).

If a court finds such a status, he would be subject to a higher standard of proof under New York Times v. Sullivan. This is precisely the environment in which the opinion was written, and he is precisely the type of plaintiff that the opinion was meant to deter. 

The Supreme Court ruled that tort law could not be used to overcome First Amendment protections for free speech or the free press. The Court sought to create "breathing space" for the media by articulating that standard that now applies to both public officials and public figures.

Moreover, courts are highly protective of "opinion" statements. People are allowed to reach a different conclusion from the jury in calling Rittenhouse a murderer or to characterize his actions as racist given the subject of the underlying protests. That does not mean that they are right or fair. There is no evidence that Rittenhouse is a White supremacist. However, courts give a wide berth to free speech in such public controversies.

Many cite the litigation by Nicholas Sandmann, a former high school student who was widely and unfairly accused of abusing a Native American at a pro-life event at the Lincoln Memorial. 

Reporters latched on to the fact that he was wearing a MAGA hat and called a racist and falsely accused of starting the confrontation. 

He sued and settled with some media outfits.  However, courts rejected his claims based on being labeled a racist. Where he prevailed was on statements that he "blocked" the activist at the scene.

There may be more specific false statements like those in Sandmann's case but the characterizations of his motivations or beliefs will be the most challenging to litigate. 

Bond claims

Finally, there is likely to be litigation over who receives the $2 million bond posted in the Kyle Rittenhouse. Now that he has been acquitted, the bond ordinarily goes to the defendant. However, his previous lawyer, Lin Wood, and his organization Fightback Foundation claim the money.

In a letter sent to Kenosha County Circuit Court Judge Bruce Schroeder, Kenosha attorney Xavier Solis wrote that the money should be returned to Fightback:

"These funds were transferred by the Fightback Foundation to the Pierce Bainbridge Law Firm’s trust account and paid by attorney John Pierce on behalf of, and as an agent for, the Fightback Foundation. 

Accordingly, the $2 million shall be returned to the Fightback Foundation, if and when such funds are released consistent with Wisconsin law and pursuant to court rulings releasing the bail money back to the individual or entity that posted the cash bail."

That presents a novel question. The court received the money on behalf of Rittenhouse. The family also claims that his mother raise a fair amount of the bail money. This could come down to a contractual dispute if Rittenhouse expressly agreed that this was a loan to be returned to the foundation. If not, the court could just return the money to Rittenhouse and have the lawyers sue to the family for recovery of owed funds.

What is clear is that the Rittenhouse case (like the Simpson and Sandmann cases) will continue for years. Indeed, Sandmann is still awaiting trial on some of his defamation claims. 

This is why Thomas Edison once remarked that "a lawsuit is the suicide of time."

This column is adapted from a post on the author’s blog: JONATHAN TURLEY/Res ipsa loquitur – The thing itself speaks.

 

John Wayne Bobbitt is a certain kind of celebrity too.

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Holy Jesus Christ on a pogo stick

“Marjorie Taylor Greene introduces bill to award Congressional Gold Medal to Rittenhouse”

We are concerned that awarding Kyle with a Congressional Gold Medal will give him a big head during the internship with our office." ( a representative of Gaetz’s office)

Rep. Madison Cawthorn (R-N.C.) also offered Rittenhouse an internship following the verdict

https://www.yahoo.com/news/marjorie-taylor-greene-introduces-bill-223138187.html

 

 

 

 

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Well,well, well, 

Only in America, Can an unlicensed teenage firearm packing vigilante attend an out of control riot, kill two people, maim a 3rd, have zero consequences against him for his actions from the legal system,

and then, all his cheerleaders can think about is cashing in on the misery.

Does anyone in America wonder why the rest of the free world looks at your culture from the outside in, and is just completely flabbergasted.

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1 minute ago, Keith said:

Well,well, well, 

Only in America, Can an unlicensed teenage firearm packing vigilante attend an out of control riot, kill two people, maim a 3rd, have zero consequences against him for his actions from the legal system,

and then, all his cheerleaders can think about is cashing in on the misery.

Does anyone in America wonder why the rest of the free world looks at your culture from the outside in, and is just completely flabbergasted.

Can you imagine how long MTG would last in the Canadian parliament? Ignoring the fact that there is no fucking way she would be elected up here. I'd say about 2 hours, tops.

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4 hours ago, animeproblem said:

It can't too far off that we see an endorsement deal/signature model AR for this little clown.

I can see it now: announcing are new AR 15-KR special edition, official tool of Patriotism! 

Didn't Carroll Shelby copyright KR when he built the GT500KR?

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2 hours ago, Keith said:

Well,well, well, 

Only in America, Can an unlicensed teenage firearm packing vigilante attend an out of control riot, kill two people, maim a 3rd, have zero consequences against him for his actions from the legal system,

and then, all his cheerleaders can think about is cashing in on the misery.

Does anyone in America wonder why the rest of the free world looks at your culture from the outside in, and is just completely flabbergasted.

 

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2 hours ago, Keith said:

Well,well, well, 

Only in America, Can an unlicensed teenage firearm packing vigilante attend an out of control riot, kill two people, maim a 3rd, have zero consequences against him for his actions from the legal system,

and then, all his cheerleaders can think about is cashing in on the misery.

Does anyone in America wonder why the rest of the free world looks at your culture from the outside in, and is just completely flabbergasted.

Lest we forget..

 

 

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53 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

Just sayin'.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTtfd-YWYjFlf875q_8Y64

Yeah - a stupid college act 20 years ago is just the same as taking an AR15 to a riot and shooting and killing people.

You seem to have doubled up on your daily dose of stupid recently. You've been holding your own with such luminaries as Vermin and the Sea Slug.

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10 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Yeah - a stupid college act 20 years ago is just the same as taking an AR15 to a riot and shooting and killing people.

You seem to have doubled up on your daily dose of stupid recently. You've been holding your own with such luminaries as Vermin and the Sea Slug.

You are so full of shíte ….

 

Which of your socks is viewmy posts because ‘obviously’ you’ve me on ignore…

 

Lol

 

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The Exoneration Club of America Welcomes Kyle Rittenhouse

We're a nonpartisan support group of fellow exonerated killers and accused criminals who prevailed against the “woke mob” of the liberal media, devious prosecutors, and hostile public once we had our day in court.
norman150.jpg?h=b2ed1833&itok=h-ubBIHS

TONY NORMAN

November 24, 2021 by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

To: Kyle Rittenhouse.

From: George M. Zimmerman, president of the Exoneration Club of America (2013 to present).

Dear Kyle,

We've never met, but I'm thrilled to welcome you as the latest member of the Exoneration Club of America. You were nominated by our board for membership the minute your verdict was announced. Like the jurors at your trial, the vote was unanimous here at the club. You're one of us now, Kyle. Congratulations!

They're lionizing you as a hero when you and I both know that deep down, you're scared and wondering if you'll ever be able to sleep again without seeing the faces of those you killed in your dreams.

You've probably never heard of us, so let me explain how monumental this honor we've bestowed upon you is. We're a nonpartisan support group of fellow exonerated killers and accused criminals who prevailed against the "woke mob" of the liberal media, devious prosecutors and hostile public once we had our day in court. Like you, we've all had the pleasure of hearing the sweetest words that have ever been uttered by a jury: "Not guilty on all charges."

The ECA was officially started by half-brothers Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam in 1955. They were exonerated by an all-white jury for the lynching of Emmett Till, a Black 14-year-old Chicagoan who was kidnapped, tortured and murdered for allegedly whistling at a store clerk who was married to one of our founding members.

Here in the ECA, we do not pass judgment on the likely guilt or innocence of our members. The courts have already done that. All we can do is humbly defer to the wisdom of the judicial system. My job as the current president of the ECA is to make you aware of resources you'll need to navigate the rough days and sleepless nights ahead of you.

But before we get down to business, allow me to commend you for the gutsy decision to take the stand in your own defense at your murder trial.

During my 2013 trial for defending myself against Trayvon Martin, my lawyers refused to let me take the stand because they thought I would come off as unsympathetic. I beg to differ, since the jury was obviously on my side from the beginning.

To their credit, my lawyers put Trayvon's ghost on trial, knowing that most of the jurors would understand my very reasonable fear of being beat up and killed by an angry, muscular Black teenager who looked 10 feet tall on that dark and rainy night in Sanford, Fla.

I shot him because I knew that the law was on my side, just as it was on yours. I was standing my ground. You were defending yourself. Every other fact and circumstance is immaterial.

I remember those heady days after my acquittal on all charges. I was feted by Fox News, just as you are now. Along with several family members, I took a victory lap on "Hannity" and other programs that would have me. I was invited to gun shops and shooting ranges. I was a genuine hero in the eyes of a good portion of America because I refused to take any guff from an unarmed Black kid.

You're doing Tucker Carlson's show these days and weighing a lot of competing offers from various Republican congressmen to go to D.C. Not bad for a former high school dropout who is now taking online courses to become a nurse.

Rep. Matt Gaetz from down here in Florida tweeted that you "would probably make a pretty good congressional intern." This ignited a friendly rivalry with Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., who was recently censured by the House for creating a video cartoon in which he killed Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

Mr. Gosar responded to Mr. Gaetz's tweet by offering to arm wrestle his Florida colleague to "get dibs for Kyle as an intern." Meanwhile, no one was more over-the-top in their admiration for you than Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., who proclaimed his passion for you on Instagram in all caps: "KYLE: IF YOU WANT AN INTERNSHIP, REACH OUT TO ME."

I didn't get those kinds of offers when I was acquitted of killing Trayvon Martin, so I admit to being a little jealous. I got lots of radio and television interview time, but those don't pay the bills after the notoriety fades. Oddly enough, being a symbol of American violence isn't very lucrative. The NRA and the GOP raised millions from my image while I was living in my car. There's something unfair about that.

You're probably too young to remember, but I had all sorts of hassles with the police within months of my acquittal. There was a notorious road rage incident, a divorce that left me drowning in debt, a bout of homelessness and accusations of domestic violence that dog me to this day. I was an insurance underwriter and wannabe cop the night I shot Trayvon. I haven't had any gainful employment since. Oh, and I don't want to be a cop anymore, either.

I tried various hustles. I tried to auction off the gun I killed Trayvon with, but that went bust. I tried my hand at painting but ran into copyright issues because of the images I copied. Admittedly, my subjects weren't very popular. I thought the nation was ready for limited-series Confederate flag paintings and Trayvon Martin portraits by yours truly. One critic called my work "murderabilia," which I thought was clever, but no one wants to pay me for my art.

This is just to warn you that fame is term-limited and that the folks carrying you on their shoulders today won't have any time for you a year from now. That goes for Tucker, Hannity and all of those Fox News phonies, too. They're lionizing you as a hero when you and I both know that deep down, you're scared and wondering if you'll ever be able to sleep again without seeing the faces of those you killed in your dreams.

I noticed that your lawyer, Mark Richards, has expressed disdain about the Republican congressmen—and Donald Trump Jr.—trying to profit from your image.

"They're raising money on [Rittenhouse's celebrity], and you have all of these Republican congressmen saying, 'Come work for me.' They want to trade on his celebrity, and I think it's disgusting," your lawyer said.

He's not wrong in being so contemptuous.

Most of the politicians that have been invoking your name are vultures and bottom-feeding opportunists who don't care that you might be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after killing two people and badly injuring a third. They want the fame that comes with being in proximity to you, but they couldn't care less about you or your conscience once deep remorse kicks in. They will have already moved on to another pliable culture warrior once your soul starts hurting.

Your lawyer is saying the same sorts of things in public my lawyer said after springing me. Your lawyer told CNN, "There's too many guns in society" and "I wish our society wasn't perceived as being so dangerous that people need to arm themselves."

I wouldn't go as far as your lawyer and say there are too many guns in society. America was built on the right to shoot people out of fear. That's a sacred American right that you'll have to pry from our dead, cold hands, right, amigo?

While I have you, I'd like to offer you the vice presidency of the Exoneration Club of America. Please think about it. I can't think of a finer person than you to become president of the ECA one day. I offered it to Bill Cosby a few months ago when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out his conviction for sexual assault, but he called me a "racist" and turned me down flat. I must admit that coming from Cos, that hurt. I'm such a fan of his work.

I'm preparing exoneration packets for the three men in the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial in Georgia, but I suspect they're going to be convicted, which is too bad. I hear those Georgia boys are good workers. We could've used their enthusiasm around here.


 
Tony Norman

TONY NORMAN

Tony Norman is a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist. He was once the Post-Gazette’s pop music/pop culture critic and appeared as an expert on cultural issues on local radio talk shows and television programs. In 1996, he began writing an award-winning general interest column, which, he says, rejuvenated his enthusiasm for the kind of journalism that makes a difference.

 
 

 

 
 
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2 hours ago, bstrdsonofbtl said:

The Exoneration Club of America Welcomes Kyle Rittenhouse

We're a nonpartisan support group of fellow exonerated killers and accused criminals who prevailed against the “woke mob” of the liberal media, devious prosecutors, and hostile public once we had our day in court.
norman150.jpg?h=b2ed1833&itok=h-ubBIHS

TONY NORMAN

November 24, 2021 by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

To: Kyle Rittenhouse.

From: George M. Zimmerman, president of the Exoneration Club of America (2013 to present).

Dear Kyle,

We've never met, but I'm thrilled to welcome you as the latest member of the Exoneration Club of America. You were nominated by our board for membership the minute your verdict was announced. Like the jurors at your trial, the vote was unanimous here at the club. You're one of us now, Kyle. Congratulations!

They're lionizing you as a hero when you and I both know that deep down, you're scared and wondering if you'll ever be able to sleep again without seeing the faces of those you killed in your dreams.

You've probably never heard of us, so let me explain how monumental this honor we've bestowed upon you is. We're a nonpartisan support group of fellow exonerated killers and accused criminals who prevailed against the "woke mob" of the liberal media, devious prosecutors and hostile public once we had our day in court. Like you, we've all had the pleasure of hearing the sweetest words that have ever been uttered by a jury: "Not guilty on all charges."

The ECA was officially started by half-brothers Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam in 1955. They were exonerated by an all-white jury for the lynching of Emmett Till, a Black 14-year-old Chicagoan who was kidnapped, tortured and murdered for allegedly whistling at a store clerk who was married to one of our founding members.

Here in the ECA, we do not pass judgment on the likely guilt or innocence of our members. The courts have already done that. All we can do is humbly defer to the wisdom of the judicial system. My job as the current president of the ECA is to make you aware of resources you'll need to navigate the rough days and sleepless nights ahead of you.

But before we get down to business, allow me to commend you for the gutsy decision to take the stand in your own defense at your murder trial.

During my 2013 trial for defending myself against Trayvon Martin, my lawyers refused to let me take the stand because they thought I would come off as unsympathetic. I beg to differ, since the jury was obviously on my side from the beginning.

To their credit, my lawyers put Trayvon's ghost on trial, knowing that most of the jurors would understand my very reasonable fear of being beat up and killed by an angry, muscular Black teenager who looked 10 feet tall on that dark and rainy night in Sanford, Fla.

I shot him because I knew that the law was on my side, just as it was on yours. I was standing my ground. You were defending yourself. Every other fact and circumstance is immaterial.

I remember those heady days after my acquittal on all charges. I was feted by Fox News, just as you are now. Along with several family members, I took a victory lap on "Hannity" and other programs that would have me. I was invited to gun shops and shooting ranges. I was a genuine hero in the eyes of a good portion of America because I refused to take any guff from an unarmed Black kid.

You're doing Tucker Carlson's show these days and weighing a lot of competing offers from various Republican congressmen to go to D.C. Not bad for a former high school dropout who is now taking online courses to become a nurse.

Rep. Matt Gaetz from down here in Florida tweeted that you "would probably make a pretty good congressional intern." This ignited a friendly rivalry with Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., who was recently censured by the House for creating a video cartoon in which he killed Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

Mr. Gosar responded to Mr. Gaetz's tweet by offering to arm wrestle his Florida colleague to "get dibs for Kyle as an intern." Meanwhile, no one was more over-the-top in their admiration for you than Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., who proclaimed his passion for you on Instagram in all caps: "KYLE: IF YOU WANT AN INTERNSHIP, REACH OUT TO ME."

I didn't get those kinds of offers when I was acquitted of killing Trayvon Martin, so I admit to being a little jealous. I got lots of radio and television interview time, but those don't pay the bills after the notoriety fades. Oddly enough, being a symbol of American violence isn't very lucrative. The NRA and the GOP raised millions from my image while I was living in my car. There's something unfair about that.

You're probably too young to remember, but I had all sorts of hassles with the police within months of my acquittal. There was a notorious road rage incident, a divorce that left me drowning in debt, a bout of homelessness and accusations of domestic violence that dog me to this day. I was an insurance underwriter and wannabe cop the night I shot Trayvon. I haven't had any gainful employment since. Oh, and I don't want to be a cop anymore, either.

I tried various hustles. I tried to auction off the gun I killed Trayvon with, but that went bust. I tried my hand at painting but ran into copyright issues because of the images I copied. Admittedly, my subjects weren't very popular. I thought the nation was ready for limited-series Confederate flag paintings and Trayvon Martin portraits by yours truly. One critic called my work "murderabilia," which I thought was clever, but no one wants to pay me for my art.

This is just to warn you that fame is term-limited and that the folks carrying you on their shoulders today won't have any time for you a year from now. That goes for Tucker, Hannity and all of those Fox News phonies, too. They're lionizing you as a hero when you and I both know that deep down, you're scared and wondering if you'll ever be able to sleep again without seeing the faces of those you killed in your dreams.

I noticed that your lawyer, Mark Richards, has expressed disdain about the Republican congressmen—and Donald Trump Jr.—trying to profit from your image.

"They're raising money on [Rittenhouse's celebrity], and you have all of these Republican congressmen saying, 'Come work for me.' They want to trade on his celebrity, and I think it's disgusting," your lawyer said.

He's not wrong in being so contemptuous.

Most of the politicians that have been invoking your name are vultures and bottom-feeding opportunists who don't care that you might be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after killing two people and badly injuring a third. They want the fame that comes with being in proximity to you, but they couldn't care less about you or your conscience once deep remorse kicks in. They will have already moved on to another pliable culture warrior once your soul starts hurting.

Your lawyer is saying the same sorts of things in public my lawyer said after springing me. Your lawyer told CNN, "There's too many guns in society" and "I wish our society wasn't perceived as being so dangerous that people need to arm themselves."

I wouldn't go as far as your lawyer and say there are too many guns in society. America was built on the right to shoot people out of fear. That's a sacred American right that you'll have to pry from our dead, cold hands, right, amigo?

While I have you, I'd like to offer you the vice presidency of the Exoneration Club of America. Please think about it. I can't think of a finer person than you to become president of the ECA one day. I offered it to Bill Cosby a few months ago when the Pennsylvania Supreme Court threw out his conviction for sexual assault, but he called me a "racist" and turned me down flat. I must admit that coming from Cos, that hurt. I'm such a fan of his work.

I'm preparing exoneration packets for the three men in the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial in Georgia, but I suspect they're going to be convicted, which is too bad. I hear those Georgia boys are good workers. We could've used their enthusiasm around here.


 
Tony Norman

TONY NORMAN

Tony Norman is a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette columnist. He was once the Post-Gazette’s pop music/pop culture critic and appeared as an expert on cultural issues on local radio talk shows and television programs. In 1996, he began writing an award-winning general interest column, which, he says, rejuvenated his enthusiasm for the kind of journalism that makes a difference.

 
 

Assuming crybaby can read that much, do you suppose he would get it?

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23 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

The power of American propaganda is supremely evident when foreigners get so wrapped up in our affairs.

I'm not one of you. I don't get it with the Canuck & Aussie lwnj crap here. no stoppig it though, shake my head & walk away.

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56 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

The power of America is supremely evident when foreigners get so wrapped up in our affairs.

FTFY

It's curious that only American right wingers seem unable to understand why foreigners are so interested in American affairs.

Just one more example of their substandard intellects I guess.

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I was actually interested in the propagation of the "Rittenhouse killed 3 Black Men" reporting error.  I've always been curious about information propagation - including narratives and propaganda - and that particular mistake was interesting because it didn't seem to come from American sources.  The mistake seemed to be an addition by American adjacent sources - foreign journalists - looking to feed their own foreign reader base.  At the time, all the stories out of the US were "white man kills black man" and they just assumed this was the same kind of story so added the adjectives by mistake.   They have their own deadlines to hit too.  People are people, everywhere.

Global politics isn't terribly different that things like Americans being interested in the affairs of the Royals or some K-pop band.  Pop culture is pop culture.

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9 hours ago, BeSafe said:

I was actually interested in the propagation of the "Rittenhouse killed 3 Black Men" reporting error.  I've always been curious about information propagation - including narratives and propaganda - and that particular mistake was interesting because it didn't seem to come from American sources.  The mistake seemed to be an addition by American adjacent sources - foreign journalists - looking to feed their own foreign reader base.  At the time, all the stories out of the US were "white man kills black man" and they just assumed this was the same kind of story so added the adjectives by mistake.   They have their own deadlines to hit too.  People are people, everywhere.

Global politics isn't terribly different that things like Americans being interested in the affairs of the Royals or some K-pop band.  Pop culture is pop culture.

Anecdotally, it came as a big surprise to one of my Egyptian buds when I mentioned the BLM protests were mostly white people, even all but completely white on some occasions. He had a hard time getting his head around that one. 

 I would imagine foreign based journalists might have that same problem and leap to the conclusion that if BLM protesters were shot they must have been black.  

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1 hour ago, Mark K said:

Anecdotally, it came as a big surprise to one of my Egyptian buds when I mentioned the BLM protests were mostly white people, even all but completely white on some occasions. He had a hard time getting his head around that one. 

 I would imagine foreign based journalists might have that same problem and leap to the conclusion that if BLM protesters were shot they must have been black.  

So while various codes may have some differences, most share common elements including the principles of truthfulness, accuracy, objectivity, impartiality, fairness, and public accountability, as these apply to the acquisition of newsworthy information and its subsequent dissemination to the public

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22 hours ago, Mark K said:

Anecdotally, it came as a big surprise to one of my Egyptian buds when I mentioned the BLM protests were mostly white people, even all but completely white on some occasions. He had a hard time getting his head around that one. 

 I would imagine foreign based journalists might have that same problem and leap to the conclusion that if BLM protesters were shot they must have been black.  

I'm not saying it didn't happen, but can you provide any examples of all or mostly white BLM protests.  Nor do I buy that the majority of BLM protests were mostly white people.  

Sure there were decent amounts of white folk in the protests, no dispute there.  But I think a racial justice protest movement co opted by white folk would have pissed off the BLM organizers to no end.   

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10 minutes ago, Burning Man said:

I'm not saying it didn't happen, but can you provide any examples of all or mostly white BLM protests.  Nor do I buy that the majority of BLM protests were mostly white people.  

Sure there were decent amounts of white folk in the protests, no dispute there.  But I think a racial justice protest movement co opted by white folk would have pissed off the BLM organizers to no end.   

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/24/us/portland-oregon-protests-white-race.html

Just one, but google up the photos of most and see whatcha see, particularly the one in Wisconsin we are discussing. 

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On 11/25/2021 at 11:28 AM, Raz'r said:

(and now we know the “good guy with a gun” was another lie, cause gun owners are pussies who say to run away from shooters)

Fuck yes. IMO there are only 2 viable approaches to dealing with an active shooter armed with a large ammo cap long gun.

Run & hide or shoot them from a distance. Trying to tackle them bare handed is just asking for a Darwin award.

Not that I'm saying KR was an active shooter, mind. 4 fuckwits went out to play and none of them survived intact.

FKT

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On 11/24/2021 at 3:25 PM, jzk said:

I think you have it backwards.  Even so, he is going to make 100s of millions.

Keep smoking the dope dude. At least you’re funny now.

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4 hours ago, jzk said:

Let's mark this post and keep track of what a dipshit you are.

Hundreds of millions. As good a quote as “yoo hoo”

hundreds of millions…

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2 hours ago, Sol Rosenberg said:

Interesting that shooting people or gassing them are acceptable responses to protection destruction of property, but destruction of property in response to shooting people is not. 

Added a word that you missed  

With that change you are Correct not sure why you are confused.   Besides most of the current looting is not driven by anger it’s driven by greed.  

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  • 3 weeks later...

image.thumb.png.e4a60832f14a0d5eed365125ebaed0de.pngcashing in………..  

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7 hours ago, Rain Man said:

Should be enough time for omicron to be well established.  Hopefully the crowd sticks close together and doesn't wear masks.

You and I know damned well they are too patriotic for that libbyrul mask crap.

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18 minutes ago, jzk said:

Some really good people on this forum.  First class.

Yeah, we're almost as bad as someone who cashes in on killing and/or maiming 3 people.  Or someone who pays to hear that person describe the glory of their killing/maiming.

Of course, the topic of Kyle's speech could be the need for gun control in the USA and why 17-year-olds shouldn't carry assault rifles into protests.  But I doubt it.

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5 minutes ago, jzk said:

Like I was saying.  Further, it seems that, perhaps, "zero fucks" means something different than what you think it means.

Correct usage 

ZFGs for anyone who catches the Covid at this upcoming even. None. Nada. Zero.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

Correct usage 

ZFGs for anyone who catches the Covid at this upcoming even. None. Nada. Zero.

 

 

If you have to go through the trouble of posting it on the internet, you probably give more than zero fucks.

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11 minutes ago, jzk said:

Like Joe Biden?

Screen-Shot-2021-11-28-at-8.34.24-AM-2.jpg

Yeah.  Him, too.  We know enough that the fucking mask is a minor inconvenience for the benefit it can lend.

I do note your proficiency is "whataboutism" is not slacking.  If only you held Republicans to the standard of perfection and consistency you reserve for Democrats.

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3 minutes ago, Bus Driver said:

Yeah.  Him, too.  We know enough that the fucking mask is a minor inconvenience for the benefit it can lend.

I do note your proficiency is "whataboutism" is not slacking.  If only you held Republicans to the standard of perfection and consistency you reserve for Democrats.

If you can cite some republicans that wish death upon their political opponents, then I am happy to condemn that as well.  

BTW, what is the mask end game?  Do we just wear masks in public until the end of time?  Not saying we shouldn't, just asking.

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3 minutes ago, jzk said:

If you can cite some republicans that wish death upon their political opponents, then I am happy to condemn that as well.   ...

These people

th?id=OIP.TZp0iaOCksPYGAMMKQcGLQHaD4%26p

And all the ones who try to pretend it didn't happen this way, including yourself

- DSK

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20 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Correct usage 

ZFGs for anyone who catches the Covid at this upcoming even. None. Nada. Zero.

 

 

...and insurance should refuse to pay for COVID hospitalization if you're not vaxxed!

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13 minutes ago, jzk said:

If you can cite some republicans that wish death upon their political opponents, then I am happy to condemn that as well.  

BTW, what is the mask end game?  Do we just wear masks in public until the end of time?  Not saying we shouldn't, just asking.

Not talking about your "whatboutism" regarding wishing death on others.  Just pointing out you always make it a point to take a jab at a Democrat, whether they are part of the topic, or not.  It's a classic example of "whataboutism".  And, you are incredibly well-practiced in its use.

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