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T-Mobile home internet?


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I looked at it a while back.  Still haven't pulled the plug.  All done wirelessly so you need good T-Mobile cell tower near your house. There are a number of videos on YouTube describing the service.  On the surface it looks like a good deal. The only thing that scares me is the fact that there are no wires coming into the house.  I have good fibre service from Comcast although they charge through the nose.  

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Here's what's behind it, FWIW. Sprint had some beachfront spectrum, nationwide from a failed venture. T-Mobile bought Sprint for this spectrum*, in order to build out their 5G network.  The problem is that they have the same chunk of spectrum in the outer suburbs (with few mobile users per square mile) and in city centers (with many mobile users, densely packed). In other words, in order to have enough spectrum for coverage in the cities, they had to buy a lot of spectrum they didn't need in the 'burbs. So in order to get some return on these otherwise stranded assets, they're offering 5G home internet only in places where they have excess capacity.

What does that mean for you? Depends. First, it may or may not ever be available at your location.  Second, how are you getting your Internet service now, how fast, how much per month? If all you have is crappy ADSL from your local phone company at a puny 3 Megabits per second (Mbps), or you're paying $80 a month for cable Internet (including equipment fees and data cap overage fees) at  30 Mbps per second, then T-Mobile will offer you a good deal. If you have zippy cable (or better yet, fiber) at $50 or $60 a month, there's no point to switching.

As to speed, T-Mobile makes no guarantees because... it depends. They say that most customers see "average" 100 Mbps, and "typical" 35-115 Mbps download speeds. Whatever "typical" is supposed to mean. Of course, they don't mention upload speeds, which are a lot less than download speeds -- not that it's that big of a deal for most people. 100 Mbps is much more than a typical household needs, for the foreseeable future, so don't get hung up if your cable company promises 500 Mbps.

So IF it comes to your location, it may be interesting, or not. Speculating here, but I think that the price is going to come down to more like $40 a month.

*Spectrum = capacity for data.

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21 minutes ago, Throatwarbler-Mangrove said:

Here's what's behind it, FWIW. Sprint had some beachfront spectrum, nationwide from a failed venture. T-Mobile bought Sprint for this spectrum*, in order to build out their 5G network.  The problem is that they have the same chunk of spectrum in the outer suburbs (with few mobile users per square mile) and in city centers (with many mobile users, densely packed). In other words, in order to have enough spectrum for coverage in the cities, they had to buy a lot of spectrum they didn't need in the 'burbs. So in order to get some return on these otherwise stranded assets, they're offering 5G home internet only in places where they have excess capacity.

What does that mean for you? Depends. First, it may or may not ever be available at your location.  Second, how are you getting your Internet service now, how fast, how much per month? If all you have is crappy ADSL from your local phone company at a puny 3 Megabits per second (Mbps), or you're paying $80 a month for cable Internet (including equipment fees and data cap overage fees) at  30 Mbps per second, then T-Mobile will offer you a good deal. If you have zippy cable (or better yet, fiber) at $50 or $60 a month, there's no point to switching.

As to speed, T-Mobile makes no guarantees because... it depends. They say that most customers see "average" 100 Mbps, and "typical" 35-115 Mbps download speeds. Whatever "typical" is supposed to mean. Of course, they don't mention upload speeds, which are a lot less than download speeds -- not that it's that big of a deal for most people. 100 Mbps is much more than a typical household needs, for the foreseeable future, so don't get hung up if your cable company promises 500 Mbps.

So IF it comes to your location, it may be interesting, or not. Speculating here, but I think that the price is going to come down to more like $40 a month.

*Spectrum = capacity for data.

Had sprint..  Finally got switched to "Official" tmobile about a month ago...  Hate Comcast, but need the reliability for work.  Good to know the reasoning behind it.  

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We just dropped Ubifi for Calyx.

They're a nonprofit and their unique distinction is actually getting the public a look at what's in a secret NSA letter.

I like their attitude but we've already signed up for Starlink. Elon's people say they should be able to start serving us "late next year." Can't come a moment too soon.

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Actually about to pull the trigger on this...T-Mobile guy at store says it's available at our street address...no contract required at $50/month...gonna try it without giving up my Cox Cable (internet only)for a month just to test it for our fairly minimal needs...our Cox internet is fine...until you need a service call...guy says if you don't like the T-Mobile just pack it up and send it back only pay for the month you have it...don't see a downside to a trial run...

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Assuming you like it and it meets your needs, you now have leverage over your current provider - even if you like them. You can cancel and see what offers they make.  If those aren't good enough, cancel and wait the required period to get new subscriber deals.  For Fios, that was 2 months.

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I have been using it for several months.  It is nowhere near as fast as cable but the only cable provider in my area (mediacom) sucked.  It would drop 10-15 times per day sometimes for as long as 30 min.

Signal was week in my area and I have a block home with all voids filled with concrete so inside signal was really bad but I bought a repeater with a directional outside antenna and that fixed that issue.

We can stream on 3-4 devices at one time without issues most of the time.  

Overall I am happy with it would recommend it as long as you do not NEED 500 Mbps.

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