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34' Cruising sailboat


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22 minutes ago, Sailor Rhonda said:

My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?

Chartering, to understand what your priorities are before buying... you will need qualifications to charter without a skipper and acquiring those will significantly aid your decision making.

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Yeah, new sailors don’t need an offshore boat.  It will be some time before you develop the skills and confidence to safely head offshore, not to mention determine if you would like that sort of thing.  No reason to start with a boat setup for something you may or may not do some years down the road.  Get something that is rewarding to sail and suited for coastal sailing in your local waters.  
You don’t really provide enough info about your goals/plans, budget, etc…. To make any sort of recommendation.

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23 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Here’s your boat! 

6CE2BBF7-22D8-4CAA-8B88-97991F84D923.jpeg

BFF0288D-D11D-4E59-B629-E7148B886AF4.jpeg

No Way,  it's a sharp yacht.
I sailed dragon, not bad but never again.
J&V designs late 90's  are my favourite.


 

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4 hours ago, Sailor Rhonda said:

My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?

You could post in Cruising Anarchy to find out about cruising ;)

Do you have a budget in mind? Where exactly "offshore" are you planning to go? Where are you now?

* the budget is important. If you send me $150,000, I will have an excellent offshore cruiser sent your way ASAP. For $15,000, it will be a challenge to say the least. For $1500 I'll set you up with a frying pan.

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I am very new to sailing. I know how to kiteboard and windsurf and sail sunfish and lasers but big boats with interiors were a complete mystery as of a month ago.

I opted to just buy one and figure it out instead of chartering. I am happy about it. Sailing moves a lot slower than I expected and I don't think I'd really get much use out of a charter. But because there are a ton of little improvements and maintenances you need to futz with on a boat you own it's a lot more fun going out and testing vs. having a clean boat that you know is going to work.

You probably don't want a true bluwater boat. My 26' boat doesn't even have an inboard motor and there's plenty of things to get confused about. Having a water generator, two autopilots, radar, lifeboats, working refrigerators etc would just be a mess

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Start with an ASA learn to sail, then bareboat certification. If you get through that you will may be qualified to start thinking about coastal cruising.

To quote me from another thread, if I found a well sorted Ranger 33 I would buy it. Good boat, cheap, manageable size. You can sell if you really want to pursue the offshore dream a year from now.

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1 hour ago, bdeller said:

I am very new to sailing. I know how to kiteboard and windsurf and sail sunfish and lasers but big boats with interiors were a complete mystery as of a month ago.

I opted to just buy one and figure it out instead of chartering. I am happy about it. Sailing moves a lot slower than I expected and I don't think I'd really get much use out of a charter. But because there are a ton of little improvements and maintenances you need to futz with on a boat you own it's a lot more fun going out and testing vs. having a clean boat that you know is going to work.

You probably don't want a true bluwater boat. My 26' boat doesn't even have an inboard motor and there's plenty of things to get confused about. Having a water generator, two autopilots, radar, lifeboats, working refrigerators etc would just be a mess

There are plenty of things to get confused about, and plenty of additional equipment... and skills to operate... over small boats. The basics of making the boat sail are the same, just slower and with a lot more momentum (which is why learnin to -sail- on a big boat is a mistake). Once you know how to make a sailboat go from point A to point B, add navigating (and the gear that your boat has to do so), reading a chart and a pilot is a skill all to itself... then learn to anchor (again, with the gear your boat has)... then learn to reef for strong winds, and also learn to read the weather... then learn about 12V systems including batteries and chargers...

There's a lot to it. Cruising is work, which is why more people dream about it than actually do it. But being skipper of one's own little vessel is one of the most rewarding experiences I've ever found.

- DSK

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8 hours ago, Sailor Rhonda said:

My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?

If you or your husband are hands on or are mechanically minded and adventurous and have bank then  a 34 footer is not an unreasonable starting point, but most people either gain experience crewing on Friend’s boats or start small. (Teens to mid twenties)

Failing that, Google nautical donations on the south side.

They have plenty of boats suited to noobs.

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Laser, if you are young and athletic, a sunfish if you are not.  Also, a nice starter boat is the Precision 15.  Not cheap or easy to find but simple. 

Main point, learn to steer the boat before tackling the complexities of a large craft.  In my limited opinion as a professional educator as well as a fellow who has helped quite a few others get started sailing, the best way to really learn to sail once you understand the basics, is to get in a boat and sail.  Sailing, is somewhat of a muscle memory task.  Smaller boats make this learning much easier and quicker.  

 

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9 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

A newbies first post about wanting a boat for offshore cruising?

And people are actually giving serious responses?

 

fucking-embarrassing-coach.gif

Yeah  - one post drive-by, trolling is definitely possible here.

If it is a troll, the next post will be that weird passive-aggressive thing that reads like:

I want to buy a boat made from aluminum foil and powered by fish oil. Sure I have never seen a boat before, but my calculations show it will work great.

<many negative responses follow>

You all are old and stuck in your ways and don't want to see the future of boating

and on and on and on

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8 minutes ago, Will1073 said:
1 hour ago, loneshark64 said:

Get a Macgregor 26 with an offset companionway and an 8’ bowsprit and lets see some tits.

Next.

But what kind of anchor is best?

And what kind of guns do you recommend to blast the pirates?

- DSK

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Actually a couple of these, one on the bow, one on the stern and maybe a couple more on each gunwale should be sufficient. Loaded with grapeshot, should do a pretty good job of discouraging pirates jealous of your fabulous Mac 26.

672DB08E-5C59-4473-808C-690298BB14D6.jpeg

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On 11/23/2021 at 3:04 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

If this proves out to not a be a troll, a Pacific Seacraft 34 is actually a very nice offshore cruiser.

Glad to see you say that. I like mine, but I've sailed dinghies, then Hobie cats, then small cabin boats on lakes, not to mention windsurfing and kitesurfing, for the past 53 years. I bought her two years ago in Panama, but have barely gotten to sail her due to covid and shoulder surgery. We just got back from Panama where we did an overnight to the San Blas islands, a few days there, and then another late night arrival coming back to my marina, Panamarina, near the larger Linton Bay on the north shore. The boat handled wonderfully for such a heavy boat. On the way out once the NE trades filled in we had an amazing 6 hours after the moon set at midnight, with only a 100% jib up and winched tight, the boat tracked perfectly on its own, keeping course when I would nod off periodically (hand-steering because autopilot failed). We were launching off the NE swell and holding a near-E course, with bioluminescence sparkling off the bow and wake. On the way back we had the NE trades on broad reach, almost surfing down the swells with full main and the 100% jib, even had to take in the first reef for a while, arriving at the marina at midnight and gingerly finding our way in by moonlight and spotlight. I'm hoping to do real offshore work with her eventually, as she is fully fitted out for it by the PO, but it will be new territory for me.

In early 2019 I almost bought an Aloha 32 in California as a coastal cruiser and really liked that boat (just a little leery of the Westerbeke diesel with V-drive transmission). I could have learned a lot on it coastal cruising for a year before selling it on and getting an offshore boat like my PSC34, and being in the US I would actually have been able to use it during covid.

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