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Coastguard Hovercraft hits anchored sailboat


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While on a medivac mission, the coast guard hit an anchored sailboat with no one on board.  The hovercraft was only doing 8 knots and those things have complete radar.  Just shows how invisible a sailboat can be.

Coast Guard hovercraft hits sailboat during Salt Spring Island medevac mission – Peninsula News Review

 

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10 hours ago, Foolish said:

While on a medivac mission, the coast guard hit an anchored sailboat with no one on board.  The hovercraft was only doing 8 knots and those things have complete radar.  Just shows how invisible a sailboat can be.

Coast Guard hovercraft hits sailboat during Salt Spring Island medevac mission – Peninsula News Review

 

“Unlit sailboat outside the anchorage “

many harbours are  poorly run .. anchorages should be inside a zone marketed by yellow anchorage bouys 

boats outside this zone get instantly removed,  fined 

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

“Unlit sailboat outside the anchorage “

many harbours are  poorly run .. anchorages should be inside a zone marketed by yellow anchorage buoys

boats outside this zone get instantly removed,  fined 

I have never seen these "yellow anchorage buoys" anywhere in the USA or Canada. Where are these found?

There are some important semantics here too, at least in the USA a boat on a *mooring* does not require an anchor light and a boat that is *anchored* very much does.

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They are found in Glen Cove,NY among other places. They are well marked at the boundaries and have yellow channel markers. May be referred to as special anchorages on the chart with reference notes. I looked at the chart and don’t see yellow markers, which I saw when delivering a boat last summer, but instead, it seems to be marked off in red. 

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37 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I have never seen these "yellow anchorage buoys" anywhere in the USA or Canada. Where are these found?

There are some important semantics here too, at least in the USA a boat on a *mooring* does not require an anchor light and a boat that is *anchored* very much does.

All over the world …very common , mandatory around commercial ports 

 

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47 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

All over the world …very common , mandatory around commercial ports 

 

My bad, I was imagining something totally different, like a row of yellow buoys sectioning off an anchorage, which is not anything I have ever seen. I found a couple on the chart for Baltimore harbor. They seem related to anchoring or not anchoring a freighter.  The one off Annapolis definitely marks an area usually used by large ships.

These would not normally relate to sailboats except I expect if you grab a spot in one in 40 feet of water when you draw 6 feet, an incoming ship looking for a spot would be rightly annoyed you were taking a deep water spot when you didn't have to.

I have heard ships on the radio squawking about these spots. "You anchored too close to me" "No I didn't" "You will swing into me when the tide changes" "No I won't and where is the XXX tanker going to anchor when they get here if I move over" etc etc

Same old as any creek on a holiday :D

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22 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Sometimes they literally box in an Anchorage , sometimes only a 

solitary bouy with bearing lines to landmarks or a see note , consult coast pilot 

I appreciate well marked anchorages 

 

The ones here don't really apply to sailboats except as a place to NOT spend the night.

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5 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

The Anchorage I posted above is out of any shipping lanes and is well marked off with large yellow buoys. Boxed in, as it were…

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Many times normal navigation bouys will be used to mark anchorages 

the coast pilot will clarify 

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The area in question doesn't really mark the anchorage - they mark a float plane landing path. There's dozens of unattended boats with no anchor lights in there.

Coming in there at 8kts in the dark is simply way too fast; especially with something that size. If time was a factor for this medical emergency I don't understand why they didn't use a helicopter...

I wonder if the 100s of crab trap floats this thing run over were affected.

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47 minutes ago, climenuts said:

The area in question doesn't really mark the anchorage - they mark a float plane landing path. There's dozens of unattended boats with no anchor lights in there.

Coming in there at 8kts in the dark is simply way too fast; especially with something that size. If time was a factor for this medical emergency I don't understand why they didn't use a helicopter...

I wonder if the 100s of crab trap floats this thing run over were affected.

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I don’t like that type of town

high density of boats but no organization of the harbour 

a free for all 

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59 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Many times normal navigation bouys will be used to mark anchorages 

the coast pilot will clarify 

You are correct. The markers in the area are green and red. Only the 2 main entrance markers are yellow in Glen Cove and they separate the boundary of the 2 anchorages to the north and south with a channel east into the boat ramp and boat yard.

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1 hour ago, climenuts said:

I wonder if the 100s of crab trap floats this thing run over were affected.

No, they'd just get pushed down with the bubble.

18 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

I don’t like that type of town

high density of boats but no organization of the harbour 

a free for all 

Us Canadians, we're just a bunch of anarchists, eh. There are very few restrictions on anchoring. It's a part of navigation so unless you anchor in a channel or VTS controlled traffic separation scheme you can typically do what you want.

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19 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

I don’t like that type of town

high density of boats but no organization of the harbour 

a free for all 

Add to that the fact that the entire island population has a high concentration of quasi-hippies and a further concentration of garbage scow owners at anchor and you have a mess that exceeds Richardson Bay.

Salt Spring really has to be experienced to understand it. We stopped off for fuel and a break ashore a few years ago when the "Public Market" was underway. Talk about a time warp - all three of us felt like we were back in the late 60's, right down to the macrame plant hangers and the smell of patchouli in the air.

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6 hours ago, slug zitski said:

“Unlit sailboat outside the anchorage “

many harbours are  poorly run .. anchorages should be inside a zone marketed by yellow anchorage bouys 

boats outside this zone get instantly removed,  fined 

Inside anchorage Zone in DAGO

USCG Runs Over Anchored Christmas Boat Parade Family Spectator Boat

DESPITE having Lights

 

Do As They Say ... Not ASS They Do .............

3 families in fatal boat crash suing Coast Guard

Anthony DeWeese, 8, died in a December boat crash.
Anthony DeWeese, 8, died in a December boat crash.

Intent is to force change in protocol on S.D. Bay

Feb. 17, 2010 12:02 AM PT

To read the lawsuit filed yesterday in the Coast Guard boat-crash case, go to uniontrib.com/docs

Three Rancho Peñasquitos families involved in a Coast Guard boat crash that killed an 8-year-old boy in December sued the federal government yesterday for wrongful death and negligence, with hopes of making the service overhaul how it operates on San Diego Bay.

Five days before Christmas, Anthony Cole DeWeese was on his family’s 24-foot Sea Ray with 12 others attending the San Diego Bay Parade of Lights when the pleasure craft was hit by a 33-foot Coast Guard vessel rushing to help a grounded boater.

The boy died of blunt-force injuries about an hour later at UCSD Medical Center. Five other people on the family’s boat, including two younger children, were injured.

“A lawsuit does not begin to bring back little Anthony to life nor to erase the emotional scars that these families are going to have, but one of the purposes of the suit is to make sure the Coast Guard continues to address the problems,” said Dennis Schoville, the attorney for Jason and Katherine Stannard, parents of the injured children.

“The training has to be changed,” Schoville said. “There has to be accountability so that people who are there to secure our safety in fact do that.”

A spokesman for the Coast Guard sector in San Diego said the agency doesn’t comment on active litigation. The government has 60 days to file a response to the lawsuit, said lawyers in the case.

The Stannards’ 4-year-old son suffered skull fractures while their 8-year-old daughter — a classmate of Anthony’s — suffered a head cut and shoulder and elbow injuries, Schoville said. Jason Stannard suffered a 7-inch head wound but has since returned to work.

An attorney for the third family, Grant and Kathleen Mills and their two children, declined to comment.

The lawsuit mentions unspecified damages. But Michael Neil, the DeWeese family’s lawyer, said his clients haven’t discussed the money issue. “They only want to make sure that no other family loses a child due to the negligence of the Coast Guard,” he said.

Neil also said the DeWeese, Stannard and Mills households filed their joint lawsuit relatively early because of the expected time lag in the courts and because they have finished their own investigation.

Of the three agencies preparing reports on the incident, the Port of San Diego’s Harbor Police is expected to complete its work first. That document will be delivered to the County District Attorney’s Office without being made public because it’s part of an ongoing investigation, a Harbor Police spokesman said.

In their lawsuit, the plaintiffs accuse Coast Guard leaders of knowing that the boat’s crew wasn’t properly trained and supervised because of one or more prior incidents.

Schoville wouldn’t explain that reference, but the San Diego incident came two weeks after a 25-foot Coast Guard vessel struck a tour boat in Charleston, S.C., at night, injuring three passengers.

Coast Guard officials have touted their national and local safety records since the DeWeese incident. The San Diego sector has logged only one serious boating or aviation accident in the past five years, according to the agency’s records.

A Coast Guard spokesman has said boat pilots undergo 10 months of intensive training and must have worked for two or three years with the agency before assuming that job.

Still, Neil said, the Coast Guard vessel involved in the December crash was traveling about 35 to 40 mph when it should have been going about 5 mph because the bay was filled with hundreds of spectator boats for the annual parade.

Despite the Coast Guard’s safety statistics, boaters have stepped forward since the accident to complain about frequent “hot rodding” by the agency’s crews, Schoville said.

“I would hope the Coast Guard would readily accept responsibility and attempt to mitigate to the extent that they are capable,” he said. “Then the case could move toward settlement.”


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24 minutes ago, Zonker said:

No, they'd just get pushed down with the bubble.

Us Canadians, we're just a bunch of anarchists, eh. There are very few restrictions on anchoring. It's a part of navigation so unless you anchor in a channel or VTS controlled traffic separation scheme you can typically do what you want.

I'm a little surprised there is not a designated navigation channel where anchoring is prohibited in Ganges Harbour.  Even us lesser islanders have that in Silva Bay. (Not that everyone complies.)

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9 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

Inside anchorage Zone in DAGO

USCG Runs Over Anchored Christmas Boat Parade Family Spectator Boat

DESPITE having Lights

 

Do As They Say ... Not ASS They Do .............

3 families in fatal boat crash suing Coast Guard

Anthony DeWeese, 8, died in a December boat crash.
Anthony DeWeese, 8, died in a December boat crash.

Intent is to force change in protocol on S.D. Bay

Feb. 17, 2010 12:02 AM PT

To read the lawsuit filed yesterday in the Coast Guard boat-crash case, go to uniontrib.com/docs

Three Rancho Peñasquitos families involved in a Coast Guard boat crash that killed an 8-year-old boy in December sued the federal government yesterday for wrongful death and negligence, with hopes of making the service overhaul how it operates on San Diego Bay.

Five days before Christmas, Anthony Cole DeWeese was on his family’s 24-foot Sea Ray with 12 others attending the San Diego Bay Parade of Lights when the pleasure craft was hit by a 33-foot Coast Guard vessel rushing to help a grounded boater.

The boy died of blunt-force injuries about an hour later at UCSD Medical Center. Five other people on the family’s boat, including two younger children, were injured.

“A lawsuit does not begin to bring back little Anthony to life nor to erase the emotional scars that these families are going to have, but one of the purposes of the suit is to make sure the Coast Guard continues to address the problems,” said Dennis Schoville, the attorney for Jason and Katherine Stannard, parents of the injured children.

“The training has to be changed,” Schoville said. “There has to be accountability so that people who are there to secure our safety in fact do that.”

A spokesman for the Coast Guard sector in San Diego said the agency doesn’t comment on active litigation. The government has 60 days to file a response to the lawsuit, said lawyers in the case.

The Stannards’ 4-year-old son suffered skull fractures while their 8-year-old daughter — a classmate of Anthony’s — suffered a head cut and shoulder and elbow injuries, Schoville said. Jason Stannard suffered a 7-inch head wound but has since returned to work.

An attorney for the third family, Grant and Kathleen Mills and their two children, declined to comment.

The lawsuit mentions unspecified damages. But Michael Neil, the DeWeese family’s lawyer, said his clients haven’t discussed the money issue. “They only want to make sure that no other family loses a child due to the negligence of the Coast Guard,” he said.

Neil also said the DeWeese, Stannard and Mills households filed their joint lawsuit relatively early because of the expected time lag in the courts and because they have finished their own investigation.

Of the three agencies preparing reports on the incident, the Port of San Diego’s Harbor Police is expected to complete its work first. That document will be delivered to the County District Attorney’s Office without being made public because it’s part of an ongoing investigation, a Harbor Police spokesman said.

In their lawsuit, the plaintiffs accuse Coast Guard leaders of knowing that the boat’s crew wasn’t properly trained and supervised because of one or more prior incidents.

Schoville wouldn’t explain that reference, but the San Diego incident came two weeks after a 25-foot Coast Guard vessel struck a tour boat in Charleston, S.C., at night, injuring three passengers.

Coast Guard officials have touted their national and local safety records since the DeWeese incident. The San Diego sector has logged only one serious boating or aviation accident in the past five years, according to the agency’s records.

A Coast Guard spokesman has said boat pilots undergo 10 months of intensive training and must have worked for two or three years with the agency before assuming that job.

Still, Neil said, the Coast Guard vessel involved in the December crash was traveling about 35 to 40 mph when it should have been going about 5 mph because the bay was filled with hundreds of spectator boats for the annual parade.

Despite the Coast Guard’s safety statistics, boaters have stepped forward since the accident to complain about frequent “hot rodding” by the agency’s crews, Schoville said.

“I would hope the Coast Guard would readily accept responsibility and attempt to mitigate to the extent that they are capable,” he said. “Then the case could move toward settlement.”


Sounds like the west coast of the US 

nasty place…stand clear 

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8 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Cool. I have never seen one like that.

Boston outer harbor has 5 yellow marks for the commercial shipping anchorage, but the anchorage in the inner harbor, which extends from the airport to Boston Harbor Shipyard and Marine, isn't marked except on the chart.

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Nanaimo harbour has white bouys marking the anchorage.   The harbour patrol will scold you if you anchor outside the zone, but I don't think they have much clout.  The biggest problem we have is the lack of restriction on putting down mooring bouys, which are clogging up good anchorage harbours all over the coast.  Silva Bay, for example, has very little room left for anchoring now that the bay is full of moorings.  Many if not most of the boats on these moorings are derelicts.

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On 11/25/2021 at 12:10 PM, SloopJonB said:

Silva bay is completely fucked by them. It used to be my first stop after crossing but I won't go back - we only use Porlier now.

There is a good anchorage in behind Kendrick Island outside Gabriola Passage, we usually stay there on the outside or Clam Bay on the inside.

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26 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

There is a good anchorage in behind Kendrick Island outside Gabriola Passage, we usually stay there on the outside or Clam Bay on the inside.

If we go to Gabriola pass I prefer going through to Pirates Cove - it's always been my favourite anchorage of all.

Since Silva has been ruined we tend to go in through Porlier and anchor in the bay between the Secretaries. It also has the advantage of being less tide dependent - sure don't want to hit Gabriola pass at the wrong time.

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Kendrick:  A certain yacht club has taken up some of the anchoring space with mooring bouys.  There is some room left, but I have seen it fill up.  It is deep, and can get windy, so you need room to swing with a lot of chain out.  If you shore tie to the new marine park you are beam on to the wind.  There will also be wake from big power boats powering through the pass at full throttle.

Pirates: If the NW wind is predicted to over 15 kts and the tide is high at night it can be a bad place to be.  I've had several bad experiences in strong NW conditions in there, and would only consider anchoring overnight there in calm or SE conditions.  The problem is mud over top of shale - anchors can't dig deep enough to hold, they just slide over the shale instead.  I prefer to anchor on the south side of De Courcey or Clam Bay if the wind is NW.

I know, glass half empty.  Both are very nice in the right conditions and on the right day.

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Thanks for the suggestion of Kendrick. Looks good on the chart but I've never visited it.

You can anchor south of the yacht club outstation in a small bay, but if it gets breezy overnight it can get a little exposed on a high tide.

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We prefer to anchor close to the east shore north of the club.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

If we go to Gabriola pass I prefer going through to Pirates Cove - it's always been my favourite anchorage of all.

Since Silva has been ruined we tend to go in through Porlier and anchor in the bay between the Secretaries. It also has the advantage of being less tide dependent - sure don't want to hit Gabriola pass at the wrong time.

You can't always choose your time when you're coming down or going up Georgia Strait, if you're not going to hit slack it's a good place to wait.

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On 11/25/2021 at 2:53 PM, Rain Man said:

Nanaimo harbour has white bouys marking the anchorage.   The harbour patrol will scold you if you anchor outside the zone, but I don't think they have much clout.  The biggest problem we have is the lack of restriction on putting down mooring bouys, which are clogging up good anchorage harbours all over the coast.  Silva Bay, for example, has very little room left for anchoring now that the bay is full of moorings.  Many if not most of the boats on these moorings are derelicts.

Tragefy og the commons

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On 11/25/2021 at 5:55 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

I have never seen these "yellow anchorage buoys" anywhere in the USA or Canada. Where are these found?

There are some important semantics here too, at least in the USA a boat on a *mooring* does not require an anchor light and a boat that is *anchored* very much does.

You are responding to an eastern european troll.  Who hasn't been on a sailboat since before his grandfather begat his father.  

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I know I'm a miserable old luddite bastard, but I do have a problem with modern led masthead anchor lights.

There's something about led light that I find harder to judge distance.  I have more of a problem with the masthead position. I accept it gives 360 degree visibility and can't be blocked by the mast. You also have no idea how tall the mast is that the light's on, so it's not as obvious how close the boat is.  The old style lamp type light hanging lower invariably car a bit of light on the rig and deck which have you much better indication of exactly where the boat was.

No an excuse for hitting a boat with a light on, just requires more concentration when you might want to be concentrating on something else.

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5 hours ago, European Bloke said:

I know I'm a miserable old luddite bastard, but I do have a problem with modern led masthead anchor lights.

There's something about led light that I find harder to judge distance.  I have more of a problem with the masthead position. I accept it gives 360 degree visibility and can't be blocked by the mast. You also have no idea how tall the mast is that the light's on, so it's not as obvious how close the boat is.  The old style lamp type light hanging lower invariably car a bit of light on the rig and deck which have you much better indication of exactly where the boat was.

No an excuse for hitting a boat with a light on, just requires more concentration when you might want to be concentrating on something else.

Same with me

i don’t like LED or masthead anchorlights

The led is not easily seen against a shoreline background and the masthead height light makes it even worse when in an area of light pollution ….you are forced to look up into the background light pollution 

 

 

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6 hours ago, European Bloke said:

I know I'm a miserable old luddite bastard, but I do have a problem with modern led masthead anchor lights.

There's something about led light that I find harder to judge distance.  I have more of a problem with the masthead position. I accept it gives 360 degree visibility and can't be blocked by the mast. You also have no idea how tall the mast is that the light's on, so it's not as obvious how close the boat is.  The old style lamp type light hanging lower invariably car a bit of light on the rig and deck which have you much better indication of exactly where the boat was.

No an excuse for hitting a boat with a light on, just requires more concentration when you might want to be concentrating on something else.

Same with me. I have posted about this before. My old incandescent anchor light has a "size" to it, the closer you get to the boat the bigger it looks. LED anchor lights seem like pinpoints of light not related to a boat below. I once came around a corner into a cove on a hazy night and the collection of boats with LED lights looked like some variation on random bright stars or a bunch of airplanes with LED landing lights turned on about 20 miles away or pretty much anything else but boats :rolleyes:

Then there is the ongoing issue that powerboaters at night, if they look at anything at all except their three 12 inch displays on full bright, are NOT looking up. If you don't want to get hit, a deck level light is a nice addition.

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On 11/24/2021 at 7:29 PM, DA-WOODY said:

that's NOT "THE COASTGUARD"

Da-Woody, sometimes, you can be so fucking obnoxious.

Do you really think that the USA is the only country with an organization to enforce laws and regulations applying to their seashore? And how the hell are the other countries  supposed to call it then?

In France, we have the "garde-côtes"; guess how it translates in English.

 

Your vocabulary appropriation is just as stupid as saying that a country with a land based military defense organization could not call it THE ARMY....

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Same with me. I have posted about this before. My old incandescent anchor light has a "size" to it, the closer you get to the boat the bigger it looks. LED anchor lights seem like pinpoints of light not related to a boat below. I once came around a corner into a cove on a hazy night and the collection of boats with LED lights looked like some variation on random bright stars or a bunch of airplanes with LED landing lights turned on about 20 miles away or pretty much anything else but boats :rolleyes:

Then there is the ongoing issue that powerboaters at night, if they look at anything at all except their three 12 inch displays on full bright, are NOT looking up. If you don't want to get hit, a deck level light is a nice addition.

I sure hope none of you guys has a lawn.

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On 11/24/2021 at 5:29 PM, DA-WOODY said:

that's NOT "THE COASTGUARD"

 

6 hours ago, Laurent said:

Da-Woody, sometimes, you can be so fucking obnoxious.

Do you really think that the USA is the only country with an organization to enforce laws and regulations applying to their seashore? And how the hell are the other countries  supposed to call it then?

In France, we have the "garde-côtes"; guess how it translates in English.

 

Your vocabulary appropriation is just as stupid as saying that a country with a land based military defense organization could not call it THE ARMY....

 

Hook Up !!!!  :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::rolleyes::);)

Catch & Release: How to Unhook Fish Properly

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On 11/25/2021 at 8:22 AM, Sail4beer said:

The Anchorage I posted above

What is the Canadian Coast Guard doing up in Anchorage anyway?

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Our anchor lights on our boats were always attached to the backstay, down low. Helped others (especially high speed local fishing boats or dinghies) to see our boat because light was shining on the cockpit/stern area and not just a pinprick of light. Permanently rigged, not "hoistable" in the foretriangle. Does slug really do that or has he just read about i.

The anchor light does not have to be in the forward part of the vessel or at the masthead. 

COLREGS Rule 30 (b) A vessel of less than 50 metres in length may exhibit an all-round white light where it can best be seen instead of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule.

 

I've only ever seen black anchor balls in Australia. Must be common in Europe? Or is it a local thing varying by country? 

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10 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Our anchor lights on our boats were always attached to the backstay, down low. Helped others (especially high speed local fishing boats or dinghies) to see our boat because light was shining on the cockpit/stern area and not just a pinprick of light. Permanently rigged, not "hoistable" in the foretriangle. Does slug really do that or has he just read about i.

The anchor light does not have to be in the forward part of the vessel or at the masthead. 

COLREGS Rule 30 (b) A vessel of less than 50 metres in length may exhibit an all-round white light where it can best be seen instead of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule.

 

I've only ever seen black anchor balls in Australia. Must be common in Europe? Or is it a local thing varying by country? 

^^ this, put the anchor light low so fuckwits can see it.

If you have even entered a crowded bay on a dark clear night it is extremely difficult to not confuse weak masthead lights with stars. You are looking for silhouettes at eye level but have to keep looing up as well...

As for moored vessels in a mooring area, they are marked on the chart and any professional mariner familiar with the harbour should absolutely know where they are. Its also local knowledge. We do not have to have lights, balls or whatever  in those designated areas.  

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:
 

I've only ever seen black anchor balls in Australia. Must be common in Europe? Or is it a local thing varying by country? 

It's in the colregs.

Quote

RULE 30 Anchored Vessels and Vessels Aground
(a) A vessel at anchor shall exhibit where it can best be seen:
(i) in the fore part, an all-round white light or one ball;

Just roundly ignored in many places. In the UK in the 80's we would always hoist one..... we would also always use the triangle when motor sailing.... :).

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8 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Never seen a day shape on a sailboat but anchored ships here always have a (ridiculously small) ball up forward.

I have an inflatable black ball tucked into the anchor locker. At least that's where I last saw it, it may have run away. Never used it.

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4 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I know of an incident involving a powerboat that hit an anchored sailboat and successfully defended himself in court because there was no day shape displayed.

Like I said. ;)

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You have to be pretty stunned to not be able to recognize in broad daylight whether or not a boat is anchored.

At my lake, commercial traffic has right of way over pleasure craft. So by putting up that ball I tell them that I do not drift nor motor slowly and that they have to go around me.  (Yes, I anchor outside the ferry lines but it’s a crowded place and the ferry captains sometimes divert faaaar from their usual courses in order to avoid pedal boats, SUPs, millennials on air mattresses and such.) However, I am a minority. 

I have an inflatable ball like @ishmael. I hate it because the beach ball style valve is so small it takes hours to blow it up by mouth. So I keep it 85% inflated in the locker. Space saving my ass! 

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13 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I know of an incident involving a powerboat that hit an anchored sailboat and successfully defended himself in court because there was no day shape displayed.

 

I think my boat is about a foot short of needing one by the regs. The three worst "anchor" situations I have encountered are fishing boats, large ships, and subs.

A fleet of fishing boats that are say 1/3 anchored, 1/3 drifting, and 1/3 motoring very slowly is a big mess.

A large ship at night will have a lot of lights. Unfortunately the odds are about 99% they are a bunch of streetlights, so if there are shore lights in the background all you see is a shit-ton of streetlights with no clear indication of what is what.

Subs at night are the absolute worst. They tend to be black and sit low in the water with one anchor light on the conning tower and one on the top of the rudder. These lights are 200 or more feet apart, so they really look like two different anchored boats. Last one I saw they had to employ a guy in a RIB to orbit the sub at night to keep people from "going between the boats". The subs are also poor radar targets at best for reasons.

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On 11/25/2021 at 2:49 AM, Wetabehindtheears said:

Somebody was operating that hovercraft with their head planted in the instruments.

At 5:45pm here it's dark. The sun sets at 4:30pm now. 

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Say, I saw that somebody suggested using traffic cones for at anchorage signaling.  Taking that a step further,   I'm just wondering if you could use truck nuts in lieu of an anchor ball? 

 

HUMOUR_TruckNuts_preview.jpeg 

 

You'd get two and so you would always have a spare. Or, you can use both to signal "not under command." (Note: you'll need three if you are going to be doing any mine sweeping).  Be sure to order the appropriate color per international signaling rules.

No need to inflate them. Always ready. Certainly makes a statement.

What do you think?

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10 minutes ago, Tacoma Mud Flats said:

Say, I saw that somebody suggested using traffic cones for at anchorage signaling.  Taking that a step further,   I'm just wondering if you could use truck nuts in lieu of an anchor ball? 

 

HUMOUR_TruckNuts_preview.jpeg 

 

You'd get two and so you would always have a spare. Or, you can use both to signal "not under command." (Note: you'll need three if you are going to be doing any mine sweeping).  Be sure to order the appropriate color per international signaling rules.

No need to inflate them. Always ready. Certainly makes a statement.

What do you think?

Those are cracker balls, you'll need BBB's.

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1 hour ago, Tacoma Mud Flats said:

Say, I saw that somebody suggested using traffic cones for at anchorage signaling.  Taking that a step further,   I'm just wondering if you could use truck nuts in lieu of an anchor ball? 

 

HUMOUR_TruckNuts_preview.jpeg 

 

You'd get two and so you would always have a spare. Or, you can use both to signal "not under command." (Note: you'll need three if you are going to be doing any mine sweeping).  Be sure to order the appropriate color per international signaling rules.

No need to inflate them. Always ready. Certainly makes a statement.

What do you think?

Was it Maryland that had the state legislator introduce a bill making them illegal, and everyone in hte statehouse laughed?

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A judge in Florida threw out a  indecency claim by a motorist and claimed that he had them hanging off his truck as well and had no problem swinging them around for all to see…

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