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Everyone's moving to Texas. Here's why Californians are leaving.

The traumas of the past few years have rearranged all of our lives. Many Americans have new needs, new desires, new possibilities and new priorities. They’re looking for bigger homes, second homes or any home at all. They’re searching for work — or trying to escape work. Some fear encroaching heat, fire or flood. Others are repulsed by bitter local politics. Many simply hear the distant siren of a better life elsewhere.

We’re here to help. First, we gathered data for thousands of towns and cities on more than 30 metrics, such as school quality, crime rates and affordability. Then we used that data to make a quiz: Select the criteria you find important, and we’ll show you places that might work for you.

Here’s how I used it, and what I learned.

For more than 100 years, California was the state everyone wanted to move to. In 1900, California had about as many people as Kansas; by 2000, it had grown twentyfold and was by far the most populous and most prosperous state. In technology, in the arts, in science, in gastronomy — around the turn of the century, the Golden State from north to south seemed on the cusp of becoming a global capital. It felt like the best place in America to chart a new path, to float what foundered elsewhere, to sip from a cup runneth over.

I’ve lived in California nearly all my life, and it’s still more likely than not that I will remain here; reports of a sudden “exodus” from the state are frequently exaggerated. Still, there’s plenty going wrong — soaring housing costs, devastating poverty and inequality, and the cascading disasters brought about by a change in what was once our big selling point, the climate. Not a month goes by that I don’t wonder what I’m doing here. There’s got to be somewhere better, right?

Mine is certainly a privileged flight of fancy; if I left California, I’d be one of the hordes of remote-working elites fleeing local problems and driving up house prices in once-pleasant little towns around the country. It’s a phenomenon that is the topic of much media coverage nowadays — though, in fact, mobility in the United States is inversely related to income: People suffering economic hardship tend to move more often than wealthy people.

But anyway, everyone imagines greener pastures now and then. Our quiz provides a starting point for such reveries. By scoring cities and towns, we let you filter and rank locations according to affordability, the vibrancy of local job markets, exposure to climate hazards, political and racial diversity, reproductive and transgender rights, how long you can expect to spend commuting and whether a place has lots of mountains or trees.

As my colleagues explain in a methodology note, California does very well on many of these criteria. That’s the problem — California is so nice, nobody can afford to live there anymore. Most areas in and around Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose and San Diego fall into our search tool’s most expensive category. We label that category $$$$, though it’s not as if life in, say, Irvine or Redwood City or Anaheim is very blingy. Compared to many other places in the country, some pricey California enclaves often offer mediocre schools, not a lot of space, relatively arduous commutes and a rough forecast under climate change.

As the Golden Gate shuts, the Lone Star beckons. If you’re looking for an affordable, economically vibrant city that is less likely to be damaged by climate change than many other American cities, our data shows why Texas is a new land of plenty. For the many hypothetical life scenarios I ran through our quiz, the suburbs around Dallas — places like Plano, McKinney, Garland, Euless and Allen — came up a lot. It’s clear why these are some of the fastest-growing areas in the country. They have relatively little crime and are teeming with jobs, housing, highly rated schools, good restaurants, clean air and racial and political diversity — all at a steep discount compared to the cost of living in America’s coastal metropolises.

This fall, I visited Dallas and its mushrooming suburbs on a scouting mission. Tens of thousands of Californians have moved to Texas every year of the last decade. Should I?

Texas has been growing explosively for two decades, so its strong showing in a ranking tool for deciding where to live is about as surprising as its strong showing in a list of rodeo championships. From 2010-20, the population of Texas grew by nearly 4 million; about 29 million people live there now. In the same period, California, which has nearly 40 million people, added just over 2 million.

About half of Texas’ growth in 2018-19, for example, was due to what demographers call “natural increase” — big Texans making little Texans. The rest was through migration from other parts of the country and the world. People from every state move to Texas, but California contributes an outsize number of new Texans. In 2019, Californians accounted for about 42% of Texas’ net domestic in-migration.

What do Texas cities have that other places don’t? In my searches, there were two preferences that, when combined with jobs, tended to guarantee results in Texas: racial diversity and lower climate risks.

There are lots of places in America with jobs and lower climate risks or jobs and racial diversity, but if you want all three, Texas will take care of you best.

Diversity is what Texas has over many cities in the Midwest or the West — places like Madison or Colorado Springs or Portland. Nearly all of Texas’ recent growth has been in populations of color, and its growth areas are as racially diverse as many places in California. Growth cities in Texas are not just racially diverse but also politically diverse, if you’re into that sort of thing. In Plano, a thriving suburb of Dallas, about 60% of voters are Democrats; in Menlo Park, a thriving suburb south of San Francisco, about 80% are — the difference between living among political allies and living in an echo chamber.

Then there are Texas’ climate risks. Houston will not do well on a warming planet — it is economically dependent on the oil and gas industry and is threatened by hurricanes and a surge in sea levels. But other big cities, including Dallas and Fort Worth, face more moderate risks, especially compared with many cities in California. Yes, Texas is very hot and likely to get hotter; but if a lot of other American cities also begin to get very hot, Texas cities might not feel as overheated by comparison. In addition to the risk of heat stress, Texas also faces the possibility of water shortages, but that will be true across much of the West, including California’s population centers.

What Texans will not have to worry about as much are wildfires, the scourge of so much of California, and the attendant air pollution, though experts predict increases in wildfires in Texas. It’s true that Texas’ less extreme fire risk is related to something precious about California that Texas lacks — abundant trees and mountains in major metro areas, or really any of California’s striking natural beauty. But nobody said living through climate change would be pretty.

You might argue that it’s too speculative to take into account something as broad and complex as climate change when deciding where to live. And more important, there’s no real escape from a long-term planetary disaster — even if you move to some place with lovely weather, your life is bound to be altered in significant ways as habitability shifts elsewhere on the globe.

Still, living through California’s tinderbox years has convinced me to keep an eye on climate dangers; while forecasts on climate risk are inexact, making some effort to anticipate its danger when deciding where to live feels more responsible than ignoring it. And when people in California are paying a million dollars above asking price for homes in areas of high and increasing wildfire risk, isn’t that something like ignoring it?

There is a concept in behavioral economics known as a “Minsky moment,” which describes when a bull market suddenly wises up to its own unsustainability, causing a collapse in prices. Jesse Keenan, an associate professor at the Tulane University School of Architecture who studies how climate change affects housing markets, told me that a Minsky moment could be coming for high-priced homes in at-risk coastal cities. As home lenders, insurance companies and other players in the real estate business begin to better understand their exposure to climate risks, they may raise premiums or force disclosure requirements that could lower home values.

At the moment, buying a home in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live, looks like a safe investment. But lately I have begun to obsess about the uncertainty built into the changing weather. What if three fire seasons from now proves to be one fire season too many — and, in a blink, the housing market into which we’ve invested so much of our future implodes? “In a way, climate change could begin to look like a foreclosure crisis,” Keenan told me.

A Californian will feel right at home in Dallas even before touching the ground. Like the suburbs around Los Angeles, San Diego and across the Bay Area, Dallas and other Texas metros are built on the certainty of cars and infinite sprawl; from the air, as I landed, I could see the familiar landscape of endless blocks of strip malls and single-family houses, all connected by a circulatory system of freeways.

I rented a sweet pickup truck to get around Dallas, but that was the extent of my taste of local flavor. Texas has barbecue and California has burritos, but the American urban landscape has grown stultifyingly homogeneous over the past few decades, and perhaps one reason so many Californians are comfortable moving to Texas is that, on the ground, in the drive-through line at Starbucks or the colossal parking lot at Target, daily life is more similar than it is different.

My guide through the Dallas suburbs was Marie Bailey, a real estate agent who runs Move to Texas From California!, a Facebook group that helps disillusioned Californians find their way to the promised land. Bailey is herself a Californian. She and her family moved in 2017 from El Segundo, a beach city next to Los Angeles International Airport, to Prosper, a landlocked oasis of new housing developments north of Dallas. In El Segundo, the median home list price is $1.3 million; in Prosper, it’s less than half that.

And in Prosper, the houses are palatial, many of them part of sprawling new developments that brim with amenities unheard-of in California. “It’s like living in a country club,” Bailey told me, which sounded like hyperbole until she showed me the 5-acre lagoon and white sand beach in the development where she and her husband purchased a home. Their house is 5,000 square feet. They bought it for about the same price for which they sold a home they owned in Orange County, which was 1,500 square feet.

Bailey’s move gets to the heart of the great California-Texas migration: housing. As she drove me around Dallas’ suburbs, Bailey would point out cute house after cute house now occupied by a Californian. I had been talking about the idea of choosing between California and Texas, but for many people moving here, Bailey suggested, there really was not much choice at all — it was simply that, economically, they could not make their lives work in California, and in Texas, they could.

I visited Dallas two weeks after Texas’ bounty-hunter abortion law went into effect, and a week after Greg Abbott, the governor, signed a bill that severely restricts voting access. Attractive as Texas’ real estate might be, I was beginning to regret this whole idea: Twitter was alive with calls to boycott Texas and here I was — a lefty New York Times columnist — preparing to laud the livability of a state that seemed to be lurching to the fringe right.

I suspect that politics isn’t a primary factor in most people’s moving decisions, but politics is never far below the surface of any discussion comparing California to Texas. In the news media, the gulf between California’s politics and Texas’ politics is usually described as so profound as to be unbridgeable. And it’s true that there are certain issues on which there is little room for compromise.

If you select transgender rights or reproductive rights as important to you in our quiz, Texas will plummet in your results. No one in my family is transgender nor likely to be in need of an abortion soon, but could I live in a state that maintains restrictions with which I profoundly disagree? Could I live in a state where the governor tried to ban mask mandates?

For many, though, the political calculus can be more complicated. For one thing, rapid growth is rapidly altering Texas’ politics. As people pour in, Texas keeps getting more diverse, younger and more liberal. One reason Republicans may be rushing to limit voting access is out of fear of being overrun. “Don’t California My Texas!” is a popular refrain.

There is an added nuance, which is that actually living in a place is different from observing its politics from afar. On an electoral map, Texas looks inhospitable to anyone on the left. But its biggest cities and suburbs largely voted blue in 2020, and as a practical matter they may feel no less welcoming to people on the left than some of the most liberal of coastal metropolises.

My hotel in downtown Dallas was within a short walk of several gay bars; sex shops selling packers, which are often used by trans men; smoothie shops; and purveyors of CBD remedies of all kinds. Black Lives Matter signs dotted front yards. Not everyone was wearing a mask, but lots of people were — many more than I was expecting, and certainly enough that I never felt out of place donning one.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research and a former Californian, told me that rather than hot-button political issues, a more salient problem for Californians moving to Texas is the paltriness of government services. Texas spends far less on welfare benefits than California, and it did not expand Medicaid under "Obamacare." “Californians are used to a high level of public services, and Texas is a lower-amenity state,” Fulton said.

The poor services and reactionary state politics bother me greatly, but I can see how, for a lot of people, low taxes and more living space could be inducement enough to overlook Texas’ apparent downsides.

As I toured houses in Dallas, I knew that I wouldn’t be moving to Texas anytime soon — but mainly because I’m not in a place in life where I have to. If I were 10 years younger, if my kids weren’t settled at their schools and my wife wasn’t tied to a job in California, I’d feel a lot differently.

Texas, now, feels a bit like California did when I first moved here in the late 1980s — a thriving, dynamic place where it doesn’t take a lot to establish a good life. For many people, that’s more than enough.

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20 minutes ago, hobie1616 said:

Everyone's moving to Texas. Here's why Californians are leaving.

The traumas of the past few years have rearranged all of our lives. Many Americans have new needs, new desires, new possibilities and new priorities. They’re looking for bigger homes, second homes or any home at all. They’re searching for work — or trying to escape work. Some fear encroaching heat, fire or flood. Others are repulsed by bitter local politics. Many simply hear the distant siren of a better life elsewhere.

We’re here to help. First, we gathered data for thousands of towns and cities on more than 30 metrics, such as school quality, crime rates and affordability. Then we used that data to make a quiz: Select the criteria you find important, and we’ll show you places that might work for you.

Here’s how I used it, and what I learned.

For more than 100 years, California was the state everyone wanted to move to. In 1900, California had about as many people as Kansas; by 2000, it had grown twentyfold and was by far the most populous and most prosperous state. In technology, in the arts, in science, in gastronomy — around the turn of the century, the Golden State from north to south seemed on the cusp of becoming a global capital. It felt like the best place in America to chart a new path, to float what foundered elsewhere, to sip from a cup runneth over.

I’ve lived in California nearly all my life, and it’s still more likely than not that I will remain here; reports of a sudden “exodus” from the state are frequently exaggerated. Still, there’s plenty going wrong — soaring housing costs, devastating poverty and inequality, and the cascading disasters brought about by a change in what was once our big selling point, the climate. Not a month goes by that I don’t wonder what I’m doing here. There’s got to be somewhere better, right?

Mine is certainly a privileged flight of fancy; if I left California, I’d be one of the hordes of remote-working elites fleeing local problems and driving up house prices in once-pleasant little towns around the country. It’s a phenomenon that is the topic of much media coverage nowadays — though, in fact, mobility in the United States is inversely related to income: People suffering economic hardship tend to move more often than wealthy people.

But anyway, everyone imagines greener pastures now and then. Our quiz provides a starting point for such reveries. By scoring cities and towns, we let you filter and rank locations according to affordability, the vibrancy of local job markets, exposure to climate hazards, political and racial diversity, reproductive and transgender rights, how long you can expect to spend commuting and whether a place has lots of mountains or trees.

As my colleagues explain in a methodology note, California does very well on many of these criteria. That’s the problem — California is so nice, nobody can afford to live there anymore. Most areas in and around Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose and San Diego fall into our search tool’s most expensive category. We label that category $$$$, though it’s not as if life in, say, Irvine or Redwood City or Anaheim is very blingy. Compared to many other places in the country, some pricey California enclaves often offer mediocre schools, not a lot of space, relatively arduous commutes and a rough forecast under climate change.

As the Golden Gate shuts, the Lone Star beckons. If you’re looking for an affordable, economically vibrant city that is less likely to be damaged by climate change than many other American cities, our data shows why Texas is a new land of plenty. For the many hypothetical life scenarios I ran through our quiz, the suburbs around Dallas — places like Plano, McKinney, Garland, Euless and Allen — came up a lot. It’s clear why these are some of the fastest-growing areas in the country. They have relatively little crime and are teeming with jobs, housing, highly rated schools, good restaurants, clean air and racial and political diversity — all at a steep discount compared to the cost of living in America’s coastal metropolises.

This fall, I visited Dallas and its mushrooming suburbs on a scouting mission. Tens of thousands of Californians have moved to Texas every year of the last decade. Should I?

Texas has been growing explosively for two decades, so its strong showing in a ranking tool for deciding where to live is about as surprising as its strong showing in a list of rodeo championships. From 2010-20, the population of Texas grew by nearly 4 million; about 29 million people live there now. In the same period, California, which has nearly 40 million people, added just over 2 million.

About half of Texas’ growth in 2018-19, for example, was due to what demographers call “natural increase” — big Texans making little Texans. The rest was through migration from other parts of the country and the world. People from every state move to Texas, but California contributes an outsize number of new Texans. In 2019, Californians accounted for about 42% of Texas’ net domestic in-migration.

What do Texas cities have that other places don’t? In my searches, there were two preferences that, when combined with jobs, tended to guarantee results in Texas: racial diversity and lower climate risks.

There are lots of places in America with jobs and lower climate risks or jobs and racial diversity, but if you want all three, Texas will take care of you best.

Diversity is what Texas has over many cities in the Midwest or the West — places like Madison or Colorado Springs or Portland. Nearly all of Texas’ recent growth has been in populations of color, and its growth areas are as racially diverse as many places in California. Growth cities in Texas are not just racially diverse but also politically diverse, if you’re into that sort of thing. In Plano, a thriving suburb of Dallas, about 60% of voters are Democrats; in Menlo Park, a thriving suburb south of San Francisco, about 80% are — the difference between living among political allies and living in an echo chamber.

Then there are Texas’ climate risks. Houston will not do well on a warming planet — it is economically dependent on the oil and gas industry and is threatened by hurricanes and a surge in sea levels. But other big cities, including Dallas and Fort Worth, face more moderate risks, especially compared with many cities in California. Yes, Texas is very hot and likely to get hotter; but if a lot of other American cities also begin to get very hot, Texas cities might not feel as overheated by comparison. In addition to the risk of heat stress, Texas also faces the possibility of water shortages, but that will be true across much of the West, including California’s population centers.

What Texans will not have to worry about as much are wildfires, the scourge of so much of California, and the attendant air pollution, though experts predict increases in wildfires in Texas. It’s true that Texas’ less extreme fire risk is related to something precious about California that Texas lacks — abundant trees and mountains in major metro areas, or really any of California’s striking natural beauty. But nobody said living through climate change would be pretty.

You might argue that it’s too speculative to take into account something as broad and complex as climate change when deciding where to live. And more important, there’s no real escape from a long-term planetary disaster — even if you move to some place with lovely weather, your life is bound to be altered in significant ways as habitability shifts elsewhere on the globe.

Still, living through California’s tinderbox years has convinced me to keep an eye on climate dangers; while forecasts on climate risk are inexact, making some effort to anticipate its danger when deciding where to live feels more responsible than ignoring it. And when people in California are paying a million dollars above asking price for homes in areas of high and increasing wildfire risk, isn’t that something like ignoring it?

There is a concept in behavioral economics known as a “Minsky moment,” which describes when a bull market suddenly wises up to its own unsustainability, causing a collapse in prices. Jesse Keenan, an associate professor at the Tulane University School of Architecture who studies how climate change affects housing markets, told me that a Minsky moment could be coming for high-priced homes in at-risk coastal cities. As home lenders, insurance companies and other players in the real estate business begin to better understand their exposure to climate risks, they may raise premiums or force disclosure requirements that could lower home values.

At the moment, buying a home in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I live, looks like a safe investment. But lately I have begun to obsess about the uncertainty built into the changing weather. What if three fire seasons from now proves to be one fire season too many — and, in a blink, the housing market into which we’ve invested so much of our future implodes? “In a way, climate change could begin to look like a foreclosure crisis,” Keenan told me.

A Californian will feel right at home in Dallas even before touching the ground. Like the suburbs around Los Angeles, San Diego and across the Bay Area, Dallas and other Texas metros are built on the certainty of cars and infinite sprawl; from the air, as I landed, I could see the familiar landscape of endless blocks of strip malls and single-family houses, all connected by a circulatory system of freeways.

I rented a sweet pickup truck to get around Dallas, but that was the extent of my taste of local flavor. Texas has barbecue and California has burritos, but the American urban landscape has grown stultifyingly homogeneous over the past few decades, and perhaps one reason so many Californians are comfortable moving to Texas is that, on the ground, in the drive-through line at Starbucks or the colossal parking lot at Target, daily life is more similar than it is different.

My guide through the Dallas suburbs was Marie Bailey, a real estate agent who runs Move to Texas From California!, a Facebook group that helps disillusioned Californians find their way to the promised land. Bailey is herself a Californian. She and her family moved in 2017 from El Segundo, a beach city next to Los Angeles International Airport, to Prosper, a landlocked oasis of new housing developments north of Dallas. In El Segundo, the median home list price is $1.3 million; in Prosper, it’s less than half that.

And in Prosper, the houses are palatial, many of them part of sprawling new developments that brim with amenities unheard-of in California. “It’s like living in a country club,” Bailey told me, which sounded like hyperbole until she showed me the 5-acre lagoon and white sand beach in the development where she and her husband purchased a home. Their house is 5,000 square feet. They bought it for about the same price for which they sold a home they owned in Orange County, which was 1,500 square feet.

Bailey’s move gets to the heart of the great California-Texas migration: housing. As she drove me around Dallas’ suburbs, Bailey would point out cute house after cute house now occupied by a Californian. I had been talking about the idea of choosing between California and Texas, but for many people moving here, Bailey suggested, there really was not much choice at all — it was simply that, economically, they could not make their lives work in California, and in Texas, they could.

I visited Dallas two weeks after Texas’ bounty-hunter abortion law went into effect, and a week after Greg Abbott, the governor, signed a bill that severely restricts voting access. Attractive as Texas’ real estate might be, I was beginning to regret this whole idea: Twitter was alive with calls to boycott Texas and here I was — a lefty New York Times columnist — preparing to laud the livability of a state that seemed to be lurching to the fringe right.

I suspect that politics isn’t a primary factor in most people’s moving decisions, but politics is never far below the surface of any discussion comparing California to Texas. In the news media, the gulf between California’s politics and Texas’ politics is usually described as so profound as to be unbridgeable. And it’s true that there are certain issues on which there is little room for compromise.

If you select transgender rights or reproductive rights as important to you in our quiz, Texas will plummet in your results. No one in my family is transgender nor likely to be in need of an abortion soon, but could I live in a state that maintains restrictions with which I profoundly disagree? Could I live in a state where the governor tried to ban mask mandates?

For many, though, the political calculus can be more complicated. For one thing, rapid growth is rapidly altering Texas’ politics. As people pour in, Texas keeps getting more diverse, younger and more liberal. One reason Republicans may be rushing to limit voting access is out of fear of being overrun. “Don’t California My Texas!” is a popular refrain.

There is an added nuance, which is that actually living in a place is different from observing its politics from afar. On an electoral map, Texas looks inhospitable to anyone on the left. But its biggest cities and suburbs largely voted blue in 2020, and as a practical matter they may feel no less welcoming to people on the left than some of the most liberal of coastal metropolises.

My hotel in downtown Dallas was within a short walk of several gay bars; sex shops selling packers, which are often used by trans men; smoothie shops; and purveyors of CBD remedies of all kinds. Black Lives Matter signs dotted front yards. Not everyone was wearing a mask, but lots of people were — many more than I was expecting, and certainly enough that I never felt out of place donning one.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research and a former Californian, told me that rather than hot-button political issues, a more salient problem for Californians moving to Texas is the paltriness of government services. Texas spends far less on welfare benefits than California, and it did not expand Medicaid under "Obamacare." “Californians are used to a high level of public services, and Texas is a lower-amenity state,” Fulton said.

The poor services and reactionary state politics bother me greatly, but I can see how, for a lot of people, low taxes and more living space could be inducement enough to overlook Texas’ apparent downsides.

As I toured houses in Dallas, I knew that I wouldn’t be moving to Texas anytime soon — but mainly because I’m not in a place in life where I have to. If I were 10 years younger, if my kids weren’t settled at their schools and my wife wasn’t tied to a job in California, I’d feel a lot differently.

Texas, now, feels a bit like California did when I first moved here in the late 1980s — a thriving, dynamic place where it doesn’t take a lot to establish a good life. For many people, that’s more than enough.

Poor Texas 

they need to build some kinda wall to keep them out 

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Read the 1700 or so comments on this opinion piece from the NYT.  I would suggest that the negative comments about TX in respect to its political climate, the weather, last year’s utility grid failure, the air pollution around Houston are at least equal to, if they do not exceed positive comments.

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This is what - about the 10,456,765th article about people leaving California because everything is so expensive because everyone wants to move to California :rolleyes::lol: Supply and demand still is a thing, houses in California would be cheap if no one wanted them ;)

There HAS TO BE some Trumptardish institute paying people to write this drivel. Lets think about it for a second:

Texas is safe from climate change, except for floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and sudden cold snaps that take out the power grid. So except for that, no climate worries :rolleyes:

Texas is a place where the state government sends vigilante citizens after anyone seeking an abortion. Great fit for Californicators that :rolleyes:

California has oil wells, gas wells, gas and oil wells, pipelines, and refineries. If you want to get away from the petroleum industry, Texas is the place. Or not.

California has Mexicans that sneak in and out. Texas has Mexicans that sneak in and out. Big change there ;)

Need I go on?

Well Texas real estate IS cheap, if you are tired of Big Sur this awaits you:

Study Butte, Texas - Colorful Desert Shack - Our Ruins

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In the article the selling feature of Texas seems to be big houses in sprawling subdivisions where everyone drives everywhere. 

I can't imagine anything less appealing. 

I live in a neighbourhood where I can walk or bicycle just about everywhere I need to go.  What is the appeal of sprawling suburbs and 'car culture'?  I don't get it at all.  

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5 minutes ago, Bugsy said:

In the article the selling feature of Texas seems to be big houses in sprawling subdivisions where everyone drives everywhere. 

I can't imagine anything less appealing. 

I live in a neighbourhood where I can walk or bicycle just about everywhere I need to go.  What is the appeal of sprawling suburbs and 'car culture'?  I don't get it at all.  

You can sell your million dollar shack in LA and buy something twice the size for half the price in Texas. A quarter the price in Alabama, Mississippi or Arkansas. With the Boomer demographic entering their retirements, working from home becoming much more doable, this stuff shouldn't even mystify a mentally challenged pelican.   

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Texas schools have long dominated textbook production in the US, preferring those written in a MAGA style and helping sustain a terrible national ranking in educational metrics. Slipping to 43rd this year from #39, there can be nothing great in store for the state rapidly becoming toxic to progressives concerned with women's rights, LGBTQ issues and historical accuracy. Given the moratoriums against mask use and resistance to vaccination, I doubt many coastal Californians would enjoy the taste of vomit in their mouth when the social and political ramifications of their new zip code hit home.

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43 minutes ago, phillysailor said:

Texas schools have long dominated textbook production in the US, preferring those written in a MAGA style and helping sustain a terrible national ranking in educational metrics. Slipping to 43rd this year from #39, there can be nothing great in store for the state rapidly becoming toxic to progressives concerned with women's rights, LGBTQ issues and historical accuracy. Given the moratoriums against mask use and resistance to vaccination, I doubt many coastal Californians would enjoy the taste of vomit in their mouth when the social and political ramifications of their new zip code hit home.

They will avoid all that my moving to Austin, which since everyone wants to go there - sound familiar??? - will quickly become as expensive as California, but surrounded by morons :rolleyes:

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Just now, kent_island_sailor said:

They will avoid all that my moving to Austin, which since everyone wants to go there - sound familiar??? - will quickly become as expensive as California, but surrounded by morons :rolleyes:

Just as has happened in here in Utah.  And yes, I moved here from California 16 years ago for various reasons.

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At least Austin is  the home of:

* a huge J-80fleet

*Wednesday Night Sunfish and Laser races

* lots of good music 

* a giant new robot run Tesla Factory 

* a Formula 1 Racetrack

* a nude beach

* cheap Mexican food on every corner 

* plenty of homeless folks

* scorpions

* fire ants

* mosquitoes 

* coyotes

* cedar pollen…. Lots and lots of it 

* horrendous traffic 

* international headquarters of the ILCA 

 And of course…

America’s Favorite Boatshop

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22 minutes ago, Gouvernail said:

At least Austin is  the home of:

* a huge J-80fleet

*Wednesday Night Sunfish and Laser races

* lots of good music 

* a giant new robot run Tesla Factory 

* a Formula 1 Racetrack

* a nude beach

* cheap Mexican food on every corner 

* plenty of homeless folks

* scorpions

* fire ants

* mosquitoes 

* coyotes

* cedar pollen…. Lots and lots of it 

* horrendous traffic 

* international headquarters of the ILCA 

 And of course…

America’s Favorite Boatshop

What I hear you saying is that the music and the sailing is great, but it's probably going to be ground zero in the upcoming Human/Robot War.

- DSK

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1 minute ago, Steam Flyer said:

What I hear you saying is that the music and the sailing is great, but it's probably going to be ground zero in the upcoming Human/Robot War.

- DSK

What they really need are salt-water crocodiles, just to round out the attractions.

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Not TX but a good friend of my son’s sold her house in Carmel, CA for close to $4 million and moved to Bozeman, MT.  I have a niece who has been living in Bozeman for well over a decade and she tells me that this is becoming more and more common. There goes the neighborhood

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On 11/26/2021 at 1:50 PM, Bugsy said:

In the article the selling feature of Texas seems to be big houses in sprawling subdivisions where everyone drives everywhere. 

I can't imagine anything less appealing. 

I live in a neighbourhood where I can walk or bicycle just about everywhere I need to go.  What is the appeal of sprawling suburbs and 'car culture'?  I don't get it at all.  

Ummmmmm.  It's Texas?? 

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On 11/26/2021 at 1:03 PM, Mark K said:

You can sell your million dollar shack in LA and buy something twice the size for half the price in Texas. A quarter the price in Alabama, Mississippi or Arkansas. 

But then you have to live in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi or Arkansas.

There are reasons why low cost areas are low cost.

And vice versa.

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The funny thing about these stories:

"Someone sold their $4M house and moved to cheaper Texas"

ok - but what about the other part?

"Someone loved Carmel so fucking much, they just dropped $4M on a house that would cost $500k anywhere else, to live there. Damn, must be really f'ing nice there!"

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8 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

But then you have to live in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi or Arkansas.

There are reasons why low cost areas are low cost.

And vice versa.

I have actually been thinking a lot about this issue. Sure with remote work you can move somewhere cheap, but it is probably cheap for a reason. How long could a sentient person last surrounded by Trumptards before going crazy?

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18 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

 How long could a sentient person last surrounded by Trumptards and other suburban-dwellers before going crazy?

"Hey, check out my kitchen renovation."

"Let's go to the mall!". 

"If it is Saturday, it must be Home Depot day!"

"Ooooh....let's go to the Mega-Plex to see the latest from Hollywood."

"Why yes I do enjoy eating out at national chain restaurants."

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Just now, benwynn said:

There has been an exodus of customers from Ruth's Chris Steakhouse to McDonald's.  It's way cheaper and you don't need to make reservations.  Conclusion: Cheaper means better. 

In other news, Republicans STILL don't understand supply and demand, thinking that Texas housing being cheaper means there's MORE demand....

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1 hour ago, Bugsy said:

"Hey, check out my kitchen renovation."

"Let's go to the mall!". 

"If it is Saturday, it must be Home Depot day!"

"Ooooh....let's go to the Mega-Plex to see the latest from Hollywood."

"Why yes I do enjoy eating out at national chain restaurants."

That last will drive you nuts. I used to travel all over the country and not being able to find a nice place to eat was very annoying in certain locales. When people think about moving out to BFE and getting a huge house for cheap, they forget that if they are the only people there with money, none of the businesses they are used to relying on will exist because there will no customers for them. It'll be McDs and BK for a cheap night out and the Pizza Palace for Friday nights :rolleyes:  Ye Olde Coffee Shoppe with shade-grown single source beans harvested by bisexual handicapped people and vegan sandwiches with that special cheese from Luigi in Italy on fresh baked sourdough made from a recipe passed on from a 49er will be nowhere to be found, but the gas station always has a pot brewing ;)

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On 11/25/2021 at 1:52 PM, Olsonist said:

TX nurses are making $17-$20/hr. while Contract nurses (one is a friend of mine) is making $700/day

who'd want to work in a Hospital for $17/hr

 

go figure

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1 minute ago, dacapo said:

TX nurses are making $17-$20/hr. while Contract nurses (one is a friend of mine) is making $700/day

who'd want to work in a Hospital for $17/hr

 

go figure

What...............

Around here the kid making your coffee is at $13. WTF? Any nurse I know in this area wouldn't even get out of bed for that money.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

The funny thing about these stories:

"Someone sold their $4M house and moved to cheaper Texas"

ok - but what about the other part?

"Someone loved Carmel so fucking much, they just dropped $4M on a house that would cost $500k anywhere else, to live there. Damn, must be really f'ing nice there!"

  It's not about slamming CA or boosting the deep South.  It's about the fiscal realities of retired people and young couples looking to have enough cash left over after making the monthly house payment to raise a family.    

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2 minutes ago, Mark K said:

  It's not about slamming CA or boosting the deep South.  It's about the fiscal realities of retired people and young couples looking to have enough cash left over after making the monthly house payment to raise a family.    

Oh, I totally get that. I might bail out of Cali, or the bay area, when I stop working in a few years. And off I will go. Maybe cali, maybe somewhere else. Someone will REALLY want this house and pay quite a bit for it. What I find interesting is how that "decision" is a "political" decision of hating california and wanting out. Not in the least. 

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1 hour ago, dacapo said:

TX nurses are making $17-$20/hr. while Contract nurses (one is a friend of mine) is making $700/day

who'd want to work in a Hospital for $17/hr

 

go figure

Are these RN and better?  Rough figures, RN with an AS degree or better is making $40.00 an hour in Texas.

https://nursinglicensemap.com/resources/nurse-salary/

At $700.00 per day, again rough number s that is $170K a year - I know a few traveling nurses that will jump on this in a New York second. PM where this is.

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3 hours ago, Raz'r said:

The funny thing about these stories:

"Someone sold their $4M house and moved to cheaper Texas"

ok - but what about the other part?

"Someone loved Carmel so fucking much, they just dropped $4M on a house that would cost $500k anywhere else, to live there. Damn, must be really f'ing nice there!"

Yeah, Carmel is very nice, but not $4.0 Million nice. 

Montana, not a cheaper Texas - well not all of it.  Whitefish, Klaispel, and the areas around Flathead Lake are pretty nice if you're into the outdoors and is attracting a lot of people

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Oh, I totally get that. I might bail out of Cali, or the bay area, when I stop working in a few years. And off I will go. Maybe cali, maybe somewhere else. Someone will REALLY want this house and pay quite a bit for it. What I find interesting is how that "decision" is a "political" decision of hating california and wanting out. Not in the least. 

I used to have family in California. They all left for cheaper pastures. That doesn't mean California is bad, it means it is so good that people with a shitload of money are bidding everything up.

I know people that moved out of little coal mining towns too. They didn't leave because it was too expensive and no rich people fought over their trailers :rolleyes:

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22 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

Yeah, Carmel is very nice, but not $4.0 Million nice. 

Montana, not a cheaper Texas - well not all of it.  Whitefish, Klaispel, and the areas around Flathead Lake are pretty nice if you're into the outdoors and is attracting a lot of people

California has alway been  a desirable safe space for coprophiliacs .  Copro’s will pay big money for the opportunity to live next to a fresh load.

many California real estate agents subscribe to  TURD MASTER , a fresh dump mapping agency, to assist clients in choosing a prime location  

If you are lucky enough to be located in a high load zone,   your property  very valuable 

 

 

8752712B-7069-4569-9F04-34C0D372D1EE.jpeg

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4 hours ago, solosailor said:

How is a total net loss of 200k out of 39 million "everyone"?  Especially since that's total loss, not loss just to Texas.

Especially since the ones who move are likely to be 1- old and close to retirement and 2- trumpalos, it's not a loss at all. It's gaining back the space they took up and the oxygen they would have otherwise wasted.

- DSK

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13 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Especially since the ones who move are likely to be 1- old and close to retirement and 2- trumpalos, it's not a loss at all. It's gaining back the space they took up and the oxygen they would have otherwise wasted.

- DSK

If the broke ones are leaving, and the wealthy are coming? There are definitely issues with that in diversity and wealth distribution, but Cali is running massive surpluses for some reason...

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2 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

Are these RN and better?  Rough figures, RN with an AS degree or better is making $40.00 an hour in Texas.

https://nursinglicensemap.com/resources/nurse-salary/

At $700.00 per day, again rough number s that is $170K a year - I know a few traveling nurses that will jump on this in a New York second. PM where this is.

Friend is in Odessa Tx right now 

there are traveling nurse gigs all over TZ right now 

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4 hours ago, solosailor said:

How is a total net loss of 200k out of 39 million "everyone"?  Especially since that's total loss, not loss just to Texas.

I would tend to agree with you on this - it is a drop in the bucket; however, the demographic of those leaving are many of the ones that are contributing a pretty nice chunk to the local and state coffers in the way of income and sales taxes.  When it comes to tax revenue projections and setting budgets, you need to look five-ten years down the road, not next year.  Currently, there is a concern with this at the state controller's office, but sadly this message is not registering with others.

But it is not just them; companies are leaving too.  Disney just shifted 2,000 jobs to Florida, and this is just the first wave.  Not only are the business taxes and fees going, how many small businesses in Burbank and Anaheim counted on some of those people/companies spending their money with them? 

When you're having a negative population change over a period of years - the long-term effect is not positive.

 

 

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2 hours ago, slug zitski said:

California has alway been  a desirable safe space for coprophiliacs .  Copro’s will pay big money for the opportunity to live next to a fresh load.

many California real estate agents subscribe to  TURD MASTER , a fresh dump mapping agency, to assist clients in choosing a prime location  

If you are lucky enough to be located in a high load zone,   your property  very valuable 

 

This joke didn't work.

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12 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

But it is not just them; companies are leaving too.  Disney just shifted 2,000 jobs to Florida, and this is just the first wave.  Not only are the business taxes and fees going, how many small businesses in Burbank and Anaheim counted on some of those people/companies spending their money with them? 

 

 

Some context.  The Int'l employees who were probably paid out of the CA HQ didn't spend much in Anaheim or Burbank.  I don't know what not having full dedication to Disneyland means, other than it sounds like they can do their job from anywhere.  I think California and the OC will be fine.

Employees who will be asked to relocate will mostly be part of the Parks, Experiences and Products division who don’t have full dedication to the Disneyland Resort. This also includes some roles that work with Disney’s international theme parks. Josh D’Amaro, Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products and other Disney officials have said that the Burbank offices are not completely leaving Southern California, where the film and television divisions of the company are located. In fact, the 2,000 jobs that are being relocated are less than five percent of Disney’s staff in California.

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57 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

but Cali is running massive surpluses for some reason...

Not so fast there.

Sacramento claims that we have a $75.7 Billion-Dollar Surplus, suggesting CA is flush with money. What they are not telling you, they are counting $37.7 billion of federal funding set for schools as part of his “surplus.” They are banking on the recent real-estate property transfers to boost the tax revenue to cover education costs.  Think about this when you walk into your kid's school and see peeling paint and crumbling buildings and what some of that $37.7 billion would do to fix that.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-05-17/newsom-budget-relies-on-reserve-funds-analyst-report

Know, I know, you're going to come back and say "but but but but, California is roaring back” and therefore, able to spend $5.2 Billion on rent relief, implying the budget is so great, we can spend $5.2 billion giving back."    Bullshit... $2.6 billion is Federal money from the Trump-signed Omnibus & Covid plan in December 2020. $2.2 billion comes from Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan. Leaving just $400 million coming from California.

You seem like a smart guy there Razor, you need to realize you're getting screwed and how!

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, roundthebuoys said:

Some context.  The Int'l employees who were probably paid out of the CA HQ didn't spend much in Anaheim or Burbank.  I don't know what not having full dedication to Disneyland means, other than it sounds like they can do their job from anywhere.  I think California and the OC will be fine.

Employees who will be asked to relocate will mostly be part of the Parks, Experiences and Products division who don’t have full dedication to the Disneyland Resort. This also includes some roles that work with Disney’s international theme parks. Josh D’Amaro, Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products and other Disney officials have said that the Burbank offices are not completely leaving Southern California, where the film and television divisions of the company are located. In fact, the 2,000 jobs that are being relocated are less than five percent of Disney’s staff in California.

This is the first wave...  people in Burbank are nervous.  I know they said Burbank is not completely leaving (wink-wink).

But, Disney is one example, there are many more.

When Toyota left Torrence, there was a vacuum created that is still hurting the area small business-wise.

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2 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

This is the first wave...  people in Burbank are nervous.  I know they said Burbank is not completely leaving (wink-wink).

But, Disney is one example, there are many more.

Where in Texas are you planning on going? I'm thinking about Lubbock.

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Just now, Ventucky Red said:

This is the first wave...  people in Burbank are nervous.  I know they said Burbank is not completely leaving (wink-wink).

But, Disney is one example, there are many more.

That's where the studios are though, right?  I don't think they can move all that to Florida.  I doubt it matters where the parks HQ is.  Either way, California will always be fine.  Every Rose Bowl Parade when it's 75 and sunny people say fuck it and move there.  If they have money.

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3 minutes ago, βhyde said:

Where in Texas are you planning on going? I'm thinking about Lubbock.

Go for it, you and Buddy Holley.  Texas Tech Med School is there, but I don't think they have a psyc program for ya.

If I go anywhere it would be back to the Philadelphia area where I grew up.

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4 minutes ago, roundthebuoys said:

That's where the studios are though, right?  I don't think they can move all that to Florida.  I doubt it matters where the parks HQ is.  Either way, California will always be fine.  Every Rose Bowl Parade when it's 75 and sunny people say fuck it and move there.  If they have money.

Studios can operate anywhere.  I have some friends from the dirt bike days in the stunt business and many live on the east coast now - NC, SC, and GA.  A lot of production is being done in those areas.

Yes, there is still a fair amount being done in CA.  Another friend that does the catering for the locations tells me business is fair, but they are now getting squeezed on prices where before they never had these conversations.  There is a competition for cheaper production.

Yeah, CA might be OK, I just want my kids to have it the same way I did it not better than when I first came here, it is the trajectory doesn't look good right now.

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13 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

...

If I go anywhere it would be back to the Philadelphia area where I grew up.

What's stopping you? The trajectory of PA is looking much better than CA, right?

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25 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

Not so fast there.

Sacramento claims that we have a $75.7 Billion-Dollar Surplus, suggesting CA is flush with money. What they are not telling you, they are counting $37.7 billion of federal funding set for schools as part of his “surplus.” They are banking on the recent real-estate property transfers to boost the tax revenue to cover education costs.  Think about this when you walk into your kid's school and see peeling paint and crumbling buildings and what some of that $37.7 billion would do to fix that.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-05-17/newsom-budget-relies-on-reserve-funds-analyst-report

Know, I know, you're going to come back and say "but but but but, California is roaring back” and therefore, able to spend $5.2 Billion on rent relief, implying the budget is so great, we can spend $5.2 billion giving back."    Bullshit... $2.6 billion is Federal money from the Trump-signed Omnibus & Covid plan in December 2020. $2.2 billion comes from Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan. Leaving just $400 million coming from California.

You seem like a smart guy there Razor, you need to realize you're getting screwed and how!

 

 

 

 

I'm sorry, what is your point?

There is money from the feds? Well, duh, every state got money from the feds last year

That this real estate market of houses changing hands and resetting Prop 13 valuations is happening? Oh, yes, indeed.

that more money in the schools could be useful? I suppose so. The paint at my kids school isn't peeling however, in fact our little county took on an assessment a few years back for a bond measure for our schools and we've been building like crazy since. 

That Cali turned $400M of it's own cash into $5.2B?  Sounds pretty astute to me.

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Just now, Ventucky Red said:

Emphasis on the word IF. So we don't waste time tap dancing, what is your end game here?

 

No end game. I recently got a job with the California Department of Fuck Off if You Don't Like it Here and am encouraging people to follow their desire to live in places other than where they found their fortunes. It's a new outreach program. Check the website to see if you qualify for relocation assistance.

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Just now, Raz'r said:

I'm sorry, what is your point?

There is money from the feds? Well, duh, every state got money from the feds last yearh

That this real estate market of houses changing hands and resetting Prop 13 valuations is happening? Oh, yes, indeed.

that more money in the schools could be useful? I suppose so. The paint at my kids school isn't peeling however, in fact our little county took on an assessment a few years back for a bond measure for our schools and we've been building like crazy since. 

That Cali turned $400M of it's own cash into $5.2B?  Sounds pretty astute to me.

You took on a bond measure and incurred debt when there is money sitting in Sacramento to do this.   Why isn't your county board of education going after and getting this money?

I hope your wife or one of your kids manages the finances at your house, because you don't sound as though you have a fiscal clue. 

And, please explain your last sentence.  Did California invest that money - no, is there some sort of new alchemy that turns $1.00 bills into $100 bills.  Seriously explain this, this is very concerning how you think this is a positive.

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4 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

You took on a bond measure and incurred debt when there is money sitting in Sacramento to do this.   Why isn't your county board of education going after and getting this money?

I hope your wife or one of your kids manages the finances at your house, because you don't sound as though you have a fiscal clue. 

And, please explain your last sentence.  Did California invest that money - no, is there some sort of new alchemy that turns $1.00 bills into $100 bills.  Seriously explain this, this is very concerning how you think this is a positive.

Well, we spent the money on the schools several years ago, so kinda odd to ask for money eatmarked for new construction to pay off old debts. Kinda defeats the point of a recovery spend, doesn't it?

On the rent thing, I just used your numbers  - you said Cali is spending $5B on rental assistance, but only $400M out of their own pocket. Sounds like prudent budgeting to me. 

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7 minutes ago, βhyde said:

No end game. I recently got a job with the California Department of Fuck Off if You Don't Like it Here and am encouraging people to follow their desire to live in places other than where they found their fortunes. It's a new outreach program. Check the website to see if you qualify for relocation assistance.

Okay, if that is all you got, guess we're done with you.

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11 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Well, we spent the money on the schools several years ago, so kinda odd to ask for money eatmarked for new construction to pay off old debts. Kinda defeats the point of a recovery spend, doesn't it?

On the rent thing, I just used your numbers  - you said Cali is spending $5B on rental assistance, but only $400M out of their own pocket. Sounds like prudent budgeting to me. 

 

Schools - go back a read what you wrote. Saying money is for one thing and using it for something else... the California Legislature Motto.

No Newsome and Sacramento claimed California was flush and things are doing great therefore they have all the money to spend when the reality it wasn't the truth.  Either enjoy being lied to or are too idealistic to see through the BS

Are the Republicans any better - no. They would probably pull the same shit.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

 

Schools - go back a read what you wrote. Saying money is for one thing and using it for something else... the California Legislature Motto.

No Newsome and Sacramento claimed California was flush and things are doing great therefore they have all the money to spend when the reality it wasn't the truth.  Either enjoy being lied to or are too idealistic to see through the BS

Are the Republicans any better - no. They would probably pull the same shit.

 

 

Thanks for agreeing with me. Lots of cash. Doing well. Not spending it all. Also good.

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1 hour ago, Ventucky Red said:

Yeah, CA might be OK, I just want my kids to have it the same way I did it not better than when I first came here, it is the trajectory doesn't look good right now.

The trajectory is to being more expensive because it's a nice place to live.  That's all I see.  The rest is Right/Left BS noise that people, especially not from there, foist upon it.  Don't get me wrong, I left after 44 years of being born and raised and thriving up to a point, but I liked the idea of a smaller town in the mountains with good schools and less cost.  Absolutely nothing to do with taxes, governors or politics.  By the way, the only friends I have from high school who moved back to Newport Beach after college have an inheritance or walked into their parents business.  Everyone else moved to Laguna Niguel, Mission Viejo, Irvine, etc or completely out of the area.  That tells me that even the old school locals are being pushed out of places they grew up in.  And that's because it's where everyone else wants to be.  It sucks but you can't replicate the Pacific Ocean anywhere else.

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I would think the posters being whiney bitches about California should simply better themselves so they can be happy here. Ya know, pull themselves up by the bootstraps instead of crying about everything. It’s pathetic. 

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I really wish these articles were true, but they just aren't. I was driving east out of the bay area a couple of months ago and crossed over into Nevada or some such shithole and saw this series of billboards about how relieved one must be finally leaving California and starting a new life out in the middle of this godforsaken desert. Who pays for this shit and why do they care? Texas is an even bigger shithole than Nevada. 

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20 minutes ago, El Borracho said:

I would think the posters being whiney bitches about California should simply better themselves so they can be happy here. Ya know, pull themselves up by the bootstraps instead of crying about everything. It’s pathetic. 

Says the one the lives in Daddy's house.  Sure.... you got cred!

45 minutes ago, roundthebuoys said:

 It sucks but you can't replicate the Pacific Ocean anywhere else.

Have you ever been to Chile? Have a friend that works for Dole foods and currently lives in Zapallar.  Like you were born and raised in CA, and laments it is like the California he grew up in with a strong European flair. They're coming up over Christmas and from what my wife says she thinks they have committed to moving there permanently.

 

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Thanks for agreeing with me. Lots of cash. Doing well. Not spending it all. Also good.

They're not spending it because they don't have it.

Learning Annex has a course on balancing your checkbook...  let's take some baby steps and start there.  But first, you're going to need one of these.

Childs-Colorful-Junior-Calculator-with-M

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39 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

Have you ever been to Chile? Have a friend that works for Dole foods and currently lives in Zapallar.  Like you were born and raised in CA, and laments it is like the California he grew up in with a strong European flair. They're coming up over Christmas and from what my wife says she thinks they have committed to moving there permanently.

 

I haven't and I know I would love it.  A few more years until my kids graduate, then I'm going somewhere else.  This little slice of paradise is getting old.

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50 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

They're not spending it because they don't have it.

Learning Annex has a course on balancing your checkbook...  let's take some baby steps and start there.  But first, you're going to need one of these.

Childs-Colorful-Junior-Calculator-with-M

Just another big-gov't republican who wants to borrow and spend more than the state has. Typical.

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10 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

Not so fast there.

Sacramento claims that we have a $75.7 Billion-Dollar Surplus, suggesting CA is flush with money. What they are not telling you, they are counting $37.7 billion of federal funding set for schools as part of his “surplus.” They are banking on the recent real-estate property transfers to boost the tax revenue to cover education costs.  Think about this when you walk into your kid's school and see peeling paint and crumbling buildings and what some of that $37.7 billion would do to fix that.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-05-17/newsom-budget-relies-on-reserve-funds-analyst-report

Know, I know, you're going to come back and say "but but but but, California is roaring back” and therefore, able to spend $5.2 Billion on rent relief, implying the budget is so great, we can spend $5.2 billion giving back."    Bullshit... $2.6 billion is Federal money from the Trump-signed Omnibus & Covid plan in December 2020. $2.2 billion comes from Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan. Leaving just $400 million coming from California.

You seem like a smart guy there Razor, you need to realize you're getting screwed and how!

 

 

 

 

california has 1 trillion dollars in unfunded  pension liabilities 

it’s a liberal basket case 

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9 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

They're not spending it because they don't have it.

Learning Annex has a course on balancing your checkbook...  let's take some baby steps and start there.  But first, you're going to need one of these.

Childs-Colorful-Junior-Calculator-with-M

Balancing your checkbook requires extracting square roots?

Republicans are better for business, yeah.

- DSK

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15 hours ago, slug zitski said:

California has alway been  a desirable safe space for coprophiliacs .  Copro’s will pay big money for the opportunity to live next to a fresh load.

many California real estate agents subscribe to  TURD MASTER , a fresh dump mapping agency, to assist clients in choosing a prime location  

If you are lucky enough to be located in a high load zone,   your property  very valuable 

 

From your site mime and the above description it appears that you have shit for brains.

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12 hours ago, Ventucky Red said:

Emphasis on the word IF. So we don't waste time tap dancing, what is your end game here?

 

Ah, come on goat roper.  You're dodging the question.  You hate the Democrat Wonderland you're living in and you'll never see the GOOPERS run things there again.  Move to Texas.  You can sell your little subdivision shitbox and get a palatial estate with acreage.  

Your kids will get the best education ever using wing nut restricted texts.  You can take them to school in your gimungo pick-em-up welders truck while packing your favorite assault weapon.

Don't wait goat roper, get that for sale sign planted in your from yard today!

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There seems to be two entirely different conversations going on.

1. Actual real life problems in California.

2. The idiotic never-ending right wing memes about California being a failed state that everyone is escaping from.

 

#1 is the only one worthy of discussion, #2 is beyond stupid. I personally have zero interest in living in California. I have spent a lot of time there and long ago realized that my lifestyle would decline significantly if I moved there. That is because so many other people with more money want to go there that they bid up all the stuff I would be interested in beyond what I can afford. This is the curse of being too popular, not the curse of being a disaster everyone is fleeing.

 

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20 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

This is the curse of being too popular, not the curse of being a disaster everyone is fleeing.

 

I have been taught that you leave things better than what they were when you got there.   I'll let you spin in that for a while...

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18 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

I have been taught that you leave things better than what they were when you got there.   I'll let you spin in that for a while...

Rather begs the question of "What is better?" To many GOP'ers "better" would be more twinkling offshore oil platforms viewed from private beaches backed by soaring condominium blocks. Thank the libs (the true conservatives) that that did not happen.

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1 hour ago, El Borracho said:

Rather begs the question of "What is better?" To many GOP'ers "better" would be more twinkling offshore oil platforms viewed from private beaches backed by soaring condominium blocks. Thank the libs (the true conservatives) that that did not happen.

There you go again with your idealistic attack that all the good in the world is only done by one group of people.

Beach huh?  Okay, what about Martin's Beach that is right up the road from you in Half Moon Bay?  From what I understand, Khosla is an avid supporter of Team D.  I guess it didn't help keep that beach private.  Oh, another Seadrift Beach in Marin County, yeah you can get there, but you can't there unless you live there, which is the same for Hope Ranch Beach in Santa Barbara. 

Oil platforms - I agree with you, but we still have quite a few pumping away and a shitload more on land. I have to say they do make from great racing mark..  we have a few of them here.  But I seem to remember Jerry Brown catching some shit when he jetted around talking about climate change and not doing anything about the drilling until Trump eased the restrictions on the leases. It was then and only then that he sprung into action.  What is that Newton's law of motion - "A body is at rest and will remain at rest unless it is acted upon by force.  And there is a flip side, it is far cheaper to suck the middle east dry to pump a gallon into the tank than it is to get it out of the ground here.

 

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20 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

There you go again with your idealistic attack that all the good in the world is only done by one group of people.

I agree with your post. Though you are rather cherry-picking items. Sure there are bad people on all sides. Certainly some D people, especially the insanely wealthy like Koshla, who seems to have a warped idea of the larger liberal agenda. Better for your argument would be to find (one?) major GOP leader(s) who have backed the significant conservation efforts in California — a good GOP’er. 

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14 minutes ago, Ventucky Red said:

There you go again with your idealistic attack that all the good in the world is only done by one group of people.

Beach huh?  Okay, what about Martin's Beach that is right up the road from you in Half Moon Bay?  From what I understand, Khosla is an avid supporter of Team D.  I guess it didn't help keep that beach private.  Oh, another Seadrift Beach in Marin County, yeah you can get there, but you can't there unless you live there, which is the same for Hope Ranch Beach in Santa Barbara. 

Oil platforms - I agree with you, but we still have quite a few pumping away and a shitload more on land. I have to say they do make from great racing mark..  we have a few of them here.  But I seem to remember Jerry Brown catching some shit when he jetted around talking about climate change and not doing anything about the drilling until Trump eased the restrictions on the leases. It was then and only then that he sprung into action.  What is that Newton's law of motion - "A body is at rest and will remain at rest unless it is acted upon by force.  And there is a flip side, it is far cheaper to suck the middle east dry to pump a gallon into the tank than it is to get it out of the ground here.

 

Sounds like you support the dem positions of open beach access and use their oil first. Nice!

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1 minute ago, El Borracho said:

I agree with your post. Though you a rather cherry-picking items. Sure there are bad people on all sides. Certainly some D people, especially the insanely wealthy like Koshla, who seems to have a warped idea of the larger liberal agenda. Better for your argument would be to find (one?) major GOP leader(s) who have backed the significant conservation efforts in California — a good GOP’er. 

So far, all I've heard him do is parrot Dem positions. Deal with the homeless in a caring way, clean up the environment, open beaches, use ME oil first, balance the budget. Give him time and he'll realize he's a fan of the wrong logo. 

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1 hour ago, Ventucky Red said:

I have been taught that you leave things better than what they were when you got there.   I'll let you spin in that for a while...

Well OK, I have never been in a position to influence the condition of California in any way, so I didn't leave it any better or worse than I found it.

Overall it was "better" in San Francisco back when I was a frequent visitor for the young and not rich. There was an amazing variety of people doing an amazing variety of things and there was a place for everyone to hang out from homeless right up to billionaires.

Now the vast wave of money has washed much of that away. Is that "worse"? Maybe. This is the *exact same issue* that plagues Annapolis, New York City, ski towns in Colorado, and anyplace else everyone wants to be. There is a lot of money sloshing around the country and the world and it can cause tremendous distortions. This is not a liberal problem nor a conservative one, it is more like gravity or the speed of light.

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