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X-Yacht abandoned near USVI, 1 presumed dead, 2 rescued by cruise ship


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Cruise ship 'Mein Schiff' rescued two crew from a large sailing yacht between USVI and Anguilla.

One was reportedly dead before rescue attempts started, two were taken from a liferaft by daylight by a German cruise ship.

Looks like a large X-Yacht to me, XP 44 or 50?

Report (in German only)

https://www.bild.de/video/clip/news-ausland/yacht-drama-im-atlantik-deutsches-kreuzfahrtschiff-wird-zum-seenotretter-78376522,auto=true.bild.html#skip-nav

 

Looks very strange to me, boat looks in tiptop condition, all lights on, did not sink as it seems.

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26 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Finally got in with Opera. Is my translation of "the skipper was killed when he was hit in the head with the boom" reasonably accurate? Maybe he was the only one aboard who could sail?

Almost. It was one of the crew beig hit in the head. The skipper prevented him from falling overboard. According to the article.

BILD is the german fox news, so take it with a grain of salt.

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https://www.worldcruising.com/newsarticle.aspx?page=S637737124313254734

 

Agecanonix – Tragedy at Sea

World Cruising Club are sad to report the death of crew member Max Delannoy on board the ARC yacht Agecanonix during the night of 26/27 November. The full circumstances of the incident are not known at this point.

The three-man, all French crew, were sailing Agecanonix, an X-Yachts X4.3, as part of the ARC IRC Racing Division, and had opted for a course well to the north of the rhumb line route to Saint Lucia, aiming to avoid the light winds affecting the southerly route close to Cape Verde.

A MAYDAY call was made from the Agecanonix around midnight on 26/27th requesting a medical evacuation. Sadly, injured crew member Max Delannoy was declared dead before any outside help could be provided.

MRCC France Gris-Nez were initially involved in controlling the incident, before passing over to MRCC Ponta Delgada in the Azores, as the closest station to the Agecanonix. At the request of MRCC, the cruise ship PV Mein Schiff 1, diverted to evacuate Philippe Anglade, who was also injured, Jean-Philippe Anglade and the body of Max Delannoy.

PV Mein Schiff 1, arrived at the distress position as planned around 21:30 UTC (27 Nov). Weather locally was easterly Force 8, with rough seas of 4-5 metres.

The larger vessel was positioned to create a lee for the rescue operation. After assessing the situation, the ship’s rescue boat was deployed and started approaching the Agecanonix. During this time winds started gusting to +40kts and Agecanonix started moving out of control and the rescue operation had to be aborted. PV Mein Schiff 1 then remained in the vicinity waiting for the weather to improve and for daylight.

At around 14:00 UTC today, 28th November, MRCC Ponta Delgada reported that the rescue operation was successfully completed, with both crew and the deceased safely on board, and PV Mein Schiff 1 had set course for Funchal, Madeira. The Agecanonix has been abandoned at approximate position 29° 3.71 N, 026° 30.38 W and continues to be tracked by MRCC via the on-board YB tracker.

Our thoughts are very much with the Anglade and Delannoy families during this sad and difficult time.

World Cruising Club would also like to express their sincere gratitude to all the staff at the MRCC's involved in coordinating the incident, and in particular to the Captain, officers and crew of PV Mein Schiff 1.

 

 

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Last position indicated was

29° 3.71 N, 026° 30.38 W

so that is far from USVI, I have no means to change the title of the thread, sorry, the first news reports were false in this regard.

Here is more:

https://farevela.net/2021/11/28/tragedia-allarc-muore-un-velista-francese-per-un-incidente-su-agecanonix-a-sud-delle-azzorre/

Apparently, the skipper is among the injured, not the one crew member deceased.

Still, what a tragedy.

 

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14 hours ago, SurleySailor said:

Looks like the boom is broken in the middle where the vang attaches. Mainsheet is led to the aft end of the boom on these boats. Wonder if it was a preventer placed at the easily accessible vang attachment point vs the end of the boom. 

to me it looked like the break was a bit further aft than where a vang might attach - somewhere between the mainsheet and the vang

seems like an odd place for it to break..

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My boat is an Olson 40 set up only for cruising and explicitly not for racing.

One thing I intentionally did was to make the boat safer: less likely to injure or kill crew.

One way I made the boat safer was by the way the main is rigged.

1) The vang is a Vang Master (now branded by Harken). This is a tubular vang with an air filled cylinder to provide upward force on the boom, eliminating the need for a topping lift. I removed the tackle, so the vang can ONLY push the boom upward, it cannot keep the boom down.

2) I eliminated the traveller, and instead I use two separate main sheets, one to port and another to starboard. For example, the port main sheet dead end is shackled to a car on the toe rail track, then leads up to the end of the boom, though a low friction ring, then forward along the boom to a ring at the gooseneck, then diagonally down to the port chain plate, then aft to a self tailing winch near the aft end of the cockpit. Starboard is a mirror image. By adjusting both main sheets, I can position the end of the boom wherever I want. With the main sheet end at the rail, I can provide all the boom down force I need for downwind sailing, as I generally don't sail DDW, instead gybing down wind.

The result is that when the boom comes across the cockpit, especially during a gybe, the boom goes UP so it crosses the boat well above anyone's head. If the gybe is accidental, the boom does not come across at all, perhaps moving a foot or two horizontally at most.

This is not the best arrangement for racing, where tacking and gybing must happen ASAP. But for cruising, taking about a minute to get the main right where it needs to be after a tack or a gybe is not a problem.

So a minor loss in how long it takes to get back up to speed after a tack or gybe, but a big gain in safety.

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First of all my condolences to the loved ones.

Secondly, "Mein Schiff"? Seriously, someone named their cruising ship Mein Schiff? 

I had to look it up and apparently there is more than one...

image.png.fd13bc63496bba715709d48a51aadd22.png

thirdly, with next to nothing known about the cause of death, it might be too early to make suggestions.

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19 hours ago, carcrash said:

The result is that when the boom comes across the cockpit, especially during a gybe, the boom goes UP so it crosses the boat well above anyone's head.

One of the "safety" features that helped me decide to buy my current boat was that when gybing the boom is overhead for everyone in the cockpit under 6'3", unless you are standing on the cockpit seats

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Standing in the cockpit the boom is well above your head in a X 4.3. So I am pretty shure that the cause for the accident was a broken boom. According to reports there were 4 to 5 meter seas running at the time and winds of more than 40 knts. Maybe the boom hit the water and then broke at the point where the preventer was rigged.

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5 hours ago, AnotherSailor said:

 

Secondly, "Mein Schiff"? Seriously, someone named their cruising ship Mein Schiff? 

Low brow German mass-tourism. “Mein Schiff” brand ships are a dumbed down version of the „Aida“ brand ships which are a dumbed down version of the “Costa NNN” brand ships which are a dumbed down version of real cruise ships. The oceans would be a better place without them. 

Edit: Well ok, except for that rescue. 

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12 hours ago, 10thTonner said:

Low brow German mass-tourism. “Mein Schiff” brand ships are a dumbed down version of the „Aida“ brand ships which are a dumbed down version of the “Costa NNN” brand ships which are a dumbed down version of real cruise ships. The oceans would be a better place without them. 

Edit: Well ok, except for that rescue. 

so that would be "dumberderest"?

These things are monstrosities for sure. 

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“Our dear Max was a victim of an accident last night, when he was just taking the helm for his night shift, the boom violently hit him in the head. Philippe, who was in the cockpit, was able to hold him back from falling into the water, but he died suddenly.”

https://www.yachtingworld.com/news/arc-yacht-abandoned-after-fatality-mid-atlantic-135592

it remains unclear why the yacht abandoned.

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On 11/29/2021 at 2:48 PM, Parma said:

Is this boat now open to salvage claim/title? In my imagination I see half a dozen guys scrambling to go salve it.

I'm reluctant to get into "who gets the boat" so soon after what was from all I could see, was the loss of a much-loved sailor.   But salvage is more than just towing an apparently seaworthy boat with rig intact (save for the boom), which was left empty because the rescuers took remaining crew off. 

Yes, whoever finds and tows her in, is entitled to something.  The lesser the peril the boat was in (afloat and not about to be dashed onto the rocks), and there wasn't much risk in making fast and bringing her in (if the weather for the towing crew was not extreme), then the more any likely award will be roughly the value of the towage. 

And getting medevaced doesn't necessarily mean she's "abandoned" (unless boatowner actually does intend to abandon her). 

So you don't get "title", unless a court so decides after a long process, or the owner doesn't contest it.  Salvage isn't some magic wand, it's a combination of factors whereby salvors/towers are fairly recompensed for the risk they took, the value of what they saved, the value of the would-be salvors' boat and equipment they put at risk, and what risk of loss the salved vessel was facing when the someone took her in tow.  For the sea lawyers, it's generally explained in a case called The "Blackwall" from long ago, wherein these factors were articulated.

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Blackwall is good guidance but this boat is in int'l not US waters.

I would bet the owners are already making inquiries into her recovery; somebody has to be going that way/passing by.

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On 11/28/2021 at 11:05 PM, Ishmael said:

Finally got in with Opera. Is my translation of "the skipper was killed when he was hit in the head with the boom" reasonably accurate? Maybe he was the only one aboard who could sail?

Sorry I was going to say they didn't give any cause but I only saw the video not the linked article

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41 minutes ago, Parma said:

Blackwall is good guidance but this boat is in int'l not US waters.

I would bet the owners are already making inquiries into her recovery; somebody has to be going that way/passing by.

Without getting too specific about non-US jurisdiction, and in general, admiralty law is pretty much the same all over the maritime world, always has been, it's sometimes referred to as the "law of nations".  Coastal states try to do this, and mostly they do.  I would expect you'd find the "Blackwall" factors in one form or another, or at least similar reasoning, in, say, China, Ecuador, Italy, India for for a similar type of claim.  I think it originated with the Phoenicians, and spread outward.

Ditto nautical rules of the road, though that's an international  Convention.  Ditto a lot of things.

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On 12/2/2021 at 3:38 PM, floater said:

“Our dear Max was a victim of an accident last night, when he was just taking the helm for his night shift, the boom violently hit him in the head. Philippe ... was in the cockpit

Obviously there remain many unknowns, but I wonder whether Max had fully woken up before assuming the watch and helm.

On 12/2/2021 at 3:38 PM, floater said:

It remains unclear why the yacht (was) abandoned.

Don’t know. But I suppose if the weather is crappy (although not dangerous), your boat has a broken boom, one of your two crew mates has very recently been killed in a terrible accident, and the opportunity to get off is right there, it must be tempting to say “fuck this, I’ve had enough, I’m outta here”.

Also, the two survivors will now be able to accompany the body back to France and meet with Max’s family at the earliest opportunity. Which seems rather more respectful than fixing up the rig and continuing the ARC

 

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17 hours ago, Svanen said:

..I suppose if the weather is crappy (although not dangerous), your boat has a broken boom, one of your two crew mates has very recently been killed in a terrible accident, and the opportunity to get off is right there, it must be tempting to say “fuck this, I’ve had enough, I’m outta here”.

Also, the two survivors will now be able to accompany the body back to France and meet with Max’s family at the earliest opportunity. Which seems rather more respectful than fixing up the rig and continuing the ARC

no doubt that could explain it - but jumping off the boat seems a big step to take.

Derelict-Freedom-1150x863.jpg

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On 12/3/2021 at 8:40 PM, Svanen said:

Obviously there remain many unknowns, but I wonder whether Max had fully woken up before assuming the watch and helm.

Don’t know. But I suppose if the weather is crappy (although not dangerous), your boat has a broken boom, one of your two crew mates has very recently been killed in a terrible accident, and the opportunity to get off is right there, it must be tempting to say “fuck this, I’ve had enough, I’m outta here”.

Also, the two survivors will now be able to accompany the body back to France and meet with Max’s family at the earliest opportunity. Which seems rather more respectful than fixing up the rig and continuing the ARC

 

I was doing an overnight delivery in poor conditions up the coast from Santa Cruz to San Francisco and when rotating watch at 0400 we had to keep the new watch from climbing up on deck at their first go. The first one up did not have his harness on and the one behind him did not see it. Took another 10 minutes before we saw properly kitted folks reaching out the hatch with their carabiner in hand positively reaching for the pad eye and a game face on. 

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