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Lead keel and primer products


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Hi,

Did a keel treatment on my C&C115 in April.

Sanding, cleaning old product of and applying new, also filled to make a smooth even surface.

After clean and sanding applied these products:

1. International VCTar2, 3 coats

2. International VC17m Extra graphite

Hauled the boat end of September for a check and a wash before winterizing. (I keep the boat in water during winter season)

Due to unusual warm waters and also a little less usage there was some growth around the leading and trailing edge and the bottom edges.

When power washed the underside, the areas that had growth the VC17 and the VCtar2 let go and bare lead became visible. The areas where no growth was no flaking appeared. It may be because a strong power washer was used and maybe more intense usage on the areas where there was growth.

I was hoping the VCTar2 would stick better and tolerate a bit of intense power wash.

Any ideas of better products as a primer for the VC17m extra on lead keels or some procedures.

(During the cleaning before winterizing)

IMG_7777.thumb.JPEG.5606b23e47ee715b814a9c27318d3c51.JPEG

After the spring cleaning and treatment. (for reference)

IMG_6899.thumb.JPEG.fb9532a07c30186ac2278cfd53a58a56.JPEG

 

Thanks in advance

-Vegard

 

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I've only used one process on my keels - both iron and lead.

Clean the metal to bright.

Immediately coat with epoxy resin to seal it.

Fill & fair with talc filled epoxy

IP2K as prescribed

Anti-foul paint.

Never had a failure.

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30 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I've only used one process on my keels - both iron and lead.

Clean the metal to bright.

Immediately coat with epoxy resin to seal it.

Fill & fair with talc filled epoxy

IP2K as prescribed

Anti-foul paint.

Never had a failure.

Same here, except we immediately coat with IP2000

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I have never had epoxy delaminate from lead. Usually I sand the head with 16 grit before the first layer of epoxy. 
 

i have used pretty much every marine brand of epoxy I have seen for sale. 
 

I make it a point to work the epoxy into the surface 

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1 hour ago, Blitz said:

Scrubbing the epoxy in with a wire brush helps adhesion also.

In their book the Gougeons talked about "wet sanding" epoxy in to get better adhesion. It sounded a bit over the top to me - as well as incredibly messy.

I've frequently rough sanded substrate to give it "tooth" before gluing and I've never had an epoxy joint fail. On the exceedingly rare failures it's always been the substrate that failed.

Has anyone done any testing to see if there really is a benefit?

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On 11/29/2021 at 8:30 AM, SloopJonB said:

I've only used one process on my keels - both iron and lead.

Clean the metal to bright.

Immediately coat with epoxy resin to seal it.

Fill & fair with talc filled epoxy

IP2K as prescribed

Anti-foul paint.

Never had a failure.

 

+1 for this method.

We used it on the lead keel on my Dash 34 in 1983 when we discovered it had only been painted at the factory, and of course the paint was peeling off.  We used WEST epoxy for the first coat on shiny metal.  I can't remember whether we used IP2K or some other epoxy with filler after that.  Faired it, painted it, and thereafter only renewed the bottom paint from then until we sold the boat in 2019, except that we sanded all the paint off and sprayed 2-3 coats of System 3 hi-build epoxy on it in 1994.  We did that only because we were doing the entire boat with this as a barrier coat.  

We did the same on the iron keel on our Jeanneau 36.2 last year.  We were unable to get the entire keel down to shiny metal - that would have required sandblasting and it just isn't available at a reasonable price locally (quotes were 1.5 - 2K-ish).  It will be interesting to see what it looks like when we haul it again at the end of next year.  I believe we got to 5 coats on the IP2K before we stopped.

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I wire brush the epoxy onto the lead immediately after sanding with a coarse grit and final prep.  Lead oxidizes exceptionally quickly and it is the lead oxide that fails.  Wire brushing cuts through any oxide that forms during the brief time between sanding, cleaning and priming. 

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