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Dehumidifires  

23 members have voted

  1. 1. If you own a racer or racer/cruiser with no fitted or installed 110/220 Volt AC system and you use a dehumidifier, what sort of over current protection do you rely on?

    • I rely on an extension cord plugged into the shore side outlet.
      13
    • I rely on a strip plug with surge protector, plugged into an extension cord plugged into the shore side outlet.
      2
    • I rely on a strip plug with a circuit breaker(s), plugged into an extension cord plugged into the shore side outlet.
      5
    • I rely on a strip plug with a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter, plugged into an extension cord plugged into the shore side outlet.
      3
    • I rely on another option that you did not think of and have detailed it below.
      0


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This poll is regarding the installation of dehumidifiers (or dehumidifires) on boats with no fitted 110-220 Volt AC system.  I have had several surveys over the years where boats have sustained fire damage due to a failed dehumidifier.  I am curious to know how boats owners are installing and protecting the dehumidifier power supply.

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I have a proper 120VAC 30A system on board, but previously I used our club-mandated system of a 30A shore power cord, with a Marinco 30/15A GFCI adapter, model 199128 I think.  I'm pretty sure there was an incident at one of our marinas that prompted this to be the minimum required setup.

 

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Are you sure you're asking the right question? I was under the impression that the majority of dehumidifier fires are not caused by overload but by overheating of the compressor or fan, perhaps due to blockages, tipping etc. and sometimes exacerbated by dust buildup on filters, frost on coils, low build quality etc. 

 Look into a high quality,  dessicant version, rather than a refrigerant/compressor one and be careful with positioning. 

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We are plugged into a 15A gfci, to house power. This article made me aware of the danger, and will be taking pics, and validating if our unit is a recall. With so many being recalled you never know. I really appreciate this article being shared. 

 

 

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I've a small boat and use a small dehumidifier.   I place it in a large rectangular, tall sided, metal cake pan elevated off the sole a few inches on bricks.  My hope is that any high heat or flame from a short will be contained within the pan.   I probably could diy a metal cover or something to protect for over head flames from the plastic humidifier body.  I assume that the plastic compound has additives that will not support combustion, like many products, including that 1970's blistering boat resin.

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I run an Air Dryer vs. a true Dehumidifier w/water catch tank. The description says "no spark" but these dumb things still get hot and stop working eventually.

I think I'm on my fourth in 3 years. For the size, it's does a decent job in a 32 footer but won't suck all the moisture out. If my lines or kite get wet, they go home with me and dry out on the lawn.

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--air-dryer-with-fan-dehumidifier-120v-ac--7867518?recordNum=1

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On 11/29/2021 at 3:53 PM, Bill E Goat said:

Put it on a timer so it only runs an hour a day, that way less chance of it overheating.  If you rely on it switching itself off based on the humidity setting it could fry itself if this doesn't work

This^^^

If you don't have fitted 110-220v system in your boat, it would seem the safest approach would be a 30amp shore power cord to bring power from dock into the boat.  Then an adapter to 120 volt plug, then a power strip with a surge/circuit beaker on it, then a timer, so you only run the dehumidifier for an hour or two a day.  Then go check on it after its run for 2 hours to make sure no parts of the system are getting too hot.

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I had a crewmate that was told to plug in the shorepower cord.  We were at a large regatta in a far away city.  I was really busy with other duties of my own, so I didn’t notice that it took him over 20 minutes to accomplish this task.  About a half hour later, another crewmate asks me if I smell anything strange.  And, yeah, I smell a burning electrical odor.  I feel the small fan on the floor, quite warm!  Cordless drill battery charger, hot!  Dehumidifier, very hot!  It turns out, he couldn't fit the plug into the socket, so he whipped out his Leatherman, and bent the prongs to fit.  He fit a 115vac/30a plug into a 220vac/50a outlet!  Had to replace all these devices, and the cord!    That was $1000 gone!  Still won the regatta!  I don't think the Owner ever had a clew that anything happened.  

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3 hours ago, silent bob said:

I had a crewmate that was told to plug in the shorepower cord.  We were at a large regatta in a far away city.  I was really busy with other duties of my own, so I didn’t notice that it took him over 20 minutes to accomplish this task.  About a half hour later, another crewmate asks me if I smell anything strange.  And, yeah, I smell a burning electrical odor.  I feel the small fan on the floor, quite warm!  Cordless drill battery charger, hot!  Dehumidifier, very hot!  It turns out, he couldn't fit the plug into the socket, so he whipped out his Leatherman, and bent the prongs to fit.  He fit a 115vac/30a plug into a 220vac/50a outlet!  Had to replace all these devices, and the cord!    That was $1000 gone!  Still won the regatta!  I don't think the Owner ever had a clew that anything happened.  

No matter how hard you try to make something idiot proof, the world will make a better idiot.

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5 hours ago, silent bob said:

I had a crewmate that was told to plug in the shorepower cord.  We were at a large regatta in a far away city.  I was really busy with other duties of my own, so I didn’t notice that it took him over 20 minutes to accomplish this task.  About a half hour later, another crewmate asks me if I smell anything strange.  And, yeah, I smell a burning electrical odor.  I feel the small fan on the floor, quite warm!  Cordless drill battery charger, hot!  Dehumidifier, very hot!  It turns out, he couldn't fit the plug into the socket, so he whipped out his Leatherman, and bent the prongs to fit.  He fit a 115vac/30a plug into a 220vac/50a outlet!  Had to replace all these devices, and the cord!    That was $1000 gone!  Still won the regatta!  I don't think the Owner ever had a clew that anything happened.  

Of course you won the regatta. You didn't have any fucking wiring left onboard!

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