Jump to content

Is this where these nylon washers belong?


Recommended Posts

I was in the process of replacing the pin that holds the gooseneck together and wondered what purpose was served by the nylon washer you see in the picture. (There’s one on either side)

 

Do I correctly imagine that the washers should be in-between the mating pieces, not on the outside?

 

 

D8BCAE0F-6976-4A41-8DD2-B6F9727CB860.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends. 
 

if there is room inside then yes. If the pin is too long they are on the outside to keep the pin from walking. 
 

best is finding plastic washers inside and metal washers outside. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing that precipitated this little project is that I’ve been having lines getting caught on the rings, so I was planning to replace the pin with a 316 SS bolt with nylon insert nut with the nylon washers between the tang and the toggle and SS washers on the outside. Seem reasonable?
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

The thing that precipitated this little project is that I’ve been having lines getting caught on the rings, so I was planning to replace the pin with a 316 SS bolt with nylon insert nut with the nylon washers between the tang and the toggle and SS washers on the outside. Seem reasonable?
 

Yes. But make sure the bolt is unthreaded where it bears on alloy. Difficult to source. A sleeve and bolt can work but engineering questions arise. Just use a well bent and smoothed cotter pin and be done with it. Won’t snag. Meets all specs and requirements. Zero cost. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, El Borracho said:

Yes. But make sure the bolt is unthreaded where it bears on alloy. Difficult to source.

That is a bolt - as opposed to a cap screw which is threaded full length.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That is a bolt - as opposed to a cap screw which is threaded full length.

Yes. Having the grip length of the bolt closely match the gooseneck ear width can be a problem. Then the extra threaded length should be trimmed to avoid snags…ugh. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two possibilities: a shoulder bolt which has a defined bearing length (available from McMaster or other hardware supplier); or a length of round stock with a thread run on each end as required and tow nylocks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, DDW said:

Two possibilities: a shoulder bolt which has a defined bearing length (available from McMaster or other hardware supplier); or a length of round stock with a thread run on each end as required and tow nylocks.

Planning to use one of these. It should have just enough length to allow a stainless washer under the head and another under the nut as long as the nylon washers fit between the tang and the toggle. 
 

Overkill? Maybe (probably), but what else will I do all winter…

 

 

 

CF7DE6F9-148C-4A21-9696-265B0CEB6D98.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2021 at 10:04 PM, El Borracho said:

Yes. But make sure the bolt is unthreaded where it bears on alloy. Difficult to source. A sleeve and bolt can work but engineering questions arise. Just use a well bent and smoothed cotter pin and be done with it. Won’t snag. Meets all specs and requirements. Zero cost. 

Not hard to source.  Shoulder bolt from mcmaster.  You'll have it tomorrow. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/30/2021 at 10:52 PM, European Bloke said:

Once you've got the washers placed correctly replace the ring with an appropriate pin and you'll save a lot of fucking about.

this , along with a blob of silicone to smooth it all out and no more probs

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/29/2021 at 8:15 PM, Quickstep192 said:

I was in the process of replacing the pin that holds the gooseneck together and wondered what purpose was served by the nylon washer you see in the picture. (There’s one on either side)

 

Do I correctly imagine that the washers should be in-between the mating pieces, not on the outside?

 

 

D8BCAE0F-6976-4A41-8DD2-B6F9727CB860.jpeg

The large washers on the inside reduces friction , chafe and keeps both components  aligned 

on the outside you typically have a pair of washers,  a stainless washer to take the split pin , pin head load plus  a plastic washer to prevent stainless to aluminum contact 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/30/2021 at 12:34 PM, Quickstep192 said:

Planning to use one of these. It should have just enough length to allow a stainless washer under the head and another under the nut as long as the nylon washers fit between the tang and the toggle. 
 

Overkill? Maybe (probably), but what else will I do all winter…

 

 

 

CF7DE6F9-148C-4A21-9696-265B0CEB6D98.jpeg

A shoulder bolt could be used but unfortunately they are typically custom made 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

A shoulder bolt could be used but unfortunately they are typically custom made 

Except for all the off the shelf ones in existence...

 

I bet the boat yards love to see you coming.  "Yeah sure we can make you a shoulder bolt, but it's gonna be a custom machining job you know...but you can just charge it to your owner"

 

image.png.2ed856c7b622c57e82fff159464e4f83.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Varan said:

Gosh, how about just a bit of tape around the rings and gooseneck?

Just be sure it's duct tape - the Red Green handyman's secret weapon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A shoulder bolt will have a unthreaded portion.  Usually you can poke around and find one with the correct shoulder length then cut off the extra length of the threaded portion.  Much cheaper than a specialty bolt.  For this I would stick with a pin though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Nylon washer are commonplace and cost pennies.

Why would you bother with anything else?

Because when I charge money I rebuild the equipment exactly how the original engineer designed it 

I see many g10 washers and suspect it was chosen because it is stable 

if I was tasked with servicing the original posters equipment I would duplicate it even though it is  very low quality workmanship 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, slug zitski said:

Because when I charge money I rebuild the equipment exactly how the original engineer designed it 

 

Do you duplicate the original design to avoid disputes with customers? Why not improve it if you can?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Quickstep192 said:

Do you duplicate the original design to avoid disputes with customers? Why not improve it if you can?

Yes ..avoid hassles 

Because I’m not an engineer  I never make substitutions

if I see something that failed from poor design or workmanship  I try to notify the client with suggestions but I grow tired of arguing with clients . Also consider the time delay … I submit an observation and it may take a week or two to get a reply …an 8 hour quote turns into a money losing project 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Back to this…

Turns out those nylon washers are too thick to fit between the tang and the toggle so I’m searching for thinner washers. Given the love for G10 I’d like to have a go at using it. Can anyone share a good source for small quantities of G10 sheet or washers? I just need to make two 1.5”OD washers approx .04 thick. I can easily make them from a sheet if I can find the materials. 
 

Any ideas? Does anyone by chance have a few scraps they’d part with?

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Quickstep192 said:

G10 sheet or washers

NTTAWWT,  but... :)

Is G10 the ideal material for this?

The outside shape doesn't need to be round, does it? If not then drilling a hole in any old sheet material should be adequate. For "any old sheet material" why not go with something soft and slippery? Glass might win the war of abrasion with aluminum, UHWM probably wouldn't even fight that war. Phenolic with cotton (IIRC) was used in blocks and cleats in the old days. It seems to hold up well in the marine world and it's still available. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, weightless said:

NTTAWWT,  but... :)

Is G10 the ideal material for this?

The outside shape doesn't need to be round, does it? If not then drilling a hole in any old sheet material should be adequate. For "any old sheet material" why not go with something soft and slippery? Glass might win the war of abrasion with aluminum, UHWM probably wouldn't even fight that war. Phenolic with cotton (IIRC) was used in blocks and cleats in the old days. It seems to hold up well in the marine world and it's still available. 

It doesn’t have to be round, but J is have a lathe, so it’s easy enough for me to make them round if I can get the material. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I added nylon washers to my gooseneck. They didn't last.  So I cut some squares of polyethylene sheet, drilled a hole, and used that. Doesn't need to be round.  Held up much better.  You ought to be able to get it pretty thin.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...