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I'm resident to wearing a Wetsuit!


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Hello Winter dinghyers (Northern Hemisphere obv!).

I am resistant to wearing a Wetsuit!

I want to be cool retro dinghy sailor, wearing layers of wool and waterproofs instead of James bond 'spywholovedme' get up etc.

i noticed a few weeks ago that I capsized in merino wool base layers and waterproof/spray top,. and was warm in a few mins after getting out of the water, and my wetsuited power ranger colleagues were visibly shivering about half an hour later!.

am I bionic, or can non wetsuit clothes be better when you are out of the water? .

obviously I don't want to go Duncan Goodhew 

https://youtu.be/4nL7T0tBCN8

as it's not a good look,

but are there any other 'No-to-prene' types out there?

(I do wear sailing boots, mind)! 

any tips?.

 

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1 hour ago, Hero said:

I am resistant to wearing a Wetsuit!

Then get a drysuit.

 

1 hour ago, Hero said:

I want to be cool retro dinghy sailor, wearing layers of wool and waterproofs instead of James bond 'spywholovedme' get up etc.

Why?  There are some things which technology has improved.  Wet wool is heavy and smelly.

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I've gone back hard to wetsuits after being resistant. New ones, especially new good ones, are much more comfortable than what you're imagining. More air than rubber now days. The liners, stretch, and selective thickness have all made them more bearable.  I own several, and love my Mystic Marshal 5/4/3. I use a Mystic Voltt 6/4/3 with a 2mm Ion top when its really cold. Say 30-35F air temp and 40 water temp. Putting them on warm/dry makes a big difference though. I'd rather be toasty than chasing leaks in my drysuit and dodging waves in spray gear. I stay dryer in my semi-dry wetsuits than I ever did in other spray/dry gear. Including my drysuit.

In short, you do you. Work on your boat balance so you can stay out of the lake. ;):lol:


 

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Thanks :)

I think wool is better because it stays warm when wet, which other stuff doesn't.  it's a bit heavy if it's not skinny merino maybe but I've not noticed! ..

 

Dry suits are ok, but they still look like you are trying to 'out gear' people.

I want to look casual like I don't know what I'm doing, and have just turned up casually but still stay warm! 

i also wondered how waxing my cotton hiking trousers would go...

hmmm..

 

 

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In the 80s i raced in lots of wool and ealy polarplus with offshore bibs and tops. Of course it is warm when wet. It is wool. But if you are in the water then you are in for a shock if it is below 50f water temp. You have to get out of the water immediately. Right the boat and get in.

Wetsuits have never been warm in the wind. That was always a problem. But Rollerskates says they can work that way now.

Fit is key too. For a wetsuit to actually work as one it must fit snug and prevent water from flowing through it...this is much more difficult to achieve than buying a roomy drysuit andvwearing your coat and tie underneath hahaha

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You're gear must be old.  A good drysuit with sailing shorts and an overly large spray smock over your pfd to protect the drysuit.  Modern versions of this stuff cannot be beat.  Under it I use rash guard shirt and shorts, then neoprene shorts for warmth, padding, and just in case the suit leaks you can get in before turning into a popsicle.  If its really cold I'll start adding things like wool socks, another tech layer over legs, tech fleece long sleeve shirt, touk or a full wrap around hat to cover sides of head and neck, neoprene gloves.  It's usually obvious that I shouldn't be sailing anymore if there is snow/ice on the boat and I'm wearing a neoprene balaclava and the only thing out more than my main is my flask.

Hard lesson.  If you have to chip away at ice in the basin to get out and sail, stop.  Go back and unrig the boat, pull out said flask and watch from shore.  All that gear will keep you toasty while your less wise friends provide you with entertainment.  If you are nice, hold off on the flask and jump in a safety boat so you can laugh at them up close help anyone that turns turtle and cannot recover because they cannot feel their hands, feet, face.

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1 hour ago, Autonomous said:

My gear is old kayaking stuff. Does anyone with a brain use a farmer John wet suit?

Thanks

Yes they do, don't let us brow beat you entirely.  My hiking pants (with power pads!) are actually farmer john style and they are 2mm neoprene.  I forgot to add above that as it gets cold and if the wind is up the neoprene shorts go away and the farmer john hiking pants come in.

In spring and fall on the Chesapeake Bay I may use the farmer john hiking pants with other gear, (no dry or wet suit).

Here is a good test.  Put on your gear, jump off the dock where you sail.  Hang out in the water for 15 minutes.  Now stand around at the end of the dock for an hour.  Comfortable? Great!  Cold?  Better/more gear.

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That's a brutal test. My upcoming dinghy is not typical of what you see here. It is an easily righted, displacement, wherryish hull with a balanced lug rig and sliding seats.

I don't want to die of cold shock but at times will be rowing. Am in the PNW so water temp are cool.

11.jpg

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2 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

That's a brutal test. My upcoming dinghy is not typical of what you see here. It is an easily righted, displacement, wherryish hull with a balanced lug rig and sliding seats.

I don't want to die of cold shock but at times will be rowing. Am in the PNW so water temp are cool.

11.jpg

Ok, yeah, most of us are thinking boats we sit on or trap out on, not sit in.  If you are rowing I suspect it is not windy so the gear you need is very different from a day when it's gusting enough to flip your boat.  Think out your layers, what can you quickly peel off if you get too hot and not have to pull your gear apart?

A john suit may permit you to stay warm long enough to get the boat righted, it's all a matter of water temperature, air temperature, and wind speed.  You should have neoprene boots, not keelboat boots, and warm sailing gloves as well.  If your boat tips over in cold water and you don't have the correct gear you have a limited window to right it before your body becomes cold and you lose strength.  In as little as 5 minutes in the water you can lose a lot of the strength you had on shore and no longer be able to self rescue.

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If you are sailing in cold water, there is no substitute for a dry suit.  Initial purchase is a few bucks, but they last a long time and are effective in a much wider range if conditions than a wetsuit.

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The bottom line is , it’s all dependent on the conditions and the place you sail. Only the op can really make the call about what to wear 

I live inland in the uk and have sailed for 30 years , all year round, and have  mostly just used hiking shorts, good waterproofs  and loads of layers underneath. 
BUT I’ve got away with this because;

1) I’ve sailed deep cockpit boats and have always launched off pontoons or landing stages , so I am always dry when starting the race .

2) I’ve always sailed on small rivers or very tiny ponds so I know I am never going to be in the water for long as the bank is only minutes away. 
3) If I do totally capsize I know that’s my race over .

 

This year I became a Dzero owner , which is open transom, so I am now wet to start with . This means investing in a new long john ( yes people with brains do buy them :D) and I am really impressed with the quality of it and how much more comfortable it is than the one I had when I started sailing and so so much warmer. It now means I am warm at the start, middle and end of a race even after a capsize.

 

I am now a convert and now wouldn’t sail in the winter with out it .

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8 hours ago, Hero said:

I want to look casual like I don't know what I'm doing, and have just turned up casually but still stay warm! 

Wanting to look casual is as much an affectation as wanting to look like a superstar because you're wearing $1500 worth of gear.

Just relax, buy the best crap you can afford, and impress folks with your sailing skill.  If you're like me, with pretty unimpressive skills, just be a decent human being.

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4 hours ago, Autonomous said:

That's a brutal test. My upcoming dinghy is not typical of what you see here. It is an easily righted, displacement, wherryish hull with a balanced lug rig and sliding seats.

I don't want to die of cold shock but at times will be rowing. Am in the PNW so water temp are cool.

11.jpg

What is that?  From Gig Harbor?

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7 minutes ago, sailor-cfn said:

Wanting to look casual is as much an affectation as wanting to look like a superstar because you're wearing $1500 worth of gear.

Just relax, buy the best crap you can afford, and impress folks with your sailing skill.  If you're like me, with pretty unimpressive skills, just be a decent human being.

My current dry suit is less expensive than the collection of gear I have to wear to do the same job.  If you want to be cheap wear a dry suit and gear up and down internally until it is just too hot.

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Stholquist has a dry suit with a ventilation- not water proof mode that looks good. 

https://www.nextadventure.net/catalog/product/view/id/206143/s/stohlquist-shift-drysuit/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=&scid=scplp442599&sc_intid=442599&gclid=Cj0KCQiA-qGNBhD3ARIsAO_o7ymUIqmPaK3U8LCB9Al1_qX78YlZsvtR4lgue0uW_O_n-KzfexNZKuYaAiDIEALw_wcB

 Most of my existing gear is Kokatat and they have a lightweight dry(ish) paddling suit that looks good too. A front zipper seems like a fair way to promote ventilation.

https://www.rei.com/product/816632/kokatat-lightweight-gore-tex-paddling-suit-mens

These are just guesses and any experienced opinions are welcome.

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2 minutes ago, Foredeck Shuffle said:

My current dry suit is less expensive than the collection of gear I have to wear to do the same job.  If you want to be cheap wear a dry suit and gear up and down internally until it is just too hot.

This exactly.   I frostbite on Long Island Sound.  I race a boat which isn't self right-able (so I need to hang around for a crash-boat when I go over). There are days the air temp in in the 50s, and days it is in the high 20s.   When its in the 50s, I might just have some thin pants and a tshirt on.  When its in the 20s, I might have a thermal base-layer, a mid-layer, a thin fleece vest, and a thin-ish fleece jacket - regardless, when the day is over, I take the dry suit off and just head home.

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14 minutes ago, Foredeck Shuffle said:

My current dry suit is less expensive than the collection of gear I have to wear to do the same job.  If you want to be cheap wear a dry suit and gear up and down internally until it is just too hot.

Yep, I paid $600 cdn ($500 USD) for my Ocean Rodeo dry suit.  Looks like a black jacket and grey pants.  As long as the water is liquid and not solid ice I can sail my beach cat.

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3 hours ago, Xeon said:

The bottom line is , it’s all dependent on the conditions and the place you sail

having lived (and sailed) in multiple places of, um, ample weather variance... I now live in Miami ... and I think you're right! 

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18 minutes ago, TBW said:

Yep, I paid $600 cdn ($500 USD) for my Ocean Rodeo dry suit.  Looks like a black jacket and grey pants.  As long as the water is liquid and not solid ice I can sail my beach cat.

I see Ocean Rodeo has been bought by Mustang Survival.

Would you buy that style again?

Thanks

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My son wore a Musto pretty classic heavy duty drysuit all the way through high school and college and during late and early season 505 sailing. A fantastic "piece of kit" which I wonder if anyone makes anything that good now?  Not breathable. But TOUGH. About every other year you take it to the dive shop and have the kneck, cuffs and leg cuffs replaced. They can do rubber or neoprene. (Or silicone but that is not what you want--big technical thing about why). They test for leaks and patch. About $70 each time.

I would be in my full wetsuit out on the wire and he would be all nice and toasty back there in his hermetically sealed drysuit.

I have not tried sailing in my wetsuit below about 50 degrees water and air. Somehow the season just ends and its back to skis...and then in the spring all that varnish and fiberglass and rigging somehow ... compared to younger days in college and after, sailing in March for god's sake! In foulies! And capsizing! (that's why I say you have to get out of the water asap or you are in deep trouble...)

 

 

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oh thanks! some interesting 'not drysuit' looking dry suits! .

I do want to say I have sailed throughout November using no wetsuit and capsized, going in,  twice on a two hour session and was fine.. my spray top does have quite good Neck and wrist rubbers, plus waist but the effectiveness that is limited by not being on skin. every time was wet to thighs before sailing anyway as we beach launch, and I was fine .

I didn't sail last week as very gusty and cold wind (Storm Arwen) which was definitely a good mood.

am racing this weekend in very stable boats on one of the days .I'm ok with that as going in unlikely.

it's lasers that give me the willies a bit about cold water with my preferred look/gear but I'm kind of keen to try with a wool jumper to see..

I do right boats quickly usually because I hate the boat when it capsized and refuse to let it win :)

i agree with the dock test, brutal though it may be and wonder ifvant  feeling of being resistant to that might be a signal I'm not as confident about my gear..! 

mind you the only opportunity I'd have to do that, given time available in total, would be just before sailing, and that might be a bad idea! 

anyway no time to buy wetsuit before weekend so I'm going to have to see .

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, Autonomous said:

I see Ocean Rodeo has been bought by Mustang Survival.

Would you buy that style again?

Thanks

I would, it's comfortable, lightweight and shows very little wear after about 5 years of use, I have used it for both sea kayaking and beach cat sailing in sub freezing temperatures up to about 15 celcius/60 farenheit. It doesn't look like a dry suit, unless you know what you are looking at.  I would spend the few extra bucks to get the model with the relief zip.p3.png.2dcaa5d455a3f21b442da7bfe050502f.png

prindleb.thumb.png.3cc0e48f6e5b17df1b2fced43da694ea.png

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31 minutes ago, Hero said:

That is amazing.  Do that to a drysuit and I am in!

 

9 hours ago, fastyacht said:

My son wore a Musto pretty classic heavy duty drysuit all the way through high school and college and during late and early season 505 sailing. A fantastic "piece of kit" which I wonder if anyone makes anything that good now?  Not breathable. But TOUGH. About every other year you take it to the dive shop and have the kneck, cuffs and leg cuffs replaced. They can do rubber or neoprene. (Or silicone but that is not what you want--big technical thing about why). They test for leaks and patch. About $70 each time.

I would be in my full wetsuit out on the wire and he would be all nice and toasty back there in his hermetically sealed drysuit.

I have not tried sailing in my wetsuit below about 50 degrees water and air. Somehow the season just ends and its back to skis...and then in the spring all that varnish and fiberglass and rigging somehow ... compared to younger days in college and after, sailing in March for god's sake! In foulies! And capsizing! (that's why I say you have to get out of the water asap or you are in deep trouble...)

Kotatat.  Probably the best there is outside of a survival suit.  If the seals blow out years later they replace them for free.  You pay for that maintenance in the upfront purchase price.

The value of a lesser dry suit is that there is less material involved so getting under the boom is less an issue so I don't buy Kotatat.  Had a Henri Loydd and it was satisfactory.  Currently using a Gill and the mobility is excellent but it does not provide much warmth in its own layer so you need to do the layering, which to me is perfect.

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I don't understand, are you against the use of Neoprene or is it just the image your going for?

If your against neoprene because it's oil based, why not try something like an Exofleece long john made by Rooster https://www.roostersailing.com/collections/men-ranges-exofleece

If it's image, just buy a cheap wetsuit from Decathlon Sports, Lidl, Aldi...etc & wear your woolly clothes over the top...simples.

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Not sure who you are addressing. If me I'm just looking for something comfortable in a wide temperature range that will keep me from getting cold shock if I capsize.

Regardless, do you have experience with Exofleece? The ad copy looks good FWIW.

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15 hours ago, Autonomous said:

Not sure who you are addressing. If me I'm just looking for something comfortable in a wide temperature range that will keep me from getting cold shock if I capsize.

Regardless, do you have experience with Exofleece? The ad copy looks good FWIW.

No sorry never tried Exofleece, so can't comment on how good it is.

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Personally at this time of year I wear:-  Polypro top, Thermaflex 1.5mm top, 3/2mm gull front zip short sleeve wetsuit, Rooster Classic hikers & an oversized  Pro-lite Aquafleece over my PDF. Also I have Polypro socks to go in my boots & an Aquafleece beenie.

The good thing about the Pro-lite Aquafleece is the ability to have the neck loose to let out excess heat

Sounds like i'm sponsored by Rooster, but I just like their kit.:D

Sometimes I'll leave one of the tops off, depending on the wind.

BTW I sail a Laser so get quite wet.

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12 hours ago, Martin T said:

Personally at this time of year I wear:-  Polypro top, Thermaflex 1.5mm top, 3/2mm gull front zip short sleeve wetsuit, Rooster Classic hikers & an oversized  Pro-lite Aquafleece over my PDF. Also I have Polypro socks to go in my boots & an Aquafleece beenie.

The good thing about the Pro-lite Aquafleece is the ability to have the neck loose to let out excess heat

Sounds like i'm sponsored by Rooster, but I just like their kit.:D

Sometimes I'll leave one of the tops off, depending on the wind.

BTW I sail a Laser so get quite wet.

Lol as a man that sailed a Laser for 20years , compared to a Dzero a Laser is a dry boat :D

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ok all, thanks for the tips .

here's the result of a bit of a test yesterday. I wore .

zhik boots,

two pairs calf length wool socks (thin) ..half my leg wool.

runners tights, camping trousers (just thin, quick drying material, waterproof overtrousers.

on top wool base layer, cotton t-shirt, spray top (Decathlon, with rubberised back, sleeves and waist) 

beach launch so wet at start to mid thigh.

out for about 2 hours.

capsize towards the end with immersion.

derigging, berthing all done without changing 

wind about 15mph 

I was warm all the way through. 

I think the layers acted quite like a wetsuit, as the waterproof layers stopped flushing/water exchange, after beach launch feet were warm quickly.

after derigging my feet were a bit chilly but only 'walk to work winter morning' chilly, not 'blocks of ice' chilly.

 So the set up still works, juuuust into December! 

i don't know what long immersion would be like. mine was enough for the capsize to be righted then recapsize (not as head to wind as I thought) then swim round then re-right successfully .

so a 'typical' length of time..

 

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2 hours ago, Hero said:

ok all, thanks for the tips .

here's the result of a bit of a test yesterday. I wore .

zhik boots,

two pairs calf length wool socks (thin) ..half my leg wool.

runners tights, camping trousers (just thin, quick drying material, waterproof overtrousers.

on top wool base layer, cotton t-shirt, spray top (Decathlon, with rubberised back, sleeves and waist) 

beach launch so wet at start to mid thigh.

out for about 2 hours.

capsize towards the end with immersion.

derigging, berthing all done without changing 

wind about 15mph 

I was warm all the way through. 

I think the layers acted quite like a wetsuit, as the waterproof layers stopped flushing/water exchange, after beach launch feet were warm quickly.

after derigging my feet were a bit chilly but only 'walk to work winter morning' chilly, not 'blocks of ice' chilly.

 So the set up still works, juuuust into December! 

i don't know what long immersion would be like. mine was enough for the capsize to be righted then recapsize (not as head to wind as I thought) then swim round then re-right successfully .

so a 'typical' length of time..

 

Glad it works for you. I sailed in similar gear for 20 years , not sure I would do it now in the winter now I am pushing 60. Lol.

 

Just wondering , doesn’t your club have rules over wet and dry suit wearing in the winter months ?  A lot of uk clubs do these days , mine doesn’t but it is advised to. 

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3 hours ago, Hero said:

 

 So the set up still works, juuuust into December! 

 

 

Might work somewhere with relatively warm Decembers.  Wouldn't work in December here.

Shorts and a T Shirt would be fine for December in Key West.

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3 hours ago, Xeon said:

Glad it works for you. I sailed in similar gear for 20 years , not sure I would do it now in the winter now I am pushing 60. Lol.

 

Just wondering , doesn’t your club have rules over wet and dry suit wearing in the winter months ?  A lot of uk clubs do these days , mine doesn’t but it is advised to. 

From my clubs rules & by-laws.

But that's just for racing I'm guessing

Wetsuit rule.JPG

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My winter club has a similar rule for wearing a wet or dry suit.

It didn't though 40+ years ago when I hit an ice berg small ice flow with the laser and it threw me off...

Darn laser righted itself and sailed off, I had to swim for the river bank.. 

That cost me two separate weeks in hospital and my job..

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2 hours ago, The Q said:

My winter club has a similar rule for wearing a wet or dry suit.

It didn't though 40+ years ago when I hit an ice berg small ice flow with the laser and it threw me off...

Darn laser righted itself and sailed off, I had to swim for the river bank.. 

That cost me two separate weeks in hospital and my job..

Wait' WHAT?!

Details! We want the details!

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 Sailing down river, light winds, hit the Ice flow, the jolt of hitting the ice sent me over the side, the laser fell over but the sail did not collapse, the wind behind kept it full. So it still shot way from me, then it righted itself... never seen that before or since on a laser, then it went on down to the 90 bend of the river and hit the bank about about 100 yards away.

Me, Went over the side, I may have hurt myself where it hurts, swam to the river bank about 30ft away, I was just scrambling out when the rescue boat arrived. Back to the club house, in the shower got changed, felt OK. Got home didn't feel to bright, went to bed.. Next morning felt really bad, went to the doctors, I had  got Hypothermia, this had allowed me to catch some nasty bug, maybe from the river, which caused the right one to do an imitation of a Rugby (American football).. Ambulance to hospital, treatment for the above including an operation, woke in a ward covered in Ice because I was overheating..... Released after a week walking like John Wayne..

 

Couple of years later, bug came back same results, same waking in a ward, windows open with snow on the ground outside, just a sheet covering me as they tried to cool me down..  This time the anaesthetist recognised the condition as not being related to the bug, but an Allergy to anaesthetics which has a  50:50 death rate..

Six months later I  had to attend a specialist hospital where they took a chunk of muscle out of my leg for testing ( It's now just a blood test). It confirmed I have it, it's called "Susceptible to Malignant Hyperpyrexia" it's hereditary, I'm the first in the family to have been found.

My parents were tested but don't have it, but are therefore both carriers, My Brother has it, my sisters don't. But my sisters have a 50:50 chance of being carriers.

So my sisters children have a 25% chance of having it unless their father also has or carries the defective gene..

And my brother having it means his children have a 50% of getting it or being carriers..


Anyway I was in the RAF, a year or so later I was about to go on a promotion course and then they asked me to sign on for another ten years which means they expected me to get two more promotions before I left, i.e. it's likely I would have made Warrant officer... Then came the medical, much discussions going on and eventually having seen some of the most senior doctors in the RAF in London, they said I couldn't stay on as the RAF didn't carry the specialist anaethetics I can have should I get injured again ..

So I'm on just over half of a warrant officers pay in my current job, with the consequent reduction of pension as well. Overall when I fully retire next year , that not wearing a wet or dry suit will be costing me about 50% of income as a retiree..

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If there is a chance I'll go in the water, and a chance I'll get separated from the boat, I wear a wetsuit.  Have occasionally, through little fault of my own, found myself in big deep cold water without a boat under me, a 5mm layer of neoprene really is the next best thing, try swimming any distance in a drysuit.

One day, I may be too old for this nonsense, and sail a boat with a fence around it, and some seats, and some form of counterweight to keep the mast pointed at the sky, then I can sail in nice warm clothes.  Maybe take a book, so it's not too boring.

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1 hour ago, maxstaylock said:

If there is a chance I'll go in the water, and a chance I'll get separated from the boat, I wear a wetsuit.  Have occasionally, through little fault of my own, found myself in big deep cold water without a boat under me, a 5mm layer of neoprene really is the next best thing, try swimming any distance in a drysuit.

 

Swim in my dry suit all the time.  Not even sure what the problem would be.  A few extra pounds of buoyancy isn't a bad thing in ice water, keep your head and face out of the water.  Breast stroke, side stroke are nice.  Added bonus, you don't have hypothermia when you reach your destination.  

 If you can swim any distance shivering and freezing in wet suit, than you can do it warm and dry with a bit of air trapped in your dry suit.

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2 hours ago, TBW said:

Swim in my dry suit all the time.  Not even sure what the problem would be.  A few extra pounds of buoyancy isn't a bad thing in ice water, keep your head and face out of the water.  Breast stroke, side stroke are nice.  Added bonus, you don't have hypothermia when you reach your destination.  

 If you can swim any distance shivering and freezing in wet suit, than you can do it warm and dry with a bit of air trapped in your dry suit.

I have nothing against dry suits and always recommend them to other sailors ( personally I cannot put up with the neck seal ) but if anyone is shivering and freezing in a wet suit , they are wearing the wrong one for the conditions .

 

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well, I had a chat with a windsurfer who was very much a fan of wetsuits when you are going to be wet a lot, he said a tight fitting wetsuit gains you an hour or more, and to go really tight and check the fits of different manufacturers, so I was nearly swayed! I think some of my resistance is to having a large bit of kit that I only really want to use for maybe late Dec, Jam and Feb.. 

I think my decision would change if we had cage lockers at the sailing club, then there's be no hanging human skin in my home closet! 

heartened by those who move to wetsuits later in the year, but also in the opposite direction by outdoor swimmers! 

one day maybe I'll do it! 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've wooled my legs too now, and capsized, sailed for an hour and a half, changed trousers and wool leggings, and went for cotton trousers and running synthetic tights and long wool socks sailed for a further three hours with previously fully dunked top layers .still wet wool base layer cotton long sleeve and spray top.  I was fine .my toes were a bit chilly in one sock layer plus sailing boots, but no more than for a winter walk.

 

I'm sure you are all very interested still :)

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12 minutes ago, Hero said:

I've wooled my legs too now, and capsized, sailed for an hour and a half, changed trousers and wool leggings, and went for cotton trousers and running synthetic tights and long wool socks sailed for a further three hours with previously fully dunked top layers .still wet wool base layer cotton long sleeve and spray top.  I was fine .my toes were a bit chilly in one sock layer plus sailing boots, but no more than for a winter walk.

 

I'm sure you are all very interested still :)

It’s very interesting, in the same way as if we were listening to some one tell us the the world is flat . :D

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1 hour ago, fastyacht said:

But it is flat. Otherwise the water would all draim off.

Of course it's flat. Long distance sailors have used flat charts for centuries. If the earth were round they would take globes rather than flat charts to navigate.

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On 12/2/2021 at 3:06 PM, Hero said:

Hello Winter dinghyers (Northern Hemisphere obv!).

I am resistant to wearing a Wetsuit!

I want to be cool retro dinghy sailor, wearing layers of wool and waterproofs instead of James bond 'spywholovedme' get up etc.

i noticed a few weeks ago that I capsized in merino wool base layers and waterproof/spray top,. and was warm in a few mins after getting out of the water, and my wetsuited power ranger colleagues were visibly shivering about half an hour later!.

am I bionic, or can non wetsuit clothes be better when you are out of the water? .

obviously I don't want to go Duncan Goodhew 

https://youtu.be/4nL7T0tBCN8

as it's not a good look,

but are there any other 'No-to-prene' types out there?

(I do wear sailing boots, mind)! 

any tips?.

 

What is use for cold sailing is a special wetsuit. Its typically used for thriatlons because they absorb the water and that means you stay dry even if you go into the water. And as we all know we humans cool down 20x faster when we are wet. Sometimes i wear some wool under it or some special thing. I buy my wet dry suits from orca. The good thing is they are pretty thin which means it feels like a second skin on you and you can move sometimes even better than with other wetsuits. a spraytop over it maybe a aquafleece and your pretty warm. Those neopren gloves usually are also very thick and the water just prenetates through i'd recommend some thick gardening gloves and under them plastic one time use gloves so that you dont get wet. I stay most of the time warm since sailing is a sport where you need to move a lot. Be careful with the dry wet suit from orca because usually they get scratched easily and break so maybe get some protectic pants for them anything really that stops them from breaking and watch out when you bend down they can break sometimes if you got the wrong size obviously 

 

advise coming from an European laser sailor who can't really write engorca_alpha_male_front-6.jpgimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcT9vJH2Ftr3eQwog_iycVolish second picture is the warm thing you can use

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/2/2021 at 12:05 PM, Hero said:

Thanks :)

I think wool is better because it stays warm when wet, which other stuff doesn't.  it's a bit heavy if it's not skinny merino maybe but I've not noticed! ..

 

Dry suits are ok, but they still look like you are trying to 'out gear' people.

I want to look casual like I don't know what I'm doing, and have just turned up casually but still stay warm! 

i also wondered how waxing my cotton hiking trousers would go...

hmmm..

 

 

Wtf ... 

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  • 4 weeks later...

hello, 

 

thanks for the tip about a triathlon designed suit thats a good idea plus I could also add cold water swimming too as I am a member of a club that has that too. For those interested. I am still sailing sans wetsuit and doing fine.  I use waterproof trousers over laters and it seems to be similar to a wetsuit in that anything wet inside gets warm quite quickly 

 

the  coldest day was more about crewing in light wind than being energetic but getting the odd dunking!

I'm pondering neoprene trousers just because of beach launches and/or groundings..

I presume I can also wear them nightclubbing ?!?! .

 

:)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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