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What's in the Freedom to Vote Act? Do you support it or not, and why?


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The Freedom to Vote Act is a trimmed version of the For the People Act the House passed at the beginning of this congressional session. It establishes a baseline for access to the ballot across all states. That baseline includes at least two weeks of early voting for any town of more than 3000 people, including on nights and weekends, for at least 10 hours a day. It permits people to vote by mail, or to drop their ballots into either a polling place or a drop box, and guarantees those votes will be counted so long as they are postmarked on or before Election Day and arrive at the polling place within a week. It makes Election Day a holiday. It provides uniform standards for voter IDs in states that require them.
 
The Freedom to Vote Act cracks down on voter suppression. It makes it a federal crime to lie to voters in order to deter them from voting (distributing official-looking flyers with the wrong dates for an election or locations of a polling place, for example), and it increases the penalties for voter intimidation. It restores federal voting rights for people who have served time in jail, creating a uniform system out of the current patchwork one.
 
It requires states to guarantee that no one has to wait more than 30 minutes to vote.
 
Using measures already in place in a number of states, the Freedom to Vote Act provides uniform voter registration rules. It establishes automatic voter registration at state Departments of Motor Vehicles, permits same-day voter registration, allows online voter registration, and protects voters from the purges that have plagued voting registrations for decades now, requiring that voters be notified if they are dropped from the rolls and given information on how to get back on them.
 
The Freedom to Vote Act bans partisan gerrymandering.
 
The Freedom to Vote Act requires any entity that spends more than $10,000 in an election to disclose all its major donors, thus cleaning up dark money in politics. It requires all advertisements to identify who is paying for them. It makes it harder for political action committees (PACs) to coordinate with candidates, and it beefs up the power of the Federal Election Commission that ensures candidates run their campaigns legally.
 
The Freedom to Vote Act also addresses the laws Republican-dominated states have passed in the last year to guarantee that Republicans win future elections. It protects local election officers from intimidation and firing for partisan purposes. It expands penalties for tampering with ballots after an election (as happened in Maricopa County, Arizona, where the Cyber Ninjas investigating the results did not use standard protection for them and have been unable to produce documents for a freedom of information lawsuit, leading to fines of $50,000 a day and the company’s dissolution). If someone does tamper with the results or refuses to certify them, voters can sue.
 
The act also prevents attempts to overturn elections by requiring audits after elections, making sure those audits have clearly defined rules and procedures. And it prohibits voting machines that don’t leave a paper record.
 
The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act (VRAA) takes on issues of discrimination in voting by updating and restoring the 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA) that the Supreme Court gutted in 2013 and 2021. The VRA required that states with a history of discrimination in voting get the Department of Justice to approve any changes they wanted to make in their voting laws before they went into effect, and in the 2013 Shelby County v. Holder decision, the Supreme Court struck that requirement down, in part because the justices felt the formula in the law was outdated.
 
The VRAA provides a new, modern formula for determining which states need preapproval, based on how many voting rights violations they’ve had in the past 25 years. After ten years without violations, they will no longer need preclearance. It also establishes some practices that must always be cleared, such as getting rid of ballots printed in different languages (as required in the U.S. since 1975).
 
The VRAA also restores the ability of voters to sue if their rights are violated, something the 2021 Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee decision makes difficult.
 
The VRAA directly addresses the ability of Indigenous Americans, who face unique voting problems, to vote. It requires at least one polling place on tribal lands, for example, and requires states to accept tribal or federal IDs.
 
As summarized by political historian Heather Cox Richardson.
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5 minutes ago, The Joker said:

Read the bill not the partisan hype of the bill

I live in a state with no-reason absentee. Works great.

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2 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I live in a state with no-reason absentee. Works great.

obviously joke couldn't read it clear with his white hood on ....or he's just an ignorant backwoods run of the mill cunt

 

you decide

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25 minutes ago, Nice! said:

And it prohibits voting machines that don’t leave a paper record.

Well, that will make some huge changes in vote totals. Just ask Moscow Mitch how he keeps getting elected with approval numbers in the high teens.

It's also the kiss of death for many ES&S voting machines. The Republican owners will have to find a new grift.

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10 minutes ago, The Joker said:

Read the bill not the partisan hype of the bill

have y'all read it ?? 

What a dissembling liar you are . .  

a real many of the Riech

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I’m all for it, with one major exception. It needs to be done as a constitutional amendment. I’m pretty sure it’d get crushed by the SC under the current game plan. 

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5 minutes ago, Monkey said:

I’m all for it, with one major exception. It needs to be done as a constitutional amendment. I’m pretty sure it’d get crushed by the SC under the current game plan. 

That pesky targeting of states of one political party might be an issue. 

 

15 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I live in a state with no-reason absentee. Works great.

Yep a solid blue state  

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Just now, shaggy said:

Ya got a problem with that??  

Nope each state is allowed to set its own rules.   That’s what CA did.  This bill is about removing that right for some states. 

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3 minutes ago, Nice! said:

Are you for it or against it, and why?

Parts of it, like early voting. I disagree with day of registration and removing requirements on registering to vote.   There need to be stronger checks on who is registering. Most specifically the  parts that allow the AG to decide on oversight of states based on individual complaints.    If it’s so important go through an constitutional amendment. 

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38 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I live in a state with no-reason absentee. Works great.

Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah, and Washington conduct their elections entirely by mail. We should all be so lucky.

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AP News August 4, 2021

CLAIM: California is mailing out ballots for the recall election because of the delta variant.

AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. The California Legislature passed a bill in February 2021, months before the delta variant surge, requiring that mail-in ballots be sent to all registered voters ahead of an election.

THE FACTS: On Sept. 14, California will hold a recall election that could remove first-term Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, from office. The recall vote is occurring after officials certified that 1.7 million valid petition signatures were turned in to qualify it for the ballot.

In February, the state Legislature passed a billmandating that all active registered voters get a ballot in the mail for the election even if they didn’t ask for one. Ballots will be mailed this month. Even before the pandemic, more than half of California voters chose to mail in their ballots; in 2018 statewide elections, two-thirds of voters cast vote-by-mail ballots.

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All is explained here:  "Heather" thread 1/12/22 posted  by Bus Driver, 7 hours ago...

 

January 12, 2022 (Wednesday)

The struggle between the Trump-backed forces of authoritarianism and those of us defending democracy is coming down to the fight over whether the Democrats can get the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Act through the Senate. 

It’s worth reading what’s actually in the bills because, to my mind, it is bananas that they are in any way controversial. 

The Freedom to Vote Act is a trimmed version of the For the People Act the House passed at the beginning of this congressional session. It establishes a baseline for access to the ballot across all states. That baseline includes at least two weeks of early voting for any town of more than 3000 people, including on nights and weekends, for at least 10 hours a day. It permits people to vote by mail, or to drop their ballots into either a polling place or a drop box, and guarantees those votes will be counted so long as they are postmarked on or before Election Day and arrive at the polling place within a week. It makes Election Day a holiday. It provides uniform standards for voter IDs in states that require them. 

The Freedom to Vote Act cracks down on voter suppression. It makes it a federal crime to lie to voters in order to deter them from voting (distributing official-looking flyers with the wrong dates for an election or locations of a polling place, for example), and it increases the penalties for voter intimidation. It restores federal voting rights for people who have served time in jail, creating a uniform system out of the current patchwork one. 

It requires states to guarantee that no one has to wait more than 30 minutes to vote.

Using measures already in place in a number of states, the Freedom to Vote Act provides uniform voter registration rules. It establishes automatic voter registration at state Departments of Motor Vehicles, permits same-day voter registration, allows online voter registration, and protects voters from the purges that have plagued voting registrations for decades now, requiring that voters be notified if they are dropped from the rolls and given information on how to get back on them. 

The Freedom to Vote Act bans partisan gerrymandering.

The Freedom to Vote Act requires any entity that spends more than $10,000 in an election to disclose all its major donors, thus cleaning up dark money in politics. It requires all advertisements to identify who is paying for them. It makes it harder for political action committees (PACs) to coordinate with candidates, and it beefs up the power of the Federal Election Commission that ensures candidates run their campaigns legally. 

The Freedom to Vote Act also addresses the laws Republican-dominated states have passed in the last year to guarantee that Republicans win future elections. It protects local election officers from intimidation and firing for partisan purposes. It expands penalties for tampering with ballots after an election (as happened in Maricopa County, Arizona, where the Cyber Ninjas investigating the results did not use standard protection for them and have been unable to produce documents for a freedom of information lawsuit, leading to fines of $50,000 a day and the company’s dissolution). If someone does tamper with the results or refuses to certify them, voters can sue.  

The act also prevents attempts to overturn elections by requiring audits after elections, making sure those audits have clearly defined rules and procedures. And it prohibits voting machines that don’t leave a paper record. 

The John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act (VRAA) takes on issues of discrimination in voting by updating and restoring the 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA) that the Supreme Court gutted in 2013 and 2021. The VRA required that states with a history of discrimination in voting get the Department of Justice to approve any changes they wanted to make in their voting laws before they went into effect, and in the 2013 Shelby County v. Holder decision, the Supreme Court struck that requirement down, in part because the justices felt the formula in the law was outdated.

The VRAA provides a new, modern formula for determining which states need preapproval, based on how many voting rights violations they’ve had in the past 25 years. After ten years without violations, they will no longer need preclearance. It also establishes some practices that must always be cleared, such as getting rid of ballots printed in different languages (as required in the U.S. since 1975). 

The VRAA also restores the ability of voters to sue if their rights are violated, something the 2021 Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee decision makes difficult. 

The VRAA directly addresses the ability of Indigenous Americans, who face unique voting problems, to vote. It requires at least one polling place on tribal lands, for example, and requires states to accept tribal or federal IDs. 

That’s it. 

It is off-the-charts astonishing that no Republicans are willing to entertain these common-sense measures, especially since there are in the Senate a number of Republicans who voted in 2006 to reauthorize the 1965 Voting Rights Act the VRAA is designed to restore.  

McConnell today revealed his discomfort with President Joe Biden’s speech yesterday at the Atlanta University Center Consortium, when Biden pointed out that “[h]istory has never been kind to those who have sided with voter suppression over voters’ rights. And it will be even less kind for those who side with election subversion.” Biden asked Republican senators to choose between our history’s advocates of voting rights and those who opposed such rights. He asked: “Do you want to be…on the side of Dr. King or George Wallace? Do you want to be on the side of John Lewis or Bull Connor?  Do you want to be on the side of Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis?

Today, McConnell, who never complained about the intemperate speeches of former president Donald Trump, said Biden’s speech revealed him to be "profoundly, profoundly unpresidential."

The voting rights measures appear to have the support of the Senate Democrats, but because of the Senate filibuster, which makes it possible for senators to block any measure unless a supermajority of 60 senators are willing to vote for it, voting rights cannot pass unless Democrats are willing to figure out a way to bypass the filibuster. Two Democratic senators—Krysten Sinema (D-AZ) and Joe Manchin (D-WV)—are currently unwilling to do that. 

Nine Democratic senators eager to pass this measure met with Sinema for two and a half hours last night and for another hour with Manchin this morning in an attempt to get them to a place where they are willing to change the rules of the Senate filibuster to protect our right to vote. They have not yet found a solution.

This evening, Senate Majority Leader Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) announced that he would bring voting rights legislation to the Senate floor for debate—which Republicans have rejected—by avoiding a Republican filibuster through a complicated workaround. When the House and Senate disagree on a bill (which is almost always), they send it back and forth with revisions until they reach a final version. According to Democracy Docket, after it has gone back and forth three times, a motion to proceed on it cannot be filibustered. So, Democrats in the House are going to take a bill that has already hit the three-trip mark and substitute for that bill the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. They’ll pass the combined bill and send it to the Senate, where debate over it can’t be filibustered. 

And so, Republican senators will have to explain to the people why they oppose what appear to be common-sense voting rules.

 

 

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34 minutes ago, The Joker said:

That pesky targeting of states of one political party might be an issue. 

 

Yep a solid blue state  

Only recently. Reagan and Nixon were Governors here. As was Arnold. What's left of the R party has been focusing on issues the majority of Californians don't give a shit about, and ignoring the ones we do. I voted R as recently as 2000. Since then? Not so much. Arnie was ok. Jerry fixed the budget but did start the train to nowhere. Gavin is pretty much unheard from. Mostly, we don't really care about state level gov't anyway, and the school boards and small town offices are mostly non-partisan. 

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30 minutes ago, The Joker said:

Nope each state is allowed to set its own rules.   That’s what CA did.  This bill is about removing that right for some states. 

You're continual misstatement of the Connie is no longer a miss-understanding on your part. It's just bullshit. 

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8 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

You're continual misstatement of the Connie is no longer a miss-understanding on your part. It's just bullshit. 

You clearly have never read the constitution.  You seem to want to only look at the second part rather than the first  


The Constitution simply states that "The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations" (Article I, section 4).

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3 minutes ago, The Joker said:

You clearly have never read the constitution.  You seem to want to only look at the second part rather than the first  


The Constitution simply states that "The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations" (Article I, section 4).

That clearly states the Feds have the ability to regulate the elections.

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5 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

That clearly states the Feds have the ability to regulate the elections.

Within the laws passed correct.  My point is this law should be created with bipartisan efforts.  Because parts of it are good, but other parts are not.  
I want informed voters not just sheep having their ballots harvested by political operatives.   I think mail in voting should be available but are we ready for 200,000,000 ballots through the USPS?  I also think registering needs to be tougher than they propose and photo voter ID should be required for in person voting.  

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42 minutes ago, phillysailor said:

AP News August 4, 2021

CLAIM: California is mailing out ballots for the recall election because of the delta variant.

AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. The California Legislature passed a bill in February 2021, months before the delta variant surge, requiring that mail-in ballots be sent to all registered voters ahead of an election.

THE FACTS: On Sept. 14, California will hold a recall election that could remove first-term Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, from office. The recall vote is occurring after officials certified that 1.7 million valid petition signatures were turned in to qualify it for the ballot.

In February, the state Legislature passed a billmandating that all active registered voters get a ballot in the mail for the election even if they didn’t ask for one. Ballots will be mailed this month. Even before the pandemic, more than half of California voters chose to mail in their ballots; in 2018 statewide elections, two-thirds of voters cast vote-by-mail ballots.

Ten states mailed out unsolicited absentee ballots by using Covid as the excuse 

 

CD15337C-D524-48BA-9AE8-55FBFF202296.png

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13 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

That clearly states the Feds have the ability to regulate the elections.

Tie that to the Supremacy Clause (Article 6, Clause 2) and even this right wing SCOTUS would have a difficult time declaring the legislation to be unconstitutional. Not that they won’t try.

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6 minutes ago, The Joker said:

Within the laws passed correct.  My point is this law should be created with bipartisan efforts.  Because parts of it are good, but other parts are not.  
I want informed voters not just sheep having their ballots harvested by political operatives.   I think mail in voting should be available but are we ready for 200,000,000 ballots through the USPS?  I also think registering needs to be tougher than they propose and photo voter ID should be required for in person voting.  

Other than the Military budget, nothing of note has been done in a bi-partisan way since the Usurper was elected. Going on 17 years now. 

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4 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Ten states mailed out unsolicited absentee ballots by using Covid as the excuse 

 

CD15337C-D524-48BA-9AE8-55FBFF202296.png

It's terrible, TERRIBLE, that a government would make something easier on their citizenry. Terrible I tell you!

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Just now, Raz'r said:

Other than the Military budget, nothing of note has been done in a bi-partisan way since the Usurper was elected. Going on 17 years now. 

The usurper?  

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4 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

by using Covid as the excuse 

 

So covid was not a valid reason to make exceptions??  I mean, 800,000 + dead people and you will not except a dr note?? 

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Just now, Raz'r said:

It's terrible, TERRIBLE, that a government would make something easier on their citizenry. Terrible I tell you!

No it’s not, but STEAM LIAR claimed it has never happened.   Which is why these posts are being made. 

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2 minutes ago, The Joker said:

The usurper?  

The 1/2 black muslim guy.

 

However, he was just the final catalyst to complete the schism that Gingrich began.

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Just now, shaggy said:

So covid was not a valid reason to make exceptions??  I mean, 800,000 + dead people and you will not except a dr note?? 

Yes it was valid.  As are states deciding how those changes should or should not be used in future elections.   Still waiting to hear how GA voting laws, which are way more inclusive and open than say Joe Biden’s home state are inhumane.  

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

The 1/2 black muslim guy.

 

However, he was just the final catalyst to complete the schism that Gingrich began.

He was elected in 2008. So only 14 years ago. 

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15 minutes ago, The Joker said:

Yes it was valid.  As are states deciding how those changes should or should not be used in future elections.   Still waiting to hear how GA voting laws, which are way more inclusive and open than say Joe Biden’s home state are inhumane.  

Any change to state election laws must have legislative approval…not executive action 

 

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38 minutes ago, slug zitski said:

Ten states mailed out unsolicited absentee ballots by using Covid as the excuse 

 

CD15337C-D524-48BA-9AE8-55FBFF202296.png

"Applications to vote by mail sent to Registered Voters" does not mean sending out "unsolicited absentee ballots". Your ESL is showing again.

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Only recently. Reagan and Nixon were Governors here. As was Arnold. What's left of the R party has been focusing on issues the majority of Californians don't give a shit about, and ignoring the ones we do. I voted R as recently as 2000. Since then? Not so much. Arnie was ok. Jerry fixed the budget but did start the train to nowhere. Gavin is pretty much unheard from. Mostly, we don't really care about state level gov't anyway, and the school boards and small town offices are mostly non-partisan. 

No, the train to nowhere was passed by the voters in 2008 during Arnold's terms as governor, 2003-11.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_California_Proposition_1A

I voted for it. I think it's a good idea but sometimes we suck at the infrastructure projects and that one got politicized. Similarly, it took 10 years for the eastern span replacement of the Bay Bridge, mostly because of Willie Brown who even wanted it named after him and did have the existing western span re-named after him. Willie is SF's version of Trump, only a little more capable and a little less greedy.

That said, Republicans were particularly useless in the early aughts. There was Prop 8 and the virulently anti-gay gay Republican from Kern County.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Ashburn

There was the special election after Arnie came into office, everything was rejected (even the good stuff).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_California_special_election

Every year was a dog fight over the budget. Red districts sent quality people like Darrell Issa and straight married man Michael Huffington to Congress. Then there's the Gavin Newsom recall.

After awhile CA just kind of gave up on Republicans. They're just nuts.

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Radical idea here....as everyone in the country is affected by the outcome of elections, should not everyone in the country also have a say as to the outcome of those elections?

(getting my popcorn ready to observe the explosion of conservative heads)

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3 hours ago, sail611 said:

Radical idea here....as everyone in the country is affected by the outcome of elections, should not everyone in the country also have a say as to the outcome of those elections?

(getting my popcorn ready to observe the explosion of conservative heads)

Every citizen should. 

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Forgot to add, the provision requiring a guarantee of no more than 30 minutes to vote is nonsense. Even in my white privileged little suburb, I’ve occasionally had to wait longer than that. You can’t expect every polling location to staff up and have equipment to deal with the afternoon rush all day long. I’d prefer a rule instead to require voting locations per capita. Yes, I’ll be banished as a righty for that. It would mean more inner city voting locations easily accessible. 

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10 hours ago, Raz'r said:
10 hours ago, The Joker said:

Read the bill not the partisan hype of the bill

I live in a state with no-reason absentee. Works great.

B-b-but they send you UNSOLICITED ballots!

That's just WRONG!!!

Maybe the Federal gov't should ban absentee ballots... oh wait

- DSK

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11 hours ago, billy backstay said:

It requires states to guarantee that no one has to wait more than 30 minutes to vote.

This is a yuge issue. 

Hours long wait times to vote, but only in certain areas, are a key component of voter suppression.  

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8 minutes ago, AJ Oliver said:

This is a yuge issue. 

Hours long wait times to vote, but only in certain areas, are a key component of voter suppression.  

 

This is just one of many key components of the GOP plans to "steal" the votes.  I have to stop paying so much attention to politics since one man is not going to change anything.

 

Cat with a cancerous foot, and 7-month pregnant daughter in S. Carolina, so I need to step away from this shit and focus on what is more important, where I can possibly make a difference, as just one man, but of course, supported by Missus BB always...

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1 minute ago, billy backstay said:

  I have to stop paying so much attention to politics since one man is not going to change anything.

Take a break, get right with what you have to do . . . 

but please do not pack it in, 

that is what the Riech wants us to do. 

 

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4 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

This is just one of many key components of the GOP plans to "steal" the votes.  I have to stop paying so much attention to politics since one man is not going to change anything.

 

Cat with a cancerous foot, and 7-month pregnant daughter in S. Carolina, so I need to step away from this shit and focus on what is more important, where I can possibly make a difference, as just one man, but of course, supported by Missus BB always...

Best of luck with your cat and daughter.  When the birth is imminent, wild horses won't keep Mrs. BB and likely you from South Carolina.  A mother's daughter giving birth is special.  A son's wife giving birth, not as much.  Enjoy these times.

PS. Which model kickstand did you order?

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Too bad Stevie didn't call out the scum by name. Sinema and Manchin deserve to be pilloried for putting their own advancement ahead of the needs of their country.

 

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On 1/13/2022 at 11:49 AM, Raz'r said:

It’s sounds terrible. terrible! More of those poor and minorities might vote!

From the mouths of babes...

“I don’t want everybody to vote,” Paul Weyrich, an influential conservative activist, said in 1980. “As a matter of fact, our leverage in the elections quite candidly goes up as the voting populace goes down.”

-------------------------------

a Trump campaign aide was recorded saying: “Traditionally it’s always been Republicans suppressing votes in places.”

-------------------------------

The Guardian 3/30/2020:

Donald Trump admitted on Monday that making it easier to vote in America would hurt the Republican party.

The president made the comments as he dismissed a Democratic-led push for reforms such as vote-by-mail, same-day registration and early voting as states seek to safely run elections amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

While we discuss what the Dems are proposing, again, it's important to remember talk is cheap:

Democrats had proposed the measures as part of the coronavirus stimulus. They ultimately were not included in the $2.2tn final package, which included only $400m to states to help them run elections.

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  • 1 month later...
14 minutes ago, jzk said:

 

 

Well, that's interesting, what staff is required? Does the state of texas require poll watchers from both parties or something?

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6 hours ago, jzk said:

 

 

Well I'm certain there's no missing context here which would offer a logical explanation to this. And I'm surely not going to investigate that before sharing it on social media. Instead, I'm just going to blindly post it in order to share my outrage with like minded Americans, and also win points "owning the libs". Yee-haw.

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5 hours ago, Nice! said:

Well I'm certain there's no missing context here which would offer a logical explanation to this. And I'm surely not going to investigate that before sharing it on social media. Instead, I'm just going to blindly post it in order to share my outrage with like minded Americans, and also win points "owning the libs". Yee-haw.

Owning the enemy Libs is all that matters. 

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On 1/13/2022 at 12:59 PM, billy backstay said:

The Freedom to Vote Act cracks down on voter suppression. It makes it a federal crime to lie to voters in order to deter them from voting (distributing official-looking flyers with the wrong dates for an election or locations of a polling place, for example), and it increases the penalties for voter intimidation. It restores federal voting rights for people who have served time in jail, creating a uniform system out of the current patchwork one. 

What about self-owns?

Many years ago when I was working for a political consulting firm on Patrick Kennedy's first campaign (son of Ted, running for State Representative in RI) the NRA decided to step in and "nip another Kennedy in the bud" (their words, not mine) by spending some money in a tiny little district in Rhode Island.

Needless to say over at Kennedy campaign HQ there was some consternation. There were attempts on our end to curb the madness of spending in the type of race you could usually win with a direct mail piece, a few key funeral and parade visits, and a lot of door knocking - there were about 5,000 registered voters in the district. The NRA showing up for this type of race was unheard of.

Here's the thing - this particular race was a primary, there was no Republican candidate. Kennedy was running against a do-nothing Democratic incumbent who was just marking time until he could qualify for his fat legislative pension. But due to some vagaries of R.I. law, the statewide primary was being held on a Wednesday instead of a Tuesday.

And guess what the out-of-town NRA whiz-kids put in their mailer to every Democratic and unaffiliated voter in the district as election day? Oh yeah.

Much hilarity (and delightful bad press) ensued after the NRA blew its wad telling everyone to come out and vote against Patrick on Tuesday.

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We voted early last Thursday(Texas and had zero problems) - the machine are new and touch screens - no more scrolling knob. 1st step was select which primary R or D.  I do understand that at some locations different rooms were used to separate the voters but the same machines were used. There were some reports of malfunctions for BOTH parties, the biggest issue was the new law re mail in ballots resulting in as many as 1/3 being rejected.  And you could only get one by request and then it had to be approved and with the same ID when registering (such as DL or SS) and if you used the wrong one it was rejected.  If you gave up and come to vote in person then you have to bring all your original application data so no possibility of voting twice. Major PITA (I know this as in the last election I didn't trust my vote to be actually counted so did it in person).

 

very clever....

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