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Any dick shard who tuns this thread political and gets this purgatoried to PA deserves to have an aluminum winch handle shoved up their gizzards so that every log of their shit for the next six years will vaguely read the words "Ram Well."

This is not political, it just a bunch of some really fucking friendly people who run the King Soopers here in Colorado, and keep the fish counter surprisingly well stocked even though we are land locked. They make good bread and pastries, they manage to keep the paper aisle stocked with the things we need, the milk is fresh, the half-and-half tastes like supermodel pussy and the cashiers and baggers lick tits by moving a lot of people through these stores with a really hard won level of efficiency.

Supermarket work requires a bit more ability for complexity than a job like mine, and these employees need to stay in King Soopers because they run a tight ship. If King Soopers ends up getting staffed by a bunch of strikebreakers, most of them will leave when Kroger drops their $22 per hour strikebreaker pay to $16.50 per hour pay. And then King Soopers will be swallowed alive by Walmart and Amazon and all the other companies that are owned by zillionaires and don't allow labor union membership.

Yeah, I fucking said it, but it's still not political. There are righties and lefties working those stores, grocering, bagging, cashiering, stocking peaches, cutting the scales off of fish, frying up chicken wings, wrapping chunks of plastic in the cheese, stocking the beer aisle and pulling carts. And they're on that line picketing for a wage so they can afford to stay in Colorado, because the cost of living in this shithole has skyrocketed lately for some reason I don't understand. It's getting so that Shaggy is going to have to downgrade his three-knot-shitbox for an RC boat and race in Lollipop Lake. It's getting so that the dude up in Buena Vista is forced to drink slightly less than top-shelf scotch. Yeah, that tough. So shit is getting hard here for some reason, maybe because we're now a state of potheads, I'm not sure though.

The point is, we need to not cross that line to get a fucking jar of plum marmalade and a box of post-menopausal tampons or whatever our old ladies told us to get, because the people on that line are our friends. They ski with us, sail with us, gamble with us, drink with us. Without them, King Soopers is just a building with boxes of cereal and canned products with the faint aroma of Saint Petersburg at noon. And when we don't cross the line, we should beep our horns to let them the Kroger billionaires know that their employees have a lot of friends, who aren't necessarily always shit-fucked on Mount Gay 1703 Master Select swilled out of a cocksucking pickle dish.

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1.   You are wrong,

2    It is too political.    And wrong.

3..   What’s this thread about? 
 

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2 minutes ago, Lark said:

1.   You are wrong,

2    It is too political.    And wrong.

3..   What’s this thread about? 
 

Sheboygan Sausages at Kroger.

Are Johnsonville Brats actually the same thing as Sheboygan Sausages? Why did they change the name? Are they made the same way?

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Just now, mikewof said:

Sheboygan Sausages at Kroger.

Are Johnsonville Brats actually the same thing as Sheboygan Sausages? Why did they change the name? Are they made the same way?

Sheboygan is a pretty town,   Cheboygan is better canoeing,    I didn’t know they named a town after my Johnson, but I approve.     

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7 minutes ago, Lark said:

Sheboygan is a pretty town,   Cheboygan is better canoeing,    I didn’t know they named a town after my Johnson, but I approve.     

I used to run a hot dog cart in Downtown Denver. We got VERY good at presenting the Sheboygans. Many people -- even ones on vacation from Michigan and Wisconsin -- would tell us that they were the best Sheboygans they ever had. It wasn't complicated, but the owners worked hard to figuring it out.

1. The sausages were steamed. Not grilled or fried, or baked or put on a roller. They were steamed, just like at the ballpark.

2. White hot dog buns but bigger than usual to allow room for the good stuff.

3. Chopped onions if they wanted it, and Mady's Mustard. This was the secret. They tested literally hundreds of different mustards, and none had the flavor profile that went with the Sheboygans better than Mady's. It looked like this .

MADYS-BEER-MUSTARD.jpg

4. Some people added relish and ketchup and the sweet things, but the onions usually had enough sweetness not to have to bother with that. I think the salient point here is that they found the way we prepared it so delicious because we didn't fucking drown in in a bunch of chili and cheese and tomato-based products. Those Sheboygans were of such high quality that they just didn't need it. They needed a simple bun, they needed the right mustard, they needed a little bit of chopped raw onion and that was that. You know Lark, when you have a good steak, it needs S&P pan seared and then down the hatch ... but pan searing, might be a bit of over-handling.

 

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Just now, SuddenlyBrown said:

Plant based sausages duuuuuude.

There are two brands. One is made with Genetically Modified Organism, and one isn't. I can't remember which is which.

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8 minutes ago, mikewof said:

I used to run a hot dog cart in Downtown Denver. We got VERY good at presenting the Sheboygans. Many people -- even ones on vacation from Michigan and Wisconsin -- would tell us that they were the best Sheboygans they ever had. It wasn't complicated, but the owners worked hard to figuring it out.

1. The sausages were steamed. Not grilled or fried, or baked or put on a roller. They were steamed, just like at the ballpark.

2. White hot dog buns but bigger than usual to allow room for the good stuff.

3. Chopped onions if they wanted it, and Mady's Mustard. This was the secret. They tested literally hundreds of different mustards, and none had the flavor profile that went with the Sheboygans better than Mady's. It looked like this .

MADYS-BEER-MUSTARD.jpg

4. Some people added relish and ketchup and the sweet things, but the onions usually had enough sweetness not to have to bother with that. I think the salient point here is that they found the way we prepared it so delicious because we didn't fucking drown in in a bunch of chili and cheese and tomato-based products. Those Sheboygans were of such high quality that they just didn't need it. They needed a simple bun, they needed the right mustard, they needed a little bit of chopped raw onion and that was that. You know Lark, when you have a good steak, it needs S&P pan seared and then down the hatch ... but pan searing, might be a bit of over-handling.

 

Good God Woofsie, you are supporting a company that supports the Wild...  SHAME...... 

https://www.facebook.com/sheboygansausage/

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Horseradish,    You forgot the horseradish and kraut.   Plant based?   We’re the plants free range?    I suppose they’re popular with the anti pork religions (and pigs).   

Steak:   Marinate with Italian dressing and grill.   Poor steak, add the onions and mushrooms and sauté.   

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1 hour ago, mikewof said:

Sheboygan Sausages at Kroger.

Are Johnsonville Brats actually the same thing as Sheboygan Sausages? Why did they change the name? Are they made the same way?

 

9 minutes ago, dyslexic dog said:

I’m confused. Is this about Michigan or Wisconsin?

 

Has to be Michigan.   My Johnson never had any action in the Wisconsin town, so they wouldn’t have renamed themselves.   

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1 hour ago, mikewof said:

Any dick shard who tuns this thread political and gets this purgatoried to PA

You ain't gonna control shit. 

 

1 hour ago, Lark said:

I didn’t know they named a town after my Johnson,

You needn't capitalize. ;)

 

1 hour ago, shaggy said:

SHAME....

Is this where it got political?

I honestly don't know.

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7 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

 

 

You needn't capitalize. ;)

 

 

Apple did it automatically,   I assume the AI recognized it as a proper noun, or more likely, the name of a god.  :D

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2 hours ago, mikewof said:

Any dick shard who tuns this thread political and gets this purgatoried to PA deserves to have an aluminum winch handle shoved up their gizzards so that every log of their shit for the next six years will vaguely read the words "Ram Well."

This is not political, it just a bunch of some really fucking friendly people who run the King Soopers here in Colorado, and keep the fish counter surprisingly well stocked even though we are land locked. They make good bread and pastries, they manage to keep the paper aisle stocked with the things we need, the milk is fresh, the half-and-half tastes like supermodel pussy and the cashiers and baggers lick tits by moving a lot of people through these stores with a really hard won level of efficiency.

Supermarket work requires a bit more ability for complexity than a job like mine, and these employees need to stay in King Soopers because they run a tight ship. If King Soopers ends up getting staffed by a bunch of strikebreakers, most of them will leave when Kroger drops their $22 per hour strikebreaker pay to $16.50 per hour pay. And then King Soopers will be swallowed alive by Walmart and Amazon and all the other companies that are owned by zillionaires and don't allow labor union membership.

Yeah, I fucking said it, but it's still not political. There are righties and lefties working those stores, grocering, bagging, cashiering, stocking peaches, cutting the scales off of fish, frying up chicken wings, wrapping chunks of plastic in the cheese, stocking the beer aisle and pulling carts. And they're on that line picketing for a wage so they can afford to stay in Colorado, because the cost of living in this shithole has skyrocketed lately for some reason I don't understand. It's getting so that Shaggy is going to have to downgrade his three-knot-shitbox for an RC boat and race in Lollipop Lake. It's getting so that the dude up in Buena Vista is forced to drink slightly less than top-shelf scotch. Yeah, that tough. So shit is getting hard here for some reason, maybe because we're now a state of potheads, I'm not sure though.

The point is, we need to not cross that line to get a fucking jar of plum marmalade and a box of post-menopausal tampons or whatever our old ladies told us to get, because the people on that line are our friends. They ski with us, sail with us, gamble with us, drink with us. Without them, King Soopers is just a building with boxes of cereal and canned products with the faint aroma of Saint Petersburg at noon. And when we don't cross the line, we should beep our horns to let them the Kroger billionaires know that their employees have a lot of friends, who aren't necessarily always shit-fucked on Mount Gay 1703 Master Select swilled out of a cocksucking pickle dish.

Posts with this many words automatically belong in pa no matter what the subject matter. I am not reading it.

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Here's a Bunny With a Pancake On Its Head" - Oolong the Rabbit Gains Fame |  World History Project

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1 hour ago, dyslexic dog said:

I’m confused. Is this about Michigan or Wisconsin?

I'm still suspect of landlocked fish markets.

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1 hour ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

Posts with this many words automatically belong in pa no matter what the subject matter. I am not reading it.

I skimmed it then skipped to the end. Mikey doesn’t want you to cross the picket line to shop at some market because the staff there are nice.

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3 hours ago, shaggy said:

Good God Woofsie, you are supporting a company that supports the Wild...  SHAME...... 

https://www.facebook.com/sheboygansausage/

As an Avs fan until the end of time, I love the Wild, but damned if they don't hate us. How can we not love the Wild, and that miserable drought of Stanley Cups that even manages to the make the Detroit Lions look kinda not so bad in comparison ... hell, at least the Lions USED to be good. Cripes, even as the Stars, the old Minnesota team won a Cup and went five times. Didn't the North Stars win a Cup too back in the day? But the poor, miserable Wild? What do they eat for breakfast, Postseason Defeat Flakes?

In the words of and Avs fan who learned of the Blue Jackets feud, "it's like finding out that your houseplant secretly hates you."

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53 minutes ago, Point Break said:

I skimmed it then skipped to the end. Mikey doesn’t want you to cross the picket line to shop at some market because the staff there are nice.

Even if they were assholes, I would support their union and not cross their picket line, because I'm no fucking scab. I support the firefighter's union too, vigorously, and I always have. It's the way I was raised. Workers have a right to organize for better pay and better conditions, the same way that ownership has the right to attempt to fuck over the unions. But as a rule, I tend to side with people who bust their ass for me, rather than a handful of billionaires who scream at me when I wrinkle their cashmere sweater that they tied around the fucking shoulder strap of their goddamned overloaded golf bag, with a quart of lemonade and literally the limit of fourteen clubs in their bag, and the rich fuckers still can't hit a fucking bogey with open green and the sun warm and high in the sky. 

I digress ... Why would any of us scab a picket line of our friends and neighbors when we can just drive three minutes down the road and get our comestibles from Safeway?

The Kroger employees are working toward an employee stock ownership takeover of the company, similar to Publix and Hy-Wee, which are both already under ESOPs. That produces a ton of value in my life, and helps bring me tasty fish, fresh produce, well-selected meats, expertly-baked goods and well-stocked shelves.

So why would any of us cross that line? Just to fuck with them?

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2 hours ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

Posts with this many words automatically belong in pa no matter what the subject matter. I am not reading it.

Reading is tough. Sheboygans are tasty. Steak is tastier. Pig can never beat Cow, Chris, sorry ...

 

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Mikey is wrong.  Of course it's political.

He rants and raves about Wal Mart and Amazon, yet he probably has an Alexa to order things easily.  

Like many people Mikey is mystified about how all of this happened.  It happened because people want all kinds of cheap consumer products, which companies provide by exploiting low wage countries to fill the demand.  And then they wonder why they lost their job.  People rant about poor infrastructure and in the same breath complain about paying taxes and vote for the kinds of politicians that do things for the big money donors and not the average Joe.  Why on earth do people thing a corrupt, grifting billionaire would be a good president and help the ordinary folks???

 

Everything is political.

People need to start looking in the mirror and open their eyes.

 "The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind..."

 

pogo.jpg

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3 hours ago, hobot said:
4 hours ago, mikewof said:

comestibles

Dang Mike, I had to look up that word.

#meto

 

While I wase at it, I looked up scab, I thick Mickkey is usseng it incorrectley..............                       :)

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A Monty Python classic.  That's where I learned that word years ago.

"...sallied forth, and infiltrated your place of purveyance to negotiate the vending of some cheesy comestibles

 

 

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10 hours ago, Point Break said:

I skimmed it then skipped to the end. Mikey doesn’t want you to cross the picket line to shop at some market because the staff there are nice.

To be fair, he is right, but it obv could have been said in 20 words or less... PL were empty yesterday at all the kings...  IMHO, They deserve what they are asking for.  

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9 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

Johnsonville sausages suck,  they're overloaded with msg

Miesfelds  A better Sheboygan Sausage.  One tends to think of Bratwurst and Sheboygan.  In the '50s there were maybe a dozen local butchers grinding Bratwurst.  The last, Luedkes, closed 20 years ago. A friend, the son of one of the other butchers, grinds a small amount for a local chain once or twice a year. Johnsonville and Old Wisconsin, Handcrafted, Hardwood Smoked Sausages | Old Wisconsin seem to be the last 2 volume producers.

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8 minutes ago, shaggy said:

To be fair, he is right, but it obv could have been said in 20 words or less... PL were empty yesterday at all the kings...  IMHO, They deserve what they are asking for.  

I have no knowledge of their issues so I’ll certainly not argue that point. There is no doubt unions are a necessity- at least in our economic model - or the average worker would often not get a fair shake/make progress. However, having been very active on both sides of that critter in the public sector I can tell you it can be a double edged sword. We had an expression in the industry…..”Fire Chiefs get the union they deserve”. Turns out the reverse of that is true as well. 

If I were back there and had to choose whether to cross to shop or not I’d have to educate myself on the issues, decide on the merits and decide. Not every set of demands and strike actions are meritorious……..and SEIU is a very very big dog in the yard.

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14 hours ago, mikewof said:

I used to run a hot dog cart in Downtown Denver. We got VERY good at presenting the Sheboygans. Many people -- even ones on vacation from Michigan and Wisconsin -- would tell us that they were the best Sheboygans they ever had. It wasn't complicated, but the owners worked hard to figuring it out.

1. The sausages were steamed. Not grilled or fried, or baked or put on a roller. They were steamed, just like at the ballpark.

2. White hot dog buns but bigger than usual to allow room for the good stuff.

3. Chopped onions if they wanted it, and Mady's Mustard. This was the secret. They tested literally hundreds of different mustards, and none had the flavor profile that went with the Sheboygans better than Mady's. It looked like this .

 

 

fab....   

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I wasn't aware of a strike, not noticing it at my local store.   If the concern was crossing a Kroger's picket line:

As with Mike, I of course claim expertise in the subject.  I'm a former Kroger's union member (not of good standing).    I worked there for a summer in college and wasn't even aware I was working in a union shop.    When I came back for the Christmas break the manager apparently failed to forward union dues, so in the spring I got a threatening letter from said union explaining I was in arears and not welcome to toil under their banner until I made good.   

Based on this life changing experience, I fail to see the benefit of honoring the picket line.   Assuming I don't show solidarity for my union brothers by going on a hunger strike, the alternative is to buy from the non union competition a mile away.  Perhaps that's what the strikers themselves are doing. 

For a while the deli and other counters have had limited and unpredictable hours, due to their inability to find labor.   This might seem to be an argument for better compensation, except the same thing is true for four franchise dental offices in Dayton, closed half the week due to their inability to find dentists and office managers (who do get paid a few dollars more).   Therefore the answer seems to be more robots (but not necessarily robotic root canals).   

 

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8 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Mikey is wrong.  Of course it's political.

He rants and raves about Wal Mart and Amazon, yet he probably has an Alexa to order things easily.  

Like many people Mikey is mystified about how all of this happened.  It happened because people want all kinds of cheap consumer products, which companies provide by exploiting low wage countries to fill the demand.  And then they wonder why they lost their job.  People rant about poor infrastructure and in the same breath complain about paying taxes and vote for the kinds of politicians that do things for the big money donors and not the average Joe.  Why on earth do people thing a corrupt, grifting billionaire would be a good president and help the ordinary folks???

 

Everything is political.

People need to start looking in the mirror and open their eyes.

 "The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind..."

 

 

This is not political.

This state has become very, very expensive in the last few years with so many people moving here. They are committed to the customers and they are committed to the Kroger corporation. I know for a fact that those people on that line span the gamut in political thought from left to right. I have had drinks with some of them, watched them wrestle, rode dirtbikes with them.

They want to stay with their jobs, and they need a higher wage to support their families. One can bargain for a price on a car without being accused of politics, one should be able to bargain for the pay of a job without being accused of politics.

And for the record Eddy, I don't have an Alexa, and I am not an Amazon Prime user or member. Amazon is sometimes a necessity and I accept that, but I manufacture my products in the USA, and I don't do that for political reasons, I do it because it is better for my customers, my suppliers and my company.

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55 minutes ago, Lark said:

As with Mike, I of course claim expertise in the subject.  I'm a former Kroger's union member (not of good standing).    I worked there for a summer in college and wasn't even aware I was working in a union shop.    When I came back for the Christmas break the manager apparently failed to forward union dues, so in the spring I got a threatening letter from said union explaining I was in arears and not welcome to toil under their banner until I made good.   

Based on this life changing experience, I fail to see the benefit of honoring the picket line.   Assuming I don't show solidarity for my union brothers by going on a hunger strike, the alternative is to buy from the non union competition a mile away.  Perhaps that's what the strikers themselves are doing. 

I think that your personal beef is with the manager (like not union) rather than the union itself, right? Why don't you track that fellow down and teepee his or her house?

You live in Ohio, you have Hy-Vee stores in Ohio right? In some ways, employee-owned corporations like Hy-Vee are even better than unions, why not just shop at your local Hy-Vee?

Down in the South they have Publix, which is also employee-owned, and an excellent chain of grocery stores.

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2 hours ago, Point Break said:

I have no knowledge of their issues so I’ll certainly not argue that point. There is no doubt unions are a necessity- at least in our economic model - or the average worker would often not get a fair shake/make progress. However, having been very active on both sides of that critter in the public sector I can tell you it can be a double edged sword. We had an expression in the industry…..”Fire Chiefs get the union they deserve”. Turns out the reverse of that is true as well. 

If I were back there and had to choose whether to cross to shop or not I’d have to educate myself on the issues, decide on the merits and decide. Not every set of demands and strike actions are meritorious……..and SEIU is a very very big dog in the yard.

It depends not just on the issues in the strike, but in the market too. Here in Colorado, the economy has gone nuts ... tons of people move here, rents have skyrocketed, costs have risen, and there is a labor shortage. Owners of fast food franchises have taken to closing their doors to 50% of capacity because they can't find employees even at $18/hour. 

The King Soopers employees whom I know have been here for years and decades, I went to high school with some of them, and they can't afford to continue to work there at those wages, which Kroger has refused to adjust more than a token amount. If they don't get a living wage, they will leave those jobs and just get higher pay elsewhere. The quality of these very good stores will plummet without expertise. Grocery work is tough work, as far as I can see, and it takes some level of expertise to do it correctly.

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A while back there was a strike with the Von's / Safeway chain in Southern CA...  In the end, current employees got most of what they wanted, and new hires really got screwed. 

Typical "phuck you, I got my stash.." mentality, and not a win for the union.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ventucky Red said:

A while back there was a strike with the Von's / Safeway chain in Southern CA...  In the end, current employees got most of what they wanted, and new hires really got screwed. 

Typical "phuck you, I got my stash.." mentality, and not a win for the union.

 

 

 

Sadly not an unheard of practice of selling out the new and not yet hired folks. Its because it is hard for union leadership to sell existing members on the future for others not yet members. I have seen the "brotherhood" in more than one location collapse pretty quickly when management offers a sweetheart deal that it knows will sunset as employees age out. On balence I've seen some pretty coherent forward thinking unions or locals of large immense unions have a pretty responsible view. Also don't underestimate the influence of the national organization when "chatting" with a local about their ongoing negotiations and any precedent this deal or that deal might set for all the other locals. After all.......management does not operate in a vacuum and many organizations peek over the fence see how things pencil out in the "neighbors yard". While a local - in most cases - is pretty much an autonomous entity at the same time they want access to the resources the national can bring to bear on an issue so they will rarely cross the national. The "local issue" at one location may very well not be a "local" issue.

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When I worked at the local GE plant, I belonged to the United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers union (UE).  The union was founded in the 1930s and primarily represented workers from GE< RCA , Westinghouse, etc. So it was a pretty powerful union.  The union was very left leaning/socialist and they had some serious battles back in the day and union members were killed on occasion.  Of course J. Edgar Hoover hated them.  They are still regarded as the most progressive (read socialist) union in the country.

UE had a proud history of militancy and it was in your best interest to join the union, even though you didn't have to.  When I started my job, my shop steward came up to me and told me I didn't have to join, but that sometimes non-union workers had bad things happen to their cars out in the big parking lots, sometimes.  My first shakedown since grade school!  

I didn't mind joining the union, I've always been a lefty and a union supporter and the union did a good job getting us excellent pay and benefits.  Health insurance was paid 100% by the company, no deductibles. I was taking home close to $300 a week for 40 hours at 18 years old and right out of high school.  And overtime was always available at time and a half for the 1st four hours and double time for anything after that and on holidays.  I will say the workers there worked damned hard in return, for the most part.

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

When I worked at the local GE plant, I belonged to the United Electrical, Radio, and Machine Workers union (UE).  The union was founded in the 1930s and primarily represented workers from GE< RCA , Westinghouse, etc. So it was a pretty powerful union.  The union was very left leaning/socialist and they had some serious battles back in the day and union members were killed on occasion.  Of course J. Edgar Hoover hated them.  They are still regarded as the most progressive (read socialist) union in the country.

UE had a proud history of militancy and it was in your best interest to join the union, even though you didn't have to.  When I started my job, my shop steward came up to me and told me I didn't have to join, but that sometimes non-union workers had bad things happen to their cars out in the big parking lots, sometimes.  My first shakedown since grade school!  

I didn't mind joining the union, I've always been a lefty and a union supporter and the union did a good job getting us excellent pay and benefits.  Health insurance was paid 100% by the company, no deductibles. I was taking home close to $300 a week for 40 hours at 18 years old and right out of high school.  And overtime was always available at time and a half for the 1st four hours and double time for anything after that and on holidays.  I will say the workers there worked damned hard in return, for the most part.

 

The shop steward was joking with you? UE is an excellent union, they rarely need to coerce anyone because UE is member-managed and member-run. And you got lucky to get a gig like that, it isn't always so easy, and some shops will only hire existing UE members to keep down their liability ... sort of a catch-22 if you aren't already in.

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9 hours ago, mikewof said:

The shop steward was joking with you? UE is an excellent union, they rarely need to coerce anyone because UE is member-managed and member-run. And you got lucky to get a gig like that, it isn't always so easy, and some shops will only hire existing UE members to keep down their liability ... sort of a catch-22 if you aren't already in.

No he wasn't joking.  There was a months long strike at the plant in the late 1960s.  More than one scab's car was set on fire during the strike.  

I clearly stated in my post that I liked the union and all that they did for us. 

As far as getting a job there, back then the plant employed 14,000 people.  It was relatively easy to walk in off the street and get a good job there.  Now, the plant employees around 3,000 people and it is  owned by WABTEC after more than 100 years of GE ownership.  The plant was built in 1910, and had a long productive history in Erie, PA, providing employment for thousands of workers, white and blue collar and a chance for working folk to have a decent life.  The plant produced thousands of diesel electric and electric locomotives used all over the world, and DC motors and generators among other industrial products.  It is sad to see such an important place in the city's manufacturing history fade away. 

Erie was a major center of heavy industry of all kinds back in the day.  Steam engines for ships, large foundries and forges, excavators, ship building, a large paper mill and more.  Most of it is gone now, many former factories are abandoned, boarded up and falling apart, a sad reminder of what once was.  Erie is the buckle of the rust belt, midway between Cleveland and Buffalo and about 120 miles north of Pittsburgh.  Grand mansions line the main street for several blocks in the middle of town built by the wealthy founders of the factories back in the turn of the 20th century.  Famous industrial names like Reed, Griswold, Zurn, Lord, and others were businesses founded in Erie.  The bay in Erie is one of the largest and finest natural harbors on the Great Lakes, providing access to ship and receive products from all over the world, and excellent shelter during the vicious storms that can brew quickly on Lake Erie.  Now, like many former heavy industry cities, Erie has reverted to a service economy.  The 2 largest employers today are a large medical center and a large insurance company.  

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I ever really thought about it until this strike, but I realized that being a grocery worker is a remarkably difficult job ...

  1. The job itself is complicated, with thousands of product codes and variations, ship-dates, special orders, customer requirements, safety,
     
  2. Unlike my desk job, when they get stressed, they often have no ability to take a break, they need to stay on register, they need to clean up Aisle 4, they need to slam produce, meat, bread, fish and stock to the shelves,
     
  3. Most every grocery worker has to regularly and constantly interact with the customers, some of them irate, some of them clueless. Many of us can just shut the door when we need to get something complicated done, but they have to maintain their composure and temper when confronted by some truly horrible humans. To their credit, I almost never see them crack. A hothead like me would rip a lot of these jerks apart when I lose my patience,
     
  4. It's a professional job ... unlike roofers, machinists, framers and assembly workers, they can't really blow off steam with loud music, cursing and fun with their coworkers, most everything they do is within earshot of the customers and of management. Short of rounding up carts in the parking lot, they work under a microscope.

 

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On 1/13/2022 at 7:50 PM, mikewof said:

Sheboygan Sausages at Kroger.

Are Johnsonville Brats actually the same thing as Sheboygan Sausages? Why did they change the name? Are they made the same way?

Not even close. Sheboygan Sausage company is in Minneapolis. Johnsonville is right outside Sheboygan. We also have Old Wisconsin.  As Warbird said, here in Sheboygan we get our Brats from Miesfield’s, or for the best ones, we go to Brockman’s. Brockman’s is an old school mom and pop butcher shop where they’re made fresh every morning with a fantastic family recipe. 
 

Edit:  Not sure how Warbird didn’t know about Brockman’s. That’s almost unforgivable. 

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2 hours ago, Monkey said:

Not even close. Sheboygan Sausage company is in Minneapolis. Johnsonville is right outside Sheboygan. We also have Old Wisconsin.  As Warbird said, here in Sheboygan we get our Brats from Miesfield’s, or for the best ones, we go to Brockman’s. Brockman’s is an old school mom and pop butcher shop where they’re made fresh every morning with a fantastic family recipe. 
 

Edit:  Not sure how Warbird didn’t know about Brockman’s. That’s almost unforgivable. 

Usingers, Kenosha...  Nuff said... :)

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For those of you who want to support the Kroger workers by taking your food dollars to a competitor until Kroger can get their shit together, these are the supermarkets around the country that are owned by Kroger that you may wish to avoid ...

Dillons
Baker's
Gerbes
Food 4 Less
Foods Co.
Fred Meyer
Fry's
Harris Teeter
Home Chef
King Soopers
City Market
Kroger
JayC
Pay Less
Mariano's
QFC
Ralphs
Roundy's
Metro Market
Pick 'n Save
Ruler Foods
Smith's
Vitacost

If you're buying a bauble for your babe, Kroger also owns some Jewelers ...
Fred Meyer Jewelers
Barclay's Jewelers
Littman Jewelers

And a chain of health clinics, usually inside of the supermarkets ...
The Little Clinic

People in Colorado have boycotted the King Soopers stores all over the state, but King Soopers is just one property of the Kroger Corporation, which is the largest supermarket chain in the country.

Finally, a question ... for Sailing Anarchist who live in or near Cincinnati, have you seen any protests in front of the Kroger National Headquarters on 1014 Vine Street?

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41 minutes ago, Mid said:

FFS take it to PA .

How is it political for our neighbors and friends to want to be able to afford to support their families?

How is negotiating for better working conditions any different from negotiating for a better deal on a tow vehicle for the boat, or a house or a mutual fund or a mortgage? Are acts of negotiation inherently political? 

A new breed of company including Amazon, Uber, Door Dash, Lyft and Instacart seek to lower costs by minimizing worker costs. Is this political or business? Is it business when a corporation negotiates for better deal for their shareholders, but political when a worker negotiates for a better deal for her children?

Mid, have you ever enjoyed a Sheboygan sausage? Do you have an opinion to the tastiest sausages? Pork? All-Beef? Do you prefer your sausages smoked, boiled, cured or dried? My all-time favorite sausage is an all-beef cured sausage that is aged and then air-dried to reduce the total weight by about 50%. I then use it to make an Estonian dish called "Schticlé" where the cured and dried all-beef sausage is then diced small, mixed with raw pumpkin seeds, peanuts and raw onions, and then soaked in fresh lime juice. It is considered a delicacy for Estonian grandparents ... the lime juice plumps and softens the meat and nut mixture, while the salt from the cured meats tenderizes the slices of lime which then become fully edible and tangy after a night in the schticlé jar. It needs no refrigeration and is good for extended trips. 

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1 hour ago, random. said:

BUY AN AD you cheap cunt

In case anyone had any doubt, this is apparently the kind of person who thinks nothing of crossing a picket line, rather than walking across the street to buy his anal lubricant.

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5 hours ago, mikewof said:

How is it political for our neighbors and friends to want to be able to afford to support their families?

How is negotiating for better working conditions any different from negotiating for a better deal on a tow vehicle for the boat, or a house or a mutual fund or a mortgage? Are acts of negotiation inherently political? 

A new breed of company including Amazon, Uber, Door Dash, Lyft and Instacart seek to lower costs by minimizing worker costs. Is this political or business? Is it business when a corporation negotiates for better deal for their shareholders, but political when a worker negotiates for a better deal for her children?

Mid, have you ever enjoyed a Sheboygan sausage? Do you have an opinion to the tastiest sausages? Pork? All-Beef? Do you prefer your sausages smoked, boiled, cured or dried? My all-time favorite sausage is an all-beef cured sausage that is aged and then air-dried to reduce the total weight by about 50%. I then use it to make an Estonian dish called "Schticlé" where the cured and dried all-beef sausage is then diced small, mixed with raw pumpkin seeds, peanuts and raw onions, and then soaked in fresh lime juice. It is considered a delicacy for Estonian grandparents ... the lime juice plumps and softens the meat and nut mixture, while the salt from the cured meats tenderizes the slices of lime which then become fully edible and tangy after a night in the schticlé jar. It needs no refrigeration and is good for extended trips. 

I'm kinda wondering how Estonians would come across peanuts and limes...

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On 1/17/2022 at 6:10 PM, mikewof said:

I ever really thought about it until this strike, but I realized that being a grocery worker is a remarkably difficult job ...

  1. The job itself is complicated, with thousands of product codes and variations, ship-dates, special orders, customer requirements, safety,
     
  2. Unlike my desk job, when they get stressed, they often have no ability to take a break, they need to stay on register, they need to clean up Aisle 4, they need to slam produce, meat, bread, fish and stock to the shelves,
     
  3. Most every grocery worker has to regularly and constantly interact with the customers, some of them irate, some of them clueless. Many of us can just shut the door when we need to get something complicated done, but they have to maintain their composure and temper when confronted by some truly horrible humans. To their credit, I almost never see them crack. A hothead like me would rip a lot of these jerks apart when I lose my patience,
     
  4. It's a professional job ... unlike roofers, machinists, framers and assembly workers, they can't really blow off steam with loud music, cursing and fun with their coworkers, most everything they do is within earshot of the customers and of management. Short of rounding up carts in the parking lot, they work under a microscope.

 

Come on Mikey, let's think about this.

To your points, with no disrespect intended toward the workers,

1. Theres nothing complicated about stocking shelves which is the majority of the work. Same job as many other retailers. I'd even say the "complexity" is far greater in someplace like home depot with a broader range of products. They don't have to read or understand product codes, they have a little widget that reads it for them.

Many items are stocked by outside vendors, not store employees. Most stocking is done at night with little to no customer interference.

2. They have regularly scheduled breaks. Bargained for in the contract.

3. That's called customer service, every retailer deals with it. They even have a section of the store set aside to deal with it. Most of the time when I ask for help I get it. 

4. Again, it's a job in retail, not exactly what I'd call "professional" work. 

Very few kroger stores have a butcher, all the meat comes in pre packaged, they just put it on the shelf. 

Probably the most complicated and or dangerous area of the store is the deli. Lots of dangerous sharp spinning thingies to deal with. Still not on the level of your machine shop comparison.

And to the stores credit, at least the non union city market in my town, they hire special needs persons to perform easy tasks like bagging groceries and rounding up carts. Or is that not allowed in a union shop?

 

So flame away at my response, not intended to belittle an entire group of workers, just look at it for what it is.

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3 hours ago, Grabbler said:

I'm kinda wondering how Estonians would come across peanuts and limes...

Like anyone else but wipe it off when you're finished...

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9 hours ago, mikewof said:

A new breed of company including Amazon, Uber, Door Dash, Lyft and Instacart seek to lower costs by minimizing worker costs. Is this political or business? Is it business when a corporation negotiates for better deal for their shareholders, but political when a worker negotiates for a better deal for her children?

"A New Breed"?  Really?  Because companies haven't been trying to do the same thing for the last... oh.... forever?  Pushing down wages, increasing work loads are nothing new.  How the heck can you imply they are?

*shakes head*.  You're such a blowhard.

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3 hours ago, bmiller said:

Come on Mikey, let's think about this.

To your points, with no disrespect intended toward the workers,

1. Theres nothing complicated about stocking shelves which is the majority of the work. Same job as many other retailers. I'd even say the "complexity" is far greater in someplace like home depot with a broader range of products. They don't have to read or understand product codes, they have a little widget that reads it for them.

Many items are stocked by outside vendors, not store employees. Most stocking is done at night with little to no customer interference.

2. They have regularly scheduled breaks. Bargained for in the contract.

3. That's called customer service, every retailer deals with it. They even have a section of the store set aside to deal with it. Most of the time when I ask for help I get it. 

4. Again, it's a job in retail, not exactly what I'd call "professional" work. 

Very few kroger stores have a butcher, all the meat comes in pre packaged, they just put it on the shelf. 

Probably the most complicated and or dangerous area of the store is the deli. Lots of dangerous sharp spinning thingies to deal with. Still not on the level of your machine shop comparison.

And to the stores credit, at least the non union city market in my town, they hire special needs persons to perform easy tasks like bagging groceries and rounding up carts. Or is that not allowed in a union shop?

 

So flame away at my response, not intended to belittle an entire group of workers, just look at it for what it is.

I have thought about a lot of this, and I realized that my initial thoughts to the general easy of grocery work were wrong.

1. Stocking shelves might be fairly easy, but the chess game that management plays to move product puts a lot of complexity on the workers. Home Depot or O'Reilly's Auto Parts (for example) have a relatively well-defined market, for instance people who fix cars, people who fix houses, DIY homeowners, etc.. Supermarkets don't have that luxury, their market is literally anyone who eats food, which is everyone. Managing customers expectations on that level is remarkably difficult. I have rarely seen customers lose their shit in a Home Depot or an O'Reilly's but I see it all the time in supermarkets. Wealthy people rub shoulders with homeless, nerves are exposed, the elderly feel shat upon, the young are in a hurry. Someone with a twelve pack of Budweiser waits patiently while someone with a screaming infant has to manage. And through this, the employees manage to hold their shit. In all of my years, I have only seen a grocery worker loser her shit one time, and she regained almost instantly. To a hothead like me, that takes a special kind of talent.

2. Regardless what you write, one of the complaints of the union is that management has been so overstressed with lack of employees that they have not honored the union-agreed break schedules. And worse, when some raging roided-out asshole verbally assaults some supermarket worker because the shelf is out of stock of his favorite protein powder, she can't step outside to cool off, she has to stay there and deal with his bullshit. When people stressed me out with my office job, I could literally leave any meeting or conference to take a breather.

4. Customer Service is a tough part of the business, but it is something that most every supermarket worker (other than say the night-stockers) are required to provide. When someone needs to know where their favorite brand of cocktail sauce is located, they don't stand on line at the customer service counter, they instead ask the nearest worker for help, just like Home Depot, if an employee can actually be found at Home Depot.

5. I think if you look at the difficulty of the work and the requirements of the workers who do it, you might reconsider your decision to not consider their work "professional." To do the work properly, and break in a worker can take a year or two years. It is advanced and difficult work. It might just take a week to train someone to corral carts. But speed bag a cart of groceries, run the till quickly to keep the lines down, manage a hundred-some item menu at the deli, manage over a thousand items through the year in produce? it is very easy to tell who has experience of five to ten years in these positions and who just started. That is basically the definition of a professional position; one that requires an extensive level of training to do. So while we're at it, let's put machine operators, CAD programmers and auto technicians in that bin as well. They are all professionals.

6. Yes, the meat is pre-cut, but unlike the days of yore, the deli workers now make fresh fried chicken, they rotisserie chickens, they make sandwiches, and create ready-to-eat food of all kinds that grocery workers rarely had to do when you and I were kids. The most ready-to-eat thing in the store when you and I came up was the free sugar cookie handed to us by the baker.

 

Anyway, the City Market in your town is owned by Kroger, are you still shopping there, or can you boycott them until the strike is over?

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6 hours ago, Grabbler said:

I'm kinda wondering how Estonians would come across peanuts and limes...

The original recipe used hemp seeds rather than pumpkin seeds and pistachios rather than peanuts, along with vinegar rather than lemons and limes, but the "new-world" version tastes really good in my opinion.

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18 hours ago, Grabbler said:

I'm kinda wondering how Estonians would come across peanuts and limes...

Did you try a batch yet? Here is a photo of my most recent batch ... I got most of the ingredients at King Soopers before the strike, and I dried the beef salamis for about two weeks before I cut them for the batch. Also from King Soopers from before the strike. King doesn't have the raw pumpkin seeds, I get those from the Natural Grocer, which is still non-union, but Sprouts is slowly getting the idea. Onions are Peruvia, but purple onions work. Jalapeno, peanuts and lemon instead of lime, I tend to use whichever looks fresher, but oranges don't have enough acidity to pull it all together. If you make it, you have to be really careful to pull all the seeds from the citrus, because they will too closely mimic the consistency of the pumpkin seeds, but with a yucky payoff.

shticle.thumb.jpg.773c62c7d9e31dd74a5a590e1f176742.jpg

It's an odd dish, because of course, as Eastern European poverty food, it's made by and for peasants, but it's essentially made for the older folks, so they can get a solid dose of fat and protein to keep them healthy as they tend to eat less in their old age. The meat is marinated in the citrus (or vinegar, in the old days) to make it soft enough for the old folks to eat without a decent tooth in their head. The ingredients make it on the more expensive side of peasant, but it works. It also is made with strong tastes, because old folks tend to lose their ability to taste nuance as they get older. So it has a taste they tend to like; the bitterness of the citrus rind, the savory of the meat, the bright sour of the juice, the saltiness of the nuts and cured-dried meat, the heat of the hot peppers, and the sweetness of the Peruvian onions.

It takes a bit of constitution to eat the citrus rind. Young people tend to leave it in the bowl, the elderly tend to gum it up and spit it back into the bowl, and the middle-agers tend to eat the living shit out of the citrus. The bitter gets tempered really well with the salt from the meat and peanuts. It's an addictive kind of bitter.

Do actual Eastern Europeans eat schticlé anymore? I doubt it, but holy hell it caught on in South America, especially for the more inland locations in Argentina and Peru where European sausages are sought after as something different for regular ceviche dishes other than fish when it is too expensive to get fresh. It is a taste explosion, no other way to describe it. Since the dish isn't cooked, none of the flavors are muted, it's like comparing a brand-new Yamaha piano to a hundred-year-old Bösendorfer. Is it a good dish for being lazy around the house? Nah. But if you're on the job site and you want something to wake you up and leave you feeling like you just ate something, without needing to shnort a line or some flask juice, it's good for that.

And it has a big advantage over regular fish ceviche ... schticlé doesn't mind the heat. It is acidic enough to repel bugs and salty enough to slough off difficult conditionsI have no worry about leaving a container of it out in the heat for days on end. It just doesn't care. I have tested it in high-country hot summers, it does fine. What else can do that other than just straight jerky, which after a few weeks becomes as enticing as eating the tits on Queen Tut's mummy.

I know your normal motto is shoot-and-savor rather than shoot-shovel-shutup, so this might work for you with some venison sausage. You probably will need to add some oil that you wouldn't need to add with beef sausage, but the taste with venison I think would go really well with the other ingredients.

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20 hours ago, mikewof said:

I have thought about a lot of this, and I realized that my initial thoughts to the general easy of grocery work were wrong.

Back home in PA one of the big chain stores is Wegman's. When I go visit, I always take my daughter grocery shopping there.  

The store is quite large.  They have a huge well stocked fruit and vegetable section, packaged meat as well as a butcher shop with all kinds of nice steaks, etc., in addition to a very nice selection of fresh and live seafood.  They have a bakery with all manner of bread and sweets.  The store is always well staffed, I've never seen long checkout lines, and there are always friendly people on the floor ready to help.

The last time I was there I saw a couple of men in business clothing with name tags.  I stopped and asked if they were important and they chuckled and admitted they might be.  I told them that I always enjoyed shopping there, the store was always sparkling clean, plenty of friendly employees ands everything was very well done there.  They looked a little shocked at first and then said they appreciated the feedback.  I told them to pass on my compliments to their staff and they assured me that they would.  It turns out it was the store manager and his boss up the line.

Wegmans is a little pricier that some of the other places in town, but the quality and selection and great service make it worth shopping there.  I don't think they are unionized but I've heard from people that they pay better than any other grocery store in town, and people who work there say it's a good place to work.    

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Strike is over. Biggest supermarket chain in the USA saw the head of steam that was being picked up the grocery workers, and like firefighters to keep fire from heading to their other stores, they settled fast, apparently gave in to most of the strikers' demands, based on how quickly it all ended.

The grocery store workers were geared up salary-wise (the picketers get paid by the union) they were set for another three weeks, but it was barely an issue because the picket lines were actually getting bigger by customers and off-clock workers standing the lines. So Kroger got some kind of injunction to limit the strikers to just ten per store ... the grocery workers just sent the extras to picket on the streets off of the King Soopers property.

Now what happens next isn't clear ... Colorado is a market with a huge labor shortage. A median market like Texas (which already voted for the strike) is likely going to be settled close to their demands.

Honestly I miss the strike, it was fun to see how many regular people honored that line and shopped elsewhere. That definitely woke up Kroger. But it also kind of helpa me come to terms with my own childhood, where my dad's machinist union at Gardner-Denver was beaten by the company. Like Coors, they managed to bust up the union, run on scabs and then unlike Coors they packed up the pneumatic tool factory and moved it to Mexico. I remember after the strike, the cupboards were a little depleted for a while, a lot of family friends were out of work, and the entire economy in this area continued its gradual collapse. Gardner-Denver eventually lost their lead in the industry, once they no longer had expertise behind the turret lathes, milling machines, forges and quality control, then they were bought by Ingersoll Rand.

But it didn't happen that way this time for a supermarket. Yeah, it's not high-precision machine shop that manufactures high-end precision American tools, but it's a good start ... the employees have to still vote to accept the offer or not, for all anyone knows, I have seen strikes spring up again when the company decided to change their tune. But based on how fast this one settled, it seems likely that Kroger is going to play fair.

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Long time ago, as a very young carpenter I was for a while a member of the BLF...post Jack Mundey years...but only just :o...and the wounds of the federal union takeover and the ensuing period of corruption and abandonment of principles were still raw...to paraphrase "It was the best of unions. It was the worst of unions"...

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/12/jack-mundey-was-an-australian-hero-who-saved-sydney-from-the-bulldozers-and-shaped-a-generation-of-activists

Builders_Labourers_Federation_Logo.jpg

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On 1/20/2022 at 9:11 AM, Ed Lada said:

Back home in PA one of the big chain stores is Wegman's. When I go visit, I always take my daughter grocery shopping there.  

The store is quite large.  They have a huge well stocked fruit and vegetable section, packaged meat as well as a butcher shop with all kinds of nice steaks, etc., in addition to a very nice selection of fresh and live seafood.  They have a bakery with all manner of bread and sweets.  The store is always well staffed, I've never seen long checkout lines, and there are always friendly people on the floor ready to help.

The last time I was there I saw a couple of men in business clothing with name tags.  I stopped and asked if they were important and they chuckled and admitted they might be.  I told them that I always enjoyed shopping there, the store was always sparkling clean, plenty of friendly employees ands everything was very well done there.  They looked a little shocked at first and then said they appreciated the feedback.  I told them to pass on my compliments to their staff and they assured me that they would.  It turns out it was the store manager and his boss up the line.

Wegmans is a little pricier that some of the other places in town, but the quality and selection and great service make it worth shopping there.  I don't think they are unionized but I've heard from people that they pay better than any other grocery store in town, and people who work there say it's a good place to work.    

Just went to the new "Fries Superstore" down here for the first time.  It was build in the last 2 years and My god.  Why in the fuck do we need a grocery store that big???  It was bigger than my local target back home.  It's the Kroger brand so had the same stuff as our Much smaller king soopers, but You need a frigging map, a sherpa and the better part of an afternoon  to get from one end to the other.  Forgot the crushed garlic when we were on the frozen foods side of the planet...  Took me 15 mins to get to the veg and back all whilst my beloved continued and missed 1/2 the stuff we needed so we had to go back to the summit of the frozen section..  I was able to get sox, the command hooks and a case of tall frosties so there is that, but why do i need 15 types of rice a roni???  I am not advocating for the bodega model, but come on, I shouldn't need to put my hiking boots to get a frigging gallon of milk.  

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On 1/26/2022 at 10:00 AM, shaggy said:

Just went to the new "Fries Superstore" down here for the first time.  It was build in the last 2 years and My god.  Why in the fuck do we need a grocery store that big???  It was bigger than my local target back home.  It's the Kroger brand so had the same stuff as our Much smaller king soopers, but You need a frigging map, a sherpa and the better part of an afternoon  to get from one end to the other.  Forgot the crushed garlic when we were on the frozen foods side of the planet...  Took me 15 mins to get to the veg and back all whilst my beloved continued and missed 1/2 the stuff we needed so we had to go back to the summit of the frozen section..  I was able to get sox, the command hooks and a case of tall frosties so there is that, but why do i need 15 types of rice a roni???  I am not advocating for the bodega model, but come on, I shouldn't need to put my hiking boots to get a frigging gallon of milk.  

As long as you're here, you might try the grocery store of the locals ... Lowe's Mercado, the Mexican supermarket over on Federal and other locations. Mexican-style ... simple, just big enough, really fresh produce, quality foods from around the Americas at good prices, smoking hot Latin chicks who shop in heels ...

566301434_ScreenShot2022-01-27at6_17_40PM.png.6d8034d7b6230f188e3a46ec0df7535b.png

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3 hours ago, mikewof said:

As long as you're here, you might try the grocery store of the locals ... Lowe's Mercado, the Mexican supermarket over on Federal and other locations. Mexican-style ... simple, just big enough, really fresh produce, quality foods from around the Americas at good prices, smoking hot Latin chicks who shop in heels ...

566301434_ScreenShot2022-01-27at6_17_40PM.png.6d8034d7b6230f188e3a46ec0df7535b.png

well that sounds like a store i'd patronise!

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15 hours ago, chester said:
18 hours ago, mikewof said:

Lowe's Mercado, the Mexican supermarket over on Federal and other locations. Mexican-style ... simple, just big enough, really fresh produce, quality foods from around the Americas at good prices, smoking hot Latin chicks who shop in heels ...

566301434_ScreenShot2022-01-27at6_17_40PM.png.6d8034d7b6230f188e3a46ec0df7535b.png

Expand  Expand  

well that sounds like a store i'd patronise!

#meto, I dointe speake Latin butte I coude try.......                :)

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FWIW, I found some Sheboygan mild Italians at the local Grocery Outlet in North Seattle and tried them out last night. Pretty good. Very flavorful with a little bit of spice, despite being mild.

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13 hours ago, IStream said:

FWIW, I found some Sheboygan mild Italians at the local Grocery Outlet in North Seattle and tried them out last night. Pretty good. Very flavorful with a little bit of spice, despite being mild.

What was the brand name?

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

Ed is correct. That's the only reason I recognized them as Sheboygan sausages at the store.

It is confusing, sorry. They should be labeled Sheboygan made in Minneapolis Sausage.  It's a Sheboygan thing.

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19 hours ago, warbird said:

It is confusing, sorry. They should be labeled Sheboygan made in Minneapolis Sausage.  It's a Sheboygan thing.

Now I'm confused.  The Sheboygan sausage I linked to has been made in Sheboygan Wisconsin since 1933 when a German sausage maker came to the US.  

Are you saying there are imposters out there?

Do we need to summon Mikey?

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3 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Now I'm confused.  The Sheboygan sausage I linked to has been made in Sheboygan Wisconsin since 1933 when a German sausage maker came to the US.  

Are you saying there are imposters out there?

Do we need to summon Mikey?

Sheboygan Sausage Company left Sheboygan for Minneapolis long ago. If the sausage you bought was made in Sheboygan, for the sake of your intestinal tract, I hope you checked the expiration date!!!

Source:  Warbird and I live in Sheboygan and that company doesn’t exist here. 

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3 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Now I'm confused.  The Sheboygan sausage I linked to has been made in Sheboygan Wisconsin since 1933 when a German sausage maker came to the US.  

Are you saying there are imposters out there?

Do we need to summon Mikey?

I barely know my ass from my elbow wrt sausages ... but isn't Sheboygan a registered trade name, like Champagne?

If your sausage/drink doesn't come from Sheboygan/Champagne or registered to the Sheboygan/Champagne company then it is just a sausage/sparkling-wine, right?

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33 minutes ago, Monkey said:

Sheboygan Sausage Company left Sheboygan for Minneapolis long ago. If the sausage you bought was made in Sheboygan, for the sake of your intestinal tract, I hope you checked the expiration date!!!

Source:  Warbird and I live in Sheboygan and that company doesn’t exist here. 

Okay, so if you got a commercial kitchen and made sausages, would you be in the clear to sell "Sausages from Sheboygan"?

If not, that sucks, and I hate it when corporations try to stake down place names as trade names. Some jackwagon in Colorado took a bunch of outdoor equipment manufacturers to Court for using the word "backcountry" in their marketing materials since they managed to register a trade name with it.

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5 minutes ago, mikewof said:

Okay, so if you got a commercial kitchen and made sausages, would you be in the clear to sell "Sausages from Sheboygan"?

If not, that sucks, and I hate it when corporations try to stake down place names as trade names. Some jackwagon in Colorado took a bunch of outdoor equipment manufacturers to Court for using the word "backcountry" in their marketing materials since they managed to register a trade name with it.

Who knows. Trademark law isn’t my thing. However, it’d be pretty funny to start the “Actually From Sheboygan Sausage Company.”

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28 minutes ago, Monkey said:

Who knows. Trademark law isn’t my thing. However, it’d be pretty funny to start the “Actually From Sheboygan Sausage Company.”

Hey, what do I know I live in Poland.  I've never been to Wisconsin or Minnesota, I  grew up in Pennsylvania.

I saw the photo below on their website, which in retrospect is an old photo, that says Wisconsin on the box.  I would guess they moved the company when they became part of American Foods Group which is part of Rosen's Diversified Inc.  Holy shit, who knew how complicated this was.  

Stand down Mikey, we got this one figured out now.

 

Sausage.jpg

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51 minutes ago, mikewof said:

I barely know my ass from my elbow wrt sausages ... but isn't Sheboygan a registered trade name, like Champagne?

If your sausage/drink doesn't come from Sheboygan/Champagne or registered to the Sheboygan/Champagne company then it is just a sausage/sparkling-wine, right?

It’s not the same thing. Champagne makes its claim based on the grapes have to be grown there because that’s where it gets it’s distinctive flavor. Probably nonsense, but whatever. 
 

Sheboygan is only known for brats because the city was basically started by German immigrants, and they brought their recipes with them. Our goofy little city just made them popular here in the U.S.  In reality, it’s Germany everyone should say thanks to. 

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