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It'll reach 80 here in Eastern NC today. The birds were chirping loudly at dawn this morning. The Bradford pears are just starting to blossom, and the red oaks have been causing people sinus distress for a couple of weeks.  Our neighborhood is on the lookout for ospreys to return any day now from their South American odyssey. Spring is about to roar in.

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Not many flights. Of course, all the bathrooms were blocked off. Every single one. But of course, people still went in and used them in the dark and there was no one to clean them, with predictable re

I really enjoyed my time living in Korea, though I have to say that it improved greatly in the 2010's. It used to be a really gritty city.  I enjoyed living in Hong Kong and especially Taiwan and Sing

Since I bought an "air fryer," 10 lbs of potatoes doesn't last all that long any more.  Fortunately, Mighty Snow Dog insists on daily hikes no matter how shitty the weather is.

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Spring is coming.

Word of the day: rasputitsa” (Russian: распу́тица).

Rasputitsa” is a Russian term for two seasons of the year, spring and autumn, when travel on unpaved roads or across country becomes difficult, owing to muddy conditions from rain or melting snow. "Rasputitsa" also refers to road conditions during both periods. (Napoleon’s and Hitler’s invasions of Russia were heavily influenced by weather conditions - the Nazi advance especially got bogged down by “rasputitsa”.)

A fascinating Twitter thread today on why the huge Russian military convoy currently  approaching Kyiv has been halted.  A former US Army truck maintenance and tire specialist (it’s a thing, seriously) briefly explains the tire-related maintenance/breakdown issues the massive Russian Army appears to be facing.  Actually, a quite interesting read. Incredible - I love the Internet!

https://mobile.twitter.com/TrentTelenko/status/1499164245250002944

DCE5660F-F009-40E3-88FF-EDDC19EC5A03.jpeg

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Nice temps this week, going to be cooler next week but the lowest high is predicted to be 58 and that’s a rain day.  

Getting work done on Anna Eleise.  Have all the old paint ground off of the keel and the hurricane damage to the keel is as mitigated as I could possibly do without creating a mold and pouring a new keel edge.  Getting the supports for the cockpit ready to bond.  Its been good.  Also getting some wood work done. Been a good week.  

Finally training for the two Senior Olympic Time Trials I am entered in later this spring.  

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Eighty-two here today. Pear tree has blossoms and a half-dozen ospreys are doing kamikaze swoops over the water. Spring has come roaring in.

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March: In like a lion, out like a lamb.

Mrs. Bull has yard work planned for me tomorrow. Moving dirt from where it is perfectly content to where she wants it. 

image.thumb.png.2ef4ad5cf099069268dd42a42f7e81a4.png

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More than anything, it's a few specific birds that hale spring here on this coast. Not the usual suspects - waterfowl - that seem to always be in transit or resting along the way. 

From a window I noticed a flock of Robins this week. They came out of the blue (literally) and descended on a few dormant fruit trees that clung to freeze dried berries. Over-fluffed for the cold and underfed, those trees are life savers right now. 

And always a pair, maybe two, of large hawks. Those two species are my sirens of spring. They get my attention. Now the usual suspects will fly in one by one. 

 

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This is about the time of year when big flocks of robins stop at our house for a few hours to water up, rest, and grab a bite on their way back north.

Haven't seen them yet, but we are getting large flocks of other migratory birds right now.

Don't know how they know we have a big birdbath full of water, but they do. We have to refill it several times an hour when the robins arrive. They are a noisy bunch.

 

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The past few days have been above freezing enough to de-ice the channel, then today we get this.  No Robins coming this week, just more snow.

23C8BA6A-F3C5-4C1F-9B69-D339286BE6D5.jpegLake Michigan channel

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No Robins here, not many birds except the water birds.  Had a couple of wood ducks on the lawn this morning and of course great blue heron fishing off of the seawall.  The Herons and Egrets stay here year round (as well as the Bald Eagles)  

However, the temps are much cooler today and rain and some cold predicted for this week.  Boat work stops in the rain and everything else moves indoors.  

 

A89F29E9-36D2-4B11-9521-FF955E4E25EA.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Santanasailor said:

No Robins here, not many birds except the water birds.  Had a couple of wood ducks on the lawn this morning and of course great blue heron fishing off of the seawall.  The Herons and Egrets stay here year round (as well as the Bald Eagles)  

However, the temps are much cooler today and rain and some cold predicted for this week.  Boat work stops in the rain and everything else moves indoors.  

 

A89F29E9-36D2-4B11-9521-FF955E4E25EA.jpeg

The male wood duck is as handsome a bird as you can find anywhere. We used to live in a place called Wood Duck Island.

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2 hours ago, toddster said:

Remember all those projects that were supposed to get done “over the winter”…?

And taxes…

:wacko:

I got mines done. The boat is ready NOW.

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5 hours ago, Santanasailor said:

No Robins here, not many birds except the water birds.  Had a couple of wood ducks on the lawn this morning and of course great blue heron fishing off of the seawall.  The Herons and Egrets stay here year round (as well as the Bald Eagles)  

However, the temps are much cooler today and rain and some cold predicted for this week.  Boat work stops in the rain and everything else moves indoors.  

 

A89F29E9-36D2-4B11-9521-FF955E4E25EA.jpeg

I so miss seeing wood ducks up here along with the Kestrels. I’m told they’re around but not for my eyes.

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8 hours ago, toddster said:

Remember all those projects that were supposed to get done “over the winter”…?

Yes - I suffered over the winter, working at the top of the mast many days and nights in a row after work, and many weekends, so that I don’t have to do it when the weather is good!  (Sounds backwards, I know...).  I’m not the type to wear a hair shirt, but I have the last two winters (electric windlass upgrade last winter; sails and rigging this one).  
 

Next winter I think I’ll do something fun and build a small boat for R2AK :-).  I’m thinking an Angus Row Cruiser...how hard could it be :-)

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8 hours ago, toddster said:

Remember all those projects that were supposed to get done “over the winter”…?

Yes - I suffered over the winter, many days and nights in a row, and many weekends, working at the top of the mast so that I don’t have to do it when the weather is good!  (Sounds backward, I know...). I’m not the type to wear a hair shirt, but I have the last two winters (electric windlass upgrade last winter; sails and rigging this one).  
 

Next winter I think I’ll do something fun and build a small boat for R2AK :-).  I’m thinking an Angus Row Cruiser...how hard could it be :-)

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4 hours ago, cyclone said:

I so miss seeing wood ducks up here along with the Kestrels. I’m told they’re around but not for my eyes.

I you look very carefully between the folds of the curtain, you can see a female wood duck on the railing of our lakeside porch.  Its a bad picture but the best I could get, she flew off immediately after I took this picture

 

 

43B7E5F4-13E9-41BE-8C8A-4515F194B73A.jpeg

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We get parrots every Spring and they've been flocking around for about a month now. Come up from Mexico and stay the summer. Lots of backyard fruit trees for them. They make very distinctive calls to one another as they fly around in flocks of 20-30 and they look funny as hell in the air, flapping at a terrific rate but not going very fast. Almost like overweight hummingbirds.

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2 hours ago, kinardly said:

We get parrots every Spring and they've been flocking around for about a month now. Come up from Mexico and stay the summer. Lots of backyard fruit trees for them. They make very distinctive calls to one another as they fly around in flocks of 20-30 and they look funny as hell in the air, flapping at a terrific rate but not going very fast. Almost like overweight hummingbirds.

Are we body-shaming parrots now? You brute.:P Hummingbirds are not a realistic body ideal for most birds, and social media just reinforces a false sense of healthy weight and activity levels. Hummingbirds, like fashion models, live on a diet of cigarettes and cocaine. Let us say to our parrot friends, "You are healthy birds with sweet, normal-sized bodies. Love yourself!"

Except for kākāpōs. Them's some lard-assed parrots, ought to be ashamed, letting themselves go like that. Too fat to fly.

Can Technology Help Save The Kākāpō, The World's Heaviest And Only  Flightless Parrot, From Extinction? Kids News Article

 

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It's a race to the finish line.  Not so many days left until launch, everything is on backorder, and an amazing amount of stuff to organize.  Health insurance, insurance, storage, mail forwarding...etc...

 

My brain however seems to have already left on sabbatical...

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3 minutes ago, Elegua said:

It's a race to the finish line.  Not so many days left until launch, everything is on backorder, and an amazing amount of stuff to organize.  Health insurance, insurance, storage, mail forwarding...etc...

 

My brain however seems to have already left on sabbatical...

It will all happen. Keep your eye on the prize.

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11 hours ago, Elegua said:

It's a race to the finish line.  Not so many days left until launch, everything is on backorder, and an amazing amount of stuff to organize.  Health insurance, insurance, storage, mail forwarding...etc...

 

My brain however seems to have already left on sabbatical...

Your boat's going to look funny sitting there unused while you're in jail. ;)

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6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Your boat's going to look funny sitting there unused while you're in jail. ;)

No funny. :angry: I have another week IF I don't go into the wrong COVID zone. IF no ones thinks they can pull a fast one while everyone is focussed on Europe. 

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13 minutes ago, Elegua said:

No funny. :angry: I have another week IF I don't go into the wrong COVID zone. IF no ones thinks they can pull a fast one while everyone is focussed on Europe. 

Frankly, I can't believe you accepted this assignment. You should have given them the middle finger and retired.

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1 minute ago, Ajax said:

Frankly, I can't believe you accepted this assignment. You should have given them the middle finger and retired.

My timing is impeccable. 

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Can’t get over how well the Sound ID feature of the Merlin Bird ID app works. It will ID multiple species calling, singing simultaneously. Free download from the Cornell Lab. Now’s a good time to try it when the mornings are getting more active. 

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March is always wacky in the Chesapeake area- a few days ago it was almost 80.  Forecast lows this weekend of 17.  Always a trick trying to figure out when to get the cover off.

Bottom job done during a warm spell a week or so ago- gotta get topsides buffed up and toerail sanded before launch on the 24th.  Got a cockpit seat locker lid in my basement- split open and recoring, hopefully done before this weekend.  Lotta work left to do in 2 weeks.

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Yes! 

Full-on cherry-popping moments; boat, de-winterizing, de-funking, bottom paint, et al and first splash,,,

Extra hour of light and a string of pleasant days coming, life starting @ 60 & blessed...

Peace ho

P-32 #3.jpg

P-32 #2.jpg

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7 hours ago, Bull City said:

What did I miss here?

I'm in lockdown in Shanghai. When I am released after 21 days, the city itself will probably be in lockdown, or at least it seems headed that way.  Six of 20 staff in my company are under various forms of lockdown for being in the wrong place at the wrong time or living in the wrong building.  

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8 hours ago, Bull City said:

@Elegua That brings a new meaning to "Shanghaied." I had no idea. Wish you the best. Keep us posted.

Best X 2,, only imagine environment, stay safe!

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On 3/12/2022 at 7:34 PM, Elegua said:

I'm in lockdown in Shanghai. When I am released after 21 days, the city itself will probably be in lockdown, or at least it seems headed that way.  Six of 20 staff in my company are under various forms of lockdown for being in the wrong place at the wrong time or living in the wrong building.  

There's a Tom Waits song in there someplace....

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On 3/12/2022 at 6:34 PM, Elegua said:

I'm in lockdown in Shanghai. When I am released after 21 days, the city itself will probably be in lockdown, or at least it seems headed that way.  Six of 20 staff in my company are under various forms of lockdown for being in the wrong place at the wrong time or living in the wrong building.  

Wrong country... :-). 

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On 3/8/2022 at 5:27 PM, accnick said:

It will all happen. Keep your eye on the prize.

Yes, yes, and yes.  There are many, many bumps, hurdles, apparent insolvencies, discouragements, unforeseen circumstances and sometimes just plain bullshit along the way! :-).

I’m dealing with a few of those now in the hard work stage, after the the figuring out stage - but I did just order a new sail, a drifter, a fun way to spend several thousand dollars.  Someone else is doing all the work this time :-)

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30 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Wrong country... :-). 

I’ve lived here three times in two different cities. I first came here in 1994. That China is long gone. It was good. I even had a Weta tri on a lake one time. We did some fun things before they got popular or restricted like visit the grottos in Dun Huang and attended the opening of the Olympics in ‘08.  I’m a history buff, so it’s fun, and sometimes a disappointment, to see the things you read about in class. 

I’m not a fan of big city living and COVID is making a mess. Three times is enough for me. I can’t imagine I’ll ever be back. 

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9 minutes ago, Elegua said:

I’ve lived here three times in two different cities. I first came here in 1994. That China is long gone. It was good. I even had a Weta tri on a lake one time. We did some fun things before they got popular or restricted like visit the grottos in Dun Huang and attended the opening of the Olympics in ‘08.  I’m a history buff, so it’s fun, and sometimes a disappointment, to see the things you read about in class. 

I’m not a fan of big city living and COVID is making a mess. Three times is enough for me. I can’t imagine I’ll ever be back. 

I lived in Japan almost four years, traveled to Korea, but never made it to China...no time.  But a friend and I had a plan to take the “ferry” from Osaka to Shanghai with our mtn bikes and cycle to Singapore.   Probably good we didn’t attempt it :-)

Yeah, I’m with you on big city living.  I feel blessed to live on an island, with easy access to a city, but also easy retreat well away from it, which makes it quickly vanish from my consciousness...
 

First I’m hearing of covid lockdowns in China - holy shit.

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I lived in Japan almost four years, traveled to Korea, but never made it to China...no time.  But a friend and I had a plan to take the “ferry” from Osaka to Shanghai with our mtn bikes and cycle to Singapore.   Probably good we didn’t attempt it :-)

Yeah, I’m with you on big city living.  I feel blessed to live on an island, with easy access to a city, but also easy retreat well away from it, which makes it quickly vanish from my consciousness...
 

First I’m hearing of covid lockdowns in China - holy shit.

I really enjoyed my time living in Korea, though I have to say that it improved greatly in the 2010's. It used to be a really gritty city.  I enjoyed living in Hong Kong and especially Taiwan and Singapore for almost opposite reasons.  Taiwan is great living, and in Singapore we enjoyed good sailing. I bought a sport boat and raced it with my family and my kids participated in the national sailing program.

Anyway, on holiday back in the states in 2009 I picked up a copy of Beth Leonard's book, I thought to myself I really want to this, and if I do really want to do this, I'd best get my finger out now.  So after some looking, I bought a boat surveyed, (reputable surveyor and CCA member), but sight unseen, in 2011.  I watched the survey on the harbor cam at the yard from Singapore. I still have a screen shot of the boat in the slings. Not the smartest start. I most certainly over paid. When I showed up, I found she stank of diesel, the bilge was full of oil, there were lots of leaks, almost flat batteries. ...etc... Plus, she was loaded to the gills with a metric shitte tonne kit from the PO's PO.  Everything was top of the line stuff from 1997, but used hard and then left to rot from 2002.  I even found a half melted chart of the N Atlantic in the bilge.  I think I raised the waterline at least 3-4" once I got all the stuff off.  Then we delivered her to Maine to refit. Possibly mistake No. 2, but at that time I had no idea.  Maine yards were still transitioning from building to service and the rates at a top of the line Maine yard were cheaper than a guy who never answered his phone in RI and for whom ABYC was a vague regulatory hassle. Might still be true. The yards were still suffering from the aftermath of 2008 and were willing to take on small vessels like mine. Today that's probably no longer true. 

Of course, on the delivery to Maine we ran into a big windline on Buzzard's Bay as soon as we turned north and spent the day bashing against the tide. and wind. There was a moment of panic when the stuffing box leaked, but look at those grins. 

80B22F91-B0FA-4021-BF73-379B6630E324_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.1b6a77fe3f3924374abdca7ed807d95a.jpeg

A moment later after I took this picture, I noticed we were sailing past the last buoy at the Hen and Chickens, and I want to say that I saw the wreck there, streaming in the seas looking like it was charging up the bay, but that is likely an unreliable memory.  We did make it to Sippican for the evening without sinking or hitting anything.  The next morning we topped up the fuel at Burr Brothers. Some older guy really know how to make us feel good by making some comment like, "looks like you're headed to Bermuda".  I then almost stalled then engine while backing up into a dock full of some very nice looking boats, but pulled off a 270 to get out of there without hitting anything. 

We went through the canal at first light and headed up to Maine in a light breeze northwest breeze.  I'll never forget the next morning off of Jeffries ledge.  I had the morning watch.  Everyone was asleep. The boat was quietly going to windward with the monitor driving as the sun came up. Sure, the boat was kind of a mess, but it really felt good. This is where we were supposed to be all along.  Finally.  I had no idea of what was to come over the next ten years.  Good thing, too. 

02142960-5D73-447B-BF73-97EF9992BC02_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.0b5935c1d21a84735f8fa82630149318.jpeg

3D4E19B3-CF9B-4B56-AAD7-9183FB61BAC3_1_105_c.jpeg

After I took the gudgeon off and cleaned the fuel tank, I realized how lucky we had been to get such benign conditions.   

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Spring is almost here, and Daylight Time has already arrived. I started a thread in General Anarchy about it. I was going to start it in CA, but I was concerned that some might say it was political. I don't think it is yet, but it's probably only a matter of time. Any how, have a look:

 

 

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6 hours ago, Bull City said:

Spring is almost here, and Daylight Time has already arrived. I started a thread in General Anarchy about it. I was going to start it in CA, but I was concerned that some might say it was political.

 

 

Political?  This (below) is political.  The freakin’ time on the clock isn’t political. :-)

https://www.newsweek.com/not-just-christmas-swiss-urged-stop-eating-cats-and-dogs-287378?fbclid=IwAR2AgaRWOaRsn7WCxFtTtSxYEl5h2zKH-RsDUoFSzQwwGfgzXRipEI_tBTw

25394D5D-CCC4-4926-8BB1-33D24F923744.jpeg

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On 3/15/2022 at 12:56 AM, Elegua said:

I really enjoyed my time living in Korea, though I have to say that it improved greatly in the 2010's. It used to be a really gritty city.  I enjoyed living in Hong Kong and especially Taiwan and Singapore for almost opposite reasons.  Taiwan is great living, and in Singapore we enjoyed good sailing. I bought a sport boat and raced it with my family and my kids participated in the national sailing program.

Anyway, on holiday back in the states in 2009 I picked up a copy of Beth Leonard's book, I thought to myself I really want to this, and if I do really want to do this, I'd best get my finger out now.  So after some looking, I bought a boat surveyed, (reputable surveyor and CCA member), but sight unseen, in 2011.  I watched the survey on the harbor cam at the yard from Singapore. I still have a screen shot of the boat in the slings. Not the smartest start. I most certainly over paid. When I showed up, I found she stank of diesel, the bilge was full of oil, there were lots of leaks, almost flat batteries. ...etc... Plus, she was loaded to the gills with a metric shitte tonne kit from the PO's PO.  Everything was top of the line stuff from 1997, but used hard and then left to rot from 2002.  I even found a half melted chart of the N Atlantic in the bilge.  I think I raised the waterline at least 3-4" once I got all the stuff off.  Then we delivered her to Maine to refit. Possibly mistake No. 2, but at that time I had no idea.  Maine yards were still transitioning from building to service and the rates at a top of the line Maine yard were cheaper than a guy who never answered his phone in RI and for whom ABYC was a vague regulatory hassle. Might still be true. The yards were still suffering from the aftermath of 2008 and were willing to take on small vessels like mine. Today that's probably no longer true. 

Of course, on the delivery to Maine we ran into a big windline on Buzzard's Bay as soon as we turned north and spent the day bashing against the tide. and wind. There was a moment of panic when the stuffing box leaked, but look at those grins. 

80B22F91-B0FA-4021-BF73-379B6630E324_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.1b6a77fe3f3924374abdca7ed807d95a.jpeg

A moment later after I took this picture, I noticed we were sailing past the last buoy at the Hen and Chickens, and I want to say that I saw the wreck there, streaming in the seas looking like it was charging up the bay, but that is likely an unreliable memory.  We did make it to Sippican for the evening without sinking or hitting anything.  The next morning we topped up the fuel at Burr Brothers. Some older guy really know how to make us feel good by making some comment like, "looks like you're headed to Bermuda".  I then almost stalled then engine while backing up into a dock full of some very nice looking boats, but pulled off a 270 to get out of there without hitting anything. 

We went through the canal at first light and headed up to Maine in a light breeze northwest breeze.  I'll never forget the next morning off of Jeffries ledge.  I had the morning watch.  Everyone was asleep. The boat was quietly going to windward with the monitor driving as the sun came up. Sure, the boat was kind of a mess, but it really felt good. This is where we were supposed to be all along.  Finally.  I had no idea of what was to come over the next ten years.  Good thing, too. 

02142960-5D73-447B-BF73-97EF9992BC02_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.0b5935c1d21a84735f8fa82630149318.jpeg

3D4E19B3-CF9B-4B56-AAD7-9183FB61BAC3_1_105_c.jpeg

After I took the gudgeon off and cleaned the fuel tank, I realized how lucky we had been to get such benign conditions.   

Great story!

My one trip north from Cape Cod Bay left us in Ptown harbor for 2 days ducking a noreaster, then a 10 hour motor on glassy calm water to Isles of Shoals for perhaps one of the finest evenings dining in the cockpit ever. It didn't hurt that neighbors kept rowing by complimenting our boat though.

I just did an inventory of frozen picked lobster meat left over from last summer. I couldn't decide whether to get a lobster license this summer or not since we had so much left over from last year. Down to about 16 lbs left, guess I better get that license after all. Looks like I'll have some fresh if you seek shelter in the Basin this year! The oyster farm is gone but I planted several thousand on the bottom in a secret spot, so there's that too.

Best of luck getting up here!

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

Great story!

My one trip north from Cape Cod Bay left us in Ptown harbor for 2 days ducking a noreaster, then a 10 hour motor on glassy calm water to Isles of Shoals for perhaps one of the finest evenings dining in the cockpit ever. It didn't hurt that neighbors kept rowing by complimenting our boat though.

I just did an inventory of frozen picked lobster meat left over from last summer. I couldn't decide whether to get a lobster license this summer or not since we had so much left over from last year. Down to about 16 lbs left, guess I better get that license after all. Looks like I'll have some fresh if you seek shelter in the Basin this year! The oyster farm is gone but I planted several thousand on the bottom in a secret spot, so there's that too.

Best of luck getting up here!

Dude, picked lobster is priced like gold these days. You are sitting on a treasure. Sorry to hear about the oyster farm, but glad you have a stash. I figure we're due for at least one trip into Casco before we shove off.  We'll be sure to give you a bell :D 

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45 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Fishermen have it to themselves now. No frikkin yachts in the harbor, they can run full throttle right to the bait landing.  Record landing last season they’re champing at the bit. 

C7FA718E-946F-4D0E-A3D9-A5FFB872A6E3.thumb.jpeg.eaae6c574950dcb2c1f1fb6268514e0d.jpeg

Is that the building that used to house Shepherds Pie? Man, they had awesome shrimp tacos there for not too much $.  Everything good and cheap goes away!

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3 minutes ago, Willin' said:

Is that the building that used to house Shepherds Pie? Man, they had awesome shrimp tacos there for not too much $.  Everything good and cheap goes away!

Close. Two lots up was Shepards Pie, now 18 Central, a raw bar restaurant. The building in the photo has Nina June, Tuscan fare (which she has background, exceptional food), and a coffee/breakfast place. 

 

 In between and under construction (and local litigation) is the Rockport Harbor Hotel, a boutique hotel that will also have an 80 seat restaurant and a bar, also with harbor views. 

 

Now you can come into Rockport and get fed and hammered, in three adjoining places. 

 

There used to a restaurant in the red building called the Sail Loft. The food business is tricky, especially in the new world, post covid. 

761982425_RockportHarborduskMJ.thumb.jpg.2ac0b3d012491c401251f53c68f13dea.jpg

 

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Springtime in Louisiana, rain so heavy you cannot see across the cove.  Flood warnings, tornado watches and severe thunderstorm warnings.  Won’t be any boatwork or outdoor cycling training today.  

image.gif

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Here in Boot Key Harbor Florida. It’s windy 20+ Yesterday and today but the locals still come around 

AD4022B8-E873-4E05-8D37-C4C90498A5F7.jpeg

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On 3/12/2022 at 6:34 PM, Elegua said:

I'm in lockdown in Shanghai. When I am released after 21 days, the city itself will probably be in lockdown, or at least it seems headed that way.  Six of 20 staff in my company are under various forms of lockdown for being in the wrong place at the wrong time or living in the wrong building.  

Yikes. Being locked down in a foreign country is one of my nightmares. I used to go back and forth between HK and Shenzhen. I always wondered what would happen if I got stuck in no-man's land on the bridge at that one crossing (I don't think it is used much anymore). You check out of China then walk for quite a while across an enclosed pedestrian bridge then you enter HK. What would happen if neither country would let you in? Would you just have to stay on the bridge forever?

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19 minutes ago, mckenzie.keith said:

Yikes. Being locked down in a foreign country is one of my nightmares. I used to go back and forth between HK and Shenzhen. I always wondered what would happen if I got stuck in no-man's land on the bridge at that one crossing (I don't think it is used much anymore). You check out of China then walk for quite a while across an enclosed pedestrian bridge then you enter HK. What would happen if neither country would let you in? Would you just have to stay on the bridge forever?

You're already in the shit with that bolded statement. :lol:   

Being in lockdown just takes away any pretenses. You get tested every 48hrs if you want to go anywhere in the city. You also need a green health code and travel code. I can't get the travel code because I don't have a local phone. Testing positive means a trip to COVID camp if you don't have a Shanghai residence.  Not many here on a business visa.  Actually 20 of 29 staff are on lock down. My entire facility in SZ is on lockdown and I can't get any of the candidates I need to interview into the city nor can I visit most of the facilities I need to see as the district they are in is locked down. In all, this was a silly trip as I predicted before I left.  The city is a ghost town. 

Still, can't lockdown the ice cream. 

IMG_0546.thumb.jpeg.edd0c8b439acb021723d147be8f7baa8.jpeg

 

 

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Launch day tomorrow morning..

Toerail sanded, hull buffed, bottom done, fresh gold on the cove stripe.  Lotta work in the last week, my body feels like I've been through boot camp!

More work on other teak when she's in the water- boat work never ends...

20220322_174932.jpg

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1 hour ago, bgytr said:

Launch day tomorrow morning..

Toerail sanded, hull buffed, bottom done, fresh gold on the cove stripe.  Lotta work in the last week, my body feels like I've been through boot camp!

More work on other teak when she's in the water- boat work never ends...

20220322_174932.jpg

 

Sigh...what I wouldn't give to paint my topsides.

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4 minutes ago, Ajax said:

 

Sigh...what I wouldn't give to paint my topsides.

I hear an owner-applied Alexseal job is pretty satisfying...

I'm in the same (but different) boat as you, but, being white, my topsides still look good from afar.

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18 minutes ago, Jim in Halifax said:

I hear an owner-applied Alexseal job is pretty satisfying...

I'm in the same (but different) boat as you, but, being white, my topsides still look good from afar.

I'm debating between my standing rigging and painting the topsides as the next big project.  There is nothing obviously wrong with my rigging, it's just old. You've heard all the arguments for replacing SS rigging so no need to elaborate further. 

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3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I'm debating between my standing rigging and painting the topsides as the next big project.  There is nothing obviously wrong with my rigging, it's just old. You've heard all the arguments for replacing SS rigging so no need to elaborate further

I'm almost finished with my standing rigging replacement, just left is the backstay. We'll probably have that replaced in the next month or two. My Rod rigging was original to the boat over 40 years old.

My paint job is barely passable. It's an old awlgrip job with lots of scratches.  Looks ok from 2 or more boatlenghts.

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I'm in the middle of replacing my standing rigging and gooseneck. I don't know the age. Might be 1996. Might be 2006. 

I'd love to fix my old awlgrip, but not in the budget this year. It's passable at 10'.

 

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On 3/17/2022 at 11:32 AM, Kris Cringle said:

they’re champing at the bit. 

<pedantic>I was gratified to see this expression used correctly. So often I read or hear "chomping at the bit."</pedantic>

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Doing an experiment thought you guys might be interested... I melted surfboard wax and painted it on the prop blades as a poor man's propspeed coating.  Will see how it works out.  I might be going for a swim with the scraper soon!

20220323_093405.jpg

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52 minutes ago, bgytr said:

I'm almost finished with my standing rigging replacement, just left is the backstay. We'll probably have that replaced in the next month or two. My Rod rigging was original to the boat over 40 years old.

My paint job is barely passable. It's an old awlgrip job with lots of scratches.  Looks ok from 2 or more boatlenghts.

I'm gratified to hear that I'm not the only person who replaces the rigging piecemeal instead of all at once.

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13 minutes ago, bgytr said:

Doing an experiment thought you guys might be interested... I melted surfboard wax and painted it on the prop blades as a poor man's propspeed coating.  Will see how it works out.  I might be going for a swim with the scraper soon!

20220323_093405.jpg

Count me curious to see if that works. I tried the rattle-can version of prop-coat one year. Worked well in cold water. 

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I've had surprisingly good results with Petit zinc prop spray even in the Chesapeake's warm water. It lasts a solid year if properly applied.

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58 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Count me curious to see if that works. I tried the rattle-can version of prop-coat one year. Worked well in cold water. 

Me too. My new pod drive has a plastic prop. It's in a fresh water lake where algae is the main growth.

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18 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I've had surprisingly good results with Petit zinc prop spray even in the Chesapeake's warm water. It lasts a solid year if properly applied.

Is there much prep work?

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23 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Is there much prep work?

Just getting the surface clean and free of all prior marine growth. I've never primed the surface but I think there is a primer that you can buy.

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54 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Me too. My new pod drive has a plastic prop. It's in a fresh water lake where algae is the main growth.

I'd worry about putting melted wax on a plastic prop tho..

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High as she'll go in the slings getting centerboard re-surfaced.  Will have to do the last bit of the centerboard over the water so it can be fully lowered

20220323_114739.jpg

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I don't recall (if I ever knew) what's in it, but perhaps the small, exorbitantly expensive can of "transducer paint" would also serve for plastic props?

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@bgytr I forget, where are you and where are you sailing?  A White Rocks Marina popped up locally in my Google-fu. Are you in Maryland?

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

I'm gratified to hear that I'm not the only person who replaces the rigging piecemeal instead of all at once.

Ya my rigger suggested doing the lowers first as those are most likely to fail first.  So I did the lowers, headstay, babystay, and jib furler winter before last, then the intermidiates and uppers this past winter.  Backstay upcoming.

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Just now, bgytr said:

Yep

Ah, ok. Your boat is well suited to the nooks and crannies around here. An 11' foot draft with the board down...wow!

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8 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ah, ok. Your boat is well suited to the nooks and crannies around here. An 11' foot draft with the board down...wow!

Ya it's a good Chesapeake boat.  Can be tricky upwind with the board down in spots tho.  You on the Bay too?

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10 hours ago, Elegua said:

You're already in the shit with that bolded statement. :lol:   

Being in lockdown just takes away any pretenses. You get tested every 48hrs if you want to go anywhere in the city. You also need a green health code and travel code. I can't get the travel code because I don't have a local phone. Testing positive means a trip to COVID camp if you don't have a Shanghai residence.  Not many here on a business visa.  Actually 20 of 29 staff are on lock down. My entire facility in SZ is on lockdown and I can't get any of the candidates I need to interview into the city nor can I visit most of the facilities I need to see as the district they are in is locked down. In all, this was a silly trip as I predicted before I left.  The city is a ghost town. 

Still, can't lockdown the ice cream. 

IMG_0546.thumb.jpeg.edd0c8b439acb021723d147be8f7baa8.jpeg

 

 

brandon pop

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