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Fraculation


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This past racing season, my good friend BeerDidClam introduced my crew to the benefits of rig fraculation, i.e., pulling the rig forward on the downwind leg. But I have two questions about fraculation:

 

1) Do the benefits of fraculation begin to diminish as one heats up the boat by sailing higher angles? If so, approximately at what AWA does it no longer make sense to fraculate the rig?

2) In a corollary question to (1), is there an apparent wind strength in which fraculation doesn't make sense? For instance, without exception, every race this year in which we fraculated the rig, was in light air. Do the benefits of fraculation diminish with increase in AWS? In higher apparent winds, is it faster to leave the rig raked back rather than pulling it far forward when sailing downwind?

 

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good damn question, Cheap. I will sit back and see what the smart guys say,

before I even take a shot at this!

 

but a lot of the consideration has got to pertain to what the boat is, what

the sail plan is, type and depth of rudder, etc. whether you can keep the

boat under the rig with the chute all powered up and stuff.

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BDC, I remember the time you fraculated the rig on the first downwind at the Leukemia Cup -- it was like kicking in a turbo, despite the lite air. Amazing, really, what a big difference it can make. Kinda weird watching the forestay flopping around up there, though (note the limp forestay in the pic -- and this is in < 5 kts!).

 

post-3599-1135043219_thumb.jpg

 

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The Henderson 30 that I sometimes (never often enough) crewed on did this on every downwind leg - except for true reaches. Just take a look at what the Stars are doing with their rigs! I seem to remember an interview where Vince Brun said that he is always looking for "flow" over the sails - as opposed to just blocking the air.

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In the Soling, we release backstay and pull forestay on max in all running conditions when there is enough air to fill the chute. There is probably about six feet of movement at the mast head between raked aft and forward positions. In very light air, it pays more to keep the chute higher in the sky. Fraculating does add a noticeable amount of speed by getting the belly of the chute away from the main. It is much easier to keep it full in the lighter stuff, and the boat is more controllable in the stronger stuff, as there is less tendancy to broach. BUT...you must make sure your rig will survive in stronger winds. Quite a few Soling masts have been lost due to raking forward without easing the lower shrouds, inverting the mast. Most boats can't fraculate enough for this to be a concern, though.

 

I personally bring the rig back vertical when reaching any less than 100 AWA. It seems to reduce leeway having it back.

 

Stuart Walker covers this topic quite nicely in a couple of his books (Manual of Sail Trim and Advanced Racing Tactics I think)

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Ok, I'll bite. I understand the concept, but have never tried this. So what would be the proper way to "fraculate," or more specifically, fraculate a boat with a fractional kite and swept spreaders?

 

Clip your headsail halyard to the bow (usually via a strop+clip so that you can keep the headsail pre-fed and just need to unclip the strop to hoist) and crank the bugger on hard (ie: winch it)... oh and let off the backstay first.

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A friend with a Farr 39 does this all the time! You release the backstay, ease off the runners big time and attach a spare halyard to the stem and grind like a sonofabitch. Rig goes way forward and off you go! And there is an automatic warning sound when you have reached just past the point where you should have stopped grinding. It's a cracking noise followed immediately by a dust storm of carbon bits and the afterguard yelling to watch your heads!

 

Works great and you get a new mast, too. You do tend to shrimp the chute, though.

 

It's a real challenge to do this with swept spreaders.

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Ok, I'll bite. I understand the concept, but have never tried this. So what would be the proper way to "fraculate," or more specifically, fraculate a boat with a fractional kite and swept spreaders?

 

Clip your headsail halyard to the bow (usually via a strop+clip so that you can keep the headsail pre-fed and just need to unclip the strop to hoist) and crank the bugger on hard (ie: winch it)... oh and let off the backstay first.

Pretty much what we do to...nothing hard, although I don't think we get the mast as far up as you could on other rigs.

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I almost hate it that so many good go fast (no longer) secrets are getting out to the pub-lick, but there are a few thing to remember.

If you have swept spreaders, you probably won't get much bang for the buck, but at least put some tension on the jib halyard lead forward.

On "0" angle spreaders, you can go for it.

Some levels of thought are to never go beyond straight, and just take the pre-bend out of the rig.

Other levelsof thought are that you can bend the mast just as much forward, as you do with the pre-bending.

Take your pick.

Some boats like the old Taylor 49 "NUMBERS 97" had a mast that actualy had a hinge at the deck level in order to really get the hounds forward. Crazy like a Star boat, where the hounds gets over the stem fitting.

And when doing this on a Star boat, the headsail luff wire ends up open, being the "new leach" on the jib.

 

Another thing to remember, if you get headed, or come up on the wind, that as the pole goes foreward to the headstay, that the pressure is now pushing aft at the spinnaker pole, and you'll end up inverting the mast a lot.

The crew needs to be prepared to ease the "fraculator" and take on the runner to prevent the mast from inverting. Same goes for if you start coming into a wave set (powerboat crossing the bow when running deep for example).

 

And, for gybing in heavy air, I like to ease the fraculator, and take up on the set runner a bit before the gybe. This gives you more "oops" room to allow the mast to go forward during the interchange of the runners during the gybe.

 

Then there's the goofball scenariou when the leeward mark is getting close, and the Dude/Dudette on the runners starts grinding before the other crew have a chance to let off on the jib halyard.

 

I tend to fraculate a little less on carbon, and more on aluminium.

 

Anybody got a photo from aloft of a fraculated mast?

And for the caption....:

as the T-shirts that were being sold on the streets in Washington DC during Nancy Reagan's anti drug campaing were saying, "Just Say MO"!

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research and get a basic understanding of aerodynamic principals before you ask dumb questions on the interweb. or go sailboat racing, for that matter.

 

 

 

 

 

edit: yeah, yeah, yeah, that was an asshole remark. sorry cheapshchat. Although, if you are the brilliant aerodynamic engineer you claim to be, shouldn't you be schooling us on the principles of fraculation rather than the other way around?

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research and get a basic understanding of aerodynamic principals before you ask dumb questions on the interweb. or go sailboat racing, for that matter.

 

You're an asshole C-Unit. Perhaps I don't have the stick time you have but I do understand aero/hydro principles better than most since that is what I do for a living. Despite what you think, I don't believe this was a dumb question and I don't think it is intuitive either. And I suspect that many on this board (good sailors among them) are probably curious about the answers to the questions I've asked. But I'll go ahead and humor you Einstein -- please explain the aerodynamic principles (with solutions to the complete 6DOF equations of motion, including rig structural dynamics) to the questions I've posed. If you can do that, then I will STFU.

 

Now, go back to your bridge, troll.

 

cheap

 

I almost hate it that so many good go fast (no longer) secrets are getting out to the pub-lick, but there are a few thing to remember.

If you have swept spreaders, you probably won't get much bang for the buck, but at least put some tension on the jib halyard lead forward.

On "0" angle spreaders, you can go for it.

Some levels of thought are to never go beyond straight, and just take the pre-bend out of the rig.

Other levelsof thought are that you can bend the mast just as much forward, as you do with the pre-bending.

Take your pick.

Some boats like the old Taylor 49 "NUMBERS 97" had a mast that actualy had a hinge at the deck level in order to really get the hounds forward. Crazy like a Star boat, where the hounds gets over the stem fitting.

And when doing this on a Star boat, the headsail luff wire ends up open, being the "new leach" on the jib.

 

Another thing to remember, if you get headed, or come up on the wind, that as the pole goes foreward to the headstay, that the pressure is now pushing aft at the spinnaker pole, and you'll end up inverting the mast a lot.

The crew needs to be prepared to ease the "fraculator" and take on the runner to prevent the mast from inverting. Same goes for if you start coming into a wave set (powerboat crossing the bow when running deep for example).

 

And, for gybing in heavy air, I like to ease the fraculator, and take up on the set runner a bit before the gybe. This gives you more "oops" room to allow the mast to go forward during the interchange of the runners during the gybe.

 

Then there's the goofball scenariou when the leeward mark is getting close, and the Dude/Dudette on the runners starts grinding before the other crew have a chance to let off on the jib halyard.

 

I tend to fraculate a little less on carbon, and more on aluminium.

 

Anybody got a photo from aloft of a fraculated mast?

And for the caption....:

as the T-shirts that were being sold on the streets in Washington DC during Nancy Reagan's anti drug campaing were saying, "Just Say MO"!

 

Excellent reply, Ocean! Thanks for the info. It helps tremendously.

 

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research and get a basic understanding of aerodynamic principals before you ask dumb questions on the interweb. or go sailboat racing, for that matter.

 

 

C-unt...dude...put down the crack pipe.

 

uh...Cheapster is a freakin engineer involved in the aerospace

industry so maybe his knowledge of aerodynamic "principals" might just...uh...generally exceed yours? ya THINK?

 

Do we need to hunt you down in St Petey and 'SPLAIN A FEW THINGS TO YOU?

 

BTW, here's Unit's idea of stick time and air-o-dynamix. I cant attest to Unit's "principals"...I went

to a different high school.

post-1770-1135093119_thumb.jpg

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Haha I don’t think one needs to frac that hard!

As for higher wind angles I’ve not noticed a difference one way or the other. However I don’t usually frac at higher angles in the bigger breeze, something about the spinnaker pole accidentally snapping the jib halyard. For example sailing a tight angle in a point to point.

The benefits on the run are noticeable, last summer when we lengthened our backstay to allow more fraculation we noticed the improvement. Also if you are in a area with a lot of stink boaters the benefit is that your rig doesn’t flop around in the chop. That being said a common scenario for sailing high angles would be in light air and in light air having the rig flopping in chop cannot be fast. So in that case I’d frac at a higher angle.

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It's a real challenge to do this with swept spreaders.

A real challenge as in it just doesn't work well, or a real challenge as in someone needs to yell timber?

I was being facetious w/the crack about swept speaders. If you grind hard on the forward-led halyard, you just start to point load the swept spreader shroud tangs and flirt with rig failure. You can do it a little and get away with it on a swept spreader rig...but not too much. If you have rod rigging, you wind up stretching the rod and that ain't good. But you still get that warning sound after exceeding SWL.

 

Fraculation is one of those benefits you get by having to put up with pain-in-the-ass runners. :huh:

 

C-unit's being just a little harsh so close to Christmas. Maybe the poor thing is all alone.

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I almost hate it that so many good go fast (no longer) secrets are getting out to the pub-lick, but there are a few thing to remember.

If you have swept spreaders, you probably won't get much bang for the buck, but at least put some tension on the jib halyard lead forward.

On "0" angle spreaders, you can go for it.

Some levels of thought are to never go beyond straight, and just take the pre-bend out of the rig.

Other levelsof thought are that you can bend the mast just as much forward, as you do with the pre-bending.

Take your pick.

Some boats like the old Taylor 49 "NUMBERS 97" had a mast that actualy had a hinge at the deck level in order to really get the hounds forward. Crazy like a Star boat, where the hounds gets over the stem fitting.

And when doing this on a Star boat, the headsail luff wire ends up open, being the "new leach" on the jib.

 

Another thing to remember, if you get headed, or come up on the wind, that as the pole goes foreward to the headstay, that the pressure is now pushing aft at the spinnaker pole, and you'll end up inverting the mast a lot.

The crew needs to be prepared to ease the "fraculator" and take on the runner to prevent the mast from inverting. Same goes for if you start coming into a wave set (powerboat crossing the bow when running deep for example).

 

And, for gybing in heavy air, I like to ease the fraculator, and take up on the set runner a bit before the gybe. This gives you more "oops" room to allow the mast to go forward during the interchange of the runners during the gybe.

 

Then there's the goofball scenariou when the leeward mark is getting close, and the Dude/Dudette on the runners starts grinding before the other crew have a chance to let off on the jib halyard.

 

I tend to fraculate a little less on carbon, and more on aluminium.

 

Anybody got a photo from aloft of a fraculated mast?

And for the caption....:

as the T-shirts that were being sold on the streets in Washington DC during Nancy Reagan's anti drug campaing were saying, "Just Say MO"!

 

 

We "Frac" all the time in the light stuff and we make real certain not to go past straightening the mast .....The Mumm's rig is real thin and has an awefull lot of pre-bend in and we try to get some of it out. We do not "frac" in over 15 and not when flying the A-Sym in light stuff where we are driving hot angles or in any reaching.

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Pretty Wavelength !!

 

Thanks, Pointy! I love the boat but I still have lots to learn about how she handles. This is the second full season we've had her and I gotta admit it hasn't been as good a year as our first. We came pretty close to winning the Leukemia Cup were it not for the wind shutting down completely in an adverse current 20 yards short of the finish line and foolishly not covering the rest of the fleet for when the wind finally did fill in.

 

The mainsail in the pic is brand new and, though I love the shape and its performance in moderate to heavy air, the full top two battens have been the bain of my existence in lite air. It is near impossible to pop an inverted batten in lite air so I need to go back to the sailmaker for some lite air battens.

 

The picture, BTW, was taken at our Frostbite Regatta the second week in November on the Potomac River -- winds were very lite and temps were in the 70's. The entire Fall seemed to follow that pattern but about a week after that regatta, the bottom dropped out and we've been freezing our asses off since!

 

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The benefits are quite real in the lighter stuff.

 

In the heavy, be aware it is possible to break the mast by inverting it.

Just let the backstay off about 80%, but not all the way unless you

don't like your mast and sails and want to give them to the insurance Co.

The rig will rock forward all by itself, no need to force it. You don't want

anybody on the nose for even one second more than is absolutely

needed in a blow as well.

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Pretty Wavelength !!

 

I need to go back to the sailmaker for some lite air battens.

 

 

cheap

 

 

Crap, that reminds me! I had these carbon fiber/foam/carbon fiber battens in my newest Q main.

Only: they were really easy to break as they were limber as hell. ANyway, I took a couple broken

ones down to Q annapolis and they switched them out with new stiffer ones free of charge (gotta

love Quantum for service) But I still have the old ones...we oughta try cutting them down to WL24 length, use the thinnest sections, and see if they are better in the light stuff. I would bet dollars to doughnutz they will be.

 

remind me because they aint doin' nothin' except taking up space in mein basement.

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good thing you didnt post the next image in the sequence, Cheapo.

told ya not to crank on too hard...

 

 

is that photoshoped? or did you really snap the rig?

 

Chopped--you can look at the standing rigging leads.

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good thing you didnt post the next image in the sequence, Cheapo.

told ya not to crank on too hard...

 

 

is that photoshoped? or did you really snap the rig?

 

Chopped--you can look at the standing rigging leads.

 

 

yea... i didnt even bother to look at that

ooopps :unsure:

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yea... i didnt even bother to look at that

ooopps :unsure:

 

Definitely chopped. BDC has too much free time on his hands .... <_<

 

We did nearly lose the rig this year when a cotter pin for the upper forestay disappeared over the side in big air early in the season with the genoa, forestay, and Tuff Luff dropping to the deck and water. Fortunately, we were driving downwind but had just raised the jib and doused the chute ready to round the leeward mark. We were literally several feet from rounding the mark and loading the rig up when it happened. Quick thinking by the crew saved the rig. Like I said, it wasn't a good year.

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any ideas on where to attach jib halyard for fraculation on a hendo 30? also, how far past vertical is it safe to go?

 

For an attachment point, it is best to have a line with a shackle attached coming from the horn to a point 12" above the tuf-luf entry. Then, attached the shackle on this line to the halyard (but not through the openning of the halyard shackle so that it is possible for a jib change without releasing the fraculator).

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Be careful when doing this. A premature fraculation going upwind will cause your stick to go limp and you will become impotent.

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Here are a few photos to illustrate the range of motion we have when moving the rig on the Evelyn from upwind to dowwind. We found it critical to build our backstay setup not only for upwind tension, but the desired range of motion as well.

post-3720-1135205761_thumb.jpg post-3720-1135205775_thumb.jpg post-3720-1135205727_thumb.jpg

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any ideas on where to attach jib halyard for fraculation on a hendo 30? also, how far past vertical is it safe to go?

 

For an attachment point, it is best to have a line with a shackle attached coming from the horn to a point 12" above the tuf-luf entry. Then, attached the shackle on this line to the halyard (but not through the openning of the halyard shackle so that it is possible for a jib change without releasing the fraculator).

 

Brian, I was following along with you in the first sentence but lost you on the second. We clip our halyard to the fraculator strop using the halyard shackle (our fraculator does not have a shackle, only a luggage tag loop to clip the halyard shackle to). If the fraculator strop did have a shackle, my nature inclination would be to clip it to the halyard shackle. Are you saying you clip the fraculator strop to the jib shackle swivel behind the shackle opening? I like that arrangement, actually. much better than what I'm currently using.

 

cheap

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Crap, that reminds me! I had these carbon fiber/foam/carbon fiber battens in my newest Q main.

Only: they were really easy to break as they were limber as hell. ANyway, I took a couple broken

ones down to Q annapolis and they switched them out with new stiffer ones free of charge (gotta

love Quantum for service) But I still have the old ones...we oughta try cutting them down to WL24 length, use the thinnest sections, and see if they are better in the light stuff. I would bet dollars to doughnutz they will be.

 

remind me because they aint doin' nothin' except taking up space in mein basement.

 

Clam, I'll take you up on that. I've actually thought of prototyping a few at our composites shop at work. But I'll probably have to make a bunch with different stiffnesses to test. I envision a lot of trial and error before I find something that works. That's why I thought I'd go back to UK-Halsey and see if they can recommend a lite air batten - I would hope that they would know the proper stiffness and batten pocket tension.

 

cheap

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pretty instructive shots of Remedy, musicman. WHat do you

do with your checkstays when you frac on...are they on

lightly to help keep the mast in column?

 

I was surprised at how much deeper the local (should say X-local) Evelyn

"Jammin'" sailed during ARW this past September. I was doing bow and

we frac'ed to a piece of spectra...gawd what a difference. We always

sailed Dire Wolf pretty hot, probably a little too hot, and now I see it really is possible to

soak a little more and keep pace with the Frers and 10M's of the world

(sail # 666 and the N/M30 possibly being exceptions)

 

Looking forward to this season...if that Carbon 1 is available, I'll get with

you after Xmas extracts its pound of flesh from my already shredded checkbook.

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any ideas on where to attach jib halyard for fraculation on a hendo 30? also, how far past vertical is it safe to go?

 

For an attachment point, it is best to have a line with a shackle attached coming from the horn to a point 12" above the tuf-luf entry. Then, attached the shackle on this line to the halyard (but not through the openning of the halyard shackle so that it is possible for a jib change without releasing the fraculator).

 

Brian, I was following along with you in the first sentence but lost you on the second. We clip our halyard to the fraculator strop using the halyard shackle (our fraculator does not have a shackle, only a luggage tag loop to clip the halyard shackle to). If the fraculator strop did have a shackle, my nature inclination would be to clip it to the halyard shackle. Are you saying you clip the fraculator strop to the jib shackle swivel behind the shackle opening? I like that arrangement, actually. much better than what I'm currently using.

 

cheap

If you have a small snapshackle on the fraculator line (I use the tiny little Wichard one thats available) the foredeck can clip the frac. to the eye of the halyard snap shackle after refeeding the luff in the prefeed. This leaves the opening part of the halyard snap shackle free (with the head of the genoa hanging off of it). If you need to switch headsails on the downwind, the halyard snap shackle is free to come off the head without releasing the frac.

 

At leeward mark, foredeck simply pops the fraculator snap shackle (while it's still loaded) and the frac is off, genoa is ready to hoist.

 

We always frac on my boat (Moore 24). Seems fast from 90 apparent and down (essentially anytime you want leehelm, rig forward is fast). Got mine set up so with backstay fully off and full frac. the mast has maybe 1/2" of inversion from the aft lower shrouds.

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[if you have a small snapshackle on the fraculator line (I use the tiny little Wichard one thats available) the foredeck can clip the frac. to the eye of the halyard snap shackle after refeeding the luff in the prefeed. This leaves the opening part of the halyard snap shackle free (with the head of the genoa hanging off of it). If you need to switch headsails on the downwind, the halyard snap shackle is free to come off the head without releasing the frac.

 

At leeward mark, foredeck simply pops the fraculator snap shackle (while it's still loaded) and the frac is off, genoa is ready to hoist.

 

We always frac on my boat (Moore 24). Seems fast from 90 apparent and down (essentially anytime you want leehelm, rig forward is fast). Got mine set up so with backstay fully off and full frac. the mast has maybe 1/2" of inversion from the aft lower shrouds.

 

slater-san: thanks for that. Makes perfect sense. You frac at 90 apparent?! Never would have guessed you could go that high. What about AWS? Is there a limit above which you don't worry about frac'ing?

 

cheap

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slater-san: thanks for that. Makes perfect sense. You frac at 90 apparent?! Never would have guessed you could go that high. What about AWS? Is there a limit above which you don't worry about frac'ing?

 

cheap

 

In my mind, it's all about balance. Sailing deep, you want the rig/sails to pull the bow down (lee helm). Reaching you want the helm to be neutral. Normally beam reaching (esp in breeze) the helm tends to load up on most boats so rig forward tends to balance the boat. We don't do a whole lot of beam reaching in big breeze, but in most cases on my boat, if the spinn is up, we're frac'd forward. With the little give in my 5/32" technora jib halyard at full length and with mainsheet tension trying to pull the rig back ,there's really no way to lock the rig full forward while beam reaching, but we still try to keep the forestay nice and "floppy".

 

SS

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any ideas on where to attach jib halyard for fraculation on a hendo 30? also, how far past vertical is it safe to go?

 

For an attachment point, it is best to have a line with a shackle attached coming from the horn to a point 12" above the tuf-luf entry. Then, attached the shackle on this line to the halyard (but not through the openning of the halyard shackle so that it is possible for a jib change without releasing the fraculator).

 

Brian, I was following along with you in the first sentence but lost you on the second. We clip our halyard to the fraculator strop using the halyard shackle (our fraculator does not have a shackle, only a luggage tag loop to clip the halyard shackle to). If the fraculator strop did have a shackle, my nature inclination would be to clip it to the halyard shackle. Are you saying you clip the fraculator strop to the jib shackle swivel behind the shackle opening? I like that arrangement, actually. much better than what I'm currently using.

 

cheap

 

Exactly as you think. Although contrary to what slater-san says, we always unload the fraculator before releasing the shackle on the strop. The loads are somewhat high and it makes the release simple without having to worry about any whiplash from the halyard/jib (this is on a BH36 and Express 37). Another benefit to this is the halyard is always clipped to something (the sail or the strop attached to the halyard), which minimizes any chance of losing the halyard in a transfer from sail to strop.

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Exactly as you think. Although contrary to what slater-san says, we always unload the fraculator before releasing the shackle on the strop. The loads are somewhat high and it makes the release simple without having to worry about any whiplash from the halyard/jib (this is on a BH36 and Express 37). Another benefit to this is the halyard is always clipped to something (the sail or the strop attached to the halyard), which minimizes any chance of losing the halyard in a transfer from sail to strop.

 

I guess on a bigger boat that's a concern. On a little boat like Cheap's or mine, don't see the need to unload the frac before release. We never have on my boat.

 

As far as J-24's.....as mentioned above, boats with swept spreaders and lots of upwind rake, it will be hard to get the rig forward very far for much benefit.

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I guess on a bigger boat that's a concern. On a little boat like Cheap's or mine, Don't see the need to unload the frac before release. We never have on my boat.

 

As far as J-24's.....as mentioned above, boats with swept spreaders and lots of upwind rake, it will be hard to get the rig forward very far for much benefit.

 

Yeah, on my personal boat it isn't an issue at all--you don't go forward on a Hobie 16...

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On the J109 with roller furling and swept spreaders we have seen a big improvement in downwind performance in light to medium breeze when we ease the backstay, cleat of the furling line then tension the jib sheets on the winches. Now I am wondering if I should just take the second jib halyard, run it down to a cleat in the bow and crank it on. Any thoughts???

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research and get a basic understanding of aerodynamic principals before you ask dumb questions on the interweb. or go sailboat racing, for that matter.

 

 

C-unt...dude...put down the crack pipe.

 

uh...Cheapster is a freakin engineer involved in the aerospace

industry so maybe his knowledge of aerodynamic "principals" might just...uh...generally exceed yours? ya THINK?

 

Do we need to hunt you down in St Petey and 'SPLAIN A FEW THINGS TO YOU?

 

BTW, here's Unit's idea of stick time and air-o-dynamix. I cant attest to Unit's "principals"...I went

to a different high school.

Shit, boys. Its all love. I think I was bored and just wanted to stir some shit when I posted that (errr, I had probably been drinking too. Theres a shocker for ya')

 

 

 

I'll put down the crackpipe.

 

 

 

 

For real though, thanks for all the good technical-style info in this thread, I now have a better understanding of why I'm in such a hurry to hook up that shackle and yell "Fucking fraculate you worthless slow ass piece of shit pit man!"

 

 

 

 

Touch the fraculator

 

 

 

Unit

 

 

 

 

PS BDC, how many of those pixs you got homeboy? Fucking classic C-Unit. E-mail 'em to me bro! I'll pay you in beer!!

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Yeah, I will send you those pix, think there are 2 or 3...a guy on our

boat took them while we were towing you guys in.

 

unforch, i have them on a disk at work, a place I am avoiding like the fuggin plague

for the next week or so...in other words, I'll send you some

higher rez versions in early January.

 

I have to admit to doing a coffee-spew when

you posted that comment about aerodynamics, man. good job!

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On the J109 with roller furling and swept spreaders we have seen a big improvement in downwind performance in light to medium breeze when we ease the backstay, cleat of the furling line then tension the jib sheets on the winches. Now I am wondering if I should just take the second jib halyard, run it down to a cleat in the bow and crank it on. Any thoughts???

 

I would be concerned about wear on the jib doing it that way. Whether that is a justified concern or not, I don't know, but on the Melges it was talked about (of course if replacing the jib a couple of times a year it isn't much of an issue).

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