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Sailed the Fabulous Hagar in Victoria, a Ron Holland design that Bob Cadranell built for Jerry Duncan, was fast in a breeze but Pendragon was over the top fast!  Went on to win 1 Ton Worlds, truly a breakthrough boat.  Man those were great times racing level Ton classes!  Keith Lorence sailed a Bayliner Peterson design.  

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Sold both the Ranger 23 and Ranger 28 about a week after coming back from a cruise this summer. Didn't even have to list them. My wife told our Harbor Master that we were gonna put both up for sale on

The 2003 article missed a few interesting nuggets that made Mull into the designer and man he later became. In 1957 Gary apprenticed for Barney Nichols in Oakland. Nichols at that time had the hottest

This thread is a treasure trove. I fell in love with Gary Mull's boats (two of them in particular) before I knew who he was. It's nice to learn about his legacy and contribute to its preservation. Bel

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17 hours ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

Must of been '76 World's I guess. We were building our Mull 3/4 tonner in '77. Set up for the '78 world's in Victoria. Found this in my files. Everybody that mattered was there. North, Davidson, Buchan etc, etc, and met "Poncho" for the first time.   

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any chance you can scan and post (or send) the rest of that program?  That's the first "major" I ever did.  Fond memories.

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Swampfire won the '74 Worlds.

That's why I was surprised at all the Swampfire copies that were built for the '78 Worlds here because It was an obsolete design long before then.

I agree SJB. But what I have known in those days. We weren't aware that there was a huge change with the IOR rule. More specifically the designers cotton on to what can be done. Davidson with Pendragon. Chance with Buchan's daggerboard Sachem and quite radical (in those days) Riotous Assembly. Boats like Hagar (although did very well) were moderate designs by comparison. Like the G&S Chocolate Chips, Lobo, Discovery 1 etc that were more like the Peterson/Ganbare design model. Didn't see many frac rigs before that.     

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15 hours ago, zenmasterfred said:

Sailed the Fabulous Hagar in Victoria, a Ron Holland design that Bob Cadranell built for Jerry Duncan, was fast in a breeze but Pendragon was over the top fast!  Went on to win 1 Ton Worlds, truly a breakthrough boat.  Man those were great times racing level Ton classes!  Keith Lorence sailed a Bayliner Peterson design.  

If I remember correctly Sachem and Pendragon were neck and neck at the end of the regatta. I think there was half a point difference after the shouting was stopped. Might have to do with the great sailors like North. Bill Buchan with his snot-nosed teenage dinghy sailors like Jonathan, Charlie and Carl. Funny,  I didn't know them at the time but in the '90's racing with them in Seattle on the DB program we got to know each other very well. Still, consider them great friends Then sailing on Dark Star and have a good relationship with the "Blue" (Bieker/Riptide) program. 

And zen: There seemed a sea change in the IOR at that point. Pendragon did win the 1 tonner worlds the following by putting a bowsprit on the boat. I'm sure the genius of Laurie made other adjustments/slight changes to make up it competitive under the IOR rule...er...at that time. When Farr got involved it was the same thing. There was a lot of "bandage" changes to the rule makers and no disrespect to them but they had a hard time keeping up. Probably to the point of the death of IOR through the end of the '80's. I think IMS went through the same thing. 

I met Keith Lorence at that regatta and I thought there were two Buccaneer 335's that should up for that regatta. A blue one: Tyrone Shoelaces and a whitish one that I don't actually competed at the end of the day. But that was a long time ago and I we were busy still bolting shit on to our boat. But Keith was definitely there and we have had a long relationship to this day. We banter back & forth and Wastebook etc. The other guy was Mike (kiss my ring) Pope who was EHYC guy through his boats"Vatican" and "Vatican II". I know Mike well and great friends with Keith. But again, I'm not sure they were racing together at the regatta but Mike did show up to RVicYC to check in to Customs from the Baygrinder factory but he saw him arrive and completely starkers going for the dock phone. He chatted with us and said - "well, better go up and check in". We said: "Er...Mike, aren't you forgot something? Like your shorts?" "Oh right - better do that I guess?" Too funny. RVicYC isn't a stuffy club but?

After spending about a month on the docks there and events, stories are legend. Very fond memories.     

   

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

any chance you can scan and post (or send) the rest of that program?  That's the first "major" I ever did.  Fond memories.

Sure Sled...remind me by PM but I'm up to my whoopie cushion it seems. 

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Gary was.  He sailed with me one Wed. Night during that 6 meter regatta on my Mull 3/4T.  I was young and it was so cool to have the designer sailing with us.  If I remember, that was also the regatta that Ian and I got the contract to scrub the bottom of all the boats  so we spent a bunch of time there.

The previous owner had added 12” to the top of the mast and removed 500 lbs off the keel and put a wood shoe in it’s place.  All to try and make an old boat competitive for the 78 kWorlds.  Luckily Cadranels still had the lead and the following year when I bought it we put it back on.  Talk about tender and tumble home!

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On 11/6/2018 at 5:20 PM, Maxx Baqustae said:

Yup. Infidel had a hydraulic drive unit in nested in the keel. Not surprising as the owner was a mining engineer. A few shots at the regatta and that full on weird Whiting design:   

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cool frickin boat

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One White Islets Race on Riotous, it was getting its doors blown off on a close reach to the Islets by things like C+C 36s with their masthead genoas.  Then turning the corner, putting up the keel and absolutely flying.  Finn though was very very nervous as the boat was not the easiest to steer, but certainly a lot better than Resolute Salmon, which was definitely a wipeout machine.  Supposedly Riotous would come back up again, but your certainly didn't want to try it out.

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The hydraulic drive wasn’t that unusual then.  My Mull 3/4 built in 74 also had one.  THe boat was aluminum with crew cockpits.  Worked great till one day we had hydraulic fluid under high pressure coming up thru the floor boards!

The blue Bayliner/Peterson 33 was Jim Smith’s boat.  Tyrone was kind of a brown/maroon with a matching mast.  I think there was a white one too.  I believe that JIm was back at the factory when they made his boat and had a few stiffeners put in around the bow topsides to help keep it from oilcanning.  I remember sailing a windy Swiftsure with them years ago, and you could see the whole hull flexing a bit going upwind into those big swells.  At the slip you could take the bulkhead by the chart table and move it back and forth a bit, watching the hull flex from the outside.  Pretty scary!

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IOR had a strange formula that liked the engine aft but the shaft/prop as close to the keel as possible. So separating engine/shaft was good for the rating. This could be done with a lay shaft to a vee drive (if it could be covered by floorboards) or by hydraulics, which made it easier (esp on smaller boats) to keep the floors low & flat for sail storage.

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1 hour ago, longy said:

IOR had a strange formula that liked the engine aft

Yup.  IIRC (never a sure thing... hey, it was the 70s) there was a factor called ECG which was the distance from the engine to the boat's center of gravity.  more ECG (until it got to some upper limit) meant lower rating.

Of course, some custom boats went the other direction - put the engine right over the keel, figuring that better sailing performance outweighed a relatively minor rating benefit.

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On 12/2/2018 at 12:07 AM, soling2003 said:

The hydraulic drive wasn’t that unusual then.  My Mull 3/4 built in 74 also had one.  THe boat was aluminum with crew cockpits.  Worked great till one day we had hydraulic fluid under high pressure coming up thru the floor boards!

The blue Bayliner/Peterson 33 was Jim Smith’s boat.  Tyrone was kind of a brown/maroon with a matching mast.  I think there was a white one too.  I believe that JIm was back at the factory when they made his boat and had a few stiffeners put in around the bow topsides to help keep it from oilcanning.  I remember sailing a windy Swiftsure with them years ago, and you could see the whole hull flexing a bit going upwind into those big swells.  At the slip you could take the bulkhead by the chart table and move it back and forth a bit, watching the hull flex from the outside.  Pretty scary!

I musta missed some of this and had that ugly flu that wouldn't go away. Ya, there were two 33's at the world's that year. Poncho and Mike Pope was involved with one or both of them. I knew the Pope pretty well and my long relationship with Poncho since. Pope had Sails by Watts on his C&C 33 "Vatican II". Funny story with Mike: When he arrived at RVicYC to check in at Customs he got off the boat starkers naked. We were pretty close where we were moored. We chatted a bit then said: "well, better get up to the phone and check in." My skipper said: "Umm....have you forgotten something?" Then he realized the problem and grabbed some shorts. RVicYC is a pretty laid back club but not that laid back! Lots of funny stories from that regatta.

The 33's were a Bayliner build when they were up the anty from those tubby football cruising 240's to the Peterson designs following along from Chaser Yachts in Ontario. The Baygrinder were brand at that time but didn't wear well. It might be the white one that we charted for Swiftsure '80. No real issues and ahead of the fleet until the westerly kicked in the morning and built up to 25 to 30 at Race Rocks. Lost the rig in the pass. It was one of those notorious Super Spars that had a flaw in the design so most of them their spars.      

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On 12/2/2018 at 12:17 PM, longy said:

IOR had a strange formula that liked the engine aft but the shaft/prop as close to the keel as possible. So separating engine/shaft was good for the rating. This could be done with a lay shaft to a vee drive (if it could be covered by floorboards) or by hydraulics, which made it easier (esp on smaller boats) to keep the floors low & flat for sail storage.

The Engine Propeller Factor (EPF) took a lot of things into into account, I can't recall all the details.  While having the shaft/prop as close to the keel may have reduced the EPF, it would also be beneficial from a drag perspective.  A prop "hidden" within the keel downwash will typically add less drag than one further aft in an area of less disturbed flow.

3 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Not sure if engine fwd was an effort to get bow down trim. I think it was more a way to optimize max  minimize EPF. There are other ways to get the bow down.

Agreed.  You didn't always want to obtain bow down trim.  Ideally, you want the boat trimmed to her design lines.  While bow down trim usually conferred a rating advantage, it was primarily obtained by raising the stern which lowered the Rated Length, which gave a pretty decent proxy for sailing length.  So bow down trim could allow you to increase SA (light air performance) at the expense of sailing length and down wind control (heavy air performance).

But, if you wanted to enhance light air performance and still rate level, increasing bow down trim was a cheap and easy fix - just add some lead bricks forward. Of course, lowering the EPF was another way, but that could get expensive if you started moving the engine and drive system around.

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54 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

The Engine Propeller Factor (EPF) took a lot of things into into account, I can't recall all the details.  While having the shaft/prop as close to the keel may have reduced the EPF, it would also be beneficial from a drag perspective.  A prop "hidden" within the keel downwash will typically add less drag than one further aft in an area of less disturbed flow.

Agreed.  You didn't always want to obtain bow down trim.  Ideally, you want the boat trimmed to her design lines.  While bow down trim usually conferred a rating advantage, it was primarily obtained by raising the stern which lowered the Rated Length, which gave a pretty decent proxy for sailing length.  So bow down trim could allow you to increase SA (light air performance) at the expense of sailing length and down wind control (heavy air performance).

But, if you wanted to enhance light air performance and still rate level, increasing bow down trim was a cheap and easy fix - just add some lead bricks forward. Of course, lowering the EPF was another way, but that could get expensive if you started moving the engine and drive system around.

Didn't bow down trim also provide lower RM (righting moment), which also improved the rating? 

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On 12/2/2018 at 12:07 AM, soling2003 said:

The hydraulic drive wasn’t that unusual then.  My Mull 3/4 built in 74 also had one.  THe boat was aluminum with crew cockpits.  Worked great till one day we had hydraulic fluid under high pressure coming up thru the floor boards!

The blue Bayliner/Peterson 33 was Jim Smith’s boat.  Tyrone was kind of a brown/maroon with a matching mast.  I think there was a white one too.  I believe that JIm was back at the factory when they made his boat and had a few stiffeners put in around the bow topsides to help keep it from oilcanning.  I remember sailing a windy Swiftsure with them years ago, and you could see the whole hull flexing a bit going upwind into those big swells.  At the slip you could take the bulkhead by the chart table and move it back and forth a bit, watching the hull flex from the outside.  Pretty scary!

Gary, I think the White one may have been Serada from Olympia. Maybe you are thinking of another, but  I don't recall many other of the Bayliner 33s racing. We always had a good battle with JIm and Scott Smith. We didn't sail the worlds, but sailed all the other events of time - Center Sound Series, PITCH , all the island races. Those hulls went OK, but they were a shit build- as you say- they flexed plenty, but we won a fair number of races with em. 

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37 minutes ago, JoeO said:

Didn't bow down trim also provide lower RM (righting moment), which also improved the rating? 

Generally speaking, yes.  It would tend to lower the CGF (0.968 minimum), particularly for fine bowed,  wide sterned boats.  Mainly by decreasing the average actual waterline beam (not to be confused with measured BWL).  If somehow BWL was reduced in that sort of trim, then I would think it is possible that CGF could increase since IIRC BWLwas used as a divisor in the CGF calculation.

Earlier Peterson One Tons were beamy and relatively slab sided with a CGF close to 1.00.  A meter boat would have a CGF in the neighbourhood of 1.06 IIRC, mainly due to their narrow beam, which would explain why such designs were not typically successful sailing under IOR - a 6% penalty is huge.

Later designs tended to shoot for minimum CGF of 0.968 even with a lot of flair and relatively narrow BWL to enhance offwind speed.  To do this the VCG had to be fairly high, which explains the internal ballast and heavy thin masts.  Normally, this would impair upwind ability...but if you start stacking rail meat then you can compensate for that a great deal.  And so began the era of human ballast.

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5 hours ago, chorus1 said:

Here is Sparky, 29.9 MORC famous boat !

Design N°156 from Gary Mull.

 

http://www.demi-coques.fr/demi-coques/demicoquestandart2?start=58

Bigger sibling to the Pocket Rocket 22, of which I can't remember how many were built.  

I believe Sparky met her demise several years ago, hitting some rocks and tearing up her hull IIRC.  Crewman seriously injured as well I believe.  There is an old thread on it somewhere here in SA.

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The 2003 article missed a few interesting nuggets that made Mull into the designer and man he later became. In 1957 Gary apprenticed for Barney Nichols in Oakland. Nichols at that time had the hottest boat design on the bay, modern 28 foot sloop epoxy marine ply hard chine auxiliary racer called a Buccaneer 28.  Nichols was  a man who learned his trade from the Lester Stone boat yard, some of the best boat builders on the west coast for more than a century, where he built tugs and landing boats for the war effort.  The Buccaneer was a serious evolution in the use of marine plywood construction using longitudinal framing held together with bulkheads correcting the tendency of plywood to scallop. The other benefit of this construction created a round bilge effect with a hard chine.  It was this boat design that inspired Ben Seaborn to design one of our favorites from the 1960s, the 26ft plywood Thunderbird. Nichols loved having the young Mull working for him. Mull was a sponge, learned some really innovative design directions from his mentor and soaked up the actual business of building sailing toys for professional men. Sweet boats with many modern design features.  Nichols was fond of saying he didn't design to the rules but to the performance. During the Mull year long apprenticeship, there were several boats delivered to customers. They included Nichols own Treasure Island class, Sea Horse class and the hot Buccaneer. A few came with iron instead of lead keels. It was Nichols practice to have Mull explain the benefit of an iron keel over the lead ones to his disappointed customers.  Needless to stay that included the young Gary going out with Nichols and their customer for heavy drinking and good stories.  Mull would rig most of the boats as well as serve as crew of the first voyage with the new owner. Many of the times it was enough to keep big money paid in the ash register  for these fast boats.  These relationships he built with Nichols later served him with his relationships with the St. Francis Yacht club.

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In 1957-8 Gary Mull's first design under Barney Nichol's direction was on a hard chine boat redesign of the Nichols Sea Horse (often confused with the Van De Stadt design Seahorse of the 1960s.)  in 1959 the new Nichol boats took the MORC season championship as well as the Division 14 under the YRA.  In the years to come, Gary opened his office not farm from his old yard and office of his former boss.  He took the lessons he learned as a young man and played them out better than Nichols and his yard there and at the Pacific yard ever did. Mull went on to design 3 boats with the buccaneer moniker, we can only speculate on whether he thought about those boats and the boats with the same name that got him started.

As of today, I am unsure if any Treasure Islands and Nichols Sea Horses are still around in San Francisco. The boat, the last of the old buccaneers above which Mull started out as an apprentice goes to the crusher this month.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Black Jack said:

The 2003 article missed a few interesting nuggets that made Mull into the designer and man he later became. In 1957 Gary apprenticed for Barney Nichols in Oakland. Nichols at that time had the hottest boat design on the bay, modern 28 foot sloop epoxy marine ply hard chine auxiliary racer called a Buccaneer 28.  Nichols was  a man who learned his trade from the Lester Stone boat yard, some of the best boat builders on the west coast for more than a century, where he built tugs and landing boats for the war effort.  The Buccaneer was a serious evolution in the use of marine plywood construction using longitudinal framing held together with bulkheads correcting the tendency of plywood to scallop. The other benefit of this construction created a round bilge effect with a hard chine.  It was this boat design that inspired Ben Seaborn to design one of our favorites from the 1960s, the 26ft plywood Thunderbird. Nichols loved having the young Mull working for him. Mull was a sponge, learned some really innovative design directions from his mentor and soaked up the actual business of building sailing toys for professional men. Sweet boats with many modern design features.  Nichols was fond of saying he didn't design to the rules but to the performance. During the Mull year long apprenticeship, there were several boats delivered to customers. They included Nichols own Treasure Island class, Sea Horse class and the hot Buccaneer. A few came with iron instead of lead keels. It was Nichols practice to have Mull explain the benefit of an iron keel over the lead ones to his disappointed customers.  Needless to stay that included the young Gary going out with Nichols and their customer for heavy drinking and good stories.  Mull would rig most of the boats as well as serve as crew of the first voyage with the new owner. Many of the times it was enough to keep big money paid in the ash register  for these fast boats.  These relationships he built with Nichols later served him with his relationships with the St. Francis Yacht club.

6848753035_63a0f37d0f.jpg

13979687760_1c22a7bb58_c.jpg

 

In 1957-8 Gary Mull's first design under Barney Nichol's direction was on a hard chine boat redesign of the Nichols Sea Horse (often confused with the Van De Stadt design Seahorse of the 1960s.)  in 1959 the new Nichol boats took the MORC season championship as well as the Division 14 under the YRA.  In the years to come, Gary opened his office not farm from his old yard and office of his former boss.  He took the lessons he learned as a young man and played them out better than Nichols and his yard there and at the Pacific yard ever did. Mull went on to design 3 boats with the buccaneer moniker, we can only speculate on whether he thought about those boats and the boats with the same name that got him started.

As of today, I am unsure if any Treasure Islands and Nichols Sea Horses are still around in San Francisco. The boat, the last of the old buccaneers above which Mull started out as an apprentice goes to the crusher this month.

 

 

 

This should be published and pinned.

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Mull’s relationship with Mike Shea and David Allen came from his time at Nichols Boat Works and the knowledge that he brought about their boats. Mike Shea continued to masterfully sailed a Treasure Island season after season from the late 50 and early 60s. The Marin Independent Journal front page 5 page story written about my boat (Lively Lady) dated January 4, 1969. (I am going to get a clearer copy of the article as she was prepared and sent to Florida to compete in the SORC.) The captain and crew were already legends here in the San Francisco bay. Many of the crew became legends in their own right winning on the national and international stage for decades.  The relationships. lines drawn and concepts behind the 1967 custom Mull built for the San Francisco and St. Francis Club crew set them all for for a decade and a half of sailing vessels and friendships as you will see in the article below.

The Skipper Of The Lively Lady Mike Shea And His Boat Are Racing Champions

THE LIVELY LADY Bay Areas Winningest Yacht Takes On Eastern Challengers WITH THE WIND in his hair, but warmly garbed against the brisk sea air, Mike Shea is happiest at the tiller of his Lively Lady, whether on a pleasure or practice sail, or engaged in racing competition with the best available challengers. If you're a San Francisco Bay yachtsman — you know who Mike Shea is. He’s the bay’s winningest skipper: Pacific Coast champion in 1962: San Francisco Bay champ in ’62. '65. ’66 and '68; one-man ocean racing champ for three years, and three-time winner of triple bay classic known as the ‘‘Midnight Moonlight Marathon” in which some 70 to 80 competitiors enter. The rest of the time he leads an interesting if less competitive workaday life as a jet captain for American Airlines. And spends as much time as he can with his wife, Nancy, and family of six youngsters, at their home on the water at 77 West Shore, Belvedere. Now, he’s answering one of the great challenges for any skipper. AS CAPTAIN of the great COVER PHOTO WITH A stiff wind blowing and the waters kicking up, Mike Shea's Lively Lady, a 30-foot racing boat designed in consultation with Oakland naval architect Gary Mull and built in Taiwan, cuts through the bay with no difficulty. The Lively Lady, one of the most successful Class D boats in Pacific Coast racing, has been shipped to Florida, there to challenge the best in the East in the annual Southern Ocean Racing Circuit competition. (Photos by Diane Beeston) team of designer, builder, crew and backer, he will enter the Southern Ocean Racing Circuit competition of six lengthy races including the Nassau Governor's Cup in February and March, at St. Petersburg, Fla. He will enter a design that has won 11 out of 12 races in which it has been entered, it is a design arrived at after lengthy consultation with Gary Mull. Oakland naval architect, built in Taiwan entirely mahogany and teak. She is the Lively Lady, a 30- foot “Cruising Club D” design similar to that known as a “Newport Thirty.” She is “strip- planked and edge-glued,” with no frames — one of a very few of her construction in the entire world. and of HER PLANKS are inch-and-a- half mahogany, her trim is teak. Her small coachhouse cabin is well raked, her deck is flush. She has a nine-and-a-half foot beam and weighs 10.000 pounds, with half of that weight in her lead-keel ballast. Captain Shea has collected a star-studded crew fc* the big February-March effort. First and foremost is his family but Shea has enioyed in sail racing Is attested by the huge collection of trophies in his home. Always the professional, Shea is a jet plane pilot for American Airlines. backer David Allen, Alarin County builder and developer, and president of the Belvedere Land Co. Allen will stand the costs of entering the Lively Lady in the Southern Ocean competitions — a series of races ranging from 85 to 435 miles in distance, and known as “the great American tank test,’’ where all the greatest of the country’s designers and yachtsmen bring (Continued on Page M3)

THE LIVELY LADY is the picture of grace as she glides over smooth waters of San Francisco Bay with skipper and crew relaxing aboard. Things become much busier, however, when the 30-foot boat competes in yachting races as she often does. Skipper Mike Shea has assembled an expert and experienced crew for what looms ahead of the Lively Lady's biggest season of racing.

BEFORE DEPARTING for Florida and the upcoming Southern Ocean Racing Circuit season, the Lively Lady underwent a careful check and tune-up in her home port. Backer David Allen, left, who is also a member of the crew, and skipper Mike Shea supervise as Mike Verrier does a ¡ob. WITH WIFE Nancy, Mike Shea relaxes on the deck of their comfortable Belvedere home beside the water upon which he spends so much of his leisure time. while other trophies from his sailing successes can be seen on the shelves behind him. IN DRYDOCK, thesize and thelines of the Gary Mull-designed Lively Lady are impressive and pleasing to the eyes. MIKE SHEA puts a bit of shine on one of the cups his yachting prowess has won for him, A QUIET MOMENT in his skippering of the refreshing can of beer and the blue of Lively Lady is used by Mike Shea, to enjoy breakfast overhead.

Jet Pilot And Boat Skipper Mike Shea Leads Two Busy Lives Continued from Page M2 their best new efforts for comparison and test. A “TANK TEST” is to a yachtsman as a wind tunnel is to an airplane builder. The sailing crew is studded with talent. There’s Lowell North of San Diego, generally considered the world’s best sailmaker. With him will be his Northern California partner, Allen Mitchell. They will watch the performance of the Lady’s sails. 

The boat’s designer, Gary Mull of Oakland, will be aboard to lend a hand, as will David Allen, Steve Taft, Tom Cooke and Les Brilliant of Belvedere. Don Felix of San Francisco and Ding Schoonmaker of St. Petersburg, navigator, complete the roster of blue-water sailors. THE PROSPECTS are good. Lively Lady, a D-class boat, has already won races against C and B classes. She was hauled from the water in early December and trucked to St. Petersburg. Except for some extraordinary troubles in one race that the Lively Lady lost by only seven seconds on corrected time, she would be entering the southern circuit as an unbeaten contender. The loss was in the Hearst Regatta, and in spite of the fact she broke her spinnaker pole, hove to for repairs and limped home on a jury rig, she came in ahead of the pack, only to lose, by those slim seven seconds, on corrected time. SHEA’S YOUNGSTERS are taking to the water. Two of his five daughters are sailing successfully, as is his 10-year-old son. Shea learned to fly with the Air Force, having flown B24s out of Africa and Italy in World War 11 until he was shot down over Yugoslavia, He then walked out in 30 days to freedom. The design of the Lively Lady is already a proven success. She has been looked-at with interest by Olin Stevens and Halsey Herreshoff, two of the world’s best designers. And an initial 10 boats of the Lively Lady class will be built for sale, as soon as a builder can be decided upon. So it will be with more than casual interest that t h e Belvedere, Marin County and Bay Area yachting communities will watch the Southern Ocean Racing Circuit this year, and the performances of Mike Shea of Belvedere, and the San Francisco Yacht Club’s Lively Lady and her crew.
 

 

 

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  • 7 months later...
21 hours ago, 262 Driver said:

I'm told that there is a model of Munequita on display at the Southern Yacht Club in New Orleans.

There is a similar model of Wings on display in Randy Smyth's living room in Ft Walton Beach.

Cool model, molded fiberglass, pretty darn accurate, made by someone in Costa Mesa close to the Ranger factory, as I recall (this was a LONG time ago!)

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Chico:  Apologies if this design of Gary's has been talked of earlier in the three pages.

Gary Mull's Chico 30 in GRP was a very popular design class in NZ.

The original Chico, named....'Chico' (fancy that) was double diagonal cold molded and sailed from NZ to West Coast of USA many years ago.  Several have circumnavigated and survived the odd cyclone.  I think one Chico ''Chubasco' won its class in the Sydney / Hobart many years ago, and got hammered by a cyclone on way back to NZ and got through without much issue.  

Couple pics of the original 'Chico' below:

CHICO (1).jpg

CHICO.jpg

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On 8/16/2020 at 9:16 AM, Black Jack said:

Gary may be dead but his boats still rock on:

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One of those with a teak deck (I know, I know) would be my dream boat - or as near to it as is possible.

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2 hours ago, sailman said:

No one has asked about that 4 gang box on the bow?

there's a gfi on the dock, he's good 

 

Just painted my Kalik 40 and got a new main. Absolutely love the boat. Don't love the people who built it. 

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

What was wrong about the build?

All the Korean boats I've seen were very nice.

Just small quality things in regards to how they laid the mat down, how the bulkheads meet the inside of the hull.. Not sure how much it's been messed with outside of the factory, I might be blaming someone else's shortcomings on them. 

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  • 5 months later...

not sure if this has been referenced in here yet and can't be arsed to reread the whole thread.. but there's a very long article about Mr Mull in this link. 

I always get sucked into these old IOR-ish threads.. 

https://issuu.com/latitude38/docs/latitude3813maunse

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Here's my Mull design at the start of the Offshore 160 last summer:

 

 

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Two Mull Sisters coming out to race the TBF. It was the first time in decades these boats raced each other in a significant bay race. These boats will improve as we dial them in for shorthanded bay racing.

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On 8/17/2020 at 6:28 PM, Bowchow said:

there's a gfi on the dock, he's good 

 

Just painted my Kalik 40 and got a new main. Absolutely love the boat. Don't love the people who built it. 

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I used to sail on a Kalik 40 called Affinity. The orignal mast was 1 spreader.

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Sold both the Ranger 23 and Ranger 28 about a week after coming back from a cruise this summer. Didn't even have to list them. My wife told our Harbor Master that we were gonna put both up for sale on Monday, and both were sold within six days by Saturday. However my youngest son still has the Ranger 33 -  pictured after finishing the bottom paint during a haulout, before we took it up the Inside Passage two years ago.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Did you know that Gary Mull in 1958 was the San Francisco Finn Dinghy Champion out of the San Francisco Yacht Club? Considering the respect we have for these dinghy class sailors now and then, could he have planned his career after that any better? 

 

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On 2/7/2021 at 12:26 AM, boomer said:

Sold both the Ranger 23 and Ranger 28 about a week after coming back from a cruise this summer. Didn't even have to list them. My wife told our Harbor Master that we were gonna put both up for sale on Monday, and both were sold within six days by Saturday. However my youngest son still has the Ranger 33 -  pictured after finishing the bottom paint during a haulout, before we took it up the Inside Passage two years ago.

108819976_10217637204631102_4755220101293511647_o.jpg

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We loved our 23 - last one built #739. We liked the boat so much we moved up to the 33  we've had 30 + years.

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On 8/14/2020 at 12:13 PM, carcrash said:

There is a similar model of Wings on display in Randy Smyth's living room in Ft Walton Beach.

Cool model, molded fiberglass, pretty darn accurate, made by someone in Costa Mesa close to the Ranger factory, as I recall (this was a LONG time ago!)

Made by the late Kenny Gardiner.

Question: is it a full model of Wings in Randy's living room? Specifically, does it have the mast and standing rigging?

Does anyone remember the defining characteristic of that rig? This is a test.

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On 2/20/2021 at 10:41 PM, Somebody Else said:

Made by the late Kenny Gardiner.

Question: is it a full model of Wings in Randy's living room? Specifically, does it have the mast and standing rigging?

Does anyone remember the defining characteristic of that rig? This is a test.

No, it does not have a rig, it is just the hull and deck, with proper colors: light blue topsides and deck, double red waterlines, and black bottom paint.

Mini spreaders! Maximized leading edge (where nearly all lift comes from) for the staysails flown under the jib tops. Only jib tops, only double head rig upwind.

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Wow, thanks everyone for the mammories.  We was something back in the day.  Great boats, great mates and great times.  I too get sucked into IOR threads.  Kudos to the sailors giving Mull boats lots of love too.

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On 8/17/2020 at 2:42 PM, Bowchow said:

Just small quality things in regards to how they laid the mat down, how the bulkheads meet the inside of the hull.. Not sure how much it's been messed with outside of the factory, I might be blaming someone else's shortcomings on them. 

No. Pretty much on point.  Nice design, poor execution. And the hull plumbing systems were down right dangerous.

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10 hours ago, carcrash said:

[Ranger 37 Wings had...]

Mini spreaders! Maximized leading edge (where nearly all lift comes from) for the staysails flown under the jib tops. Only jib tops, only double head rig upwind.

Yep! On the lowers! Sheet that genoa stays'l right in!

Say... I believe we have a mutual friend: Brownie!

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17 hours ago, carcrash said:

No, it does not have a rig, it is just the hull and deck, with proper colors: light blue topsides and deck, double red waterlines, and black bottom paint.

Mini spreaders! Maximized leading edge (where nearly all lift comes from) for the staysails flown under the jib tops. Only jib tops, only double head rig upwind.

Didn't Deaver do that first on the Cal 33 Counterpoint? 

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33' Spirit built in 1960 (maybe the first ULDB ) was drafted by Mull for Sparkman and Stephens when he was an apprentice. Flush deck racer that set the standards. Tartan boats take notice. 

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8 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

not affiliated , but this 33'er just showed up on FB for sale..

 

Ya, I saw that on Watebook myself. Other than a lot of "younger" people don't even look at boats of that age. They'd rather grab a crappy Bunter etc and call it good. It looks like it was been very well-loved and a 33 is a neoclassic. IMHO - he's not being stupid about his pricing and did a great job showing it off. Well done and somebody should grab it. 

 

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1 hour ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

 33 is a neoclassic.

Sorry Maxx but those 33's lost the "Neo" part a couple of decades ago. ;)

They're just classics now.

Maybe even vintage.

Kinda like us.

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45 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Sorry Maxx but those 33's lost the "Neo" part a couple of decades ago. ;)

They're just classics now.

Maybe even vintage.

Kinda like us.

Lol. Ya, I know. I just love the design and build. One of my first "big boat" that I raced on was out of EHYC was a modified Santana 28 (26) in '73 or '74. Then the Mull 3/4 build started in '76/'77. That was as high-tech as could be on the day. As the Who song says: "I'm not old I'm just backdated!"  

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This thread is a treasure trove. I fell in love with Gary Mull's boats (two of them in particular) before I knew who he was. It's nice to learn about his legacy and contribute to its preservation. Below is my Mull 34 and the 26 I owned prior to her (both cold-molded). 

1640355874_leewardquarter.thumb.jpg.fdd524dd279350ceb958675cccde7926.jpg

 

796170933_Travellerleeward.thumb.JPG.4794d2d5a92a7a420c62c68f1c61b4f3.JPG

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31 minutes ago, Will_Co said:

This thread is a treasure trove. I fell in love with Gary Mull's boats (two of them in particular) before I knew who he was. It's nice to learn about his legacy and contribute to its preservation. Below is my Mull 34 and the 26 I owned prior to her (both cold-molded). 

1640355874_leewardquarter.thumb.jpg.fdd524dd279350ceb958675cccde7926.jpg

 

 

 

what a great photo!

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On 2/24/2021 at 2:56 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

not affiliated , but this 33'er just showed up on FB for sale..

 

one thing I noticed about his tour, there isn't anything to cook upon...   no stove of any kind..   did I miss it  or is that how these boats are outfitted?

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23 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

one thing I noticed about his tour, there isn't anything to cook upon...   no stove of any kind..   did I miss it  or is that how these boats are outfitted?

 

21 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

It's Cali - dock to dock is the usual so you just eat in restaurants. :ph34r:

A refer replaced the stove. Garuntee they did not have refers like that when the boat was built. The dry storage was the old icebox. 

We always carried a camp stove on the sc27 or O30 racing in so cal. Nothing like hot coffee or some broth at 3am on overnighters.

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On February 23, 2021 at 10:48 AM, Black Jack said:

33' Spirit built in 1960 (maybe the first ULDB ) was drafted by Mull for Sparkman and Stephens when he was an apprentice. Flush deck racer that set the standards. Tartan boats take notice. 

Screen_Shot_2021-02-23_at_9_02.21_AM.png

Is this a scanned period picture?

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2 hours ago, Chris in Santa Cruz, CA said:

Is this a scanned period picture?

https://www.benainous.com/  Solid photographer with a good eye. https://www.benainous.com/p72923329

He used to print calendars with his photos. I would buy them and really enjoyed the composition, colors and maritime passion each month.

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11 hours ago, Black Jack said:

https://www.benainous.com/  Solid photographer with a good eye. https://www.benainous.com/p72923329

He used to print calendars with his photos. I would buy them and really enjoyed the composition, colors and maritime passion each month.

Thanks, the link to the series helped me see when the shot was taken and now I see on a pc with a larger screen that it has some modern things on the boat.

It would look better without the lifelines :)

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On 2/25/2021 at 1:52 PM, sledracr said:

 

what a great photo!

Thanks! I recall watching a video of yacht photographer on Off Center Harbor saying that the most flattering angle of a boat under sail is the leeward quarter.  

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