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Couple Cruise for 1000 Days


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you know what, rw..its not my intention to chaff your ass.

unlike the 1000 day blog; you have the freedom to correct any misinfo, so why not DO that instead of make nasty threats?

you need to work on your temper..i'm not trying to be rude, but its interfered with your message here from the very start.

why not begin here: simply explain how with all this money, reid did not support his child financially and racked up 2 warrants for deadbeat dad in NY this reporter did not EXAGGERATE or FABRICATE..

 

Donate Now!

U.S. CONTRIBUTORS

O & M Propeller Services Inc. (Staten Island) Propeller reconditioning

 

Doyle Sailmakers (City Island, NY) $25,000 (in sails)

E Paint Company (East Falmouth, MA) $1,500

American Models (Office Space) (Miami) $3,000

Andy Mannik Woodshop (New York, NY)

Bernueth Shipping Company (Miami) $1,000

Blackman Plumbing (Beth Page, NY)

Cato Machine Shop (Miami) $5,000

Dover Corporation financial contribution (NYC) $5,000

Everfair Enterprises Windgenerators (Miami) $1,500

Federal Metals (Miami) $3,000

Foster Peet Gallery (NYC)

Great! Software Inc. (NYC) $1,000

Hirondale Gallery (Millbrooke, NY)

LTV (Wainscot, NY) $4,000

Microsoft Navigational Discs (Belleview, WA)

Postmasters Gallery (NYC)

Sub Total $50,000

 

Food

Grandpa Po's Nutra Nuts (LA, CA) $600

Parmigiano-Reggiano (Syracuse, NY) .

Rossi Pasta (Marieta, OH) .

St. Helena Olive Oil (St. Helena, CA) .

Rising Sun Farms (Phoenix, OR) .

Coffee Masters (Marco Island, FL) .

Ancient Harvest (Torrance, CA) .

Arrowhead Mills (Herefort, TX) .

Meyenberg Products (Santa Barbara,CA) .

White Mountain Farms (CO) .

Jaffe Brothers (Valley Center, CA) .

FIBAR Health Food (San Francisco,CA) .

Glory Bee Foods Inc. (Eugene, OR) .

Nichols Garden Nursery (Albany, OR) .

Natural Nector (Santa Monica, CA) .

Doctor Bronner (Escondido,CA) .

Jolly International Marketing Group (Indio, CA) $3,000

Sub Total $3,600

 

Pier 63 W. 23rd (St. New York, NY)

Frying Pan Lightship

 

Art Link Multimedia (NYC) .

Boat Life Industries (Old Beth Page,NY) .

David Placky Photo Studio (NYC) .

DeeDee Maucher Advertising Design .

Edwards Editing Services .

Fabricom (NYC) .

Harbor Diesel Fuel Service (NYC) .

Kriegman Editing Services .

Rob Foley Video (NYC) .

V-Bar Video (NYC) .

Video Imprints (NYC) .

Sub Total $3,500

 

Clayton Knowles Law Offices (NYC) $1,000

Ian Cunnigham Graphics Studio (NYC) $1,000

Kinerling, Wisdom Accounting Firm (NYC) $2,000

Morales Graphics Editing Printing (NYC) $2,500

Sub Total $6,500

 

Total $63,600

 

EUROPEAN CONTRIBUTORS

 

 

 

Adult Technical School of Rochefort $20,000

Anne-France Public Relations (Rochefort) $3,000

Chamber of Commerce of La Rochelle $5,000

David Birnie Public Relations (La Rochelle) $2,000

Fluery Michon Sailing Team (La Rochelle) $4,000

Galvanlantique (La Rochelle) $1,500

Henry Lloyd (UK) $1,500

International Paint Company (La Havre) $20,000

Jacques Deniset Auto Company (La Rochelle) $2,000

Mayor of Rochefort $10,000

Migellan Electronics (UK) $2,000

Photowatt International (Isere) $4,000

Radio Club of Perigny (La Rochelle) $8,000

Stanley Tools (UK) $1,000

Technical School of Rompsay (La Rochelle) $10,000

Trefileurope Rigging Cable (Paris) $2,000

Sub Total $96,000

 

 

Food

Chocolate Klaus (Doubs) .

Biscuits of Agen (Lotgaronne) .

Biscuits LU (Paris) .

Biscuits St. Michelle (Loire Atlantique) .

Gene Herve (Indre) .

Rea Juices (Bas Rhin) .

Salaus-Haus Teas and Herbal Medicines (Germany) .

Specialties of Paul Heunann (Bas Rhin) .

Sub Total $6,000

 

Botolo Yachting Apparel (Gironde) .

Computer Land (La Rochelle) .

Fasep (Val d Oise) .

Grand Pavois of La Rochelle .

Guy Degrenne (Paris) .

Issard Sabatier 4 Etoiles (Puy-de-Dome) .

Le Capri Soilnois (St. Soulle) .

Next Destination (Paris) .

Opinel (Savoie)

Papetries Hanelin (Calvados) .

Parapluie L'Econone Thiers (Puy-de-Dome) .

Sicomin Epoxy .

Sub Total $2,800

 

Total $104,800

 

Grand Total $168,400

 

There are many ways that you and your company or organization can help to make this voyage possible.

 

Contact 1000 Days Non-Stop at Sea, Ltd. at Pier 63 North River, New York City 10011. Telephone: (212) 414-4891. Fax: (212) 691-7653. E-mail: info@1000days.net

 

quit whining and set the record straight rw. this aint even one half the money reid scammed..guess what? its all on the internet posted by the shaman himself...

 

 

 

 

Pip, Methinks you should start a campaign to raise money for this girl. God knows I had nothing to do with raising the monies your misguided post presumes. Whoever is giving you that info should be ashamed of themselves. If it's public info, I'd actually like to know where you got it.

 

thanks.

 

rd's still a mongrel growling bastard dog even if his bark's worse than his byte. i have not ingested so much SA koolaid as to mistake his mangy hide for a golden retriever right out of a Rockwell painting, beautiful wife stroking his coat by the fireplace waiting for the next child support check to come in.

 

 

Jessica Watson crashes on day one of global quest

MARISSA CALLIGEROS

September 9, 2009 - 7:25AM

 

 

 

Fifteen-year-old Queensland schoolgirl Jessica Watson poses on her yacht at the Rivergate Marina and Shipyard near Brisbane. Photo: Eddie Safarik

 

Schoolgirl skipper Jessica Watson, 16, has crashed her yacht on the first leg of her solo around-the-world voyage.

 

Watson's sloop, Ella's Pink Lady, hit a merchant ship near Stradbroke Island about 2.30am, less than 24 hours after leaving the Sunshine Coast for Sydney.

 

The Buderim schoolgirl contacted the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), which was monitoring her journey, and was told to turn her motor on and head back to Southport on the Gold Coast.

 

The teenager was not injured in the collision, but her yacht's mast and bow were substantially damaged.

 

AMSA spokeswoman Tracy Jiggins said the 16-year-old collided with the merchant ship about 15 nautical miles, or about 28 kilometres, east of Point Lookout on Stradbroke Island. It is understood the bulk carrier did not stop after the collision.

 

"Her parents contacted the our rescue co-ordination centre which advised Watson to turn her motor back on and head to Stradbroke Island," Ms Jiggins said.

 

It is understood Watson later agreed to travel to Southport on the Gold Coast.

 

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau will also investigate the crash.

 

Watson left Mooloolaba Wharf yesterday on a week-long test run ahead of her world record attempt to be the youngest person to sail solo, non-stop and unassisted around the world.

 

Bureau of Meteorology forecaster Brett Harrison said conditions in the area at the time of the crash were relatively calm.

 

"There would have been come showers around earlier this morning. The wind weren't particularly strong. It doesn't look particularly bad, apart from a few showers, Mr Harrison told ABC Radio.

 

The attempt has divided public opinion, with parents and child safety groups labelling it irresponsible and fraught with danger.

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I haven't heard of this type of cruise before, if it is in real then i would like to go for it. It will be very adventurous and even i want to know that how this experience will be, I have some friend

Translation ... "Sorry dude, no names and/or locations because I made it all up."   Reality ... Reid "supporters" rise up in direct opposition of "rabidity" of Reid bashers.   For instance, look a

Why is it that you demand that other people prove their assertions to your satisfaction while you spout oft bizarre theories that utterly defy reason and expect to be taken seriously?.   Stowe isn't

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Pip, Methinks you should start a campaign to raise money for this girl. God knows I had nothing to do with raising the monies your misguided post presumes. Whoever is giving you that info should be ashamed of themselves. If it's public info, I'd actually like to know where you got it.

 

thanks.

 

 

She'd have to be as good at exaggerating/fabricating as you to come up with that bizarro list of donations, Sir Wanker. Truly can't make that shit up. It's all on Stowe's older websites, published by him, reeking in the bowels of the internet, and for seven years statiing donations were being made to his Not-for-Profit. And you knew that... so there goes some more of your own integrity that you constantly demand of others here.

 

Here's a good way you can build your hero's credibility ~ prove he did in fact have a 501c3 registered with the IRS as he collected Pip's list of donations. Prove it.

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Pip, Methinks you should start a campaign to raise money for this girl. God knows I had nothing to do with raising the monies your misguided post presumes. Whoever is giving you that info should be ashamed of themselves. If it's public info, I'd actually like to know where you got it.

 

thanks.

 

 

She'd have to be as good at exaggerating/fabricating as you to come up with that bizarro list of donations, Sir Wanker. Truly can't make that shit up. It's all on Stowe's older websites, published by him, reeking in the bowels of the internet, and for seven years statiing donations were being made to his Not-for-Profit. And you knew that... so there goes some more of your own integrity that you constantly demand of others here.

 

Here's a good way you can build your hero's credibility ~ prove he did in fact have a 501c3 registered with the IRS as he collected Pip's list of donations. Prove it.

 

-----------

He ain't me hero ahole, and believe me I haven't raised one red cent for him, and none of his shenanigans has e'er been on my head at all. Nope, I just like the fact that he wants to do something different, a bit crazy, and definitely a demanding feat showing seamanship, hardship and fearlessness. You know, sort of a real sailing anarchy spirit. Not at all like all you phony accusatory types sitting on yer arses crying wolf.

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Pip, if you don't care, then how come you're still posting? Why are you publishing old photos and articles if you don't give a shit about the stupid voyage? You have to admit, it appeals to all of you who follow this for laughs and trash. Although obviously you'd rather have stayed safely at home and watched the whole event from shore while talking trash from the past.

 

i love the storyline and characters.

i post the flashbacks because they chronicle the mars oddysea, both good and bad. the fraudulent claims and accounting of funds, and insane pomposity of Captain Stowe are part of the story too.

honestly, its amazing what an attention whore reid is..its hard to believe the massive mountains of crap about him on the internet.

reid hopped onto the web in its infancy and it has served him very well. he uses landlubber's romantic ideas about seafaring to his advantage; he has his pitch finely honed and he plays the role of EXPLORER to the hilt.

what you don't like about the flashbacks (rw) is that many of them show what hogwash reid spouted in order to raise donations.

he even hyped his own marriage to raise money.

you would like everyone to accept whatever au courant version of 1000 days reid espouses.

what's wrong with getting a more complete and accurate story?

reid (and his ANONYMUS shoreteam) would like a sanitized version of 1000 days to be the only one available to the public.

reid will lie and cheat if he thinks he can get away with it; he always has.

he told the judge sentencing him that he was taking blind people sailing and he was helping NASA.

in this article he is claiming the reporter for the daily news 'fabricated' the facts we all know are documented.

http://www.soundingsonline.com/news/coastw...s-mission-.html

 

Along with many parts of the globe, Stowe has also put a family issue behind him. Stowe says the $10,000 in child support he owed an ex-wife, Iris Allarmira, mother of his daughter, Viva, has been paid in full. The news of the support issue broke in a New York Daily News report last year, a story Stowe calls "fabricated and exaggerated."

 

we all know reid would never have paid that warrant were it not for the bad publicity it engendered.

and NO its not alright to be a deadbeat dad, a role he is now reprising!

 

wofsey is right in some things. if reid (and soanya) were honest people, they wouldn't catch so much shit.

while you are correct rw, many here said reid would sink and railed about his pos boat and lack of sailing skills, i did not.

i am a singlehander and my boat is a beloved pos and i have many jury rigs too. i am not a racer and i actually love being becalmed. i have a dicey little motor i use only in crowded ports; i am happy sitting around at sea waiting for the wind.

 

i believe the 1000 days at sea mars ocean oddysea was over a long time ago when reid stopped to drop off soanya and when he quit sailing.

currently, i believe he is lying ahull. he is even dishonest enough to rename that tactic the 'sacred slipside' and claim it is beyond a simple sailor such as i to comprehend.

i was always taught that was a risky maneuver and have never employed it, evidently reid knows better and it has obviously worked well for him thus far. i do wonder how he stands rolling gunnel to gunnel day after day.

you are mistaken to attribute malice to my posts, rw.

there are many flashbacks i have not posted because they would hurt people who don't deserve it. why? because mr. crumb bum has pulled alot of shit during his life and never cared for anyone but himself; he is a textbook narcissist.

 

 

The prose of support has it's logic, but I'm a bit more pragmatic.

1) He'll never get his captain's license. Convicted felons are excluded from getting any USCG endorsements.

2) It's better to be lucky than good. He's very lucky. His skills level seems to never achieve the level that his time at sea represents.

3) If his plan to drift and allow his hull to become basically a floating reef that will provide an endless supply of sealife, he certainly doesn't take advantage of farming his hull. Goose Barnacles are extremely tasty... and the fact that trigger fish are making a home on his reef (hull) is amazing. Those are not pelagic fish. They are reef fish.

4) If he's catching fresh fish and then drying them for survival consumption, then he's missing out on higher quality nourishment that he seems to need. His description of the difficulty of hauling a 35lb dolphin on board shows that he really has lost much strength.

 

I'd write more, but won't waste any more logic on this pathetic battle between the forces...

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3) If his plan to drift and allow his hull to become basically a floating reef that will provide an endless supply of sealife, he certainly doesn't take advantage of farming his hull. Goose Barnacles are extremely tasty... and the fact that trigger fish are making a home on his reef (hull) is amazing. Those are not pelagic fish. They are reef fish.

They are reef fish, but I have seen them many times in the Gulf Stream very far from any reef. They'll treat flotsam like a reef, and Anne does a pretty darn good flotsam impression much of the time, based on course and speed reports.

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Tot being a blue water sailor I have a question about the current schooner course.

 

Why is he in orbit around bouy 13594?

 

At first I thought it might be because of weather, but he is about to start his third "circumnavigation" around said bouy.

 

Could it be he he is giving all the commercial ships in his area 100 miles of clearance? A bit overkill but based on past experience...

 

I have two theories, one is that the ocean is acting like a toilet bowl and he is getting slowly and inexorably flushed.

The other is that he has unknowingly entered into a symbiotic relationship with the local fish who now guide his schooner/reef so that it does not leave their ecosystem.

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Geez, thanks for a little support! As time goes on and Reid stays out there and catches fish, keeps the boat floating and under it's own power, (not to mention fixing all the deteriorating sails by HAND!) I feel just a little turn around and a wee bit more respect for the guy on here. I hope he makes it and earns the respect for all you that don't get it. Incredible journey so far.... :ph34r:<_<

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... Incredible journey so far.... :ph34r:<_<

 

Wow, it disturbs me to admit it, but I couldn't agree more. This journey, indeed, lacks credibility.

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Geez, thanks for a little support! As time goes on and Reid stays out there and catches fish, keeps the boat floating and under it's own power, (not to mention fixing all the deteriorating sails by HAND!) I feel just a little turn around and a wee bit more respect for the guy on here. I hope he makes it and earns the respect for all you that don't get it. Incredible journey so far.... :ph34r:<_<

 

i must admit that saltys' obsevations add to the humor content of this thread...under it's own power, you're a card saltypost-1557-1252592481_thumb.jpg

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I just found the problem with the electric winch: the breaker corroded. I bypassed it temporarily clamping two big lugs with a vice grips. Now the winch works, but there are more problems to overcome...

 

The problems to overcome will most likely be FIRE! This guy has skated along on luck for almost 900 days it will go pear shaped eventually.

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Geez, thanks for a little support! As time goes on and Reid stays out there and catches fish, keeps the boat floating and under it's own power, (not to mention fixing all the deteriorating sails by HAND!) I feel just a little turn around and a wee bit more respect for the guy on here. I hope he makes it and earns the respect for all you that don't get it. Incredible journey so far.... :ph34r:<_<

 

Reid's welcome home party will be exciting .....................NOT!

 

bored-jester-in-empty-stadium-uid.jpg

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The prose of support has it's logic, but I'm a bit more pragmatic.

1) He'll never get his captain's license. Convicted felons are excluded from getting any USCG endorsements.

2) It's better to be lucky than good. He's very lucky. His skills level seems to never achieve the level that his time at sea represents.

3) If his plan to drift and allow his hull to become basically a floating reef that will provide an endless supply of sealife, he certainly doesn't take advantage of farming his hull. Goose Barnacles are extremely tasty... and the fact that trigger fish are making a home on his reef (hull) is amazing. Those are not pelagic fish. They are reef fish.

4) If he's catching fresh fish and then drying them for survival consumption, then he's missing out on higher quality nourishment that he seems to need. His description of the difficulty of hauling a 35lb dolphin on board shows that he really has lost much strength.

 

I'd write more, but won't waste any more logic on this pathetic battle between the forces...

 

More logic? I know exactly what this thread needs.

 

 

 

 

 

3906383443_ea0541b778_o.jpg

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Here's a question for the onboard online peanut gallery here. How come whenever a singlehanding long distance sailor gets hit by a going too fast undermanned no one standing watch on auto pilot huge commercial vessel that the hue and cry is always about singlehanders deserving it, and there's no onus of blame at all on the commercial carriers who all too often continue on their merry way without even knowing that they just almost killed someone on the sea.

 

When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes and continue on their way is that my fault too? Is what you hold against these long distance circumnavigating singlehanders that they dare to go alone and so they deserve whatever the fates have in store?

 

I have yet to hear this sailing crowd condemn the current practice of undermanned commercial freighters of huge tonnage being able to cross the oceans with such impunity, unsafe speed and on automatic w/o a proper standing watch, as to put any sailboat with the bad luck to lie in their path in great potential peril.

 

There ought to be a law.

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Here's a question for the onboard online peanut gallery here. How come whenever a singlehanding long distance sailor gets hit by a going too fast undermanned no one standing watch on auto pilot huge commercial vessel that the hue and cry is always about singlehanders deserving it, and there's no onus of blame at all on the commercial carriers who all too often continue on their merry way without even knowing that they just almost killed someone on the sea.

 

When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes and continue on their way is that my fault too? Is what you hold against these long distance circumnavigating singlehanders that they dare to go alone and so they deserve whatever the fates have in store?

 

I have yet to hear this sailing crowd condemn the current practice of undermanned commercial freighters of huge tonnage being able to cross the oceans with such impunity, unsafe speed and on automatic w/o a proper standing watch, as to put any sailboat with the bad luck to lie in their path in great potential peril.

 

There ought to be a law.

Yep, those huge commercial ships just stop and turn on a dime.

 

1206068419g4cHE2h.jpg

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Great sail yesterday on a Hallberg Rassey 39 from Vineyard Haven to CT.

 

20-25 from the NE, we're heading west.

 

8 to 9+ knots for 9 hours until the tide changed and the motor came back on.

 

Weather forecast said 40% chance of rain, and we got sunburned..... DO NOT BELEIVE NOAA, ever!!!!

 

 

Cut and pasted for your perusal and commentary...

 

 

868-005.jpg

 

 

 

 

knots. Position 10*36n by 19*20w

 

Big Flying Fish, Full Sail

 

A beautiful morning and I make my deck rounds and prepare to lay out the new salt fish to dry in the sun. There were several nice flying fish and I thought they would make a nice lunch. Then I spotted a fish on deck that was so big I did not think it was a flying fish. It was a flying fish and the biggest one I have ever seen. He was very thick and I measured him at 15 inches long. The big flying fish have four wings...

 

We have had predominantly SW winds and I decided it was time to get further out to sea. Without the mainsail and a jib out front we can't go against the wind. I checked the electric winch only a few days before and it worked, so I was surprised when it didn't. I tried a new switch. I dismantled the wires and by passed the switch and still no luck. I inspected the wires down to where they disappear into a protected area under the winch. I checked the winch breaker and the fuse.

 

I realized I would have to dig a lot deeper and it would take me a long time, so I decided to raise the main sail by hand for the first time. As I said before, I have the mainsail set up with less pulleys. That makes it harder to pull up, but more importantly, I can get the sail down quickly without pulling on down hauls and this is reassuring in a blow. That is often when a sail tears, snapping in a heavy wind while I am trying to get it down and smother it. We have a big heavy gaff and sails.

 

To make it harder, all the bearings in my pulleys are worn out, so the pulleys don't turn as easily. I have a few spares left and I am saving them for the most important breakdowns. Setting the mainsail even with the powerwinch is not easy in a wind and rolling sea. Needless to say, I was huffing, puffing, flushed and resting before I was through, but the sail set well.

 

Then I set the jib by hand, got the schooner on a good NW course, coiled all my lines and cleaned my flying fish. It feels good sailing full sail. Lift off... to where?

 

Today I lowered the foresail for a variety of repairs and adjustments. Uh oh... some seams are going on the mainsail. I will have to keep a very close eye on her and drop her soon.

 

 

**************************************************************************

 

Day 870 A Myriad of Details Wednesday, 09 September 2009

 

 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: image pending]

 

 

Day 870 - September 9, 2009

 

Wind SW, 10 knots, Course N, Speed 1.2. Position 10*45n by 20*29w

 

A Myriad of Details

 

I managed to do some artwork over the last few weeks and it was a great joy for me. I have always loved doing art and now I love it more than ever. The work of keeping a low budget homemade schooner at sea always sailing for longer than any boat does mount up on me. Painting is restful healing and spiritually uplifting and I will do my best to keep it as part of my routine, but now again, I have many important jobs that are calling me.

 

I have to spend time figuring out how to get the winch going again. I have to restitch several areas on the foresail, sew chaffing gear over problem spots on the halyards and turn its sheet end for end in hopes of making it last longer. The new padding on the gaffjaws has held up well and I will regrease it before I rehoist the sail. I will need to drop the mainsail soon before some new spots tear open. Luckily I feel comfortable enough with our position to be able to do some "sacred sideslipping" again.

 

As I take care of the big projects, I always move around and make peripheral inspections. I made a bilge check and it has been staying dry, but I found the hose slipped off the electric bilge pump. The hose clamps had broken. The bilge pump is secured on a plastic pole, so it is easy to pull out and inspect, clean and repair. Both of the bilge alarms are also on poles and easy to inspect. The bottom of the bilge is clean.

 

I put the last of the biocide in the diesel tanks and we still have more than half of our capacity. I am in the process of shifting through food and doing inventory and feel very confident. I do little carpentry jobs to keep the interior comfy.

 

Yesterday was another glorious nature day. From early in the morning a busy giant flock of white fairy terns wearing black caps and grey shawls stayed with the schooner feeding on something that a school of tuna was scaring to the surface. We sailed west into the sun as the spray and birds flew and dove and the fish jumped and flashed.

 

I just found the problem with the electric winch: the breaker corroded. I bypassed it temporarily clamping two big lugs with a vice grips. Now the winch works, but there are more problems to overcome...

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Uhhhh....the Law of Gross Tonnage???

 

Here's a question for the onboard online peanut gallery here. How come whenever a singlehanding long distance sailor gets hit by a going too fast undermanned no one standing watch on auto pilot huge commercial vessel that the hue and cry is always about singlehanders deserving it, and there's no onus of blame at all on the commercial carriers who all too often continue on their merry way without even knowing that they just almost killed someone on the sea.

 

When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes and continue on their way is that my fault too? Is what you hold against these long distance circumnavigating singlehanders that they dare to go alone and so they deserve whatever the fates have in store?

 

I have yet to hear this sailing crowd condemn the current practice of undermanned commercial freighters of huge tonnage being able to cross the oceans with such impunity, unsafe speed and on automatic w/o a proper standing watch, as to put any sailboat with the bad luck to lie in their path in great potential peril.

 

There ought to be a law.

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No, not that law. A new one limiting speed on ocean crossings, & requiring greater # of live crewmen actually to be standing watch proportional to size of vessel rather than allowing the undermanned giant vessels at unsafe speeds being guided solely by electronics.

 

Unless you know of one like that currently being ignored.

 

-----

 

 

Home | USCG | USCGAux | Aux Public Affairs | International Affairs | Float Plan Central | Contact Us

Public Service Articles in the pursuit of

Recreational Boating Safety

 

Bigger on the water, not only means bigger, but danger as well!

 

The law of Gross Tonnage

 

 

 

 

 

By Wayne Spivak

National Press Corps

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

 

 

In a news release issued by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary in August of this year, the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary wanted to educate boaters, specifically recreational boaters about the dangers of playing in traffic.

 

Traffic, as defined by both the release and the federal navigation rules are “narrow channels” that “restrict the movement of vessels, which are constrained by their draft”. Herein lies the tale of why us small boaters should not play in traffic when the big boats are there.

 

Federal Law

 

The “Rules of the Road”, which were enacted in 1980, are contained in a book called “Navigation Rules; International-Inland” COMDINST M16672.2D and published March 25th, 1999. You can download a copy of the rules from the USCG (http://www.navcenter.org./mwv/mwv_files/NR_Files/navrules.pdf) or purchase it from either the US Government Printing Office or at your local marine supplier.

 

Every boater should be familiar with the “Rules of the Road”. Just as you are supposed to be familiar with the vehicle and traffic laws, you should be familiar with the nautical rules as well. "Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. . . .” Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Common Law (1881).

 

Please note: all vessels that are 39.4 feet or larger are required by federal law to have a copy of this book on their vessel at all times.

 

Rule number 9 – Narrow Channels, Inland states that:

 

“(B) A vessel of less than 20 meters [65 feet] in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.

 

The local boating public should be aware of the penalty provisions within U.S. Code, Title 33, Section 2072, that specify "Whoever operates a vessel in violation of the navigation rules is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation, for which penalty the vessel may be seized and the case shall be brought before the district court of the United States of any district within which the vessel may be found."

 

Now that the legalese has been stated, let’s discuss in rational terms why you, the recreational boater should not play in traffic.

 

Law of Gross Tonnage

 

The law, which is more common sense then explicitly written in the code, goes like this: “The heavier vessel always has the right-of-way.”

 

This is based on simple Newtonian physics. Newton’s first law talks about objects in motion stay in motion unless another force is acted upon it. In other words, if a boat is moving a 5 mph east and you were in the vacuum of space, it would never stop traveling east at 5 mph. However, we all know when we stop our engine on our boat, we slow down.

 

How long it takes to go from 5 mph to zero, depends on wind, and current. Even if there was no wind or current, we’d still slow down, because the water itself provides friction upon the hull of the boat, and that in itself acts as a brake.

 

We all have, by observation found that the bigger the object, the longer it takes to slow down. Newton’s second law of physics talks about how the amount of force required to move an object is inversely proportional to the mass of the object.

 

So, if a tug and barge were traveling down a narrow channel, and you stopped your boat 1,000 feet away, right in front of the tug and barge; and, if the master of the tug saw you immediately; and if the master of the tug immediately began to stop the tug and barge; you’d have less than one minute to move your vessel.

 

Because if you didn’t move your vessel in less than 60 small seconds, the tug and barge would just run right over you. It would be impossible for the master of the tug to stop, based of the collective mass of both the vessel and the barge, in 1,000 feet.

 

The law of gross tonnage is un-relenting. It is a fact of life. What also is a fact of life, is that you should not depend on the master of the tug or any other large vessel is able to see you, either visually or on radar.

 

Radar and Visual Lookouts

 

Radar, lookouts and even VHF radio’s all work the same. They actually work on the same basic principles of physics. Yes, physics that subject most of us hated in high-school rears its ugly head, yet again!

 

Radar, and VHF Radio, as well as your ability to see something, is all based on “line-of-sight”. If it is not in your field of vision, you won’t be able to see it.

 

Think about it? Have you ever looked for something, but couldn’t find it, and it was right under your nose? How bout walking with a small dog, and it disappears on you, because it is right under your feet, but you don’t see it, because you’re looking further a field, away from you.

 

This same principle is at work with radar, and your VHF radio. The radar antenna on a large boat is raised much higher over the water. This enables the ship to see farther out to sea. However, on the downside, it also gives a larger blind area.

 

The radar waves generated from the antenna are narrow beams of energy. A properly configured radar antenna won’t begin to come near the surface of the water until its maximum state range. So a 24-mile radar will scoot high above the surface for large distances before the waves will begin to pick-up objects that are close to the surface.

 

Recreational boats are close to the surface. So, even though you may be a quarter-mile away from a large vessel, the lookout, be it human, electronic or both, may never be able to see you.

 

Lessons Learned

 

So, to sum up today’s lesson in physics. Don’t play in front of large ships. They are bigger, they are dangerous, and they may never see you.

 

Oh, before I forget – never pass between a tug and its barge! That may be the last thing you will ever do! In fact, stay as far away from a tug and barge, or for that matter any large vessel.

 

Between a tug and barge you’ll find a hawser (a large diameter line or cable) which will surely decapitate the boat and its occupants should you collide with it. And all large vessels have large propellers, and prop wash. The forces made by these props are enough to either swamp your boat, drag it into the prop or combinations thereof.

 

To learn more about boating safety, why not take a boating safety course? For more information about safe boating courses, why not contact the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary at www.cgaux.org or call 1-877-875-6296.

 

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of Team Coast Guard. Founded in 1939 by an Act of Congress as the US Coast Guard Reserves and re-designated the Auxiliary in 1941. The 31,000 volunteer members (men and women) donate thousands of hours in support of Coast Guard missions.

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The article you've placed here refers to inland rules, but what they're discussing as far as stopping distance is true.

 

I'm not a merchant marine physicist (but I'm sure Wolfsey is and will chime in here soon), but what is restricting these vessels in their ability to manouever is not their SPEED, but their GROSS TONNAGE.

 

So....it sounds like you're suggesting that if these ocean going cargo vessels reduce their speed they will stop on a dime and dart around floating cheeze scows?

 

They are required to use all means available to them to keep proper look out, all vessels on the water are.

 

I have a feeling trying to make sense of your arguement will be about as useless as trying to put socks on a rooster.

 

 

No, not that law. A new one limiting speed on ocean crossings, & requiring greater # of live crewmen actually to be standing watch proportional to size of vessel rather than allowing the undermanned giant vessels at unsafe speeds being guided solely by electronics.

 

Unless you know of one like that currently being ignored.

 

-----

 

 

Home | USCG | USCGAux | Aux Public Affairs | International Affairs | Float Plan Central | Contact Us

Public Service Articles in the pursuit of

Recreational Boating Safety

 

Bigger on the water, not only means bigger, but danger as well!

 

The law of Gross Tonnage

 

 

 

 

 

By Wayne Spivak

National Press Corps

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

 

 

In a news release issued by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary in August of this year, the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary wanted to educate boaters, specifically recreational boaters about the dangers of playing in traffic.

 

Traffic, as defined by both the release and the federal navigation rules are “narrow channels” that “restrict the movement of vessels, which are constrained by their draft”. Herein lies the tale of why us small boaters should not play in traffic when the big boats are there.

 

Federal Law

 

The “Rules of the Road”, which were enacted in 1980, are contained in a book called “Navigation Rules; International-Inland” COMDINST M16672.2D and published March 25th, 1999. You can download a copy of the rules from the USCG (http://www.navcenter.org./mwv/mwv_files/NR_Files/navrules.pdf) or purchase it from either the US Government Printing Office or at your local marine supplier.

 

Every boater should be familiar with the “Rules of the Road”. Just as you are supposed to be familiar with the vehicle and traffic laws, you should be familiar with the nautical rules as well. "Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. . . .” Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Common Law (1881).

 

Please note: all vessels that are 39.4 feet or larger are required by federal law to have a copy of this book on their vessel at all times.

 

Rule number 9 – Narrow Channels, Inland states that:

 

“(B) A vessel of less than 20 meters [65 feet] in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.

 

The local boating public should be aware of the penalty provisions within U.S. Code, Title 33, Section 2072, that specify "Whoever operates a vessel in violation of the navigation rules is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation, for which penalty the vessel may be seized and the case shall be brought before the district court of the United States of any district within which the vessel may be found."

 

Now that the legalese has been stated, let’s discuss in rational terms why you, the recreational boater should not play in traffic.

 

Law of Gross Tonnage

 

The law, which is more common sense then explicitly written in the code, goes like this: “The heavier vessel always has the right-of-way.”

 

This is based on simple Newtonian physics. Newton’s first law talks about objects in motion stay in motion unless another force is acted upon it. In other words, if a boat is moving a 5 mph east and you were in the vacuum of space, it would never stop traveling east at 5 mph. However, we all know when we stop our engine on our boat, we slow down.

 

<<snip>>

 

To learn more about boating safety, why not take a boating safety course? For more information about safe boating courses, why not contact the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary at www.cgaux.org or call 1-877-875-6296.

 

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of Team Coast Guard. Founded in 1939 by an Act of Congress as the US Coast Guard Reserves and re-designated the Auxiliary in 1941. The 31,000 volunteer members (men and women) donate thousands of hours in support of Coast Guard missions.

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The article you've placed here refers to inland rules, but what they're discussing as far as stopping distance is true.

 

I'm not a merchant marine physicist (but I'm sure Wolfsey is and will chime in here soon), but what is restricting these vessels in their ability to manouever is not their SPEED, but their GROSS TONNAGE.

 

So....it sounds like you're suggesting that if these ocean going cargo vessels reduce their speed they will stop on a dime and dart around floating cheeze scows?

 

 

 

NO YOU FUCKING IDIOT. I AM SUGGESTING THAT SPEED OF THESE UNDERMANNED OCEAN CROSSING GIANTS PUTS SAILORS IN JEOPARDY AND ASKING THAT IF NECESSARY LAW BE MADE TO CREATE A SAFER ENVIRONMENT FOR SAILORS ON THE SEA.

 

I AM NOT SUGGESTING THAT GROSS TONNAGE VESSELS BE ASKED TO STOP ON A DIME as I am not a demeaning moron such as yourself. Get real asswipe.

 

i swear i am through with the outrageous idiots that claim to be sailors on this fucking forum that should be put to out to sea to die.

 

 

They are required to use all means available to them to keep proper look out, all vessels on the water are.

 

I have a feeling trying to make sense of your arguement will be about as useless as trying to put socks on a rooster.

 

 

No, not that law. A new one limiting speed on ocean crossings, & requiring greater # of live crewmen actually to be standing watch proportional to size of vessel rather than allowing the undermanned giant vessels at unsafe speeds being guided solely by electronics.

 

Unless you know of one like that currently being ignored.

 

-----

 

 

Home | USCG | USCGAux | Aux Public Affairs | International Affairs | Float Plan Central | Contact Us

Public Service Articles in the pursuit of

Recreational Boating Safety

 

Bigger on the water, not only means bigger, but danger as well!

 

The law of Gross Tonnage

 

 

 

 

 

By Wayne Spivak

National Press Corps

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

 

 

In a news release issued by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary in August of this year, the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary wanted to educate boaters, specifically recreational boaters about the dangers of playing in traffic.

 

Traffic, as defined by both the release and the federal navigation rules are “narrow channels” that “restrict the movement of vessels, which are constrained by their draft”. Herein lies the tale of why us small boaters should not play in traffic when the big boats are there.

 

Federal Law

 

The “Rules of the Road”, which were enacted in 1980, are contained in a book called “Navigation Rules; International-Inland” COMDINST M16672.2D and published March 25th, 1999. You can download a copy of the rules from the USCG (http://www.navcenter.org./mwv/mwv_files/NR_Files/navrules.pdf) or purchase it from either the US Government Printing Office or at your local marine supplier.

 

Every boater should be familiar with the “Rules of the Road”. Just as you are supposed to be familiar with the vehicle and traffic laws, you should be familiar with the nautical rules as well. "Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. . . .” Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Common Law (1881).

 

Please note: all vessels that are 39.4 feet or larger are required by federal law to have a copy of this book on their vessel at all times.

 

Rule number 9 – Narrow Channels, Inland states that:

 

“(B) A vessel of less than 20 meters [65 feet] in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.

 

The local boating public should be aware of the penalty provisions within U.S. Code, Title 33, Section 2072, that specify "Whoever operates a vessel in violation of the navigation rules is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation, for which penalty the vessel may be seized and the case shall be brought before the district court of the United States of any district within which the vessel may be found."

 

Now that the legalese has been stated, let’s discuss in rational terms why you, the recreational boater should not play in traffic.

 

Law of Gross Tonnage

 

The law, which is more common sense then explicitly written in the code, goes like this: “The heavier vessel always has the right-of-way.”

 

This is based on simple Newtonian physics. Newton’s first law talks about objects in motion stay in motion unless another force is acted upon it. In other words, if a boat is moving a 5 mph east and you were in the vacuum of space, it would never stop traveling east at 5 mph. However, we all know when we stop our engine on our boat, we slow down.

 

<<snip>>

 

To learn more about boating safety, why not take a boating safety course? For more information about safe boating courses, why not contact the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary at www.cgaux.org or call 1-877-875-6296.

 

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of Team Coast Guard. Founded in 1939 by an Act of Congress as the US Coast Guard Reserves and re-designated the Auxiliary in 1941. The 31,000 volunteer members (men and women) donate thousands of hours in support of Coast Guard missions.

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Your logic completely eludes me - I'll give it a shot one more time for shits and giggles....

 

 

You're saying the SPEED of these vessels puts everyone in danger - So you think if you slow down a cargo vessel it will be more manouverable?

 

Or is it If you put more men on a vessel it will make it more manoueverable?

 

 

I'm so confused.... :lol:

 

Idiot

 

The article you've placed here refers to inland rules, but what they're discussing as far as stopping distance is true.

 

I'm not a merchant marine physicist (but I'm sure Wolfsey is and will chime in here soon), but what is restricting these vessels in their ability to manouever is not their SPEED, but their GROSS TONNAGE.

 

So....it sounds like you're suggesting that if these ocean going cargo vessels reduce their speed they will stop on a dime and dart around floating cheeze scows?

 

 

 

NO YOU FUCKING IDIOT. I AM SUGGESTING THAT SPEED OF THESE UNDERMANNED OCEAN CROSSING GIANTS PUTS SAILORS IN JEOPARDY AND ASKING THAT IF NECESSARY LAW BE MADE TO CREATE A SAFER ENVIRONMENT FOR SAILORS ON THE SEA.

 

I AM NOT SUGGESTING THAT GROSS TONNAGE VESSELS BE ASKED TO STOP ON A DIME as I am not a demeaning moron such as yourself. Get real asswipe.

 

i swear i am through with the outrageous idiots that claim to be sailors on this fucking forum that should be put to out to sea to die.

 

 

They are required to use all means available to them to keep proper look out, all vessels on the water are.

 

I have a feeling trying to make sense of your arguement will be about as useless as trying to put socks on a rooster.

 

 

No, not that law. A new one limiting speed on ocean crossings, & requiring greater # of live crewmen actually to be standing watch proportional to size of vessel rather than allowing the undermanned giant vessels at unsafe speeds being guided solely by electronics.

 

Unless you know of one like that currently being ignored.

 

-----

 

 

Home | USCG | USCGAux | Aux Public Affairs | International Affairs | Float Plan Central | Contact Us

Public Service Articles in the pursuit of

Recreational Boating Safety

 

Bigger on the water, not only means bigger, but danger as well!

 

The law of Gross Tonnage

 

 

 

 

 

By Wayne Spivak

National Press Corps

United States Coast Guard Auxiliary

 

 

 

In a news release issued by the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary in August of this year, the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary wanted to educate boaters, specifically recreational boaters about the dangers of playing in traffic.

 

Traffic, as defined by both the release and the federal navigation rules are “narrow channels” that “restrict the movement of vessels, which are constrained by their draft”. Herein lies the tale of why us small boaters should not play in traffic when the big boats are there.

 

Federal Law

 

The “Rules of the Road”, which were enacted in 1980, are contained in a book called “Navigation Rules; International-Inland” COMDINST M16672.2D and published March 25th, 1999. You can download a copy of the rules from the USCG (http://www.navcenter.org./mwv/mwv_files/NR_Files/navrules.pdf) or purchase it from either the US Government Printing Office or at your local marine supplier.

 

Every boater should be familiar with the “Rules of the Road”. Just as you are supposed to be familiar with the vehicle and traffic laws, you should be familiar with the nautical rules as well. "Ignorance of the law is no excuse for breaking it. . . .” Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Common Law (1881).

 

Please note: all vessels that are 39.4 feet or larger are required by federal law to have a copy of this book on their vessel at all times.

 

Rule number 9 – Narrow Channels, Inland states that:

 

“(B) A vessel of less than 20 meters [65 feet] in length or a sailing vessel shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway.

 

The local boating public should be aware of the penalty provisions within U.S. Code, Title 33, Section 2072, that specify "Whoever operates a vessel in violation of the navigation rules is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation, for which penalty the vessel may be seized and the case shall be brought before the district court of the United States of any district within which the vessel may be found."

 

Now that the legalese has been stated, let’s discuss in rational terms why you, the recreational boater should not play in traffic.

 

Law of Gross Tonnage

 

The law, which is more common sense then explicitly written in the code, goes like this: “The heavier vessel always has the right-of-way.”

 

This is based on simple Newtonian physics. Newton’s first law talks about objects in motion stay in motion unless another force is acted upon it. In other words, if a boat is moving a 5 mph east and you were in the vacuum of space, it would never stop traveling east at 5 mph. However, we all know when we stop our engine on our boat, we slow down.

 

<<snip>>

 

To learn more about boating safety, why not take a boating safety course? For more information about safe boating courses, why not contact the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary at www.cgaux.org or call 1-877-875-6296.

 

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of Team Coast Guard. Founded in 1939 by an Act of Congress as the US Coast Guard Reserves and re-designated the Auxiliary in 1941. The 31,000 volunteer members (men and women) donate thousands of hours in support of Coast Guard missions.

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Here's a question for the onboard online peanut gallery here. How come whenever a singlehanding long distance sailor gets hit by a going too fast undermanned no one standing watch on auto pilot huge commercial vessel that the hue and cry is always about singlehanders deserving it, and there's no onus of blame at all on the commercial carriers who all too often continue on their merry way without even knowing that they just almost killed someone on the sea.

 

When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes and continue on their way is that my fault too? Is what you hold against these long distance circumnavigating singlehanders that they dare to go alone and so they deserve whatever the fates have in store?

 

I have yet to hear this sailing crowd condemn the current practice of undermanned commercial freighters of huge tonnage being able to cross the oceans with such impunity, unsafe speed and on automatic w/o a proper standing watch, as to put any sailboat with the bad luck to lie in their path in great potential peril.

 

There ought to be a law.

in terms of laws at sea, singlehanding long distance sailors are part-time outlaws, that's an eternal debate ... you can put a zillion crewmembers on watch on a big freighter, you can halve his speed, but that still won't avoid the odd yottie being hit at night, certainly not when that yottie himself wasn't keeping a proper watch (and possible didn't even have his navlights on) ... but we all know now why Weid was not paying attention, he had other errrr.... other pressing duties to attend to :rolleyes:

 

 

if a blind wabbit crosses the highway and it gets squashed, are you going to blame all those cars and trucks driving on the highway with such impunity, unsafe speed and a sleepy driver ?

there ought to be a law against that too.

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Day 870 A Myriad of Detail

 

Wednesday, 09 September 2009

 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: image pending]

 

Day 870 - September 9, 2009

 

Wind SW, 10 knots, Course N, Speed 1.2. Position 10*45n by 20*29w

 

A Myriad of Details

 

I managed to do some artwork over the last few weeks and it was a great joy for me. I have always loved doing art and now I love it more than ever. The work of keeping a low budget homemade schooner at sea always sailing for longer than any boat does mount up on me. Painting is restful healing and spiritually uplifting and I will do my best to keep it as part of my routine, but now again, I have many important jobs that are calling me.

 

I have to spend time figuring out how to get the winch going again. I have to restitch several areas on the foresail, sew chaffing gear over problem spots on the halyards and turn its sheet end for end in hopes of making it last longer. The new padding on the gaffjaws has held up well and I will regrease it before I rehoist the sail. I will need to drop the mainsail soon before some new spots tear open. Luckily I feel comfortable enough with our position to be able to do some "sacred sideslipping" again.

 

As I take care of the big projects, I always move around and make peripheral inspections. I made a bilge check and it has been staying dry, but I found the hose slipped off the electric bilge pump. The hose clamps had broken. The bilge pump is secured on a plastic pole, so it is easy to pull out and inspect, clean and repair. Both of the bilge alarms are also on poles and easy to inspect. The bottom of the bilge is clean.

 

I put the last of the biocide in the diesel tanks and we still have more than half of our capacity. I am in the process of shifting through food and doing inventory and feel very confident. I do little carpentry jobs to keep the interior comfy.

 

Yesterday was another glorious nature day. From early in the morning a busy giant flock of white fairy terns wearing black caps and grey shawls stayed with the schooner feeding on something that a school of tuna was scaring to the surface. We sailed west into the sun as the spray and birds flew and dove and the fish jumped and flashed.

 

I just found the problem with the electric winch: the breaker corroded. I bypassed it temporarily clamping two big lugs with a vice grips. Now the winch works, but there are more problems to overcome

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Here's a question for the onboard online peanut gallery here. How come whenever a singlehanding long distance sailor gets hit by a going too fast undermanned no one standing watch on auto pilot huge commercial vessel that the hue and cry is always about singlehanders deserving it, and there's no onus of blame at all on the commercial carriers who all too often continue on their merry way without even knowing that they just almost killed someone on the sea.

 

When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes and continue on their way is that my fault too? Is what you hold against these long distance circumnavigating singlehanders that they dare to go alone and so they deserve whatever the fates have in store?

 

I have yet to hear this sailing crowd condemn the current practice of undermanned commercial freighters of huge tonnage being able to cross the oceans with such impunity, unsafe speed and on automatic w/o a proper standing watch, as to put any sailboat with the bad luck to lie in their path in great potential peril.

 

There ought to be a law.

 

The Practical Answer -- Anyone who decides to sail solo for any great distance, or any kayaker that decides to paddle in a body of water with power boats, should be aware of the inherent dangers of each and make a judgment call as to whether or not it worth the risk.

 

The Green Answer -- All powered vessels have an optimal cruising speed for fuel efficiency. Reducing speed by half would result in much larger carbon emissions and add to global warming.

 

The Serious Answer -- Because if freighters reduced their speed by half, the additional cost in fuel would double the cost of that plastic, "Made in China" kayak you bought at Walmart.

 

Hey, Billy - Did you slip out of the bar without your mother seeing you?

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When idiot power boaters swamp my kayak with their wakes ...

 

Fuck me, what is it with you looney's and your kayaks?!? Now I have to put you on ignore too...

 

1. That's a badge of honor Duck.

 

2. I used to like it when idiots would try to swamp me, I would surf their wake, or if I was outside of Hell's Gate, I would hang out near some rocks in the channel (not marked terribly well, but the commercial guys knew exactly where they were) and then try to draw the idiot kids to their doom. I can't tell you how beautiful the sound when the half-drunk kids smash the keel of their daddy's Hatteras into those rocks. Sort of hollow, but with some mass ... "KLUNK." They tend to sober up pretty fast after that. "Sorry guys, I was trying to tell you that there were rocks over here, but you couldn't hear me over the music while you were trying to swamp me."

 

3. There is a direct proportionality between time spent in the kayak and getting quality of the reproductive act ... for some reason the kayaking action releases some powerful pheromones. Plus, it's a way better tender than an inflatable.

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Your logic completely eludes me - I'll give it a shot one more time for shits and giggles....

 

 

You're saying the SPEED of these vessels puts everyone in danger - So you think if you slow down a cargo vessel it will be more manouverable?

 

Or is it If you put more men on a vessel it will make it more manoueverable?

 

1. Obviously open ocean freighters should have right of way, for the same reason you should try to avoid being in the way of a stampede of wildebeest. But also because they're out there working, and sailors are out there screwing around. I think in all of the world's oceans, except for a few poor areas in Asia, there is not a sailor in a sailboat who really HAS to be there. It's always optional for us.

 

2. It's not that open ocean freighters move too fast, but rather that they move elusively fast. You see massive thing on the horizon, the size of a small town in Oklahoma, and you think "that's pretty far away" but it manages to steam up to you pretty fast.

 

3. People spend too much money on radar reflectors. Instead of buying two good ones for $60 each, they should instead make twenty of them out of metallized corruplast for less than $50. The radar response on the bridge follows the inverse-square law of radiation, and anyone who thinks that two dinky radar reflectors are going to show up on the radar at a few miles are mistaken, they look like dots. Shove a nest of corruplast retroreflectors up there, well wrapped in metallized mylar and they'll outlast any storm and create a big enough reflection to actually trigger the radar alarm on the bridge of the other boat. There's a difference in threshold between looking like noise and looking like another cargo boat. Captains don't sleep through that alarm.

 

4. Open ocean freighters are not freight trains. Their ability to maneuver at full steam is incredible, I've seen it first-hand. That 8,000 teu vessel can move like a cat. If they see you, they can go around you. The trick is just to let them see you, and fiberglass (or Bondo in Reid's case) reflects long waves with all of the efficiency of a bowl of sour cream.

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Your logic completely eludes me - I'll give it a shot one more time for shits and giggles....

 

 

You're saying the SPEED of these vessels puts everyone in danger - So you think if you slow down a cargo vessel it will be more manouverable?

 

Or is it If you put more men on a vessel it will make it more manoueverable?

 

1. Obviously open ocean freighters should have right of way, for the same reason you should try to avoid being in the way of a stampede of wildebeest. But also because they're out there working, and sailors are out there screwing around. I think in all of the world's oceans, except for a few poor areas in Asia, there is not a sailor in a sailboat who really HAS to be there. It's always optional for us. on open sea (unrestricted waters) ocean freighters have no specific rights over sailing yachts, normal rules apply, you might check colregs to see who in that case has right of way ...., might is not always riight, it doesn't make one bit difference if it's going over an ocean as a livelyhood or going over an ocean on a drift/scam-a-thon

 

2. It's not that open ocean freighters move too fast, but rather that they move elusively fast. You see massive thing on the horizon, the size of a small town in Oklahoma, and you think "that's pretty far away" but it manages to steam up to you pretty fast. during night, even if they light up like your proverbial small Oky town, the sense of direction they are going is in many cases the problem

 

3. People spend too much money on radar reflectors. Instead of buying two good ones for $60 each, they should instead make twenty of them out of metallized corruplast for less than $50. The radar response on the bridge follows the inverse-square law of radiation, and anyone who thinks that two dinky radar reflectors are going to show up on the radar at a few miles are mistaken, they look like dots. Shove a nest of corruplast retroreflectors up there, well wrapped in metallized mylar and they'll outlast any storm and create a big enough reflection to actually trigger the radar alarm on the bridge of the other boat. There's a difference in threshold between looking like noise and looking like another cargo boat. Captains don't sleep through that alarm. I'll set up a paypal account and if you pay for that funny shit I'll give you a degree of bosun :lol:

 

4. Open ocean freighters are not freight trains. Their ability to maneuver at full steam is incredible, I've seen it first-hand. That 8,000 teu vessel can move like a cat. If they see you, they can go around you. The trick is just to let them see you, and fiberglass (or Bondo in Reid's case) reflects long waves with all of the efficiency of a bowl of sour cream. I have been dozens of hours at the wheel of a 700 foot containercarrier, both on open sea and in ports (8 timesAmbrose to Global Terminal, Bayonne, Nuh Joisey and back.. for example) and have to tell you that although the maneuverability of a containerhulk is usually a bit better than a big bulk carrier (never did that, but steered a big gascarrier too and that was a bitch), it's certainly not like a cat, the idea that if they can see Weid they can go around Weid is total bogus at close range, when I gave the wheel a turn, then usually I could start counting up to 15 or more before anything actually would happen, and if you then wait too long to countersteer then you are way too late and youll be writing your name in the water, as they say... it's like sliding your car on ice, that's a good comparison

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I'll set up a paypal account and if you pay for that funny shit I'll give you a degree of bosun :lol:

 

Screw running them up with the bosun, I just clip the whole mess to the halyard. The mylar gets tangled eventually, but it's so thin it doesn't really cause any problems, and all those threads of metallized mylar in the mast just reflect more radar. The only change I had to make was to put up an insulated VHF antenna.

 

I think that's why people don't use regular radar reflectors when they know they should, because they get tangled up in the mast. That whole problem is avoided with mylar, when it gets tangled you just give the halyard a good yank and rip right right through it.

 

And it works. In WWII, the Allieds found they could confound German radar by dumping shredded aluminum at altitude. A lot of small pieces with space between them creates a virtual reflector nearly as large as the total volume that encloses the pieces. So several shreds hanging off of a few corruplast reflectors gives a signature bigger than the biggest retroreflector.

 

that if they can see Weid they can go around Weid is total bogus at close range, when I gave the wheel a turn, then usually I could start counting up to 15 or more before anything actually would happen, and if you then wait too long to countersteer then you are way too late and youll be writing your name in the water, as they say... it's like sliding your car on ice, that's a good comparison

 

If you have the reflectors up, they can move around you no problem. I saw a smaller container (I guess about 5000 teu) go around my kayak at 3:00 am when the durn thing sneaked up on me, probably doing about 10 knots or so, not too fast. I guess it was only a few of his lengths when he saw my frantically-grabbed flasher, and I couldn't even see the pilothouse from where I was, I just saw hull. I was ready to meet my maker and at 3:00 am he just pivoted around me. I assume it was one of the newer ones with those Van Wijks, but I wasn't really listening for the whine of a bow thruster so I can't say for sure.

 

Aren't most of the new container ships being outfitted with the tunnel thrusters now?

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flashback forum thread:

2006 thread started by an anarchist

one comment from a supporter:

"that's a big part of the reason I go by the boat... Reid has a knack for attracting the cutest eastern European girls..."

 

maybe gals like these who aren't included on the newly updated flashback gallery on 1000days.net ?

 

gee, they don't look like they are blind..

there are loads of pictures of pretty girls, but there don't seem to be any photos at all of all those cruises for the blind that reid told the judge were his way of helping others..

maybe you could put some pics of reid's charitable cruises up on the new gallery, rw?

 

 

Crew01.jpg

Kati01.jpg

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I see that Reid Stowe is on Facebook now.

Isn't that wonderful! :blink:

 

He's a glutton for punishment! What a fucking ego to think he can play there unscathed! Wonder how many "friends" he'll accept only to find out they are SAers! :lol:

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Your logic completely eludes me - I'll give it a shot one more time for shits and giggles....

 

 

You're saying the SPEED of these vessels puts everyone in danger - So you think if you slow down a cargo vessel it will be more manouverable?

 

Or is it If you put more men on a vessel it will make it more manoueverable?

 

1. Obviously open ocean freighters should have right of way, for the same reason you should try to avoid being in the way of a stampede of wildebeest. But also because they're out there working, and sailors are out there screwing around. I think in all of the world's oceans, except for a few poor areas in Asia, there is not a sailor in a sailboat who really HAS to be there. It's always optional for us.

 

2. It's not that open ocean freighters move too fast, but rather that they move elusively fast. You see massive thing on the horizon, the size of a small town in Oklahoma, and you think "that's pretty far away" but it manages to steam up to you pretty fast.

 

3. People spend too much money on radar reflectors. Instead of buying two good ones for $60 each, they should instead make twenty of them out of metallized corruplast for less than $50. The radar response on the bridge follows the inverse-square law of radiation, and anyone who thinks that two dinky radar reflectors are going to show up on the radar at a few miles are mistaken, they look like dots. Shove a nest of corruplast retroreflectors up there, well wrapped in metallized mylar and they'll outlast any storm and create a big enough reflection to actually trigger the radar alarm on the bridge of the other boat. There's a difference in threshold between looking like noise and looking like another cargo boat. Captains don't sleep through that alarm.

 

4. Open ocean freighters are not freight trains. Their ability to maneuver at full steam is incredible, I've seen it first-hand. That 8,000 teu vessel can move like a cat. If they see you, they can go around you. The trick is just to let them see you, and fiberglass (or Bondo in Reid's case) reflects long waves with all of the efficiency of a bowl of sour cream.

 

couldn't agree with you more, especially after a passage through the Molucca straits.......

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Always to much to read,

 

Guess the weed is going to make 1000 days

That it VBman you're starting to turn with the tide here. I think he's going to make it to. He's sure proved himself a worthy sailor/adventurer and no one can dispute that at this point! ;)

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Always to much to read,

 

Guess the weed is going to make 1000 days

That it VBman you're starting to turn with the tide here. I think he's going to make it to. He's sure proved himself a worthy sailor/adventurer and no one can dispute that at this point! ;)

 

 

Worthy of what?

 

How much scientific data will he be returning with? You know the "Mars analagous" data he promised his sponsors he would collect while drifting?

 

He hasn't even been keeping record of the ocean temperatures. Had he done that on a daily basis he would at least be able to contribute to global warming data. All that money he scammed and he couldn't even afford a thermometer?

 

Reid is just a scammer. Plain and simple.......

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I see that Reid Stowe is on Facebook now.

Isn't that wonderful! :blink:

 

Yeah and he has a great site! He's a master of self promotion. He must be up to about 870 days so far. Already he has accomplished an amazing feat. :rolleyes:

 

According to his initial set of goals, he was not to have any contact with outside help, see land and get any assistance from mankind for 1000 days. He dropped Soy off on day 305, slightly nuts, and HE made the rules. No time outs for dropping of his seasick preggers girlfriend. Jon Sanders boarded the Anne on Day 305, so his count must start over at Day 1, whether you like it or not. And since the rescue party brought a ham sandwich ready for Soy to scarf down, I'd be willing to bet they brought one for WEid, too. Maybe that's why Sanders went below deck with WEid...to give him a snack out of sight of the cameras, not just to get his carved whalebone. I'd love to see all the footage from the helicopter(s) and news outlets from that event!

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Day 872 566 Broken Boat Parts as Icons

Friday, 11 September 2009

 

 

Day 872 566 - September 11, 2009

 

Wind N 10 knots, Course SW, Speed 2.2 knots, Position 10*42n by 20*54w

 

Broken Boat Parts as Icons

 

In the middle of the night the main gaffjaws came tumbling down. The mainsail spilled its wind, the schooner rolled, the main boom swung and banged and woke me up. When accidents happen in the dark, it always takes a little while to figure them out. I move carefully because things swinging around out of place can be dangerous. I went right to the mainsheet and pulled the boom in tight so it would not bang again. I lowered the jib and the staysail so we could turn into the wind and stop. I figured out the three quarter-inch thick eyebolt that holds the top of the block and tackle that pulls the throat of the gaff up had broken.

 

The gaff was now vertical to the mast. I had to keep the gaff jaws from going straight down and jamming when I lowered the peak. I tied the masttop working halyard to the jaws and ran it through a deck pulley bad the winch and cranked up the front of the gaff. Then I was able to lower the peak and get the sail down.

 

In the morning I carried the halyard blocks, my back pack of tools tied with strings, the spare eyebolt and the bossun's chair to the top of the mast. With my one-hand sledge hammer I pounded the broken eyebolt out of the hole and saved it as my new icon. I mounted the new eyebolt, hooked the top of the block and tackle on, put the bottom pulley hook through a ring in my safety harness and opened the four part tackle with my weight as I went down.

 

That is a very brief description of one of the toughest jobs I have done yet. I held the hefty hunk of broken steel eyebolt up to the heavens and praised it for carrying me this far and making me stronger. What choice do I have other than give all these broken parts respect as objects of uncritical devotion? I used the best of my knowledge and skills as I tried as hard as I could at the risk of my life for them. It was like removing a bad tooth from a flying dragon. I was grateful to be the one for the honor.

 

I will save this "tooth' as an empowered broken emblem, a symbol of the imperfect broken voyage that broke records and entrenched belief systems. These objects; broken steel, pulleys and sails have soul in them and deserve to live on as cultural teachers and holy art icons.

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Day 872 566 Broken Boat Parts as Icons

Friday, 11 September 2009

 

 

Day 872 566 - September 11, 2009

 

Wind N 10 knots, Course SW, Speed 2.2 knots, Position 10*42n by 20*54w

 

Broken Boat Parts as Icons

 

In the middle of the night the main gaffjaws came tumbling down. The mainsail spilled its wind, the schooner rolled, the main boom swung and banged and woke me up. When accidents happen in the dark, it always takes a little while to figure them out. I move carefully because things swinging around out of place can be dangerous. I went right to the mainsheet and pulled the boom in tight so it would not bang again. I lowered the jib and the staysail so we could turn into the wind and stop. I figured out the three quarter-inch thick eyebolt that holds the top of the block and tackle that pulls the throat of the gaff up had broken.

 

The gaff was now vertical to the mast. I had to keep the gaff jaws from going straight down and jamming when I lowered the peak. I tied the masttop working halyard to the jaws and ran it through a deck pulley bad the winch and cranked up the front of the gaff. Then I was able to lower the peak and get the sail down.

 

In the morning I carried the halyard blocks, my back pack of tools tied with strings, the spare eyebolt and the bossun's chair to the top of the mast. With my one-hand sledge hammer I pounded the broken eyebolt out of the hole and saved it as my new icon. I mounted the new eyebolt, hooked the top of the block and tackle on, put the bottom pulley hook through a ring in my safety harness and opened the four part tackle with my weight as I went down.

 

That is a very brief description of one of the toughest jobs I have done yet. I held the hefty hunk of broken steel eyebolt up to the heavens and praised it for carrying me this far and making me stronger. What choice do I have other than give all these broken parts respect as objects of uncritical devotion? I used the best of my knowledge and skills as I tried as hard as I could at the risk of my life for them. It was like removing a bad tooth from a flying dragon. I was grateful to be the one for the honor.

 

I will save this "tooth' as an empowered broken emblem, a symbol of the imperfect broken voyage that broke records and entrenched belief systems. These objects; broken steel, pulleys and sails have soul in them and deserve to live on as cultural teachers and holy art icons.

Scary, what the Cheese Scow might look like when she comes home.

 

peterboat3a.jpg

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I see that Reid Stowe is on Facebook now.

Isn't that wonderful! :blink:

 

Yeah and he has a great site! He's a master of self promotion. He must be up to about 870 days so far. Already he has accomplished an amazing feat. :rolleyes:

 

According to his initial set of goals, he was not to have any contact with outside help, see land and get any assistance from mankind for 1000 days. He dropped Soy off on day 305, slightly nuts, and HE made the rules. No time outs for dropping of his seasick preggers girlfriend. Jon Sanders boarded the Anne on Day 305, so his count must start over at Day 1, whether you like it or not. And since the rescue party brought a ham sandwich ready for Soy to scarf down, I'd be willing to bet they brought one for WEid, too. Maybe that's why Sanders went below deck with WEid...to give him a snack out of sight of the cameras, not just to get his carved whalebone. I'd love to see all the footage from the helicopter(s) and news outlets from that event!

 

 

There's no disputing that Reid has been out at sea for over 872 days. If you want to try and downplay it with your technicalities and what if's then good luck convincing the rest of the world that knows the well documented facts of him being out at sea for 873 days. Cut it, slice it, dice it puree it anyway you want but you're more likely to cut your own finger. :lol::lol:

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I see that Reid Stowe is on Facebook now.

Isn't that wonderful! :blink:

 

Yeah and he has a great site! He's a master of self promotion. He must be up to about 870 days so far. Already he has accomplished an amazing feat. :rolleyes:

 

According to his initial set of goals, he was not to have any contact with outside help, see land and get any assistance from mankind for 1000 days. He dropped Soy off on day 305, slightly nuts, and HE made the rules. No time outs for dropping of his seasick preggers girlfriend. Jon Sanders boarded the Anne on Day 305, so his count must start over at Day 1, whether you like it or not. And since the rescue party brought a ham sandwich ready for Soy to scarf down, I'd be willing to bet they brought one for WEid, too. Maybe that's why Sanders went below deck with WEid...to give him a snack out of sight of the cameras, not just to get his carved whalebone. I'd love to see all the footage from the helicopter(s) and news outlets from that event!

 

 

There's no disputing that Reid has been out at sea for over 872 days. If you want to try and downplay it with your technicalities and what if's then good luck convincing the rest of the world that knows the well documented facts of him being out at sea for 873 days. Cut it, slice it, dice it puree it anyway you want but you're more likely to cut your own finger. :lol::lol:

 

Again Saltygirl, will Tantra Schooner make it back to NYC and if it does, where will the Sproutking keep his fine craft?

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According to his initial set of goals, he was not to have any contact with outside help, see land and get any assistance from mankind for 1000 days. He dropped Soy off on day 305, slightly nuts, and HE made the rules. No time outs for dropping of his seasick preggers girlfriend. Jon Sanders boarded the Anne on Day 305, so his count must start over at Day 1, whether you like it or not. And since the rescue party brought a ham sandwich ready for Soy to scarf down, I'd be willing to bet they brought one for WEid, too. Maybe that's why Sanders went below deck with WEid...to give him a snack out of sight of the cameras, not just to get his carved whalebone. I'd love to see all the footage from the helicopter(s) and news outlets from that event!

 

Say what you want about Reid, but now you're writing defamatory stuff about Jon Sanders, implying he lied by resupplying Stowe. That is seriously messed up, Jon is about as close to superhero as any Australian has come.

 

If you suspect something fishy went down, why don't you email Jon and ask him?

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Again Saltygirl, will Tantra Schooner make it back to NYC and if it does, where will the Sproutking keep his fine craft?

 

There are a lot of places up the Hudson that would probably love to have that Schooner. Even a modicum of additional tourist draw can do wonders for some of these towns. The Hudson River Maritime Museum up in Kingston might be interested.

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How much scientific data will he be returning with? You know the "Mars analagous" data he promised his sponsors he would collect while drifting?

 

He's not a scientist, so any data he gathered would be mostly useless anyway.

 

However he has been at sea, alone, for a long time, seemingly in a very stable, emotionally healthy state. His logs have sociological and psychological profile will probably have value to space travel researchers. For all I can tell, his hippy-trippy-dippy emotional state might be exactly what a successful space mariner needs, perhaps along with a weightless yoga platform and lots of houseplants and sprouted seeds.

 

And Soanya's pregnancy has value of something to avoid by any means possible ... because something like that would make quick work of ending a Mars mission midway.

 

He hasn't even been keeping record of the ocean temperatures. Had he done that on a daily basis he would at least be able to contribute to global warming data. All that money he scammed and he couldn't even afford a thermometer?

 

Reid is just a scammer. Plain and simple.......

 

If he took daily surface temperatures with a wide-spectrum IR thermometer, they would be essentially useless because there is no correspondence with other locations during the same time period. We can get data far more complete and far more accurate data using satellites and in-situ measurements. Anyone who thought that Reid Stowe was going to gather useful scientific data was not a scientist. So he didn't scam anyone in the scientific community ... it would be like my 7 year old telling me she is going to work in my office for the day. Yeah, I like to have here around, but I don't expect her to be able to manage production workflows.

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Scary, what the Cheese Scow might look like when she comes home.

 

peterboat3a.jpg

 

In many respects it already looks a good sight worse than this. Have you seen the inharmonious superstructures tacked onto the deck? The offensively unfair panels (even dead flat panels somehow were too difficult to make straight...)? The mixture of dissimilar metals known to corrode when in contact? The hill-billy handrails? Un-freakin'-believable! When in its best condition ever, Reid's boat was and remains an example of the sort of boat that drags down property values for an entire marina.

 

The entire Love Schooner Anne is an example of "maintenance" by reaction, not pro-action. Look at that broken iron eye-bolt. That did not fail catastrophically; it corroded and wore out over a prolonged period. It's imminent failure would have been obvious to the most casual of inspections for months, if not years. Reid has demonstrated ad nauseam his utter disregard for basic preventive maintenance. This lack of maintenance and aesthetics may distill down to the primary causes of disrespect from the more traditionally-minded sailing community. And that doesn't even visit the disrespect born of Reid's treatment of other people (such as his offspring,) his financial obligations, his made-up spiritual/religious babbling and all the other weird behavior unrelated to sailing and seamanship.

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Again Saltygirl, will Tantra Schooner make it back to NYC and if it does, where will the Sproutking keep his fine craft?

Croton Point Park.

 

 

Close to the train station so his drum carrying artist friends could conveniently visit from the city but it's a Westchester County Park so don't think they'd be too receptive to the notion.

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Again Saltygirl, will Tantra Schooner make it back to NYC and if it does, where will the Sproutking keep his fine craft?

 

There are a lot of places up the Hudson that would probably love to have that Schooner. Even a modicum of additional tourist draw can do wonders for some of these towns. The Hudson River Maritime Museum up in Kingston might be interested.

 

Tantra Schooner a tourist attraction? Right.

 

If any, most riverfront facilities like the Museum in Kingston are not open year round and most riverfront towns won't be too excited about an uninsured livaboard sweeping away their teenage daughters and further taxing their already overburdened welfare rolls.

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It's a great place to kayak out of. Don't be a hater.

 

 

have you done the put in @ cold spring 'n paddled to bannerman's castle and beacon bridge- and a swim stop off lil stony point?

 

 

most of the people who respond on this thread are ignorant haters who do not express the generally thoughtful demeanor of responsible sailors.

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It's a great place to kayak out of. Don't be a hater.

 

 

have you done the put in @ cold spring 'n paddled to bannerman's castle and beacon bridge- and a swim stop off lil stony point?

 

 

most of the people who respond on this thread are ignorant haters who do not express the generally thoughtful demeanor of responsible sailors.

 

Hater? Fuck you.

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It's a great place to kayak out of. Don't be a hater.

 

You're a kayaker? I knew there was something terribly alluring and intoxicating about you, sugar.

 

I have a folding double somewhere, but alas I am married a non-kayaker. I guess sometimes the wheels of fate spin in nonsynchronous ways.

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It's a great place to kayak out of. Don't be a hater.

 

 

have you done the put in @ cold spring 'n paddled to bannerman's castle and beacon bridge- and a swim stop off lil stony point?

 

It's been a while, what is the stop on the Metro North either before or after there that just stops at the nature reserve? No town, no parking lot, no roads, just a platform.

 

That area is incredible, mind boggling that it's so close to NYC. Good kayaking in the old sealanes around NYC/NJ too, a lot of those formerly contaminated areas have been naturally reclaimed, practically forgotten.

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Again Saltygirl, will Tantra Schooner make it back to NYC and if it does, where will the Sproutking keep his fine craft?

 

There are a lot of places up the Hudson that would probably love to have that Schooner. Even a modicum of additional tourist draw can do wonders for some of these towns. The Hudson River Maritime Museum up in Kingston might be interested.

 

Tantra Schooner a tourist attraction? Right.

 

If any, most riverfront facilities like the Museum in Kingston are not open year round and most riverfront towns won't be too excited about an uninsured livaboard sweeping away their teenage daughters and further taxing their already overburdened welfare rolls.

 

It would be a decent tourist attraction, the boat did set a world's record for sailing/drifting. People like to see that kind of stuff ... shopowners on the Strand would probably go for it. They already pay for their annual cannon display with questionable tourist benefits.

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The entire Love Schooner Anne is an example of "maintenance" by reaction, not pro-action. Look at that broken iron eye-bolt. That did not fail catastrophically; it corroded and wore out over a prolonged period. It's imminent failure would have been obvious to the most casual of inspections for months, if not years. Reid has demonstrated ad nauseam his utter disregard for basic preventive maintenance. This lack of maintenance and aesthetics may distill down to the primary

 

Maintenance by reaction, rather than proaction.

 

You just described the entire U.S. economy since the day Eisenhower left office.

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