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Another Melges 32, Envyus, sent your way a few weeks ago, Bakewell-White Z39 Jazz Player heading down soon. Toby's X & Y departing for Melbourne soon too.

That is the new Wild West. Started life as a super 30, Mike added a scoop and the sprit and possibly some other mods, design work done by Fred Barrett. I think the keel on it is the one that came with

Interesting conditions for the Tim Malone race yesterday. Had a ball sailing on the mighty Sundowner... she loved the big breeze

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Was that an echo? Did you say the new sailing calendar is out? Does it have nude pics of you in it?

 

While I'm here I might have a quick PHS rant. How about some realistic handicaps? We beat an E770 on the water by 4:40. On SMS we would have won by 1:30. On PHS they win by 4:00.

 

Don't mind having to give huge time to the lead mines but to another sportsboat?

 

So your T7 beat an E770 by 4:40 on the water. All I can deduce from that is that they must run bloody short races down your way!

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Nice work by Rob Gough and Julian Salter at the moth worlds (Lake Garda) getting 3rd and 8th respectively in one of the hottest classes on the planet. The use of the RYCT's RIB for training leading up to the worlds helped with their preparation and having the set-up at the dinghy sheds has made it very convenient to get on the water with minimal time wasted. It is quite possible that RYCT could be host to interstate mothies wanting to train against these guys over the next season.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Pipe Opener next week. Who's going?

 

Is it just me or has the event died? I keep hearing stories about what used to go on and from what I can see, it's dead.

 

I was talking to the manager at DSS yesterday, he said that they didn't have many entries, but this is always the case... being the first "hit out" of the new season, people are slow to get organised.

 

We are definitely going - entry submitted this morning. Will be surprised if it doesn't end up with pretty much all the "usual suspects" on the start line. I think there were around 35 entries last year.

 

Obviously, the Pipe Opener isn't quite the full-on piss-up that it, perhaps, once was. But you only have to look at the unfortunate events of last year to realise why that is. Clubs and skippers are probably more aware of thier responsibilities these days. The word is that there will be more safety inspections than is typical this year (not a bad thing, IMHO). I reckon it is still a great weekend, and I reckon Sean Langman and his team do a good job down at Kermandie. The days of getting fullly charged up in the DSS or RYCT before getting on your boat for a "le Mans start" are over, but that doesn't, in my opinion, mean that the Pipe Opener is dead.

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  • 2 months later...

Waiting waiting..........surveys done few issues Need fixing/explaining.....not a done deal as yet. There seems to be a communication issue between the broker and the owner. Should all work out but just going to take more time than I thought.

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the safety dance

 

I sail, I wear a PFD and a tether at night, why should I take a course?

 

To save lives, including your own. For some races, it’s required for all or part of the crew to get this certification. But the value of the course is so much greater.

 

This weekend I went to a Safety at Sea course put together by Ashley Perrin who many here know from her adventures off shore and in Antarctica. Ashley brought in Paul Cunningham, an ISAF approved instructor from England to teach the course, which was hosted at the San Francisco Yacht Club.

 

Have you ever tried to get into a life raft from the water before? Have you ever tried to cut rigging? Do you know how to service / check your own PFD or other safety equipment? Do you have any idea how incapacitated you will be when your PFD inflates? I'm smiling in this photo but that thing is big and strangulating. I had to learn how to partially deflate it so I could move my head around.

 

The premise of the course is to comply with Appendix G of the US Sailing Edition for the ISAF Offshore Special Regulations. The US Sailing and ISAF methods of teaching the course are slightly different, but the ultimate goal of either course is for the student to walk away knowing the answers to the majority of the above questions.

 

I spoke at length with Chuck Hawley, chair of US Sailing Safety at Sea this week, who gave me some of the history of the Safety at Sea courses, which have been around in the US since 1980. Initially the US Sailing Safety at Sea class was a course that attracted cruisers and racers alike, but as it took hold, it became a requirement for a percentage of the competitors in Cat 1 races and later added lead to the pencil by requiring skippers and race captains to be certified in order to go to sea in those races.

 

In about 2000, ISAF followed suit with a proscription of 14 topics to go Cat 1 racing. All of this said, the courses that evolved from these exercises are as different as they are the same. The US Sailing Course is one day course using a moderator and ten speakers who cover their areas of expertise in depth, with an optional second day of hands on (practical) training. The ISAF course is a smaller individually taught two day course with guest speakers and practicals interspersed throughout the weekend.

 

There is some debate in the forums about which course is better. Chuck Hawley feels a moderated course is helpful in taking the knowledge the experts bring and making it coherent to the class, Ashley feels the intimate course setting interspersed with speakers and practicals keeps the student engaged and learning. No matter the course method, the goal is for the student to gain an understanding of current best safety practices following Appendix G and a handle on what they don’t know, like in depth understanding of areas like First Aid, Meteorology, or VHF Communication, to name a few.

 

The course I took was a hybrid of the above, with one instructor, videos, expert guest speakers, and practical sessions. The participants included racers and cruisers in age from mid 20s to late 60s. My conclusion after taking this course and speaking at length with Chuck, was whichever course you take or are required to take, is be sure to do the practical parts.

 

I don’t want to go into a long syllabus review, but here’s our hands on work, in brief:

 

Flares: We fired SOLAS (safety of live at sea) flares and US approved flares. We learned how to set off parachute flares and hand held flares. They are hot and bright and each one is different. What I learned: Understand how each one in your kit works, and replace expired flares. Assume at least one in your kit will be a dud. Get SOLAS flares - they are significantly brighter.

 

Cutting away rigging: We brought the knives we sail with to test them on tether webbing and rigging. What we learned: A lot of our knives don’t work. Be sure you have one that does and that you can open with one hand. Look into a ceramic knife as, interestingly, it cuts a lot of things quite easily and doesn’t rust or need to be sharpened. Saws can get rusty, so can bolt cutters. Know your equipment and how you may need to use it and if it will work.

 

Putting out fires: The Tiburon fire department came and set a fire in a large pan for us. We used fire extinguishers to put it out. What I learned: Guess what - know how to use your equipment, and make sure it’s not expired. It’s pretty easy and kind of fun to use an extinguisher in that situation, but the thought of putting out a fire on your own boat may make it harder to remember how to use one. Fire blankets are pretty handy too.

 

PFDs: There are loads of different kinds of PFDs. Find the one that works best for the type of sailing you are doing. If you are offshore, note that a lot of life jackets we use in -shore won’t help you that much, if at all, off shore. Learn the difference between hydrostatic and canister auto inflation. Ashley recommends Spinlock vests and a lot of the off shore types in our group already had them. Take care of your PFD the same way you do your foulies. Learn how to check for corrosion, whether you want your vest set on manual or auto inflate and seriously consider thigh straps. A lot of this is individual, but there are compliance rules when going off shore.

 

Getting into a life raft: Let’s hope you never have to do it. But the exercise of getting from the water with a huge pillow of air around your neck and into a life raft is un-nerving. Doing it in cold water, even more challenging. The adage step up into a life raft makes a lot of sense, especially if you can actually step into it without meeting the water. Again, I hope you never have to do it.

 

A friend of mine raced from Miami to Nassau with only a harness and tether on at night. Another friend of mine drowned this year because he didn’t have on a proper PFD. I’ve been a MOB with crew who didn’t know how to pick me up out of the water. Many of us have read the panel results from the Aegean and Low Speed Chase tragedies and just last week we watched another unfold in front of our eyes in the wake of hurricane Sandy. Whether you are an active racer, race committee, or a cruiser, this course, with the hands on work, will have value.   - Paige Brooks

 

11/16/12

 

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Snoopy, you cut and shut that from some US sailing site. I agree with you points but:

 

1. Yes I know how to get in a life raft from in the water. I also know how to right an upturned life-raft while people are in it.

2. Yes I know ABOUT putting out fires at sea. I also HAVE ACTUALLY had to put out such fires.

3. Yes I know ABOUT helicopter rescue. I have also ACTUALLY HAD TO put on the helo sling (make sure it drops into the water first) and been hoisted out.

 

I have done all the above in the commercial Elements of Shipboard Safety course which qualifies me for ocean crossing on commercial vessels. BUT Yachting Australia won't recognise this and wants me to pay them to do less so I can get a "qualification to sail offshore.

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Snoopy, you cut and shut that from some US sailing site. I agree with you points but:

 

1. Yes I know how to get in a life raft from in the water. I also know how to right an upturned life-raft while people are in it.

2. Yes I know ABOUT putting out fires at sea. I also HAVE ACTUALLY had to put out such fires.

3. Yes I know ABOUT helicopter rescue. I have also ACTUALLY HAD TO put on the helo sling (make sure it drops into the water first) and been hoisted out.

 

I have done all the above in the commercial Elements of Shipboard Safety course which qualifies me for ocean crossing on commercial vessels. BUT Yachting Australia won't recognise this and wants me to pay them to do less so I can get a "qualification to sail offshore.""

 

There is recognized prior learning for sssc for some courses.......one person was given rpl for the Maria, there was a little leg work but easy enough to get qualified.

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Plenty of carnage on the Derwent on Saturday morning. War Games was absolutely smoking until she went tits-up in as fine a chinese jybe as I've ever seen. Some boats seemed to think that 35-40 knots didn't merit a reef in the main...

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  • 3 weeks later...

Snoopy, you cut and shut that from some US sailing site. I agree with you points but:

 

1. Yes I know how to get in a life raft from in the water. I also know how to right an upturned life-raft while people are in it.

2. Yes I know ABOUT putting out fires at sea. I also HAVE ACTUALLY had to put out such fires.

3. Yes I know ABOUT helicopter rescue. I have also ACTUALLY HAD TO put on the helo sling (make sure it drops into the water first) and been hoisted out.

 

I have done all the above in the commercial Elements of Shipboard Safety course which qualifies me for ocean crossing on commercial vessels. BUT Yachting Australia won't recognise this and wants me to pay them to do less so I can get a "qualification to sail offshore.

 

I agree with you here. When I was putting a Maria island race crew together, I had 4 crew members who had completed the stw95 elements of ship board safety at Amc recently, and 3 who had the YA sea survival. Now the rule from the ryct is 50 % the crew must have the YA sea survival qualification. This rule effectively made me reduce my crew from 8 most with some sort of sea safety cert ( my raft limit) to 6 @ 50% YA sea survival. In my eyes this was fairly crap rule as I would rather have 8 crew over 6 as it would certainly limit crew fatigue and many other hazards.

I doubt I will enter any more long races run by the ryct such as the Maria or Bruny, due to the need for the for the Ryct to exceed the category safety requirement set by YA.

I know some people say how can you argue about safety. Well I don't think it's about safety anymore and it's about making money from the courses that are so conveniently run just before these longer races.

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There is recognized prior learning for sssc for some courses.......one person was given rpl for the Maria, there was a little leg work(Which is the obligation of the sailor) but easy enough to get qualified.

 

This requierment has been in place for three years as a recomendation and a requierment. It is aimed at and providing benifit for yachties and owners by giving them knowlage that the people on on the boat at least know about the following:

  • Care and maintenance of safety and other equipment
  • Storm sails
  • Damage Control and Repair
  • Heavy Weather – crew routines, boat handling, drogues
  • Man overboard prevention and recovery
  • Giving Assistance to other craft
  • Hypothermia
  • SAR organisation and methods
  • Weather Forecasting
  • Liferafts and Lifejackets
  • Liferafts
  • Lifejackets
  • Liferafts and Lifejackets (practical)
  • Fire precautions and fire fighting
  • Communications equipment
  • Pyrotechnics and EPIRBs

To do that all they have to do is prove that they have a vailid SSSC ticket. Not a big ask.

 

The clubs make no money at running the courses. The cost of running them is very high and the break even point is around 16 to 17 students at the current cost of running the course. In sydney the course can be at $700.

 

other reasons for crew to have the ticket

http://sailinganarchy.com/article.php?get=9197

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There are 10 Boats doing offshore racing this christmas from hobart that have done 1 day race or less (25% of the boats)

There are 15 boats that have done no coast or offshore races this year.(37% of Boats)

Is this good enough?

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Yes I do understand some of those points, however it is impossible to ask these crew members to give up 2 weekends and several hundred dollars at the last minute to do a safety course, also the course at the maritime the course at the maritime college may not be As yacht specific but it's pretty close. Also this course is held in conjunction with coxswain's, master 4/5 or deck officer courses. These courses also provide you with far greater detail on subjects as damage control, fire fighting ( a 2 day course by its self), weather forecasting, radio operators course and most of the other details you have mentioned. Now would rather have 6 crew and 50% with ya ssc and 1 with stcw95 ssc aswell, or have 8 crew with 3 with ya ssc and 4 with stcw95 ssc. Now I know which crew I would rather race with. Also with the prior learning acknowledgment it was indeed a total and utter muck around.

Sorry if this seems like a rant but it really pissed me off all the back and forth comunication with the yacht club in the middle of exam period.

 

 

 

,

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YA sets the SSSC structure based on the ISAF requierments. That issue of course requierments and structure is for YA not the clubs.

The Maria Island race is in November usually the third weekend of the month, the sailing calander was out in july/August NoR and SI were out at least two months before the event.

SSSC course is 1 weekend only and around $400 which is valid for 5 years (80 a year). There were three courses run before the event 2 in September and 1 in november.

 

YT has asked all clubs to look at the saftey cat for all coastal and offshore events as they dont think it is adequate.

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There is recognized prior learning for sssc for some courses.......one person was given rpl for the Maria, there was a little leg work(Which is the obligation of the sailor) but easy enough to get qualified.

 

This requierment has been in place for three years as a recomendation and a requierment. It is aimed at and providing benifit for yachties and owners by giving them knowlage that the people on on the boat at least know about the following:

  • Care and maintenance of safety and other equipment
  • Storm sails
  • Damage Control and Repair
  • Heavy Weather – crew routines, boat handling, drogues
  • Man overboard prevention and recovery
  • Giving Assistance to other craft
  • Hypothermia
  • SAR organisation and methods
  • Weather Forecasting
  • Liferafts and Lifejackets
  • Liferafts
  • Lifejackets
  • Liferafts and Lifejackets (practical)
  • Fire precautions and fire fighting
  • Communications equipment
  • Pyrotechnics and EPIRBs

To do that all they have to do is prove that they have a vailid SSSC ticket. Not a big ask.

 

The clubs make no money at running the courses. The cost of running them is very high and the break even point is around 16 to 17 students at the current cost of running the course. In sydney the course can be at $700.

 

other reasons for crew to have the ticket

http://sailinganarch...le.php?get=9197

Having fairly recently completed an SSS course, conducted by the RYCT, I will mention, as an aside, that several of the points listed in your post above were not specifically addressed in the course.

 

There is no doubt that the course is useful / worthwhile. However, given that 50% is non-mandatory at this stage, it seemed incongruous to choose to enforce a recommendation. It is also the case, is it not, that the RYCT took the decision to enforce this at relatively short notice before the Maria? Given the declining numbers of boats / people actively participating in our sport, I would have thought that any action that actively discouraged particpation, however well intentioned, should be given careful consideration.

 

How many of the supposedly inexperienced offshore boats will not have completed a multi-day offshore delivery by the time the Christmas races start?

 

Who are "YT" and why should we care whether or not they think safety cat are adequate or not?

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The NOR had the crew requirements in it (section 4.4) and 50% had to have a Sssc ticket. The Nor was released Months before the race.

Participation or lack of it and safety are two separate issues and should be kept as such. Participation is a whole another topic.

On the delivery will all race crew be on the boat? Will race conditions be in place? Will all gear be on the boat? In most cases the answer is no.

YT is yachting Tasmania. They are the over riding organization that governs our sport in Tasmania.

 

There are restrictions and requirements that have to be met in other sports that require time and money to be spent and training. Motorbike riding, car racing, horse riding, field sports, shooting, and so on why should sailing be any different when considering the potential risk involved in the sport?

Why should some one be allowed to be able to step on to a boat with no skill or training and do an offshore race?

 

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I never said these guys didn't have pior training or skill some of my crew with out a regonised sssc, have over 50,000 miles at sea sailing on family yachts and sailing super yachts and are master 4 quilified, but according to YT that's not expirenced......

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The NOR had the crew requirements in it (section 4.4) and 50% had to have a Sssc ticket. The Nor was released Months before the race.

Participation or lack of it and safety are two separate issues and should be kept as such. Participation is a whole another topic.

On the delivery will all race crew be on the boat? Will race conditions be in place? Will all gear be on the boat? In most cases the answer is no.

YT is yachting Tasmania. They are the over riding organization that governs our sport in Tasmania.

 

There are restrictions and requirements that have to be met in other sports that require time and money to be spent and training. Motorbike riding, car racing, horse riding, field sports, shooting, and so on why should sailing be any different when considering the potential risk involved in the sport?

Why should some one be allowed to be able to step on to a boat with no skill or training and do an offshore race?

 

Without particularly wishing to get into a pissing-contest with you, Snoopy, old mate, there was certainly an impression that the RYCT was trying to "bully" people into attending its poorly attended SSS course by enforcing a rule that was recommended only. Frankly, it did seem a little strange that RYCT organised an SSS course only a few days after the DSS has held an SSS course. That the DSS course was very well supported and, not surprisingly the RYCT one initially wasn't - presumably because all the people "champing at the bit" to get their SSS would have attended the first course. I don't know what degree of coordination there was between RYCT and DSS but to hold 2 courses only a few days apart doesn't seem likely to result in 2 well supported courses.

 

Personally, I think our sport is already over-regulated (but I acknowledge that is only my opinion and others would disagree). I know who ISAF are. I know who YA are. I have an idea who BYC, DSS and RYCT are, and I kind of get the role of each (or I think I do). But who are YT and what is their role? My understanding is that individual clubs organise and conduct races in accordance with ISAF rules and regulations and that the governing body of our sport in Australia was YA? Obviously I am demonstrating my own ignorance here, but I don't get what YT's role is in this and what role they play in the application of "The Blue Book", particularly in regard to offshore racing. According to their website they are Gary Langford, Bob Silverberg, Murray Jones, Steve Spaulding and Jeff Cordell: August gentlemen, one and all, I don't doubt. But why are they asking clubs to look at Safey Cats (as opposed to YA doing so, or ISAF doing so, for example)?

 

to counter your questions above:

On a delivery, why does it matter if all the crew are on the boat? Your previous example was stating that many boats who are racing this Christmas have insufficient offshore work. But, presumably, you don't know whether the crew on boats that have done recent offshore races are the same crew who will be racing this Christmas.

 

What does "will race conditions be in place?" even mean? Why does it matter whether "all gear" (whatever that is) is on the boat? I'll take a punt that given current forecast chances are that most boats participating in this year's Launceston to Hobart will have epxerienced worse weather on their delivery than they experience in the race, and most boats coped short handed, and without the support mechanisms (radio skeds, briefings and forecasts, etc.) that are in place for the race.

 

Bear in mind that there is nothing stopping somebody from stepping onto a boat, with no skill no training and no certification and heading offshore, around the world if they want... as long as it isn't a race.

 

Having blabbed on for far too long, I'll stop before everyone falls asleep. It is important to recognise that we all want our sport to be healthy and vibrant and fun, and that everbody, presumably, thinks that what they are doing is for the best.

 

Have a great (and safe) Christmas one and all, and all the very best for everybody who is sailing (racing or cruising, offshore or not) over the holiday.

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There was no impressions or bullying implyed just offering a service that was over subscribed in the second RYCT course held in November. The marketing for the first course was a bit late. The course that was on in Sep was planned in march. Better cordination should be organised when putting on course.

 

If you think the sport is over regulated wait until the new OHS laws are imbeded on and off the water.

 

I was refering to experiance gained by the crew and boat as a unit, delivery trips are not optimal and dont emulate experiance that is gained by racing in multiple over night offshore events.

 

While somebody can head off around the world if they want, they asume all the risk.

 

Safe sailing and have a good christmas.

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Snoopy old mate, I still stand by my original post. Rules are rules and logic is logic. I know that YA don't recognise the commercial, international, ocean crossing, course for dealing with emergencies at sea. I just think that is illogical. More than that it's the inflexibility that is less logical. Eg the disqualification of AFR Midnight Rambler - one less First Aid certificate. How many had recently lapsed certificates? Were the crew in any more danger?

 

Ours is a self-enforced sport. Whoever protested AFR should have s good hard look at themselves.

 

In Oz we are lucky to have a national funded rescue service. Any muppet can go to sea without regulation and be rescued. I'm not saying we should have no procedures or guidelines as we have an obligation to promote safety because we use the public funded rescue services to support our sport. But when this leads to "compulsory" requirements that go beyond what the national body states; protests on technicalities that never affect the outcome of a race; and refusal to recognise international commercial qualifications, then things have gone too far.

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"While somebody can head off around the world if they want, they assume all the risk."

 

Doesn't rule 4 also put the risk on a boat that races?

4 DECISION TO RACE

The responsibility for a boats decision to participate in a race or to

continue racing is hers alone.

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Hi All, YT is Yachting Tasmania and it represents all Tasmanian affiliated yacht clubs to Yachting Australia (YA). The board is elected by members at the AGM which was held around last June. Most board members chair subcommittees such as training, rules, development etc. My role is the chairman of the offshore committee and one role is to distribute discussion papers for comment and send back feedback. You may have seen on my mailing list the stanchion paper from YA and request for comment regarding the survey instigated by Matt Allen. I'm a member of the offshore keelboat policy committee which meets annually and this is one formal way to have your issues raised at the National Level.

 

The YA structure was reviewed last year by Malcolm Speed and Garry Langford and there were some recommendations to change it significantly including how Tas feeds into YA. Like it or not that's how the structure is but it's sad to see that few understand the work we do. Your clubs use YT as part of a process to gain access to YA.

 

Now back to Maria Island... As far as I recall it's a Cat 3 race with raft. Blue book places no need for SSSC. The same with L2H. I have had discussions with YA about how races are categorized and many think both are Cat 2. It's not YT or my role to tell clubs how to run their races but in all cases they need to provide appropriate infrastructure to support safety. In my opinion I'd be quite happy to go anywhere with my crew, some of which do not have SSSC. They've done the miles, we know our boat. SSSC is a handy thing to have but it needs to be complemented with experience. Its nuts to think Wings had to drop off experienced crew and sail short-handed to comply. Some common sense needs to apply.

 

If RYCT think that there is an elevated risk that requires Cat 1 compliance for SSSC maybe they should rethink how they categorise this race. I've seen sport boats and trailer sailors compete without this being an issue, but for my part I have serious doubts about them being fit for purpose. Imagine a couple of tons of water being dumped on the deck of a Meagles or Thompson at Tasman in the middle of the night. Are the rigs and decks good enough to stand up after launching of a 4m wave? Would they flood and sink? I reckon the coroner would be asking why are sports boats being encouraged to race in a place called Strom Bay. SSSC won't save them. There is a much wider issue here. Proper vetting of experience and suitability is far more important. Boats retiring through seasickness would be a worry. SSSC won't cure this either.

 

The timing and delivering of SSSC courses is an interesting one. I taught with Alistair Douglas at RYCT for 10 years. Suddenly the work dried up and RYCT imported mainland instructors, and as a consequence the locals copped a price hike. I dunno why this happened as I've always been available but I concede some stuff ups with YA didn't help, but could and have been resolved.

The DSS will be running SSSC courses next year and hopefully RYCT will co operate with scheduling of classes rather than throwing in a last minute course like they did last Nov, which competed with inshore race days and the course that DSS had already planned.

I'd like to see crew participate in SSSC and the clubs can value add by actively promoting safety. Random audits and rolling in some practical things like flare nights would be easy to do. Just ring MAST and ask for Hoppy! Theres a lot of safety training that could be done cheaply.

 

Jeff

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Hi All, YT is Yachting Tasmania and it represents all Tasmanian affiliated yacht clubs to Yachting Australia (YA). The board is elected by members at the AGM which was held around last June. Most board members chair subcommittees such as training, rules, development etc. My role is the chairman of the offshore committee and one role is to distribute discussion papers for comment and send back feedback. You may have seen on my mailing list the stanchion paper from YA and request for comment regarding the survey instigated by Matt Allen. I'm a member of the offshore keelboat policy committee which meets annually and this is one formal way to have your issues raised at the National Level.

 

The YA structure was reviewed last year by Malcolm Speed and Garry Langford and there were some recommendations to change it significantly including how Tas feeds into YA. Like it or not that's how the structure is but it's sad to see that few understand the work we do. Your clubs use YT as part of a process to gain access to YA.

 

Now back to Maria Island... As far as I recall it's a Cat 3 race with raft. Blue book places no need for SSSC. The same with L2H. I have had discussions with YA about how races are categorized and many think both are Cat 2. It's not YT or my role to tell clubs how to run their races but in all cases they need to provide appropriate infrastructure to support safety. In my opinion I'd be quite happy to go anywhere with my crew, some of which do not have SSSC. They've done the miles, we know our boat. SSSC is a handy thing to have but it needs to be complemented with experience. Its nuts to think Wings had to drop off experienced crew and sail short-handed to comply. Some common sense needs to apply.

 

If RYCT think that there is an elevated risk that requires Cat 1 compliance for SSSC maybe they should rethink how they categorise this race. I've seen sport boats and trailer sailors compete without this being an issue, but for my part I have serious doubts about them being fit for purpose. Imagine a couple of tons of water being dumped on the deck of a Meagles or Thompson at Tasman in the middle of the night. Are the rigs and decks good enough to stand up after launching of a 4m wave? Would they flood and sink? I reckon the coroner would be asking why are sports boats being encouraged to race in a place called Strom Bay. SSSC won't save them. There is a much wider issue here. Proper vetting of experience and suitability is far more important. Boats retiring through seasickness would be a worry. SSSC won't cure this either.

 

The timing and delivering of SSSC courses is an interesting one. I taught with Alistair Douglas at RYCT for 10 years. Suddenly the work dried up and RYCT imported mainland instructors, and as a consequence the locals copped a price hike. I dunno why this happened as I've always been available but I concede some stuff ups with YA didn't help, but could and have been resolved.

The DSS will be running SSSC courses next year and hopefully RYCT will co operate with scheduling of classes rather than throwing in a last minute course like they did last Nov, which competed with inshore race days and the course that DSS had already planned.

I'd like to see crew participate in SSSC and the clubs can value add by actively promoting safety. Random audits and rolling in some practical things like flare nights would be easy to do. Just ring MAST and ask for Hoppy! Theres a lot of safety training that could be done cheaply.

 

Jeff

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Not that it matters as "I" can't watch any-way, but what SUCK NEWS to get for Christmas BoxingDay:

Wild Thing out of race :o :o :o :o

http://rolexsydneyhobart.com/news/2012/day-1/wild-thing-out-of-race/

 

CYCtrophyPassage2012_0118.jpg

 

The Race Committee of the Rolex Sydney Hobart has announced this morning that the Grant Wharington’s super maxi Wild Thing will not be allowed to race.

 

Just two and a half hours before the start of the race, Cruising Yacht Club of Australia Commodore, Howard Piggott, announced: "The Race Committee of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race will not be accepting the entry of the boatWild Thing as a result of non-compliance with the Notice of Race, in particular NOR 4.1, dealing with documentation to be lodged and verification of construction requirements.

"The Race Committee has worked with the owner of the boat, Grant Wharington, to allow him up to three hours prior to the start of the race to provide the documentation required however that has not been forthcoming, and the Race Committee has no option but to not accept the entry of Wild Thing."

Piggott said the Race Committee had been working with Wharington over recent days to try to get the necessary documentation lodged, and had extended the deadline until 10am this morning, three hours before the start.

Wild Thing has undergone extensive modifications in recent months, including a new a section of her hull that added two feet to her overall length. The race rules require that a boat designer and builder provide declarations that the yacht has been built to ABS standards.

"This is the final decision of the Race Committee, that puts safety first," Piggott told the media at a press conference.

He added: "It's disappointing; we've made every effort. I assure you we want to see boat's racing. However, it's out of our hands. We must comply with the Notice of Race, and ensure our safety standards are maintained. I believe we just have to get on with it now and go out and yacht race."

By Jim Gale, Rolex Sydney Hobart media team

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just seen the end of the Farr 40 State Championships. Three boats from Sydney - great to see.

 

Congrats to Guido and the Transfusion crew for winning on a countback from Voodoo Chile (lLloyd Clark) - great effort guys.

 

Understand that the owner of the race committe boat was involved in transporting people from bushfire devestated areas early on Sat morning & then fronting up 4 hours later to get the series underway.

 

Big effort by all concerned.

 

Link to results below

 

http://www.belleriveyachtclub.com.au/topyacht?file=%2Fresults%2FBF40%2FSGrp1.htm

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Just seen the end of the Farr 40 State Championships. Three boats from Sydney - great to see.

 

Congrats to Guido and the Transfusion crew for winning on a countback from Voodoo Chile (lLloyd Clark) - great effort guys.

 

Understand that the owner of the race committe boat was involved in transporting people from bushfire devestated areas early on Sat morning & then fronting up 4 hours later to get the series underway.

 

Big effort by all concerned.

 

Link to results below

 

http://www.belleriveyachtclub.com.au/topyacht?file=%2Fresults%2FBF40%2FSGrp1.htm

Watched yesterday's racing on the water. Voodoo 1 crew really stepped up. Transfusion gambled too much on port tack lay in Race 2 and paid the price with a penalty. Didn't see today's racing but it probably was a turning point. Top racing all round.

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Understand that the owner of the race committe boat was involved in transporting people from bushfire devestated areas early on Sat morning & then fronting up 4 hours later to get the series underway.

 

The Alaskan I assume?

Well done Phil (or whoever it was)

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Hi All, YT is Yachting Tasmania and it represents all Tasmanian affiliated yacht clubs to Yachting Australia (YA). The board is elected by members at the AGM which was held around last June. Most board members chair subcommittees such as training, rules, development etc... <snip>

Jeff

Thanks for joining the discussion Jeff. In my previous comments I meant no slight on YT in general, nor on the individual board members. I acknowledge my own ignorance around sailing's adminstrative heirarchy but suspect that I am not alone in this ignorance. I appreciate your efforts to keep us informed about ongoing YA technical issues (as a qualified and practising Mechanical Engineer, I chose to bite my tongue regarding what was, in my opinion, some fairly questionable quasi-technical reportage proffered as expert opinion in the abovementioned stanchion debate). All current debate aside, I am genuinely and sincerely grateful to any and all volunteers, you included of course, who give their time to facillitate (my) participation in a sport that I love.

 

The on-going "nanny-fication" of sailing (and of society in general fwiw) is, in my opinions an egregious and unnecessary blight. We seem to be actively discouraging personal responsibility. OH&S legislation and metaphorical firey hoops to jumped through are not, I reckon, and substitute for taking responsibility for our actions, and no amount of legislation will overcome "stupid". Personally; I want opportunities to be educated so that I can make good decisions, not have those decisions dictated to me by "guvmint" or governing body. Ongoing changes have already effectively priced the Sydney to Hobart race out of the market for me, and probably for most average non-sponsored yachties. The L2H is currently, for us (and, I'll bet for others) the only option that we can afford. Any significant further hike in cost associated with, say, re-categorising L2H from Cat3 to Cat2 or with additional OH&s or other arbitrary legislation will certainly price us out of the offshore game period. And while I am happy to take my bat and ball and just go cruising instead, if there are others forced into making similar decisions, it doesn't bode well for the long term health of our sport.

 

For the record, the L2H was a great experience for us. Many, many thanks to all involved, particularly the staff at DSS and TYC and the numerous volunteers without whom such events could not happen.

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Hi All, YT is Yachting Tasmania and it represents all Tasmanian affiliated yacht clubs to Yachting Australia (YA). The board is elected by members at the AGM which was held around last June. Most board members chair subcommittees such as training, rules, development etc... <snip>

Jeff

Thanks for joining the discussion Jeff. In my previous comments I meant no slight on YT in general, nor on the individual board members. I acknowledge my own ignorance around sailing's adminstrative heirarchy but suspect that I am not alone in this ignorance. I appreciate your efforts to keep us informed about ongoing YA technical issues (as a qualified and practising Mechanical Engineer, I chose to bite my tongue regarding what was, in my opinion, some fairly questionable quasi-technical reportage proffered as expert opinion in the abovementioned stanchion debate). All current debate aside, I am genuinely and sincerely grateful to any and all volunteers, you included of course, who give their time to facillitate (my) participation in a sport that I love.

 

The on-going "nanny-fication" of sailing (and of society in general fwiw) is, in my opinions an egregious and unnecessary blight. We seem to be actively discouraging personal responsibility. OH&S legislation and metaphorical firey hoops to jumped through are not, I reckon, and substitute for taking responsibility for our actions, and no amount of legislation will overcome "stupid". Personally; I want opportunities to be educated so that I can make good decisions, not have those decisions dictated to me by "guvmint" or governing body. Ongoing changes have already effectively priced the Sydney to Hobart race out of the market for me, and probably for most average non-sponsored yachties. The L2H is currently, for us (and, I'll bet for others) the only option that we can afford. Any significant further hike in cost associated with, say, re-categorising L2H from Cat3 to Cat2 or with additional OH&s or other arbitrary legislation will certainly price us out of the offshore game period. And while I am happy to take my bat and ball and just go cruising instead, if there are others forced into making similar decisions, it doesn't bode well for the long term health of our sport.

 

For the record, the L2H was a great experience for us. Many, many thanks to all involved, particularly the staff at DSS and TYC and the numerous volunteers without whom such events could not happen.

 

Always good to keep up on what's happening in Tasmania.....

 

Hey, any of you chaps understand that this is a US sailing site?

 

WTF?

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Attention Dorag.

 

Maybe you should keep up with whats currently happening in Tasmania right now, you offensive turd.

 

By US I assume you mean the US where they regularly shoot kids in schools but reckon owning guns is an inalienable right?

 

Fuck you and the whore that bore you!

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Always good to keep up on what's happening in Tasmania.....

 

Hey, any of you chaps understand that this is a US sailing site?

 

WTF?

You're the kind of arsehole that thinks it's OK to post pictures on SA of naked burning Vietnamese kids with the phrase, "I love the smell of napalm in the morning."

 

There are up to 100 people missing in the Tasmanian bushfires. Dare you to come here and say it doesn't matter how many foreigners got burnt.

 

You are the lowest form of scum on the earth. You may have me on ignore and may never see this but others will and I hope they pass their judgement on you.

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Just in case 'it' has pirate on ignore:

There are up to 100 people missing in the Tasmanian bushfires. Dare you to come here and say it doesn't matter how many foreigners got burnt.

 

You are the lowest form of scum on the earth. You may have me on ignore and may never see this but others will and I hope they pass their judgement on you.

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This may be a US owned site but as of today there are two articles on the front page of it about sailing/racing in Hobart! Woot!

 

Great to see all the racing in Tassie over summer!

Cadet Australian Championships

2012-13 NS14 National Championship

Audi Laser Nationals

47th International Mirror Class Australian

AUSTRALIAN 420 NATIONALS

Int Cadet World Championship

Int Cadet Promotional Championships

OAMPS Insurance Brokers Australian Youth Champs

International Optimist Australian Championships

S2H

L2H

M2H

Farr 40 State Titles

 

To name a few!!!

 

Great job by the clubs and volunteers to make it happen!!!

 

Get down and see the boat parks at the SBSC and the RYCT site to be seen!

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This may be a US owned site but as of today there are two articles on the front page of it about sailing/racing in Hobart! Woot!

 

Great to see all the racing in Tassie over summer!

Cadet Australian Championships

2012-13 NS14 National Championship

Audi Laser Nationals

47th International Mirror Class Australian

AUSTRALIAN 420 NATIONALS

Int Cadet World Championship

Int Cadet Promotional Championships

OAMPS Insurance Brokers Australian Youth Champs

International Optimist Australian Championships

S2H

L2H

M2H

Farr 40 State Titles

 

To name a few!!!

 

Great job by the clubs and volunteers to make it happen!!!

 

That's only because you guys are the few who submit articles. Be advised that no one reads the front (or can evebn find it) and teh reason is that no one cares about sailing in your world.

 

Maybe you folks could develop your own site so we don't have to wade through all you BS?????

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I was out on the windsurfer course (bic techno) and was watching the speeds these sailors were getting with the 25knot Southerly....wow....didnt stop a power boat nearly collecting a kid on a windsurfer!

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I was out on the windsurfer course (bic techno) and was watching the speeds these sailors were getting with the 25knot Southerly....wow....didnt stop a power boat nearly collecting a kid on a windsurfer!

 

Really?

 

Holy cow!

 

Wowser!

 

 

WTF?

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That's only because you guys are the few who submit articles. Be advised that no one reads the front (or can evebn find it) and teh reason is that no one cares about sailing in your world.

 

Maybe you folks could develop your own site so we don't have to wade through all you BS?????

There is a certain irony about DoRag's ongoing tirade against non-US-centric threads... his continued posting repeatedly "bumps" these threads back to the top of the heap, thus achieving the exact opposite of that which he purports to want :)

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That's only because you guys are the few who submit articles. Be advised that no one reads the front (or can evebn find it) and teh reason is that no one cares about sailing in your world.

 

Maybe you folks could develop your own site so we don't have to wade through all you BS?????

There is a certain irony about DoRag's ongoing tirade against non-US-centric threads... his continued posting repeatedly "bumps" these threads back to the top of the heap, thus achieving the exact opposite of that which he purports to want :)

 

That all you have?

 

Seriously?

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QLD ....Quiet Little drink?????? no

 

DoRag......................you have all the power and all the ability to control and deal with this offensive blog...............................stop reading this page...............Your objections have been noted now do something about it.

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Breaking News: The United States, long considered by DoRag to be the only terrestrial land mass of any significance, may in fact be one of dozens, or even hundreds, of countries that occupy the Earth.

The existence of these so-called "other countries" has been known since 1941, when America first learned of World War II, and eventually decided to step in, realising there was a profit to be made. Since then however, only a few, such as the U.S.S.R. in the 50's and Vietnam in the 70's, have been of any real importance. The new study, which was prompted by NASA's recent discovery of an event known as the World Cup, indicates that as much as 30% of the Earth's surface may be made up of territory that is not part of the United States, and has sent ripples of shock and disbelief throughout the nation.

Some people, such as DoRag, denounce the study as conspiracy theory. World class events, such as the Americas Cup, World Series and World Championship Wrestling, have long been popular in the U.S., but the idea that there might be other such events taking place in these so-called "other countries" has proven unsettling to most Americans, DoRag included. If these claims are true, it could mean drastic changes to American life, as many things which have been taken for granted would have to be recast in light of this new information.

Football, for example, might need to be referred to as American Football, since apparently the rest of the world uses the term for some other game. DoRag has responded quickly by asking his Congressman to pass a law that would force these "other countries" to make whatever changes are needed to preserve America's long-standing traditions. "Football is football," DoRag stated, "I mean, why would you call soccer football? Soccer is soccer. Calling it football is just silly." He went on to declare that he felt sure that the matter would soon be resolved once and for all, adding, "After all, we were here first." When informed that other countries are not subject to U.S. law, the visibly-distressed DoRag had to be helped from his Mom’s basement by paramedics.

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Breaking News: The United States, long considered by DoRag to be the only terrestrial land mass of any significance, may in fact be one of dozens, or even hundreds, of countries that occupy the Earth.

The existence of these so-called "other countries" has been known since 1941, when America first learned of World War II, and eventually decided to step in, realising there was a profit to be made. Since then however, only a few, such as the U.S.S.R. in the 50's and Vietnam in the 70's, have been of any real importance. The new study, which was prompted by NASA's recent discovery of an event known as the World Cup, indicates that as much as 30% of the Earth's surface may be made up of territory that is not part of the United States, and has sent ripples of shock and disbelief throughout the nation.

Some people, such as DoRag, denounce the study as conspiracy theory. World class events, such as the Americas Cup, World Series and World Championship Wrestling, have long been popular in the U.S., but the idea that there might be other such events taking place in these so-called "other countries" has proven unsettling to most Americans, DoRag included. If these claims are true, it could mean drastic changes to American life, as many things which have been taken for granted would have to be recast in light of this new information.

Football, for example, might need to be referred to as American Football, since apparently the rest of the world uses the term for some other game. DoRag has responded quickly by asking his Congressman to pass a law that would force these "other countries" to make whatever changes are needed to preserve America's long-standing traditions. "Football is football," DoRag stated, "I mean, why would you call soccer football? Soccer is soccer. Calling it football is just silly." He went on to declare that he felt sure that the matter would soon be resolved once and for all, adding, "After all, we were here first." When informed that other countries are not subject to U.S. law, the visibly-distressed DoRag had to be helped from his Mom’s basement by paramedics.

 

 

 

 

 

HHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOO.........HUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

 

As in, Dude, you really need to try harder.....

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Breaking News: The United States, long considered by DoRag to be the only terrestrial land mass of any significance, may in fact be one of dozens, or even hundreds, of countries that occupy the Earth.

The existence of these so-called "other countries" has been known since 1941, when America first learned of World War II, and eventually decided to step in, realising there was a profit to be made. Since then however, only a few, such as the U.S.S.R. in the 50's and Vietnam in the 70's, have been of any real importance. The new study, which was prompted by NASA's recent discovery of an event known as the World Cup, indicates that as much as 30% of the Earth's surface may be made up of territory that is not part of the United States, and has sent ripples of shock and disbelief throughout the nation.

Some people, such as DoRag, denounce the study as conspiracy theory. World class events, such as the Americas Cup, World Series and World Championship Wrestling, have long been popular in the U.S., but the idea that there might be other such events taking place in these so-called "other countries" has proven unsettling to most Americans, DoRag included. If these claims are true, it could mean drastic changes to American life, as many things which have been taken for granted would have to be recast in light of this new information.

Football, for example, might need to be referred to as American Football, since apparently the rest of the world uses the term for some other game. DoRag has responded quickly by asking his Congressman to pass a law that would force these "other countries" to make whatever changes are needed to preserve America's long-standing traditions. "Football is football," DoRag stated, "I mean, why would you call soccer football? Soccer is soccer. Calling it football is just silly." He went on to declare that he felt sure that the matter would soon be resolved once and for all, adding, "After all, we were here first." When informed that other countries are not subject to U.S. law, the visibly-distressed DoRag had to be helped from his Mom’s basement by paramedics.

 

 

 

 

 

HHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOO.........HUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

 

As in, Dude, you really need to try harder.....

 

 

Yawwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn...................is this all you come back with?

Like a parrot you repeat the same few comments.......DoRag YOU do really need to try harder to dispel the idiot status you currently have......

 

I notice on the front page of Anarchy the New Zealand made wing sail for the Australian helmed American entry in the Americas Cup has turned up.....truly an international effort.

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Breaking News: The United States, long considered by DoRag to be the only terrestrial land mass of any significance, may in fact be one of dozens, or even hundreds, of countries that occupy the Earth.

The existence of these so-called "other countries" has been known since 1941, when America first learned of World War II, and eventually decided to step in, realising there was a profit to be made. Since then however, only a few, such as the U.S.S.R. in the 50's and Vietnam in the 70's, have been of any real importance. The new study, which was prompted by NASA's recent discovery of an event known as the World Cup, indicates that as much as 30% of the Earth's surface may be made up of territory that is not part of the United States, and has sent ripples of shock and disbelief throughout the nation.

Some people, such as DoRag, denounce the study as conspiracy theory. World class events, such as the Americas Cup, World Series and World Championship Wrestling, have long been popular in the U.S., but the idea that there might be other such events taking place in these so-called "other countries" has proven unsettling to most Americans, DoRag included. If these claims are true, it could mean drastic changes to American life, as many things which have been taken for granted would have to be recast in light of this new information.

Football, for example, might need to be referred to as American Football, since apparently the rest of the world uses the term for some other game. DoRag has responded quickly by asking his Congressman to pass a law that would force these "other countries" to make whatever changes are needed to preserve America's long-standing traditions. "Football is football," DoRag stated, "I mean, why would you call soccer football? Soccer is soccer. Calling it football is just silly." He went on to declare that he felt sure that the matter would soon be resolved once and for all, adding, "After all, we were here first." When informed that other countries are not subject to U.S. law, the visibly-distressed DoRag had to be helped from his Mom’s basement by paramedics.

 

 

 

 

 

HHHHHHOOOOOOOOOOOO.........HUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

 

As in, Dude, you really need to try harder.....

Cos no-one is as bigger tryhard than you?

 

You haven't responded to the bushfire challenge yet ScumBag. Come on you gutless prick. You were called and couldn't take it! "I love the smell of napalm in the morning; you foreigners are irrelevant," while here in Tasmania a third of the state burned.

 

Clean doesn't support you, he said so on the AUS Sailing News thread. Ed doesn't support your cause, ie by posting the news on the front page. Face it fuckwit, maybe SA isn't your private sandbox, and all the other kids want you to play somewhere else.

 

Now if you respond with YAWN, or HO HUM, etc it means you think you might be still in this. If you don't respond, like with the bushfire challenge, or when I called you out months ago on the Veterans Day thread referencing my own foreign familiy's war service, then that proves what it says; you got nothing!

 

Tell us that you want us to burn DoRag, or fuck off out of our thread.

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Maybe 'Rag needs to ed-yeuw-kate the site owners that this a You Ess of Americuh-Only site? He could even offer to help build a really big dingo-proof fence around the site and volunteer to man one of the surveillance balloons and go knocking on doors to try to talk the millions of Ozzie illegal aliens in the USA into self-deporting.

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the youth nationals just finished up on the derwent and it wasnt a minute too soon! it was freezing and very windy the whole regatta.

Well it was windy but not exactly freezing, even if Wednesday was cool. Nowhere near as cold or windy as the Sportsboat nationals last Easter.

 

Well done to those who persevered with the regatta. Spoke to the RO for the Optimist Green fleet today and it was hell for those little tackers.

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the youth nationals just finished up on the derwent and it wasnt a minute too soon! it was freezing and very windy the whole regatta.

 

That's good to know. We need updates on this.

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Tasman Regatta: Saturday 26 January, Parsons Bay, Nubeena

 

A free family event including; water and beach activities which include boat races, kayaking, swimming, crab races a jumping castle etc plus the Lions Club of Tasman Chocolate Wheel. The fun starts at 9.00am

 

Peninsula Feast: Saturday Night 26 January, Rec Grounds Nubeena 4.30pm – 10.30pm

 

Taste the delights and delicacies’ of the Peninsula while enjoying a fine glass of wine or beer plus dance along to the sounds of local singers the band “Morning Glory”

 

Gold coin donation entry

 

All monies raised will go to the FIRE APPEAL

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the youth nationals just finished up on the derwent and it wasnt a minute too soon! it was freezing and very windy the whole regatta.

Well it was windy but not exactly freezing, even if Wednesday was cool. Nowhere near as cold or windy as the Sportsboat nationals last Easter.

 

Well done to those who persevered with the regatta. Spoke to the RO for the Optimist Green fleet today and it was hell for those little tackers.

 

Anyone care to elaborate on how Sandy Bay S C got allocated that regatta with such woeful rescue facilities?. Bugger all RIBs ( plenty of parents ribs but not rescue boats), useless tinnies and strong winds with an Opti fleet could have turned ugly. Hearing it was a similar situation with the earlier Cadet regattas. Not critical of the volunteers in ANY way, just asking the question.

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the youth nationals just finished up on the derwent and it wasnt a minute too soon! it was freezing and very windy the whole regatta.

Well it was windy but not exactly freezing, even if Wednesday was cool. Nowhere near as cold or windy as the Sportsboat nationals last Easter.

 

Well done to those who persevered with the regatta. Spoke to the RO for the Optimist Green fleet today and it was hell for those little tackers.

 

Anyone care to elaborate on how Sandy Bay S C got allocated that regatta with such woeful rescue facilities?. Bugger all RIBs ( plenty of parents ribs but not rescue boats), useless tinnies and strong winds with an Opti fleet could have turned ugly. Hearing it was a similar situation with the earlier Cadet regattas. Not critical of the volunteers in ANY way, just asking the question.

 

I know that there were Rescue boats shared and borrowed from clubs all around the state and the country. SBSC are a Safe club and would meet the saftey requierments requiered. DSS helped out alot as well.

There were a lot of boats on the river both racing and rescue/traini

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the youth nationals just finished up on the derwent and it wasnt a minute too soon! it was freezing and very windy the whole regatta.

Well it was windy but not exactly freezing, even if Wednesday was cool. Nowhere near as cold or windy as the Sportsboat nationals last Easter.

 

Well done to those who persevered with the regatta. Spoke to the RO for the Optimist Green fleet today and it was hell for those little tackers.

 

Anyone care to elaborate on how Sandy Bay S C got allocated that regatta with such woeful rescue facilities?. Bugger all RIBs ( plenty of parents ribs but not rescue boats), useless tinnies and strong winds with an Opti fleet could have turned ugly. Hearing it was a similar situation with the earlier Cadet regattas. Not critical of the volunteers in ANY way, just asking the question.

 

I know that there were Rescue boats shared and borrowed from clubs all around the state and the country. SBSC are a Safe club and would meet the saftey requierments requiered. DSS helped out alot as well.

There were a lot of boats on the river both racing and rescue/traini

The three dinghy clubs on the western shore (RYCT, DSS, SBSC) generally work together to bid for and organise these events and share race committee and rescue boat resources. They are normally very well organised and coordinated.

 

Many of us in the keel boat fleet often wish we could have the dinghy guys and girls (kudos Lulu) running our races.

 

Just an aside on the Optis. We were watching Day 1 of the Farr 40 states. Hanging around the bottom mark gate, about 50m to leeward in a 36' yacht under motor. Holding it into the breeze with just enough steerage to pass through the wind, gas it up and run away if one of the F40's got in trouble and needed runway.

 

A RIB with a gaggle of Optis following, sailed them into the area for a look. 10 tiny kids sailing all over the place, aware of the "power gives way to sail rule" but not so much the dynamics of the situation. 20 knot sea breeze with 8 Farr 40's powering down. Thanks VIC coach/ minder!

 

Disaster averted.

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Perhaps for some interstate parents, not having rescue boats turn up for every optimist within 10 seconds of a capsize might seem reckless. But rather than coddle the kids into expecting others to help them out in tough times, the kids in Tasmania learn the need to be able to get themselves out of trouble first. If the boats remain capsized for a long period of time or are drifting off the course area into a dangerous part of the river, assistance would be available. For the Optis, even though the weather was pretty bad with strong gusty winds for most of the days racing, the fleets seemed to do just fine. I bet the interstate kids learned heaps and will not quickly forget their time on the Derwent River.

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Perhaps for some interstate parents, not having rescue boats turn up for every optimist within 10 seconds of a capsize might seem reckless. But rather than coddle the kids into expecting others to help them out in tough times, the kids in Tasmania learn the need to be able to get themselves out of trouble first. If the boats remain capsized for a long period of time or are drifting off the course area into a dangerous part of the river, assistance would be available. For the Optis, even though the weather was pretty bad with strong gusty winds for most of the days racing, the fleets seemed to do just fine. I bet the interstate kids learned heaps and will not quickly forget their time on the Derwent River.

As a former coach of various teams in Hobart I would agree with you 100%. The weather in Hobart is incredibly changeable and the sailors learn to watch the weather, sail in an area of the river where they can get to safety if required while the coach assists another boat and they learn to be self sufficient. Unfortunately this doesn't seem to translate into youth world champions and olympians but it does produce a group of sailors who can go anywhere in the world and be valuable crew members or indeed skippers (Richard Hewson) of pretty much any boat. Occasionally there are regattas held that really push the boundaries of what is sailable, otherwise the regatta would not be constituted. I'm tipping that all those Optimist and Cadet sailors have come back from Hobart much more capable boat handlers than when they left the mainland before Xmas.

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Perhaps for some interstate parents, not having rescue boats turn up for every optimist within 10 seconds of a capsize might seem reckless. But rather than coddle the kids into expecting others to help them out in tough times, the kids in Tasmania learn the need to be able to get themselves out of trouble first. If the boats remain capsized for a long period of time or are drifting off the course area into a dangerous part of the river, assistance would be available. For the Optis, even though the weather was pretty bad with strong gusty winds for most of the days racing, the fleets seemed to do just fine. I bet the interstate kids learned heaps and will not quickly forget their time on the Derwent River.

As a former coach of various teams in Hobart I would agree with you 100%. The weather in Hobart is incredibly changeable and the sailors learn to watch the weather, sail in an area of the river where they can get to safety if required while the coach assists another boat and they learn to be self sufficient. Unfortunately this doesn't seem to translate into youth world champions and olympians but it does produce a group of sailors who can go anywhere in the world and be valuable crew members or indeed skippers (Richard Hewson) of pretty much any boat. Occasionally there are regattas held that really push the boundaries of what is sailable, otherwise the regatta would not be constituted. I'm tipping that all those Optimist and Cadet sailors have come back from Hobart much more capable boat handlers than when they left the mainland before Xmas.

+100 So speaks someone who coached the Opti Green Fleet RO when she was about that age.

 

Sure you can't get that new Shaw to Geelong Dave? Would be good to catch up.

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Perhaps for some interstate parents, not having rescue boats turn up for every optimist within 10 seconds of a capsize might seem reckless. But rather than coddle the kids into expecting others to help them out in tough times, the kids in Tasmania learn the need to be able to get themselves out of trouble first. If the boats remain capsized for a long period of time or are drifting off the course area into a dangerous part of the river, assistance would be available. For the Optis, even though the weather was pretty bad with strong gusty winds for most of the days racing, the fleets seemed to do just fine. I bet the interstate kids learned heaps and will not quickly forget their time on the Derwent River.

As a former coach of various teams in Hobart I would agree with you 100%. The weather in Hobart is incredibly changeable and the sailors learn to watch the weather, sail in an area of the river where they can get to safety if required while the coach assists another boat and they learn to be self sufficient. Unfortunately this doesn't seem to translate into youth world champions and olympians but it does produce a group of sailors who can go anywhere in the world and be valuable crew members or indeed skippers (Richard Hewson) of pretty much any boat. Occasionally there are regattas held that really push the boundaries of what is sailable, otherwise the regatta would not be constituted. I'm tipping that all those Optimist and Cadet sailors have come back from Hobart much more capable boat handlers than when they left the mainland before Xmas.

 

 

Thanks for sharing that. It's always good to keep up on what the foreigners in Hobbarte are up to.

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Perhaps for some interstate parents, not having rescue boats turn up for every optimist within 10 seconds of a capsize might seem reckless. But rather than coddle the kids into expecting others to help them out in tough times, the kids in Tasmania learn the need to be able to get themselves out of trouble first. If the boats remain capsized for a long period of time or are drifting off the course area into a dangerous part of the river, assistance would be available. For the Optis, even though the weather was pretty bad with strong gusty winds for most of the days racing, the fleets seemed to do just fine. I bet the interstate kids learned heaps and will not quickly forget their time on the Derwent River.

As a former coach of various teams in Hobart I would agree with you 100%. The weather in Hobart is incredibly changeable and the sailors learn to watch the weather, sail in an area of the river where they can get to safety if required while the coach assists another boat and they learn to be self sufficient. Unfortunately this doesn't seem to translate into youth world champions and olympians but it does produce a group of sailors who can go anywhere in the world and be valuable crew members or indeed skippers (Richard Hewson) of pretty much any boat. Occasionally there are regattas held that really push the boundaries of what is sailable, otherwise the regatta would not be constituted. I'm tipping that all those Optimist and Cadet sailors have come back from Hobart much more capable boat handlers than when they left the mainland before Xmas.

 

 

Thanks for sharing that. It's always good to keep up on what the foreigners in Hobbarte are up to.

Thanks for sharing that. It's always good that you foreigners keep our Aussie threads at the top of your US sailing site.

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The Ignore function unfortunately doesn’t work on quoted posts.....Ignore the idiot parrot DoRag!

 

 

A better way to "ignore" is to set up your own website and keep all this foreigner crap off this site.

 

You do know how to do that, don't you?

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The Ignore function unfortunately doesn’t work on quoted posts.....Ignore the idiot parrot DoRag!

He has his uses, like keeping the post rate of this thread up so that it stays near the top of the list and is easier to find. Very courteous of him I'd say, seeing as he states that he hates us foreigners so.

 

When does the boat arrive Snoopy? Hope Benny and I haven't been eased even before the campaign commences.

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The Ignore function unfortunately doesn't work on quoted posts.....Ignore the idiot parrot DoRag!

 

He has his uses, like keeping the post rate of this thread up so that it stays near the top of the list and is easier to find. Very courteous of him I'd say, seeing as he states that he hates us foreigners so.

 

When does the boat arrive Snoopy? Hope Benny and I haven't been eased even before the campaign commences.

 

Hopefuly this Friday or Saturday.

I'll let you know when you are being eased.

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