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History made in Louisiana!


flaps15

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

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"With the upset victory, Anh "Joseph" Cao, a eastern New Orleans attorney who fled war-ravaged Saigon as a child, becomes the first Vietnamese-American in Congress."

 

Good for him. I know that a lot of Dems crossed party lines to vote for Cao. Jefferson was stinking up the joint.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

ASIAN Americans have overcome a great deal of prejudice in this country. And they continue to face some of it to this day.

They have not had the stigma of slavery to deal with.. or the lasting effects of Jim Crowe in the south...

No.

But Japanese internment camps and The Chinese Exclusion acts are pretty dark spots on our historic resume.

 

I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

That said, I find it interesting that he has an anti-abortion stance.. perhaps he is a "Christian", too?

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

ASIAN Americans have overcome a great deal of prejudice in this country. And they continue to face some of it to this day.

They have not had the stigma of slavery to deal with.. or the lasting effects of Jim Crowe in the south...

No.

But Japanese internment camps and The Chinese Exclusion acts are pretty dark spots on our historic resume.

 

I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

That said, I find it interesting that he has an anti-abortion stance.. perhaps he is a "Christian", too?

Well...if he is, nobody's perfect.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

That said, I find it interesting that he has an anti-abortion stance.. perhaps he is a "Christian", too?

Well...if he is, nobody's perfect.

I don't know the guy from Adam.. and my comment on his possible Chirstianity is in no way a "dig" at him.

Its just that an Asian-American that has a "strong" anti-abortion stance, is rare (in my experience).. unless that person is Christian... or is pandering.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

seriously?? why would that surprise you? i guess you have never heard of harry lee?? the 2nd district is very diverse and pretty darn liberal...that he is asian would not have been an issue, at all, that he is republican and anti abortion...that would be an issue. jefferson needed to GO....a long time ago.

LA-districts-109-02.gif

 

oh and btw...there is a pretty significant vietnamese population in new orleans east and around lake borne.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

 

So how many of you signed up for the Barack Obama commemorative coins? C'mon, fess up.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

 

So how many of you signed up for the Barack Obama commemorative coins? C'mon, fess up.

 

i'm going for the commemorative plate...it's bigger.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

seriously?? why would that surprise you? i guess you have never heard of harry lee?? the 2nd district is very diverse and pretty darn liberal...that he is asian would not have been an issue, at all, that he is republican and anti abortion...that would be an issue. jefferson needed to GO....a long time ago.

LA-districts-109-02.gif

 

oh and btw...there is a pretty significant vietnamese population in new orleans east and around lake borne.

I was referring to elections to fed level and more across the south in general.. since I have no first hand experience at the state and county level beyond California's borders.

 

My post was not a value judgement as much as it was an admission that my perceptions of the south may be wrong.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

seriously?? why would that surprise you? i guess you have never heard of harry lee?? the 2nd district is very diverse and pretty darn liberal...that he is asian would not have been an issue, at all, that he is republican and anti abortion...that would be an issue. jefferson needed to GO....a long time ago.

LA-districts-109-02.gif

 

oh and btw...there is a pretty significant vietnamese population in new orleans east and around lake borne.

I was referring to elections to fed level and more across the south in general.. since I have no first hand experience at the state and county level beyond California's borders.

 

My post was not a value judgement as much as it was an admission that my perceptions of the south may be wrong.

my post was not an admonishment as much as a somewhat facetious fyi. "the south" is a strange place, i guess, to people who don't spend much time here. can't explain it, "it's a southern thing". and the southern (coastal) parts of the southern states are different from the northern parts as well (at least in louisiana) and the new orleans area is a world in itself.

 

anyway...the question stands...why would it surprise you?

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anyway...the question stands...why would it surprise you?

Asian-Americans are under-represented in government, on the whole..

More so than other "minorities.. if I recall my stats correctly.

 

In California, too.

..even in San Francisco, where there is a relatively large Asian population and they have considerable political clout thru community and business organizations.

 

Considering that the south leans Repub in the big elections (about the only time non-southerner hears much about it),

I have not considered that, perhaps the stereotypical white southerner politican may be losing his grip in the region.

 

One could hope.

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anyway...the question stands...why would it surprise you?

Asian-Americans are under-represented in government, on the whole..

More so than other "minorities.. if I recall my stats correctly.

 

In California, too.

..even in San Francisco, where there is a relatively large Asian population and they have considerable political clout thru community and business organizations.

 

Considering that the south leans Repub in the big elections (about the only time non-southerner hears much about it),

I have not considered that, perhaps the stereotypical white southerner politican may be losing his grip in the region.

 

One could hope.

 

 

"the south" voted for a lot of "firsts"...i am surprised by your surprise.

 

so your last sentence...please clarify...i can't figure out what point you are trying to make...cao is republican, anti abortion, religious (hard core catholic and former seminarian), so he's pretty much a stereotypical southern republican...just not a stereotypical white one. same with jindal, no? so one can only hope what? what exactly is this stereotypical southern white politician that you speak of? republican? democratic? crook? religious? i'm surprised by you dirge...i didn't think you dealt in stereotypes, really...i didn't.

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so one can only hope what?

I dunno...

even more diversity, maybe.

 

Perhaps, you don't see a change.

I do.

It may be subtle.. and it may not even be real.

 

I'll be optimistic and 'hope' it is.

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so one can only hope what?

I dunno...

even more diversity, maybe.

 

Perhaps, you don't see a change.

I do.

It may be subtle.. and it may not even be real.

 

I'll be optimistic and 'hope' it is.

diversity in what? the stereotype?

i never said i saw or did not see a change... i am asking you what change you are referring to and what you are hoping for and what you are so surprised about and why.

really...i have no idea what you are talking about and you are, to borrow one of jeff's words, being very obtuse.

 

very disappointing.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

ASIAN Americans have overcome a great deal of prejudice in this country. And they continue to face some of it to this day.

They have not had the stigma of slavery to deal with.. or the lasting effects of Jim Crowe in the south...

No.

But Japanese internment camps and The Chinese Exclusion acts are pretty dark spots on our historic resume.

 

I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

That said, I find it interesting that he has an anti-abortion stance.. perhaps he is a "Christian", too?

 

My point is that is NOT "just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president."

 

It's ridiculous to assert any kind of equivalence.

 

It's also pretty dangerous to lump all Asian-Americans together. Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and Vietnamese have pretty different cultural backgrounds.

 

For example, Vietnam was French colony for a long time. That's why many Vietnamese, like Joseph Cao, who actually attended a Jesuit seminary, are devout Catholics. So it's not really surprising that he is anti-abortion.

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so one can only hope what?

I dunno...

even more diversity, maybe.

 

Perhaps, you don't see a change.

I do.

It may be subtle.. and it may not even be real.

 

I'll be optimistic and 'hope' it is.

diversity in what? the stereotype?

i never said i saw or did not see a change... i am asking you what change you are referring to and what you are hoping for and what you are so surprised about and why.

really...i have no idea what you are talking about and you are, to borrow one of jeff's words, being very obtuse.

 

very disappointing.

"disappointing"

because you want to project on to me something with which you can argue against?

 

I'm being as "obtuse" as you are looking for fight.

 

Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

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My point is that is NOT "just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president."

That was your point?

 

Because the post I responded to said this:

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

Asia is a continent.

Africa is a continent.

How many people could point to the country on the map where Obama's father was born?

And how many people could intelligently discuss the cultural differences between that particular country and say.. Somalia?

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so one can only hope what?

I dunno...

even more diversity, maybe.

 

Perhaps, you don't see a change.

I do.

It may be subtle.. and it may not even be real.

 

I'll be optimistic and 'hope' it is.

diversity in what? the stereotype?

i never said i saw or did not see a change... i am asking you what change you are referring to and what you are hoping for and what you are so surprised about and why.

really...i have no idea what you are talking about and you are, to borrow one of jeff's words, being very obtuse.

 

very disappointing.

"disappointing"

because you want to project on to me something with which you can argue against?

 

I'm being as "obtuse" as you are looking for fight.

 

Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

disappointing because you are perpetuating a stereotype on people you admittedly know nothing about. i am not projecting anything on you i am just trying to understand what you are basing your stereotype on.

 

you are being obtuse because you are not answering the questions put to you for the purpose of making you pov clear.

 

give what a rest?

 

yes, that he ran and won is good for racial diversity in government (you say asian americans are under represented, but does cao represent them or does he represent stereotypical white republicans, or does he represent everyone??)

but WHY IS IT SO FUCKING SURPRISING? because he is asian? that should not be why it is surprising....that he is republican...that is surprising. that district is historically democratic . had you researched that or even been gracious enough to accept the info i gave you above, you could move on to discuss why he was elected in that district...was he elected because the district's moral/religious values have changed, because anyone was better than jefferson, because he has been doing LOTS of good things for the city and the people, because democrats have been displaced and republicans moved in....but no...you wanna harp on asian and white southern politician stereotypes. no, what surprises you is that dumbfuckistan voted for an asian....asshat. and yes, my friend, that is very disappointing.

 

as i said before, there have been many firsts in the south...first governor of african-american descent (though not elected and only for a month) pbs pinchback of louisiana who replaced oscar dunn, first black elected lt gov of a u.s. state and former slave, as lt gov, then ascended to gov during the impeachment of gov warmoth, hiram revels of mississippi was the first black senator, john willis menard was the first black representative...he was elected in louisiana, the first governor of indian descent is louisiana governor bobby jindal.

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so one can only hope what?

I dunno...

even more diversity, maybe.

 

Perhaps, you don't see a change.

I do.

It may be subtle.. and it may not even be real.

 

I'll be optimistic and 'hope' it is.

diversity in what? the stereotype?

i never said i saw or did not see a change... i am asking you what change you are referring to and what you are hoping for and what you are so surprised about and why.

really...i have no idea what you are talking about and you are, to borrow one of jeff's words, being very obtuse.

 

very disappointing.

"disappointing"

because you want to project on to me something with which you can argue against?

 

I'm being as "obtuse" as you are looking for fight.

 

Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

disappointing because you are perpetuating a stereotype on people you admittedly know nothing about. i am not projecting anything on you i am just trying to understand what you are basing your stereotype on.

 

you are being obtuse because you are not answering the questions put to you for the purpose of making you pov clear.

 

give what a rest?

 

yes, that he ran and won is good for racial diversity in government (you say asian americans are under represented, but does cao represent them or does he represent stereotypical white republicans, or does he represent everyone??)

but WHY IS IT SO FUCKING SURPRISING? because he is asian? that should not be why it is surprising....that he is republican...that is surprising. that district is historically democratic . had you researched that or even been gracious enough to accept the info i gave you above, you could move on to discuss why he was elected in that district...was he elected because the district's moral/religious values have changed, because anyone was better than jefferson, because he has been doing LOTS of good things for the city and the people, because democrats have been displaced and republicans moved in....but no...you wanna harp on asian and white southern politician stereotypes. no, what surprises you is that dumbfuckistan voted for an asian....asshat. and yes, my friend, that is very disappointing.

 

as i said before, there have been many firsts in the south...first governor of african-american descent (though not elected and only for a month) pbs pinchback of louisiana who replaced oscar dunn, first black elected lt gov of a u.s. state and former slave, as lt gov, then ascended to gov during the impeachment of gov warmoth, hiram revels of mississippi was the first black senator, john willis menard was the first black representative...he was elected in louisiana, the first governor of indian descent is louisiana governor bobby jindal.

"gracious enough" ??

 

I said my perception was wrong.

 

WHY IS IT SO FUCKING SURPRISING?

fer crissake...

YES. Diversity in the Republican Party.

It is important to EVERYONE that the Republican Party has more racial diversity..

Read some of Rubin Navarrette, Jr. for an informed viewpoint.

Seems to me that with a candiate like Jefferson as the option, the district could have done a lot worse than Cao.

 

asshat

???

 

you wanted to know what you were projecting in your earlier posts?

You clearly state it in this last post:

no, what surprises you is that dumbfuckistan voted for an asian....asshat. and yes, my friend, that is very disappointing.

 

Thanks for telling me what I am thinking.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for telling me what I am thinking.

 

 

hardly projecting or telling you what you think. you made the above post dirge. i asked you several times to explain what you meant by that. what i got was some bullshit about white southern policitian stereotypes.

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for telling me what I am thinking.

 

 

hardly projecting or telling you what you think. you made the above post dirge. i asked you several times to explain what you meant by that. what i got was some bullshit about white southern policitian stereotypes.

And in the following post

 

My post was not a value judgement as much as it was an admission that my perceptions of the south may be wrong.

 

In other words...

 

I was pleasantly surprised that my perceptions were wrong..

 

That was the intent of my posts... I admit I had a misperception.. and to that I get "asshat."

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I was pleasantly surprised that an Asian could be elected to office in the south.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for telling me what I am thinking.

 

 

hardly projecting or telling you what you think. you made the above post dirge. i asked you several times to explain what you meant by that. what i got was some bullshit about white southern policitian stereotypes.

And in the following post

 

My post was not a value judgement as much as it was an admission that my perceptions of the south may be wrong.

 

In other words...

 

I was pleasantly surprised that my perceptions were wrong..

 

That was the intent of my posts... I admit I had a misperception.. and to that I get "asshat."

and with that perception is a perpetuation of a stereotype.

 

do not misrepresent me. that is not the post in which my reply included "asshat".

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do not misrepresent me. that is not the post in which my reply included "asshat".

sorry..

 

no, what surprises you is that dumbfuckistan voted for an asian....asshat.

 

I have to distance myself from your tone in order to see that *perhaps* you meant that Cao is an "asian" AND an "asshat"

rather than;

"What surprises you (dirge)... asshat"

 

Which implies that I, dirge, am an "asshat".

 

Your tone makes your posts difficult to follow.

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do not misrepresent me. that is not the post in which my reply included "asshat".

sorry..

 

no, what surprises you is that dumbfuckistan voted for an asian....asshat.

 

I have to distance myself from your tone in order to see that *perhaps* you meant that Cao is an "asian" AND an "asshat"

rather than;

"What surprises you (dirge)... asshat"

 

Which implies that I, dirge, am an "asshat".

 

Your tone makes your posts difficult to follow.

whatever dirge, my posts are quite clear. i was calling you an asshat, as you well know.

 

you made a post that was offensive to me. because it was so unusual i made an attempt to get clarification in case i *perhaps* misunderstood your point before addressing it. alas i did not misunderstand, you hold (or did hold when you posted) a prejudicial view of louisiana voters and commented based on that prejudice. what's more is that my questions were met with sarcasm and dismissal. carry on.

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One of my early memories is the newspaper with the Vietnamese girl running toward the camera in, well, naked terror. That war did a lot to define or at least influence the country in many ways. Maybe 30 years from now an Iraqi immigrant--hell, make it an Afghani woman-- will be the Senator from Montana. Something good has to come from these wars, and in this case it seems to be the American ideals of opportunity and equality.

 

plus holy Christ a bowl of pho will cure Anything. Maybe even the economy.

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plus holy Christ a bowl of pho will cure Anything. Maybe even the economy.

 

 

My son's new drug of choice...........

 

worked for me last night. dragged a nasty virus home from Singapore. Spent Sunday night sleeping on the bathroom floor to cut down on the commute. Pho last night now fresh as new. Go the Pho!

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plus holy Christ a bowl of pho will cure Anything. Maybe even the economy.

 

 

My son's new drug of choice...........

 

worked for me last night. dragged a nasty virus home from Singapore. Spent Sunday night sleeping on the bathroom floor to cut down on the commute. Pho last night now fresh as new. Go the Pho!

one of the things i missed most from new orleans....3 yrs, no pho :(. we just had a restaurant open 2 wks ago right around the corner from work!!! whoo hoo!

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

 

So how many of you signed up for the Barack Obama commemorative coins? C'mon, fess up.

 

No need, he appeared on my toast this morning. I shall be establishing a shrine.

 

Obama_Toast.JPG

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

 

So how many of you signed up for the Barack Obama commemorative coins? C'mon, fess up.

 

i'm going for the commemorative plate...it's bigger.

 

 

NG bought the commemorative....uh....ahem....wink, wink....for the same reason.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

 

 

Oops.... careful - you've got Wabbiteer's panties in a bunch now. This guy clearly should have office because he isn't repressed enough (oh... and he's a wepublican).

 

I'm happy to see things like this too. The idea that our culture is accepting of people to that extent gives me hope. Then wabiteer posts and I remember what kind of people are really out there.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

 

 

Oops.... careful - you've got Wabbiteer's panties in a bunch now. This guy clearly should have office because he isn't repressed enough (oh... and he's a wepublican).

 

I'm happy to see things like this too. The idea that our culture is accepting of people to that extent gives me hope. Then wabiteer posts and I remember what kind of people are really out there.

I'm afraid that this, is my lot in life. (sigh) :D

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

 

 

Oops.... careful - you've got Wabbiteer's panties in a bunch now. This guy clearly should have office because he isn't repressed enough (oh... and he's a wepublican).

 

I'm happy to see things like this too. The idea that our culture is accepting of people to that extent gives me hope. Then wabiteer posts and I remember what kind of people are really out there.

 

It is just plain idiotic to state that "it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president."

 

Why is it historic that we are going to have our first black president?

 

Because for a couple of hundred years the laws of our country did not recognize that black people were human beings. They were treated under the law as chattel.

 

Because the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery was ratified only 143 years ago. To put that in context, the great-great-grandfather of our new First Lady was a slave.

 

Because the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling ending school desegregation was made in 1954, which means that many American blacks who are over 60 years old were directly affected by school segregation.

 

Because the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act were passed in 1964 and 1965, many of us here on this board were around to see that.

 

So I'd like someone to explain to me, in rational terms, how, in the arc of American history, it is "just as historic" that a "first generation Vietnamese immigrant" has been elected to represent one district in Louisiana as it is that a country that treated black people as chattel up to 140 years ago has now elected a black man as president.

 

I can see how weak comparisons could be made between Obama and Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Gary Locke, or Norm Mineta, but I can't see how Cao's election can possibly seen as equivalent to Obama's election. Vietnamese-Americans have traveled their own tough road, but most of them arrived in the US after the Civil Rights Act, and they have never been the victim of the kind of institutionalized discrimination that black, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans have suffered. How does Cao's election symbolize any kind of historic seachange?

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

 

 

Oops.... careful - you've got Wabbiteer's panties in a bunch now. This guy clearly should have office because he isn't repressed enough (oh... and he's a wepublican).

 

I'm happy to see things like this too. The idea that our culture is accepting of people to that extent gives me hope. Then wabiteer posts and I remember what kind of people are really out there.

I'm afraid that this, is my lot in life. (sigh) :D

 

Can you imagine the marraige discussions with a person who has to ALWAYS be right? Who is so hung up on semantics that they can't grasp the underlying feeling of what was said and acknowledge it?

 

God - I can see it now.

 

"It's around 64 degrees." - significant other

 

"No it's not." - wabbiteer

 

"Yes it is... it's 66 degrees." - significant other

 

"65 degrees is immediatey above 64, and 63 is below. Therefore, by saying "around" you imply on one side or the other, which is factually incorrect. YOU ARE WRONG AND MUST HANG FROM THE FINGERNAILS UNTIL DEAD. WRONG WRONG WRONG." - wabbiteer

 

"Errr... ok. It was just a..." - significant other

 

"NO! YOU WERE WRONG! I MUST BE RIGHT! YOU WILL BURN IN HELL FOR THIS TRANSGRESSION! YOU WILL BE COATED IN HONEY AND PEANUTBUTTER AND LEFT IN THE AMAZON RAINFOREST UNTIL FIREANTS FEAST ON YOUR MORE SENSITIVE PARTS! YOU WILL...." - wabbiteer

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Can you imagine the marraige discussions with a person who has to ALWAYS be right? Who is so hung up on semantics that they can't grasp the underlying feeling of what was said and acknowledge it?

 

It's not "semantics."

 

Saying that Cao's election is just as historic as Obama's diminishes the momentous transformation that the US has undergone in less than 200 years, with a lot of the transformation happening in just the last 50 years. It's something that probably couldn't have happened in any other country in the world. Its something that we should be proud of as a nation. It shouldn't be trivialized.

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He was elected as a Republican in a heavily Democratic district, so yes, that is change I can believe in.

 

Can I interest you in a life size cutout of Dubya? Seriously, I know people who have them in their living rooms, figure they should be going on the market soon.

I guess what my point in posting the above was that, To Me, it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president. Republican, Democrat, whatever. Apparently it wasn't perceived that way, oh, and sweet of you to offer the cutout, but I've never been into that commemorative crap. You might want to keep it though, might be worth something someday.

 

Because Vietnamese Americans have been battling for equal rights in this country for SOOOOOOO many centuries.

 

 

Oops.... careful - you've got Wabbiteer's panties in a bunch now. This guy clearly should have office because he isn't repressed enough (oh... and he's a wepublican).

 

I'm happy to see things like this too. The idea that our culture is accepting of people to that extent gives me hope. Then wabiteer posts and I remember what kind of people are really out there.

 

It is just plain idiotic to state that "it is just as historic that a first generation Vietnamese immigrant, has become a congressman, as is, that a partially black man, has become president."

 

Why is it historic that we are going to have our first black president?

 

Because for a couple of hundred years the laws of our country did not recognize that black people were human beings. They were treated under the law as chattel.

 

Because the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery was ratified only 143 years ago. To put that in context, the great-great-grandfather of our new First Lady was a slave.

 

Because the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling ending school desegregation was made in 1954, which means that many American blacks who are over 60 years old were directly affected by school segregation.

 

Because the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act were passed in 1964 and 1965, many of us here on this board were around to see that.

 

So I'd like someone to explain to me, in rational terms, how, in the arc of American history, it is "just as historic" that a "first generation Vietnamese immigrant" has been elected to represent one district in Louisiana as it is that a country that treated black people as chattel up to 140 years ago has now elected a black man as president.

 

I can see how weak comparisons could be made between Obama and Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Gary Locke, or Norm Mineta, but I can't see how Cao's election can possibly seen as equivalent to Obama's election. Vietnamese-Americans have traveled their own tough road, but most of them arrived in the US after the Civil Rights Act, and they have never been the victim of the kind of institutionalized discrimination that black, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans have suffered. How does Cao's election symbolize any kind of historic seachange?

i'm gonna have to disagree with you on this one wabbiteer. it's pretty historic.

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Can you imagine the marraige discussions with a person who has to ALWAYS be right? Who is so hung up on semantics that they can't grasp the underlying feeling of what was said and acknowledge it?

 

It's not "semantics."

 

Saying that Cao's election is just as historic as Obama's diminishes the momentous transformation that the US has undergone in less than 200 years, with a lot of the transformation happening in just the last 50 years. It's something that probably couldn't have happened in any other country in the world. Its something that we should be proud of as a nation. It shouldn't be trivialized.

You mean like the way Condolezza Rice wasn't trivialized. The above is your opinion. That's it, nuff said.

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

Ahhhhh, this explains a lot.... for someone who seems to loathe traditional republican issues - I guess its ok if he's a minority, huh? So even though you might loathe his political idealogy - the color of his/her skin makes a difference to you. Got it.

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It's also pretty dangerous to lump all Asian-Americans together. Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and Vietnamese have pretty different cultural backgrounds.

 

But its ok to lump all black people together who also probably have vastly different cultural backgrounds?

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I can see how weak comparisons could be made between Obama and Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Gary Locke, or Norm Mineta, but I can't see how Cao's election can possibly seen as equivalent to Obama's election. Vietnamese-Americans have traveled their own tough road, but most of them arrived in the US after the Civil Rights Act, and they have never been the victim of the kind of institutionalized discrimination that black, Chinese, Japanese, and Native Americans have suffered. How does Cao's election symbolize any kind of historic seachange?

I am not disagreeing with your general point..

 

But you have to acknowledge that a person of Vietnamese descent "appears" Asian. Thus they are lumped in with chinks, gooks, nips, etc... They inherit plenty of the leftover racism that was directed at the Chinese (Exclusion Act) and the Japanese (WWII internment camps). I would argue that, after watching the Olympics coverage and reading media coverage and blogs, there is still PLENTY of racism directed at those groups..

 

Asians were never enslaved to the degree that African victims to the slave trade were.. but there was a fair amount of near "slavery" in and around the gold rush days in California and east during the building of the Transcontinental Railroad... including some lynchings and race based killings.

 

I don't care much for the comparisons with Obama.. To me its apples and oranges.

1. Obama is not the descendant of slaves anymore than Cao is the descendant of coolies.

2. As you note.. One was elected to president and one was elected as a representative (running against a corrupt crook).. they both are seen through filters of race and they both have, likely, experienced *some* outfall from the underlying race problmes in the US.

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It's also pretty dangerous to lump all Asian-Americans together. Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and Vietnamese have pretty different cultural backgrounds.

 

But its ok to lump all black people together who also probably have vastly different cultural backgrounds?

 

 

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

Ahhhhh, this explains a lot.... for someone who seems to loathe traditional republican issues - I guess its ok if he's a minority, huh? So even though you might loathe his political idealogy - the color of his/her skin makes a difference to you. Got it.

It explains a lot?

So where Elle sees me as being obtuse.. to you I am crystal clear? :lol:

And yet you manage to miss the point, too?

 

 

I don't loathe "Republican issues".. and could have voted for Bush the elder.

What I loathe is that GWB encouraged the hijacking of the party by the Christian right.. and THIER issues became the focal point.

I beleive that a more centrist and moderate Republican Party is key to better management of the REAL issues. I beleive that with more immigrants (and first generation) and people of color in the Republican Party, the closer the party will move to the center on fundamental issues. (immigration, healthcare, ss, medicare, infrastructure, etc.)

I beleive that a more moderate Republican Party is better for the general health of the nation REGARDLESS any individual's political ideology.

And I beleive that because the Republican Party of GWB was dangerous and extroadinarily counter-productive.

 

That Cao won is a good thing because of who he replaced. Sends a pretty clear message to Washington (regardless Caos' politics, the vote CLEARLY says "enough of cah in the freezer politics").. It was a much clearer message than.. say.. Stevens losing by a hair.

I am of the opinion that the Dem party should have found a way to remove Jefferson.. and because they did not, they lost that district. Much like several Republicans who found themselves in hot water lost THIER districts.

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

Ahhhhh, this explains a lot.... for someone who seems to loathe traditional republican issues - I guess its ok if he's a minority, huh? So even though you might loathe his political idealogy - the color of his/her skin makes a difference to you. Got it.

It explains a lot?

So where Elle sees me as being obtuse.. to you I am crystal clear? :lol:

And yet you manage to miss the point, too?

 

 

I don't loathe "Republican issues".. and could have voted for Bush the elder.

What I loathe is that GWB encouraged the hijacking of the party by the Christian right.. and THIER issues became the focal point.

I beleive that a more centrist and moderate Republican Party is key to better management of the REAL issues. I beleive that with more immigrants (and first generation) and people of color in the Republican Party, the closer the party will move to the center on fundamental issues. (immigration, healthcare, ss, medicare, infrastructure, etc.)

I beleive that a more moderate Republican Party is better for the general health of the nation REGARDLESS any individual's political ideology.

And I beleive that because the Republican Party of GWB was dangerous and extroadinarily counter-productive.

 

That Cao won is a good thing because of who he replaced. Sends a pretty clear message to Washington (regardless Caos' politics, the vote CLEARLY says "enough of cah in the freezer politics").. It was a much clearer message than.. say.. Stevens losing by a hair.

I am of the opinion that the Dem party should have found a way to remove Jefferson.. and because they did not, they lost that district. Much like several Republicans who found themselves in hot water lost THIER districts.

 

 

I believe in "I before E, except after C"....yuk,yuk,yuk

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

Ahhhhh, this explains a lot.... for someone who seems to loathe traditional republican issues - I guess its ok if he's a minority, huh? So even though you might loathe his political idealogy - the color of his/her skin makes a difference to you. Got it.

It explains a lot?

So where Elle sees me as being obtuse.. to you I am crystal clear? :lol:

And yet you manage to miss the point, too?

 

 

I don't loathe "Republican issues".. and could have voted for Bush the elder.

What I loathe is that GWB encouraged the hijacking of the party by the Christian right.. and THIER issues became the focal point.

I beleive that a more centrist and moderate Republican Party is key to better management of the REAL issues. I beleive that with more immigrants (and first generation) and people of color in the Republican Party, the closer the party will move to the center on fundamental issues. (immigration, healthcare, ss, medicare, infrastructure, etc.)

I beleive that a more moderate Republican Party is better for the general health of the nation REGARDLESS any individual's political ideology.

And I beleive that because the Republican Party of GWB was dangerous and extroadinarily counter-productive.

 

That Cao won is a good thing because of who he replaced. Sends a pretty clear message to Washington (regardless Caos' politics, the vote CLEARLY says "enough of cah in the freezer politics").. It was a much clearer message than.. say.. Stevens losing by a hair.

I am of the opinion that the Dem party should have found a way to remove Jefferson.. and because they did not, they lost that district. Much like several Republicans who found themselves in hot water lost THIER districts.

 

Sorry, let me be clearer - you loathe the christian right republican issues (i.e. staunch anti-abortion, anti-gay rights, etc), which is why it surprised you that not only an asian won but that a conservative christian GOPer won in a southern liberal dem district.

 

edit to add: and if you maintain that Cao won because of who he replaced and what he stood for - why was his asian-ness even a factor in your discussion? Sorry, let me break out the BS flags.....

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edit to add: and if you maintain that Cao won because of who he replaced and what he stood for - why was his asian-ness even a factor in your discussion? Sorry, let me break out the BS flags.....

huh?

 

Did you miss all of Elle's postings, hammering on me because I apprantly did not know anything about Cao, other than he was Asian and why was I "surprised"?

 

Frankly, until this thread I did not know him from Adam (oh. I already said that once)

 

My point all along is that I'm happy to see more diversity in the Republican Party and more diveristy in congress.. but you may continue to read whatever agenda into it that makes you happy.

 

I am an intolerant ignorant liberal.

Please make a note of it.

 

 

Have a good one...

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edit to add: and if you maintain that Cao won because of who he replaced and what he stood for - why was his asian-ness even a factor in your discussion? Sorry, let me break out the BS flags.....

huh?

 

Did you miss all of Elle's postings, hammering on me because I apprantly did not know anything about Cao, other than he was Asian and why was I "surprised"?

 

Frankly, until this thread I did not know him from Adam (oh. I already said that once)

 

My point all along is that I'm happy to see more diversity in the Republican Party and more diveristy in congress.. but you may continue to read whatever agenda into it that makes you happy.

 

I am an intolerant ignorant liberal.

Please make a note of it.

 

 

Have a good one...

 

Another side step of a question. Why was Cao's asian-ness even an issue or point of discussion if you claim that the "good" supposedly was because of who he replaced not because of his skin color. You contradict yourself when you make that claim yet directly say it was a good thing he was elected REGARDLESS of his political ideology. That totally smacks of promoting diversity for diversity's sake rather than a balance of diversity AND qualifications. You're inconsistant.....

 

Look, jd - I get that you back pedaled an mea culpa'd on this already. But what I'm trying to say (I won't speak for elle) is that you of all people - who routinely calls people out for making an issue out of skin color - made an issue out of skin color when there was no need to. This validates my long running point (IMHO) that the more we make an issue of race and highlight someone's ethnicity or skin color as somehow adding or subtracting from his/her worthiness to do anything in our society - the more likely we are to perpetuate the notion of unequal. I think the entering argument for ANY discussion about politics, employment, education, whatever should start at a completely colorblind position. IMO, race should only ever be brought into the equation when there is a specific issue of race or where that makes a difference. I think equality HAS GOT TO START with assuming everyone IS equal - not that others need a head start or a leg up. The more you give one group an advantage with some good-intentioned notion of fairness, fairness goes right out the window and you just foster resentment and distrust from the group thats being disadvantaged. The old addage "two wrongs don't make a right" absolutely applies.

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It's also pretty dangerous to lump all Asian-Americans together. Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and Vietnamese have pretty different cultural backgrounds.

 

But its ok to lump all black people together who also probably have vastly different cultural backgrounds?

 

Who am I lumping together?

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edit to add: and if you maintain that Cao won because of who he replaced and what he stood for - why was his asian-ness even a factor in your discussion? Sorry, let me break out the BS flags.....

huh?

 

Did you miss all of Elle's postings, hammering on me because I apprantly did not know anything about Cao, other than he was Asian and why was I "surprised"?

 

Frankly, until this thread I did not know him from Adam (oh. I already said that once)

 

My point all along is that I'm happy to see more diversity in the Republican Party and more diveristy in congress.. but you may continue to read whatever agenda into it that makes you happy.

 

I am an intolerant ignorant liberal.

Please make a note of it.

 

 

Have a good one...

 

Another side step of a question. Why was Cao's asian-ness even an issue or point of discussion if you claim that the "good" supposedly was because of who he replaced not because of his skin color. You contradict yourself when you make that claim yet directly say it was a good thing he was elected REGARDLESS of his political ideology. That totally smacks of promoting diversity for diversity's sake rather than a balance of diversity AND qualifications. You're inconsistant.....

 

Look, jd - I get that you back pedaled an mea culpa'd on this already. But what I'm trying to say (I won't speak for elle) is that you of all people - who routinely calls people out for making an issue out of skin color - made an issue out of skin color when there was no need to. This validates my long running point (IMHO) that the more we make an issue of race and highlight someone's ethnicity or skin color as somehow adding or subtracting from his/her worthiness to do anything in our society - the more likely we are to perpetuate the notion of unequal. I think the entering argument for ANY discussion about politics, employment, education, whatever should start at a completely colorblind position. IMO, race should only ever be brought into the equation when there is a specific issue of race or where that makes a difference. I think equality HAS GOT TO START with assuming everyone IS equal - not that others need a head start or a leg up. The more you give one group an advantage with some good-intentioned notion of fairness, fairness goes right out the window and you just foster resentment and distrust from the group thats being disadvantaged. The old addage "two wrongs don't make a right" absolutely applies.

Come off your high horse there, Mr.

 

It is not his "race" that brings diversity. It is his experience and his culture. My comments have nothing to do with "equality"

 

Are you going to suggest that a Vietnamese immigrant has an "equal" life experience any other politician?

It will be different. Difference brings the diversity.. Has nothing to do with "equal".. that is UNLESS YOU want to make it about "equality"

 

We can acknowledge differences and uniqueness without suggesting equality or lack there of.

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huh?

 

Did you miss all of Elle's postings, hammering on me because I apprantly did not know anything about Cao, other than he was Asian and why was I "surprised"?

 

Frankly, until this thread I did not know him from Adam (oh. I already said that once)

 

My point all along is that I'm happy to see more diversity in the Republican Party and more diveristy in congress.. but you may continue to read whatever agenda into it that makes you happy.

 

I am an intolerant ignorant liberal.

Please make a note of it.

 

 

Have a good one...

huh?

 

i never said you did or did not know anything about cao, i don't know what the hell you know...you are the one who said you knew nothing of local/state politics outside of your voting boundaries. pretty good article for those who've never heard of him. i only wonder why you'd be compelled to make a prejudicial statement about something you admittedly have no knowledge of.

 

what i wanted was clarification of your statement that you were surprised that an "asian" could get elected in louisiana. it seemed rather bigotted and that from you would have been surprising. you continued on spouting about white southern poli stereotypes...regardless of the fact that jefferson is not white, nor is cao and that district is very racially diverse and liberal. further surprising me. now you want to state "clearly" the voters were tired of "cash in the freezer politics" rather than "clearly" being tired of "white southern politics". and you wonder i call you obtuse? and asshat?

 

your statement was offensive to me as a southern voter because your implication was that we are too racist here to consider a vietnamese candidate. that surprised me so i asked if that's what you meant...i got dismissal and sarcasm as my answers...so fuck you...and your misperception, which in anyone else on this board you would call prejudice.

 

whether or not cao will bring diversity to the republican party remains to be seen. he is an unknown. he is anti abortion, former jesuit seminarian, community activist and immigration lawyer in favor of amnesty. info on his stance on the issues you list are few and far between. he may be exactly what the republicans need to get them away from the far religious right....or he could be another jindal (who brings NO diversity to the republican party other than racial diversity)...worth watching for sure. so far he's a self professed "life long republican". time will tell.

 

personally, i think his election is very historical and a proud moment for vietnamese in this country and for louisiana. i am hoping that cao IS the answer to getting the republican party back on track. i hope that he does keep fighting for his community, because it's my community too, i hope he takes the good in his faith, the part that helps the needy and is kind to those different and is accepting and caring and leaves the part that tries to control others and deny rights with his bible behind, and i hope that his promises on ethics reform is more than just a campaign promise.

here is his agenda:

* Promote economic development and create better jobs

* Redevelop the Port of New Orleans

* Reduce wasteful spending in Washington

* Ensure our children receive an excellent education

* Preserve our wetlands and expand coastal restoration for hurricane protection

 

i also hope that he will be judged on his accomplishments and actions rather than his race and culture. that you keep stating his culture is what will bring diversity and good to the republicans to me is no better than some who could not acknowledge obama's accomplishments rather than just his race. that is what is disappointing me dirge...and maybe i misunderstand you, i did try to get you to explain...that i don't see your statements in this thread as any different from the ones in the obama threads that you, and i, took offense to or argued against. iow...it seems hypocritical to me.

 

 

so, whatever...if i'm not clear, i don't care. if you can't understand the points i am trying to make, i don't care. i am done with you in this thread.

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

jd, I'm tired of going round and round about this. I'm not as worried as elle is about you being "surprised". Hell, I'd be surprised if a white guy got elected to office in Harlem.... Or a black guy getting elected in Boise ID. Not shocked, just surprised.

 

What I still haven't gotten a straight answer from you about is your bolded sentence above. sorry jd, but you can hem and haw and back-pedal all you want - but that screams that skin color/ethnicity is MORE important to you than ideology. Knowing full well that you are a vocal hater of traditional republican values (i.e. social conservatism) like abortion, anti-gay rights, anti-stem cell research, etc etc; once can only come away with the notion that jdirge is more than willing to overlook the things that go against every core value you believe in because the guys skin color "promotes diversity". Seriously, wtf jd?

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

jd, I'm tired of going round and round about this. I'm not as worried as elle is about you being "surprised". Hell, I'd be surprised if a white guy got elected to office in Harlem.... Or a black guy getting elected in Boise ID. Not shocked, just surprised.

 

What I still haven't gotten a straight answer from you about is your bolded sentence above. sorry jd, but you can hem and haw and back-pedal all you want - but that screams that skin color/ethnicity is MORE important to you than ideology. Knowing full well that you are a vocal hater of traditional republican values (i.e. social conservatism) like abortion, anti-gay rights, anti-stem cell research, etc etc; once can only come away with the notion that jdirge is more than willing to overlook the things that go against every core value you believe in because the guys skin color "promotes diversity". Seriously, wtf jd?

How is some one supposed to respond to that?

You don't know what my personal stance on "Republican issues" is (other than the gay rights issues on which I've been pretty vocal) I think you'd be hard pressed to find clear commentary from me on the abortion rights issue..

 

And its funny.. I said "regardless".. "regardless" was an attempt to strip the party ideology out of this for a second and look at it as a singular individual who has broken some barriers.

 

Here is an article on Cao that I came across this morning. It includes some of his own comments and it may (or may not) begin to put a finger to my point.

 

link

 

"We did feel very neglected," by the party Cao said in a telephone interview this week, suggesting that the little financial support that did come in the final week of the campaign "may have hurt us more than anything else. We were running a campaign of reform."

 

A registered independent most of his adult life, the 5-foot-2 Cao paid $900 to the Louisiana secretary of state to file as the only GOP challenger in the Second Congressional District to Jefferson, who was indicted on multiple felony counts in 2007 for allegedly taking hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes from contractors looking for his help in securing work in Africa.

 

I don't know why it was necessary to point out how tall he is.. Thats pretty funny.. but do not obsess on this comment, Jeff.. as it is an aside and makes note of the kind of thing that I find curious and amusing about our media.

 

Anyway..

more..

 

...no one in Washington gave Cao a chance.

 

Boehner never met him, nor did he or any other House Republican give his campaign a single penny from their political accounts. The National Republican Congressional Committee, which spent more than $1 million to hold a neighboring House seat, offered just $50,000 to help Cao turn out votes in heavily Democratic New Orleans.

 

GOP aides privately confessed to watching his campaign commercials on YouTube to learn how to correctly say the newly elected congressman's name, which is pronounced "gow."

 

"We did not see a scenario where a Republican could win that district," said Nathan Gonzales, political editor of the Rothenberg Political Report.

 

 

 

I'd suggest, that if you want to ever understand my ideas wrt race, you will have to distance yourself from YOUR ideas of race.. if even temporarily. One of my ideas is that I do not believe it is a bad thing, necessarily, to call attention to race. In fact I think that race and culture are something to be celebrated, not ignored.. I believe you can do that withOUT creating discrimination, value judgement ( in EITHER direction), etc. Race is not the end-all, be-all.. but it IS a factor.. and just about every sociologist would admit that.

 

Interestingly, his race may have HELPED him in this election.. as I believe there is a certain degree of backlash against white conservatives in many parts of the country. It is quite possible that because he is Asian, his Republican affiliation was not quite so toxic as it was for MANY other candidates this, and last, election cycle.

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I would think that Jeff would be kind of sad about Cao winning, since it disproves his theory about black people always voting for the black guy (that district is 62% African American).

That article suggests a large number of the black vote stayed home.

 

Which doesn't really help Jeff, either.. because they may have stayed home and not voted for either party.

1. Because Jefferson is a crook.

2. They couldn't stomach voting Republican.. :lol:

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Wow.

 

I only voted in this district last Saturday. And I got all this analysis for free.

 

Ultimately it was voter fatigue on Jeff's side, and enthusiasm on Cao's side. The election timing was upset by hurricanes, and Jefferson had just one election too many, while this was Cao's first. This is looking back; looking forward, I didn't expect Cao would win. I hope he's not just a one-term reformer, but it may turn out that way.

 

Beyond this, I think I prefer to stay out of it....

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Give it a rest.. that the Repubs fielded an Asian-American candidate and that he won is a good thing.. regardless his particular bent on traditional Republican issues.

 

jd, I'm tired of going round and round about this. I'm not as worried as elle is about you being "surprised". Hell, I'd be surprised if a white guy got elected to office in Harlem.... Or a black guy getting elected in Boise ID. Not shocked, just surprised.

 

What I still haven't gotten a straight answer from you about is your bolded sentence above. sorry jd, but you can hem and haw and back-pedal all you want - but that screams that skin color/ethnicity is MORE important to you than ideology. Knowing full well that you are a vocal hater of traditional republican values (i.e. social conservatism) like abortion, anti-gay rights, anti-stem cell research, etc etc; once can only come away with the notion that jdirge is more than willing to overlook the things that go against every core value you believe in because the guys skin color "promotes diversity". Seriously, wtf jd?

*sigh* jeff...it is NOT like a white guy getting elected in harlem. which i what i have been trying to explain here...if anyone would bother to check out the freaking DISTRICT. there is no white southern politician stereotype strangle holding this district.

and frankly the application of certain people's "misperception" of louisiana PISSES me off.

 

you know jeff, what you are saying here is exactly what i was trying to explain to you wrt palin. that she goes against my core values and as such i could never vote for the ticket she was on regardless of the fact that she is a woman. the only thing i wonder is why when you suggest it everyone jumps on your ass but when dirge suggests it gets a pass.

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I'd suggest, that if you want to ever understand my ideas wrt race, you will have to distance yourself from YOUR ideas of race.. if even temporarily. One of my ideas is that I do not believe it is a bad thing, necessarily, to call attention to race. In fact I think that race and culture are something to be celebrated, not ignored.. I believe you can do that withOUT creating discrimination, value judgement ( in EITHER direction), etc. Race is not the end-all, be-all.. but it IS a factor.. and just about every sociologist would admit that.

 

Interestingly, his race may have HELPED him in this election.. as I believe there is a certain degree of backlash against white conservatives in many parts of the country. It is quite possible that because he is Asian, his Republican affiliation was not quite so toxic as it was for MANY other candidates this, and last, election cycle.

once again...you are applying a stereotype where it does not exist IN THIS CASE.

 

maybe....just maybe his actions and intelligence in addition to a change being desperately needed here are what got him elected. just maybe, huh?

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I would think that Jeff would be kind of sad about Cao winning, since it disproves his theory about black people always voting for the black guy (that district is 62% African American).

it doesn't help dirge's argument either...but why would i expect you'd say anything about that. btw...glad someone finally took a closer look at the district rather than lumping the whole state into a misperception. :rolleyes:

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Wow.

 

I only voted in this district last Saturday. And I got all this analysis for free.

 

Ultimately it was voter fatigue on Jeff's side, and enthusiasm on Cao's side. The election timing was upset by hurricanes, and Jefferson had just one election too many, while this was Cao's first. This is looking back; looking forward, I didn't expect Cao would win. I hope he's not just a one-term reformer, but it may turn out that way.

 

Beyond this, I think I prefer to stay out of it....

i just hope he keeps his religion out of it....otherwise he seems to be on the right track, imo.

i am really excited about his stance on coastal restoration. and he seems to be on a course more to my liking than jidal on healthcare reform....not really sure on this yet, need to see more from him. would like to see alot more from him, actually...i am hoping he isn't another religious right republican, i liked the old republicans o.k. before they started pandering to the hard core god crowd (like jindal) and does indeed bring the gop closer to the center and the diversity dirge keeps talking about.

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I would think that Jeff would be kind of sad about Cao winning, since it disproves his theory about black people always voting for the black guy (that district is 62% African American).

it doesn't help dirge's argument either...but why would i expect you'd say anything about that. btw...glad someone finally took a closer look at the district rather than lumping the whole state into a misperception. :rolleyes:

 

I lost track of dirge's argument a while back. But if you go back in this thread you'll see that I'm perfectly capable of disagreeing with him.

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That article suggests a large number of the black vote stayed home.

 

Which doesn't really help Jeff, either.. because they may have stayed home and not voted for either party.

1. Because Jefferson is a crook.

2. They couldn't stomach voting Republican.. :lol:

here is an article on cao . the comments give some perspective from the actual voters.

 

here

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I would think that Jeff would be kind of sad about Cao winning, since it disproves his theory about black people always voting for the black guy (that district is 62% African American).

it doesn't help dirge's argument either...but why would i expect you'd say anything about that. btw...glad someone finally took a closer look at the district rather than lumping the whole state into a misperception. :rolleyes:

 

I lost track of dirge's argument a while back. But if you go back in this thread you'll see that I'm perfectly capable of disagreeing with him.

very true, my apologies. i still think cao election is pretty historic :).

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