1/4 Tonner-Business Machine

mg38024

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Does anyone know anything about the old 1/4 tonner called Business Machine? I'm only asking because I know where she is, and I'm always curious about her story when I see her. Any information is appreciated.

 
OK, if I were a non-drinker I'd probably have something for you, but I think I killed the brain cells that stored that info. When I was a kid in the late '70's, we used to go to Rush Creek Yacht Club (Dallas TX area) once in a while with our San Juan 24. I remember Business Machine being there right after they won either the 1/4 Nats or Worlds or something big. I was impressed because I'd seen the boat in Sail magazine. edit: Pretty sure the owner was a guy named Bob Chilton. He struck me as a nice guy because he talked about the day's racing with me just like I was an adult and I was about 12.

As best I can recall, it was an old-style 1/4 tonner with a pinched transom, big foretriangle, high aspect main, etc. Similar to a SJ 24, only much more of a purpose built racer. I think it was just about one of the last ones to be really successful with that style before the lighter fractional boats took over. It's a very hazy memory, sorry. Where's the boat?

 
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Robbo22

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OK, if I were a non-drinker I'd probably have something for you, but I think I killed the brain cells that stored that info. When I was a kid in the late '70's, we used to go to Rush Creek Yacht Club (Dallas TX area) once in a while with our San Juan 24. I remember Business Machine being there right after they won either the 1/4 Nats or Worlds or something big. I was impressed because I'd seen the boat in Sail magazine. edit: Pretty sure the owner was a guy named Bob Chilton. He struck me as a nice guy because he talked about the day's racing with me just like I was an adult and I was about 12.

As best I can recall, it was an old-style 1/4 tonner with a pinched transom, big foretriangle, high aspect main, etc. Similar to a SJ 24, only much more of a purpose built racer. I think it was just about one of the last ones to be really successful with that style before the lighter fractional boats took over. It's a very hazy memory, sorry. Where's the boat?
I sailed Shields at the Rush Creek Yacht Club in the mid 70's and Business Machine was on the lake. Bob Chilten was the owner and he did win the 1/4 Ton NA's. He also had another 1/4 Tonner I think before Business Machine called Trucken Machine. He later got a cruising boat - Pearson 53 - which I saw in Newport RI in the late 70's. You could tell it was Bob as there was a huge Texas flag flying from the main mast.

 
Business Machine was the second quarter-ton boat that was owned by Bob Chilton - Dallas/Rockwall, TX. His first was Truckin' Machine. Both were Kiwi 24's - designed by Ron Holland and built down in Florida by I believe Gary Carlin. Truckin' Machine was a fairly conventional cored manufactured boat while Business Machine had a welded aluminum tube cage inside (think of Imp) around which a lighter but stronger hull was hung on. As I remember, both boats (maybe only Business Machine) had B&R rigs with rod rigging where the forestay tension was adjusted by a hydraulic ram at the base of the forestay. Both boats used North Sails exclusively and were constantly refined. I also seem to remember that Business Machine had a slightly deeper keel than the other Kiwi 24's that were made.

Having raced against both boats, I will tell you that they were both extremely well sailed/sorted out and pointed like hell - nothing was left to chance. For but one example- I remember Truckin' Machine winning the Quarter-Ton NA Championship up in Vancouver back in 1975 or so. The navigator Jim Craig had charted the assigned racing area, and they had 2 spools (600' each) of quarter-inch line that they would use for anchoring in a foul tide. They used that 1200' more than a couple of times to great effect in winning that championship - as I said, nothing was left to chance! Besides the skipper Bob Chilton, the rest of the crew would typically include Gary Carlin, Mark Foster, Jim Craig, Mark Ploch and other equally talented crew members in a pinch.

The Quarter-Ton World Championship was held down in Corpus Christi in 1976. It came down to basically a match race between Business Machine and Magic Bus (designed by the late Paul Whiting) from New Zealand skippered by Murray Ross. It all came down to the last leg of the last race with a beat through the channel into Corpus Christi bay. Ross made the choice to bear across the channel (against a stronger ebbing tide) and cover Business Machine at the very last moment - a wise and gutsy call since he won the World Championship with Business Machine a very close second!

There are "no warranties expressed or implied" in these memories - this was over 30 years ago. The one thing that I will guarantee however - Business Machine was a very well raced boat!

 

Laker

Super Anarchist
4,202
277
PNW
Business Machine was the second quarter-ton boat that was owned by Bob Chilton - Dallas/Rockwall, TX. His first was Truckin' Machine. Both were Kiwi 24's - designed by Ron Holland and built down in Florida by I believe Gary Carlin. Truckin' Machine was a fairly conventional cored manufactured boat while Business Machine had a welded aluminum tube cage inside (think of Imp) around which a lighter but stronger hull was hung on. As I remember, both boats (maybe only Business Machine) had B&R rigs with rod rigging where the forestay tension was adjusted by a hydraulic ram at the base of the forestay. Both boats used North Sails exclusively and were constantly refined. I also seem to remember that Business Machine had a slightly deeper keel than the other Kiwi 24's that were made.

Having raced against both boats, I will tell you that they were both extremely well sailed/sorted out and pointed like hell - nothing was left to chance. For but one example- I remember Truckin' Machine winning the Quarter-Ton NA Championship up in Vancouver back in 1975 or so. The navigator Jim Craig had charted the assigned racing area, and they had 2 spools (600' each) of quarter-inch line that they would use for anchoring in a foul tide. They used that 1200' more than a couple of times to great effect in winning that championship - as I said, nothing was left to chance! Besides the skipper Bob Chilton, the rest of the crew would typically include Gary Carlin, Mark Foster, Jim Craig, Mark Ploch and other equally talented crew members in a pinch.

The Quarter-Ton World Championship was held down in Corpus Christi in 1976. It came down to basically a match race between Business Machine and Magic Bus (designed by the late Paul Whiting) from New Zealand skippered by Murray Ross. It all came down to the last leg of the last race with a beat through the channel into Corpus Christi bay. Ross made the choice to bear across the channel (against a stronger ebbing tide) and cover Business Machine at the very last moment - a wise and gutsy call since he won the World Championship with Business Machine a very close second!

There are "no warranties expressed or implied" in these memories - this was over 30 years ago. The one thing that I will guarantee however - Business Machine was a very well raced boat!
You may wish to look at the results. Fred Again won the last race.

 

mg38024

Member
241
0
OK, if I were a non-drinker I'd probably have something for you, but I think I killed the brain cells that stored that info. When I was a kid in the late '70's, we used to go to Rush Creek Yacht Club (Dallas TX area) once in a while with our San Juan 24. I remember Business Machine being there right after they won either the 1/4 Nats or Worlds or something big. I was impressed because I'd seen the boat in Sail magazine. edit: Pretty sure the owner was a guy named Bob Chilton. He struck me as a nice guy because he talked about the day's racing with me just like I was an adult and I was about 12.

As best I can recall, it was an old-style 1/4 tonner with a pinched transom, big foretriangle, high aspect main, etc. Similar to a SJ 24, only much more of a purpose built racer. I think it was just about one of the last ones to be really successful with that style before the lighter fractional boats took over. It's a very hazy memory, sorry. Where's the boat?
The boat was, as near as I can tell, purchased by Jack Zink in Oklahoma. It's been sitting on a trailer at a Boy Scout camp on Zink's land for a very long time. I'm not sure how long. The story I got while working there was the boat was a victim of a tornoado that hit in the late '90s. The rig and much of the boat were destroyed. It's been pretty much rotting on the trailer since then. Zink died a couple years ago, but the boat is still at the camp as far as I know. We tried to move it several times when I worked there, but it was near impossible since the trailer is shot and the whole boat is full of water.

 

Hitchhiker

Hoopy Frood
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Business Machine was the second quarter-ton boat that was owned by Bob Chilton - Dallas/Rockwall, TX. His first was Truckin' Machine. Both were Kiwi 24's - designed by Ron Holland and built down in Florida by I believe Gary Carlin. Truckin' Machine was a fairly conventional cored manufactured boat while Business Machine had a welded aluminum tube cage inside (think of Imp) around which a lighter but stronger hull was hung on. As I remember, both boats (maybe only Business Machine) had B&R rigs with rod rigging where the forestay tension was adjusted by a hydraulic ram at the base of the forestay. Both boats used North Sails exclusively and were constantly refined. I also seem to remember that Business Machine had a slightly deeper keel than the other Kiwi 24's that were made.

Having raced against both boats, I will tell you that they were both extremely well sailed/sorted out and pointed like hell - nothing was left to chance. For but one example- I remember Truckin' Machine winning the Quarter-Ton NA Championship up in Vancouver back in 1975 or so. The navigator Jim Craig had charted the assigned racing area, and they had 2 spools (600' each) of quarter-inch line that they would use for anchoring in a foul tide. They used that 1200' more than a couple of times to great effect in winning that championship - as I said, nothing was left to chance! Besides the skipper Bob Chilton, the rest of the crew would typically include Gary Carlin, Mark Foster, Jim Craig, Mark Ploch and other equally talented crew members in a pinch.

The Quarter-Ton World Championship was held down in Corpus Christi in 1976. It came down to basically a match race between Business Machine and Magic Bus (designed by the late Paul Whiting) from New Zealand skippered by Murray Ross. It all came down to the last leg of the last race with a beat through the channel into Corpus Christi bay. Ross made the choice to bear across the channel (against a stronger ebbing tide) and cover Business Machine at the very last moment - a wise and gutsy call since he won the World Championship with Business Machine a very close second!

There are "no warranties expressed or implied" in these memories - this was over 30 years ago. The one thing that I will guarantee however - Business Machine was a very well raced boat!
You may wish to look at the results. Fred Again won the last race.
Results or it never happened!

 
My reference to Magic Bus being first and Business Machine second was for the World Championship title - not for the placings in the last race. Do you remember the speed tests that were held before the series? Every boat had to go something like 4MPH over a 100 yards (something like that). One of the boats had the wrong rotation propeller - they ran the test going backwards, and I think that they made it somehow!

Then there were the 11 (not 12) raw eggs that were strategically placed in a certain competitor's boat (winch handle pockets, line bags, spinnaker and sail bags, etc). This was quickly followed by a steel belted tire that was placed around a certain competitor's mast intact - resting above the spreaders but inside the shrouds, forestay and backstay - all of which were rod rigging. Think about that for a second!

 
Anybody remember these stickers?

/monthly_02_2011/post-5569-057897800%201296850220_thumb.jpg

 

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jww

Member
359
7
lake erie,
We owned a Kiwi 24 built after those Championships but optimized for MORC with a B&R rig and daggerboard,outboard rudder.Interior had tubular framing but was well finished.Wicked fast in light air,and I could not agree with you more about how high these boats could point.Built in Florida at KIWI YACHTS by the owner and named MAMA FU FU,(doing enough to get by)

 

Laker

Super Anarchist
4,202
277
PNW
Business Machine was the second quarter-ton boat that was owned by Bob Chilton - Dallas/Rockwall, TX. His first was Truckin' Machine. Both were Kiwi 24's - designed by Ron Holland and built down in Florida by I believe Gary Carlin. Truckin' Machine was a fairly conventional cored manufactured boat while Business Machine had a welded aluminum tube cage inside (think of Imp) around which a lighter but stronger hull was hung on. As I remember, both boats (maybe only Business Machine) had B&R rigs with rod rigging where the forestay tension was adjusted by a hydraulic ram at the base of the forestay. Both boats used North Sails exclusively and were constantly refined. I also seem to remember that Business Machine had a slightly deeper keel than the other Kiwi 24's that were made.

Having raced against both boats, I will tell you that they were both extremely well sailed/sorted out and pointed like hell - nothing was left to chance. For but one example- I remember Truckin' Machine winning the Quarter-Ton NA Championship up in Vancouver back in 1975 or so. The navigator Jim Craig had charted the assigned racing area, and they had 2 spools (600' each) of quarter-inch line that they would use for anchoring in a foul tide. They used that 1200' more than a couple of times to great effect in winning that championship - as I said, nothing was left to chance! Besides the skipper Bob Chilton, the rest of the crew would typically include Gary Carlin, Mark Foster, Jim Craig, Mark Ploch and other equally talented crew members in a pinch.

The Quarter-Ton World Championship was held down in Corpus Christi in 1976. It came down to basically a match race between Business Machine and Magic Bus (designed by the late Paul Whiting) from New Zealand skippered by Murray Ross. It all came down to the last leg of the last race with a beat through the channel into Corpus Christi bay. Ross made the choice to bear across the channel (against a stronger ebbing tide) and cover Business Machine at the very last moment - a wise and gutsy call since he won the World Championship with Business Machine a very close second!

There are "no warranties expressed or implied" in these memories - this was over 30 years ago. The one thing that I will guarantee however - Business Machine was a very well raced boat!
You may wish to look at the results. Fred Again won the last race.
Results or it never happened!
My apologes. Upon first reading, I interpreted the story wrongly.

 
I just ran across this thread on old quarter ton boats. A group of people, myself included over on "Boat Design forum/ Old Quarter Tonners -Magic Bus" has been chewing over this subject for a number of years. Most of the people are West coasters. However I grew up in the Dallas, North Texas area, living up on Texoma. I'm living in Port Townsend, Wa. at present. A very knowledgeable cuss "Paul B"; just posted snaps of "Star Eye Stella" a Peterson 1/4 Ton boat that raced down in Corpus back in the 1976 worlds. I also posted a snap of Fred Again. I'll post a snap of it, If attachments are possible in this forum.

I am impressed by the knowledge of the above forum people. I have often commented about how 1/4 ton B-M. was made, with a tubular space frame and the light shell surrounding it, keeping the water out.

I was at the 1/4 ton North Americans in Vancouver. Sailed a Peterson 25, pintail. I well post snaps of Trucking Machine, and other boats

 
There are a couple of pictures of Business Machine in the North Sails publication on their latest sail construction innovation, the miterless genoa. There is a pic of Pied Piper as well. Looking for that picture ( and why does one remember these things?) some other once well known names jump back up front, Regardless,Williwaw,Acadia, Blizzard, Forte.

 

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