110 Anarchy

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist

For those who don't already know, the 110 is sort of like a mini ULDB sled.
The first planing keel boat ( 20 years before the Flying 15) they are legitimately quick little beasts.
With a trapeze, they are fast upwind as well.


Also they are pointed at both ends which makes them irresistible.
For years the class has been wanting a kit.
I have wanted a kick ass 110 since I last sailed one when I was 15 and have very definite ideas.
So why wouldn't I design and build a CNC 110 kit?
I learned many years ago that I couldn't buy the boats I wanted so I had to build them.

The 110 does not have the modern "sport boat" styling ( asymmetrical, full battened sails and guys draped over lifelines like they are seasick) but in other ways they are firmly within the type.

I hope to document the process of building this new boat.
There are lots of choices, I will try to explain them as they come up.
This is also a record of things that aren't quite right in the kit cut. You never bat 1000. The only thing you can do is fix the screw ups one by one so the next kit will have fewer mistakes.
I met Meade Gougeon when I was 12 years old, and think that English wood racing dinghies from the 1960s and 70s are pure pussy, so even though I have built more than a few thousand fiberglass racing dinghies and maybe 100 exotic composite epoxy sandwich core dinghies,I chose to make this boat out of plywood. I am still pretty happy with the West System Koolaide. Occume plywood with a light veil of glass on both sides gets you a damn stiff boat with very little trouble. CNC cutting allows you to quickly and easily build fairly complex structures that would be onerous to make cutting parts out by hand. I have designed a few kits (Machete IC) using conventional 2d CAD, I wanted to see what using more advanced 3d modeling ( Rhino) made possible. In theory, we could build the entire hull inside the computer, explode it, and have accurate models of every part. We could then flatten them out nest them onto sheets of various thicknesses of plywood and reduce the whole build into 26 sheets of plywood.
As luck would have it, there is another CNC based effort in the PNW that is using a system developed by Turn Point Design. This is symilar but relies on PET foam cored panels instead of plywood. This looks very cool.
It is also necessary to build an assembly fixture which holds the pieces of the frame in position as they are assembled and glued together. In theory, you could build a 110 like you build a DN fuselage, using the untwisted vertical sides as the strong back which eliminates the need for building anything which isn't the boat. I tried this on the Machete, and found that it really isn't very satisfactory. You have to repeatedly check and realign the hull and you really waste a lot of time. In a jig you can set up once and rely on it. A common theme though out the design process is reliability. You always want to reduce the chance that something will turn out wrong, or crooked or somehow in the wrong place.
More soon.
SHC
 

@last

Anarchist
936
70

For those who don't already know, the 110 is sort of like a mini ULDB sled.
The first planing keel boat ( 20 years before the Flying 15) they are legitimately quick little beasts.
With a trapeze, they are fast upwind as well.


Also they are pointed at both ends which makes them irresistible.
For years the class has been wanting a kit.
I have wanted a kick ass 110 since I last sailed one when I was 15 and have very definite ideas.
So why wouldn't I design and build a CNC 110 kit?
I learned many years ago that I couldn't buy the boats I wanted so I had to build them.

The 110 does not have the modern "sport boat" styling ( asymmetrical, full battened sails and guys draped over lifelines like they are seasick) but in other ways they are firmly within the type.

I hope to document the process of building this new boat.
There are lots of choices, I will try to explain them as they come up.
This is also a record of things that aren't quite right in the kit cut. You never bat 1000. The only thing you can do is fix the screw ups one by one so the next kit will have fewer mistakes.
I met Meade Gougeon when I was 12 years old, and think that English wood racing dinghies from the 1960s and 70s are pure pussy, so even though I have built more than a few thousand fiberglass racing dinghies and maybe 100 exotic composite epoxy sandwich core dinghies,I chose to make this boat out of plywood. I am still pretty happy with the West System Koolaide. Occume plywood with a light veil of glass on both sides gets you a damn stiff boat with very little trouble. CNC cutting allows you to quickly and easily build fairly complex structures that would be onerous to make cutting parts out by hand. I have designed a few kits (Machete IC) using conventional 2d CAD, I wanted to see what using more advanced 3d modeling ( Rhino) made possible. In theory, we could build the entire hull inside the computer, explode it, and have accurate models of every part. We could then flatten them out nest them onto sheets of various thicknesses of plywood and reduce the whole build into 26 sheets of plywood.
As luck would have it, there is another CNC based effort in the PNW that is using a system developed by Turn Point Design. This is symilar but relies on PET foam cored panels instead of plywood. This looks very cool.
It is also necessary to build an assembly fixture which holds the pieces of the frame in position as they are assembled and glued together. In theory, you could build a 110 like you build a DN fuselage, using the untwisted vertical sides as the strong back which eliminates the need for building anything which isn't the boat. I tried this on the Machete, and found that it really isn't very satisfactory. You have to repeatedly check and realign the hull and you really waste a lot of time. In a jig you can set up once and rely on it. A common theme though out the design process is reliability. You always want to reduce the chance that something will turn out wrong, or crooked or somehow in the wrong place.
More soon.
SHC

Thanks for the post, informative and well thought out as always. Out of curiosity where were the vids shot? I always think of the 110's are being centered in the East coast with a few fleets here in the Midwest back in the day, but the surrounding area in the vid looks nothing like either of those locales.
 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
1670640800952.jpeg

Turn Point composite build.
SHC
 

@last

Anarchist
936
70
Tamales Bay. Inverness Yacht Club has a very active fleet.
A long skinny bay for long skinny boats!
SHC
Thanks for the reply. That would explain why it didn't look like the East Coast or Midwest. Thanks also for the build pictures, cool to see the progress.
 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,417
792
“The 110 does not have the modern "sport boat" styling ( asymmetrical, full battened sails and guys draped over lifelines like they are seasick) but in other ways they are firmly within the type.”


I’ve always argued that they are the original sport boat in many ways. Over the years I’ve had a few satisfying experiences at events with multi class lines that have included vipers, Melges 24s, Melges 20s etc and on more than a few occasions passed them on different angles of sail. I’m always amused that our boat is original fir ply and built in ‘57. The look of sheer exasperation from the folks battling nausea on the rail never gets old. Also… Being a doublehanded boat makes it so much easier to organize racing vs most sport boats
 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,417
792
Is there a source for new keel castings, or are they all recycled from the last century?
No, however a form does exist, and getting a casting wouldn’t be terribly difficult. There has also been discussion over the years of sorting out a glass option sporting encapsulated ballast.
 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
I didn't know if the official Table of Offsets delivered a fast hull. There is always some fairing and fudging to do. So we started by scanning a Westease boat. This mold was taken off of a very successful boat #266 "Kraai's Baby" and these boats have proven very good.
Casey Brown has a scanner, and this stuff is just amazing. You have to post process the files to get rid of ratty data points, and the boat we scanned wasn't really as symmetrical and fair as we wanted, so after a few cycles with Ross Weene and Casey Brown we arrived a a surface model to build a boat inside.

110 scan 1.JPG


110 scan 2.JPG


110 scan 3.JPG


110 scan 4.JPG
 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
Is there a source for new keel castings, or are they all recycled from the last century?

The finished surface of the keel is built up out of putty and fiberglass. The casting is the structure and a starting place to land the first layers.
The class has been pretty good at making sure that keels are saved when boats are broken up. I have 8 of them here. There are more in Hull. A new pattern was approved for new keels in So Cal a year ago and the aluminum pattern for new castings is in Rhode Island.
So if for some reason you want new iron instead of old iron to wrap fairing around, you can do that. I would caution that casting iron keels is not a no brainier, and the foundry may not get it right the first time.
The advantage of old keels is that they are free.
I am working on a scheme to CNC carve an MDF mold of the keel and enclose the cast iron in a fiberglass clam shell. I'm getting too old to spend much time bogging around. If the class approves, we could use that to experiment with a composite keel. It turns out that lead shot in resin is just about the same density as cast iron. There is some challenge to making it as stiff as cast iron without using miracle fiber.
SHC
 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
When will the kits be available?
Chesapeake Light craft will cut out what we have anytime. I haven't made all the corrections to the cut files ( thats why you build a prototype) and I haven't finished writing a manual. I am blessed with ADD, and this stuff is the bit a struggle with. I have asked for help, but none has been offered.
SHC
 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,417
792
It would be Interesting to scan a schock boat and compare with the Westease scan you have. I’ve always felt that they are the fastest, particularly off the wind.
 

@last

Anarchist
936
70
I didn't know if the official Table of Offsets delivered a fast hull. There is always some fairing and fudging to do. So we started by scanning a Westease boat. This mold was taken off of a very successful boat #266 "Kraai's Baby" and these boats have proven very good.
Casey Brown has a scanner, and this stuff is just amazing. You have to post process the files to get rid of ratty data points, and the boat we scanned wasn't really as symmetrical and fair as we wanted, so after a few cycles with Ross Weene and Casey Brown we arrived a a surface model to build a boat inside.

View attachment 559483

View attachment 559484

View attachment 559485

View attachment 559486
Cool that there is some ties to West Michigan here. Westease does great work and other boats they have produced include Invincible, a Maxi Morc 30 that I believe is/was a former MORC champ and I want to say the N/M 43 Vim that DC used to have or still does I think was built by them. Krai was successful with the boat and from ancient memory I believe they used to have a fleet of 110's back in the day in Holland, Mi.
 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
The frame is entirely plywood. There are strength advantages to using solid timber, but CNCcutting works best on sheet goods. The chines and sheers are rounded off to a 41mm radius and then glassed. There is some profiling of the chine logs in the cockpit to provide a landing for the double bottom. In the bow and stern there are tanks with an angled top. These provide enough buoyancy to permit self recovery from a knock down without loosing the utility of the under deck area for storage and under deck rigging.
The topsides are to the left, the have been scarfed together with jigsaw pattern and glassed on the inside with 120g/m^2 glass.
SHC


D2AD6A95-FDA9-4163-B3A2-3F867472B3F9.jpeg
 

Sidecar

…………………………
3,347
1,730
Tasmania
frame is entirely plywood. There are strength advantages to using solid timber, but CNCcutting works best on sheet goods. The chines and sheers are rounded off to a 41mm radius and then glassed.
If ever there was a sailboat designed for planking, it would have to be the 110 Canoe.

You could even cross plank most if not all of the boat for even stiffer panel strength if you wanted. My 9.5m boat has planking in both directions.

I don’t know what thickness your okoume plywood is, it looks to be 9mm? You could plank that out with 12x190mm paulownia planks, butt polyurethane glued still glassed both sides, and have a lighter and stronger hull. Paulownia is good for stringers etc too, 80% of the weight and strength of WRC, a quarter of the cost. Sections the same weight as WRC sections would be larger and stiffer. You can also get laminated panel material. Bulkheads and frames were all CNC’d from 2.0x1.2x14mm paulownia panels.

Just beware, it is pretty soft. Treat it like a sandwich material and spread loads wherever you can. I used planks because I couldn’t get the curves I wanted using plywood.



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