14th Most Dangerous Man In The World

Pertinacious Tom

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London student convicted for making gun using 3D printer
 

Tendai Muswere, 26, pleaded guilty at Southwark crown court on Wednesday to the charge of manufacturing a 3D printed gun.

Police had initially gained access to Muswere’s home in Pimlico, central London, in October 2017 using a drug warrant, but found components of a 3D printed gun capable of firing a lethal shot during the search.

Muswere, a student who does not hold a firearms licence, told officers he had printed the firearm for a “dystopian film” as part of a university project – but later refused to comment on what the film project was about.

Muswere claimed he was unaware the weapon he had printed was capable of firing. A subsequent police search of Muswere’s browsing history revealed he had watched videos demonstrating how to manufacture a firearm capable of firing live ammunition using a 3D printer.

The Metropolitan police said there was not widespread concern about the printing of guns in London. While plans for guns can be created or downloaded online, not all parts can be printed off – in other words, a gun cannot be manufactured by simply downloading plans online and using a 3D printer.
He pleaded guilty to something that can't be done, I guess.

Or maybe we're just looking at the work of a seriously confused and uninformed reporter.

Problems arise around tracing 3D-printed guns and although possession of such weapons is illegal in the US and the UK, enforcing the law is difficult because it is not necessarily known who is making them. The ease with which they can be produced and used is also of concern to authorities.
Possession of such guns is not illegal here, at least not everywhere.

It can't be done yet is easily done. Trippy. Speaking of which...

During the search of Muswere’s home, cannabis plants and evidence of cannabis cultivation were found.
So easy a pothead can do it, I guess.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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A WIRED magazine writer made a gun

This was back in 2013, before this thread was started, but it's well written and kind of interesting. The author is obviously grabby and was pretty horrified by the process and result.

I found it interesting that he tried three methods of creating a gun and learned what many buyers of project boats have learned: 80% complete isn't really all that complete. OK, so the running joke is 85%, but close enough. His interaction with a drill press was a pretty funny read. The results were similar to what happens when I open Tom's Metal Shop, meaning mangled metal and blood coming out of me.

He did manage to assemble a working AR-15 using a Ghost Gunner machine and seemed to think these would soon become a yuge problem. 6 years later, people continue to buy assembled guns instead of making them for the most part.
 

It’s worth noting that buying an AR-15 in the US isn’t hard. But the privacy-minded—as well as those disqualified from gun purchases by criminal records or mental illness—can make their own lower receiver and purchase all of the other parts, which are subject to nearly zero regulation. I ordered every part of my AR-15 but the lower receiver from the website of Ares Armor, a Southern California gun seller that doesn’t require any personal information beyond a shipping address. If I wanted to hide my purchases from my credit card company, I could have paid in bitcoin—Ares accepts it.

There's even a way to anonymously buy that highly regulated lower receiver—almost. Like many gun vendors, Ares sells what's known as an "80 percent lower," a chunk of aluminum legally deemed to be 80 percent of the way toward becoming a functional lower receiver. Because it lacks a few holes and a single precisely shaped cavity called the trigger well, it's not technically a regulated gun part.

Machining the last 20 percent myself with a CNC mill or drill press would allow me to obtain a gun without a serial number, without a background check, and without a waiting period. I wouldn’t even have to show anyone ID. Law enforcement would be entirely ignorant of my ghost gun’s existence. And that kind of secrecy appeals to Americans who consider their relationship with their firearms a highly personal affair that the government should keep out of.
Heh. That last sentence is a pretty funny way of saying "Americans who do not wish to have their property banned and confiscated."

 

Pertinacious Tom

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NY's AG wants to make that kind of journalism illegal
 

SEPTEMBER 24 – New York Attorney General Letitia James today announced that she has told 16 different websites that make and sell firearms and gun parts (including 80-lower.com) to cease and desist selling “nearly complete assault weapons” to customers in New York State.

A letter released yesterday by the Office of the New York A.G. reads:

“Your website offers unfinished lower receivers that require simple milling in order to manufacture unregistered and unserialized assault weapons, despite the fact that such manufacture and possession are illegal in New York.”

Milling an 80% lower only results in the making of a stripped lower receiver. A stripped receiver is a firearm, but it is not an assault weapon. It contains no parts which would be defined as an assault weapon by any New York or federal law, either.

Regardless, the letter continues:

“Assault weapons are illegal in New York, and the sale and/or advertisement of these products violates New York law…. I hereby demand that you stop the sale and advertisement to residents of New York of unfinished lower receivers and firearms components that are intended for the assembly of assault weapons.”
I think she's just using the broader TeamD definition of "assault weapon," namely, "gun that TeamD wants to ban." That definition knows no reasonable bounds.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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It is said to have been fired once, which is about how many times I'd expect it to work. But there are geeks who love to prove that the impossible is actually possible.

 

jerseyguy

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dacapo

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same...I'm done reading  banal blather every fucking morning

 

Pertinacious Tom

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Biker Gang Leader's DIY Guns Are Part of a Predictable Prohibition Story

As a convicted felon, Bruce Sartwell isn't legally allowed to own firearms. But the regional president of the Outlaws Motorcycle Club obviously isn't the kind of guy who cares about what he's legally allowed to do; when he was arrested in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts, he was found to be in possession of a rifle he'd made himself, as well as unregistered "silencers" (sound suppressors), parts, and the equipment needed to manufacture boats.
OK so I might have edited the ending a bit.

On Oct. 30, 2019, a search warrant executed at Sartwell's residence resulted in the recovery of an AR-15 styled 'ghost gun' – a firearm without any manufacturing or serial numbers – and firearm manufacturing tools and assembly parts including milling equipment, buffer spring, buffer tube, air-powered water dremel polish and a drill press. Two firearm silencers concealed in false bottom compartments, a guide for assembly and disassembly of an AR-15 rifle, 20 knives, a black powder handgun, a flare gun, and various ammunition compatible with the AR-15 styled rifle were also found.
I'm not quite sure what "air-powered water dremel polish" means but it sounds naughty. Like a drill press, which sounds like it might be a sexual position.

The article goes on to talk about underground firearms manufacturing in Australia, Brazil, and Israel.
 

Sartwell was caught because, as a gang leader with a criminal record, he was on law enforcement radar and he received dozens of packages from China that raised officials' suspicions. Upon opening a shipment, agents found a sound suppressor—a simple device that pretty much anybody can make at home but that's highly regulated and a crime for a convicted felon to possess. They subsequently raided his house and discovered his gun-manufacturing operation.

Most Americans haven't attracted that kind of attention and are perhaps less inclined to order felony convictions to their home addresses via international mail. Many thousands of people already have the skills and equipment to do what Sartwell did, but quietly and unobserved.

If politicians follow through on promises to further restrict the legal manufacture of firearms, they'll find Americans more than ready to emulate the defiant efforts of people around the world—often criminals, but also regular people unwilling to be disarmed by their governments. Rather than reinforcing the rule of law, tighter restrictions will unleash an uncontrollable underground firearms industry.
This reminds me that I don't have a 3D printer. Yet.

 

BeSafe

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Biker Gang Leader's DIY Guns Are Part of a Predictable Prohibition Story

OK so I might have edited the ending a bit.

I'm not quite sure what "air-powered water dremel polish" means but it sounds naughty. Like a drill press, which sounds like it might be a sexual position.

The article goes on to talk about underground firearms manufacturing in Australia, Brazil, and Israel.
 

This reminds me that I don't have a 3D printer. Yet.


He had a dremel tool.  GASP.  I'm going to jail if the cops ever dig through my tool closet.  Just THINK of what I COULD do with all that stuff!  I'm so screwed.

s-l1000.jpg

 

Pertinacious Tom

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He had a dremel tool.  GASP.  I'm going to jail if the cops ever dig through my tool closet.  Just THINK of what I COULD do with all that stuff!  I'm so screwed.
I bought the Dremel version of the Fein Multimaster. It didn't last long. Bought the Fein and like it a lot better. It's definitely not an "air-powered water dremel polish" so I guess it's OK. Working on a disguise for my drill press.

 

BeSafe

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I bought the Dremel version of the Fein Multimaster. It didn't last long. Bought the Fein and like it a lot better. It's definitely not an "air-powered water dremel polish" so I guess it's OK. Working on a disguise for my drill press.
It's not a drill press.. It's an end mill!   Oh wait, I meant high speed micro batter mixer for tiny pancakes.

 
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same...I'm done reading  banal blather every fucking morning
You do realize that clicking on threads that you already know are banal is your own fault.  Reading anyone’s posts is totally voluntary - likely Dabs quote.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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Weird procedural ruling on censorship of 3D printing code
 

The federal government in 2013 told Defense Distributed—a company whose business involves the distribution of tools and software for the 3D-printing or otherwise home-milling of weapons—that certain software files it distributed constituted the illegal export of armaments under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and the Arms Control Export Act (AECA).

Seeing the files as analogous to a book containing instructions on how to make a gun, Defense Distributed, along with other parties, sued the State Department in 2015 on First Amendment grounds. The federal government settled that lawsuit in July 2018. As part of the settlement, the feds announced certain such software files, known generically as CAD files (for computer-aided design), would be removed from the United States Munitions List (USML). Items on that list require a license to export.

Within days of that announcement, various states and the District of Columbia sued the federal government for taking the files off the list, claiming that the removal was done "in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act [APA]." The plaintiffs claimed that "there is no indication in the settlement agreement or elsewhere that any analysis, study or determination was made by the government defendants in consultation with other agencies before the federal government agreed to lift export controls on the downloadable guns." The plaintiffs also said the decision "violates the Tenth Amendment by infringing on states' rights to regulate firearms."

This week, Judge Robert A. Lasnik of U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, in deciding on motions for summary judgment in that suit, State of Washington et al. v. U.S. Department of State et al., agreed that removing those files from the USML was unlawful based on the APA arguments (though not the 10th Amendment ones), and reversed the federal government's choice to allow free distribution of the files.
But he ruled on what Defense Distributed could do, not what the rest of us can do. I think I'll do what I did when I learned that exporting the encryption program PGP was a felony under our munitions laws years ago. Export it (again).

In practical terms, this has been meaningless to any actual interest of the states suing, unless that interest was just to bedevil Defense Distributed, as the files—like most things on the internet—can be and are widely distributed by anyone else who pleased besides Defense Distributed. They're just files, after all, and nothing on the internet is easier to share.
I'm "anyone else" after all. I wonder if The Ed should be held responsible for my actions if I post the code here?

 

Pertinacious Tom

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Not 3D printing related, but in other home handyman news...
 

In 2013, the Colorado legislature passed House Bill 13-1224, which prohibits the "sale, transfer, or possession of an ammunition feeding device that is capable of accepting, or that can be readily converted to accept, more than [15] rounds of ammunition or more than [8] shotgun shells (large-capacity magazine)."

...

However, some gun dealers noticed that the bill made no mention of magazine components and capitalized on the omission. Dealers throughout the state began selling "parts kits" that contain everything a gun owner needs to assemble their own large-capacity magazine at home. In fact, some gun stores throughout the state now sell magazines only in parts kit form.

...

On the other hand, many local dealers have opted to exploit the loophole. "As soon as we remove the functionality of it and take this spring out, it's no longer a magazine," one salesman said pointing out how the terminology of the bill allows them to do this. "[A] monkey could put it back together again," a different salesman tells 9NEWS.

"I'm a little stunned about how open it is and how blatantly they're saying, 'You know, this is a stupid law, but this is the way you can get around it,'" state Sen. Rhonda Fields (D–Aurora), one of the bill's sponsors, told 9News. "The whole goal, when I ran the bill in 2013, was to limit that capacity."

Some stores aren't even making an attempt to comply with Colorado's flawed magazine ban. Two of the 10 stores 9NEWS visited operated "as though the ban did not exist."

"We're a sanctuary county, we don't give a f—. We just sell everything as is, preassembled," an employee at Family Firearms Sales, a gun store in Colorado Springs told 9NEWS.
So that's going about as well as Trump's bump stocka ban and New Jersey's magazine confiscation program.
 

Colorado's large-capacity magazine ban isn't the only example of gun regulation that has failed. For example, take President Donald Trump's attempt to ban bump stocks, a firearm accessory that essentially harnesses a gun's recoil to increase its rate of fire. After Trump issued an executive order requiring Americans to surrender their firearm accessories or risk being in violation of federal law, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives collected fewer than 1,000 bump stocks out of an estimated 280,000-500,000 in circulation. The overwhelming majority of bump stock owners decided to take their chances.

Similarly, when New Jersey imposed a 10-round limit on magazines in the state and mandated that any existing large-capacity magazines be surrendered last year, "approximately zero" of New Jersey's 1 million gun owners decided to turn them in, reported Reason's Jacob Sullum.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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The favored approach seems to be to attempt to censor the needed computer code. Which, of course, causes people like me to spread it even further around cyberspace than it was already spread, as mentioned in the 14th most dangerous person in the world thread.
If you and your elk want to be outlaws, so be it, but so much for your claims that your elk are squeaky clean types.
I'm not an outlaw and I don't work for Defense Distributed. At least, they don't pay me.

In practical terms, this has been meaningless to any actual interest of the states suing, unless that interest was just to bedevil Defense Distributed, as the files—like most things on the internet—can be and are widely distributed by anyone else who pleased besides Defense Distributed. They're just files, after all, and nothing on the internet is easier to share.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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States Sue Over Trump Admin Rules That Could Weaken Oversight of 3D-Printed Gun Blueprints Distribution

I decided to check and see if these heavily regulated 3D gun printing files could still be easily found. They can.

Sharing files is still one of the easiest things to do, and one of the hardest things to prohibit, on the internet.

A coalition of states is suing the Trump administration over new regulations that they say could allow for the online release of blueprints for 3D-printed firearms, which make it easier for anyone to access the files at home and make a functional plastic gun with a 3D printer.
You mean what is already quite easy could become quite easy? PANIC!!!

The state officials are concerned about these 3D-printed weapons because they lack serial numbers, making them untraceable by authorities. They are also often made of plastic, meaning that they may not set off metal detectors at airports. They are also easy and cheap to make. Moreover, they could render current gun regulations unenforceable because people who are normally restricted from obtaining a gun could avoid background checks and other regulatory procedures. 
The first sentence there is true, but it quickly goes downhill from there. They're not "often" made of plastic. They "often" have metal parts that will set off a metal detector. They're neither cheap nor easy to make, at least compared to buying a cheap handgun that is a lot more accurate and reliable and less dangerous to fire. But to the extent that you can, for a bunch of money, make a crappy gun that won't last long, it's false to say they "could" render gun control unenforceable. They already DID render them unenforceable. That's why I started out by mentioning that I decided to check and see if these heavily regulated 3D gun printing files could still be easily found. They can.

 

Pertinacious Tom

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Delaware Trying To Ban Gun Making

Delaware is in the process of passing a statute to make it illegal to make your own firearms or to even possess a piece of metal that is intended to be used to make a receiver. From the proposed statute, HB 277:

...

The law, if passed, will be challenged in court, on both First and Second Amendment grounds. The law applies to people without any criminal record. People with felonies are already forbidden from owning firearms. This law is to prevent people who are not criminals from making their own firearms.

It is a very new law to forbid law-abiding individuals from making firearms for their own use. Such a law has only been passed in the last two years, to my knowledge.

It is a direct violation of the First Amendment to forbid the transmission of knowledge on how to make firearms with digital code.

...

If Delaware passes this law, it will be following the steps of California (requires state serial number and following state manufacturing requirements), New Jersey (flat out ban), New York (firearm parts may only be sold to authorized buyers),  Washington (bans “undetectable” guns), Connecticut (requires a state-issued serial number). These five states, and Delaware, if it passes the law, are all treading new ground with laws passed in the last two years.

The Washington state law may not be precisely in this group, as the law bans “undetectable guns”. Almost all homemade guns are easily detectable.

I have yet to see any court challenge to these laws. There was a court challenge on the legal ability to make your own machine guns, in Arizona, in the 1990s. The Ninth Circuit upheld that right, and the Supreme Court refused to hear the case. However, the case was complicated by other factors, and the Supreme Court had not yet decided Heller.
That bolded part is flat wrong about what happened in the 9th Circuit.

In US v Stewart, Mr. Stewart was charged with making his own machine guns for personal use. The Supreme Court held the petition in that case until they decided Gonzalez v Raich, in which Ms. Raich was charged with growing her own cannabis for personal use. Having determined that Raich was affecting interstate commerce, the Supreme Court sent the Stewart case back to the 9th Circuit with a nice note saying they should reconsider the case in light of the Raich result. This resulted in the most sarcastic compliance ever from Judge Kozinsky, and the 9th held that making your own machine gun for personal use is a federal matter that affects interstate commerce. You know, like a cute toad.

Anyway, he's right about the rest of it but the "complicating factor" here is that the author is TeamR and so wears drug war blinders.

 
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