14th Most Dangerous Man In The World

jocal505

moderate, informed, ex-gunowner
14,263
298
near Seattle, Wa
You mean what is already quite easy could become quite easy? PANIC!!!
The left hand is complaining about panic, a lot, as the right hand creates it.

  • The word "gun grabby" is used to induce fear around here. Quite a bit.
  • The word "confiscation" is tossed in to unrelated conversations, to inflame.
  • A specific fear echoes hereabouts, the fear that ordinary dogballs are goners. 
  • Your induction of racially based fear, always connected to violent toolz, is a fucking body of work, I find. WTF, dude.

You got the dedication factor, in spades, I'll give you that. But as sure as dogballs, based on the layers of your behavior, there's no way I can trust your insights, on any matter. But if you insist on being this way, then take a better look at a master, go study Roger Stone. 

 
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Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
Ghost Gun PANIC!!!
 

...

Currently, ATF says a ghost gun not a gun.  

But the ATF has changed its thinking on similar issues recently. After the 2017 massacre in Las Vegas, the ATF and the Department of Justice banned bump stocks, an accessory that turned semi-automatic weapons into machine guns.

Former acting director of the ATF, Thomas Brandon, helped implement that change and was ready to recommend to his bosses at the Department of Justice that they reclassify certain ghost gun kits, like the one we ordered, as firearms because of how easy they are to put together.

Bill Whitaker: You were alarmed at what you were seeing?

Thomas Brandon: Yeah. And so I said, "Well, right now we have a public safety concern."

Bill Whitaker: You thought that the ATF should reclassify these kits as firearms? 

Thomas Brandon: Yes as the head of the agency at the time-- I said, "I'm gonna do everything I can for public safety with my team." If you wanted to buy a kit and make your own gun, it's just gonna hav-- have a serial number on it.

...
Hmmm... stirring up some fear to justify another power grab. Again.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
Last month Defense Distributed and the SAF got a favorable 5th Circuit ruling in their suit against New Jersey AG Grewal
 

Plaintiffs filed suit challenging the efforts of New Jersey's Attorney General and others to thwart plaintiffs' distribution of materials related to the 3D printing of firearms, alleging infringement of plaintiffs' First Amendment rights and state law claims. The district court granted the Attorney General's motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction, relying on Stroman Realty, Inc. v. Wercinski, 513 F.3d 476 (5th Cir. 2008).

The Fifth Circuit held that the Attorney General has established sufficient minimum contacts with Texas to subject him to the jurisdiction of Texas' courts. The court held that Stroman is distinguishable from this case in at least two key respects: first, many of plaintiffs' claims are based on the Attorney General's cease-and-desist letter; and second, the Attorney General's assertion of legal authority is much broader than the public official in Stroman. Furthermore, the Attorney General failed to timely raise arguments regarding whether judgment in plaintiffs favor would offend traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice. The court applied the principles discussed in Wien Air Alaska, Inc. v. Brandt, 195 F.3d 208 (5th Cir. 1999), and Calder v. Jones, 465 U.S. 783, 104 S. Ct. 1482 (1984), and held that jurisdiction over the Attorney General is proper. Accordingly, the court reversed and remanded for further proceedings.
One reason given in the opinion was that Grewal's actions were solely directed at DD and not at, well, people like me (see post 205).

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
'Ghost Gun' Bans Are Doomed from the Start
 

...

Presumably, then, the Biden administration is considering regulating the partial kits that are sold for people to finish and assemble into working firearms. So-called "80 percent receivers" would then be treated as complete firearms—if you could successfully define something that can, with work, be turned into a finished product without also banning materials used in other ways. While we don't know the administration's plan, a bill working its way through the Virginia General Assembly specifies, "'Unfinished frame or receiver' means a piece of any material that does not constitute the frame or receiver of a firearm, rifle, or shotgun but that has been shaped or formed in any way for the purpose of becoming the frame or receiver of a firearm, rifle, or shotgun, and which may readily be made into a functional frame or receiver through milling, drilling, or other means."

That might successfully target products explicitly marketed as 80 percent receivers, but those are conveniences for use with a jig and a few tools, as then-Reason producer Mark McDaniel detailed in 2018. Going beyond such products threatens to imperil whole aisles at home improvement outlets if the language is rigidly enforced.

"It's hard to imagine stopping it, short of banning 3D printers or metal pipes," Slate's Ari Schneider observed recently of the FGC-9, a semiautomatic weapon that's the latest brainstorm of DIY gun enthusiasts. "Most of the gun is 3D-printed, while the rest includes inconspicuous parts available at hardware stores," he noted.

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As good a reason as any to stock up on tools next time I'm at Home Despot.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
Burning Man said:
Ghost guns are basically receivers that have been unfinished. Essentially all you need to do is drill the holes for the various internal pieces to fit and then add the internal parts in the gun is complete. The part that is registered with the authorities is the receiver in most cases. So there is a loophole where if the receiver is unfinished, it doesn’t need to be registered. Ghost guns are basically receivers that have been unfinished. Essentially all you need to do is drill the holes for the various internal pieces to fit and then add the internal parts in the gun is complete. The part that is registered with the authorities is the receiver in most cases. So there is a loophole where if the receiver is unfinished, it doesn’t need to be registered.
Biden's Plan to Stop Ghost Guns Is Doomed To Fail

and here's a preview of how that will happen:
 

Defense Distributed has been fighting off federal and state legal challenges since its founding in 2012. Biden's requested rule change is the latest front in that legal battle. The president was vague on the details, but he has asked the DOJ to issue a new rule on ghost guns within 30 days. 

Wilson anticipates that the proposed regulation will classify more gun parts, such as the unfinished lower receiver that the Ghost Gunner modifies, as firearms that would each require registration numbers branded on them.

That was the rule change proposed by the nonprofit gun control advocacy organization Everytown for Gun Safety, which was founded by former New York City mayor and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg.

Wilson believes the rule change could drive up demand for DIY guns. 

"If it's actually more difficult to buy an [AR-15] upper receiver…because it's serialized and now I gotta go through the background check and everything, I'm now going to consider for the first time making an [AR-15] upper receiver," says Wilson. 

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
Gunmaking CAD Files Free To Spread Around the Internet, 9th Circuit Rules
 

In a case that was already moot in the colloquial sense of the term if not the legal one, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decided yesterday that an attempt by various states to stop the federal government from not restricting certain computer files can go no further. So for now, CAD files that can help instruct certain devices to make weapons at home can be legally spread into the public domain.

The history of the issues behind the case, State of Washington et al. v. State Department, is long and convoluted and embedded in arcane arguments about proper administrative procedure. What triggered the states to want to interfere in federal decisions was the result of a resolution in 2018 of a lawsuit from Defense Distributed, a company dedicated to the spread of gun-making software, founded by 3D weapon entrepreneur and provocateur Cody Wilson. In settling a case challenging their restrictions on such files, the government agreed to remove them from the control of International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR).

The states pretended they were fighting for public safety against the threat of computer-assisted homemade gun making. But their efforts were, at their core, an attempt to make the government continue constitutionally questionable policies restricting the free spread of information in the form of certain computer files, even though that information is obviously free to be spread through other means. For example, gun-making instructions in a book would obviously be legally protected expression.

...
I'm not so sure about that last part. Reminds me of a t-shirt my brother had that had the code for PGP on it, along with the message "this shirt is a munition."

The 9th Circuit panel decision this week, written by Judge Ryan D. Nelson, is not based on any of the important First Amendment questions implicated in earlier cases about the same overall issue—government power to prevent the spread of information under the guise of munitions control—but on the simple legal fact that the laws regarding these particular munition controls just don't allow for judicial rethinking of the agencies' decisions.

...

The states were trying to argue that only adding items to the prohibited list is judicially unreviewable, while taking items off it, at issue here, should be reviewable. The 9th Circuit panel disagreed. In other words, the lower court erred in allowing the states to successfully challenge the new rules that allow, rightly, for the free spread of these files. It's worth remembering it was never about U.S. citizens having access to them, but the alleged threat of exporting the files to overseas persons, as that was, by prior ITAR theory, the equivalent of overseas arms proliferation.
No, bullshitters, unreviewable does not mean "unless it's a review we want."

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
'Ghost guns' banned by Los Angeles City Council
 

...

On Monday, Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Alex Padilla, both D-California, sent a letter to Council President Nury Martinez expressing their support of the ordinance.

"This ordinance is an important effort to help keep unserialized and untraceable firearms, known as `ghost guns,' off our streets. Similar initiatives have already been implemented in San Diego and San Francisco, and we commend the Los Angeles City Council for considering a similar measure," the letter stated.

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Putting a serial number on and registering them is already required by state law.

 

Mike in Seattle

Super Anarchist
4,328
595
Latte land
If you spend time reading this thd, you will find where I challenged  them to actually print a liberator, load a live round , and pull the trigger.

If you decide to try, let me suggest having an ambulance standing by,

, might lose a hand

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Nevada Court Finds Ghost Gun Law Unconstitutionally Vague
 

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AB 286 attempted to ban the possession, sale, or transport of an “unfinished frame or receiver” as defined in the bill. As anyone with ordinary intelligence can determine, the definition of something which is unfinished is problematic. When does a process start? At what point does it become “unfinished”?  Does it start with molten metal, the combination of chemicals in a mold, or the first cut of a saw or turn of a drill?

Here is the definition of “Unfinished frame or receiver” as stated in AB 286:  


9.“Unfinished frame or receiver” means a blank, a casting or a machined body that is intended to be turned into the frame or lower receiver of a firearm with additional machining and which has been formed or machined to the point at which most of the major machining operations have been completed to turn the blank, casting or machined body into a frame or lower receiver of a firearm even if the fire-control cavity area of the blank, casting or machined body is still completely solid and unmachined.



Both parties agreed to the basic facts in the case.

On December 10, 2021, the Third Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada, issued Summary Judgement in favor of Polymer80, striking down the law as unconstitutionally vague. From the opinion:


The definition does not tell anyone when during the manufacturing process a blank, casting, or machined body (whatever those terms mean) has gone through the “major machining operations” (whatever those are) to turn that  blank, casting or machined body into a frame or lower receiver of a firearm (whatever that may be), a person of ordinary intelligence could not proscribe their conduct to comply with the law. As a result, this Court finds that the text of AB 286 does not provide fair notice of whatever it criminalizes. To this end, this Court asked on multiple occasions during oral argument on the Motion for Summary Judgement, what those terms as used in AB 286 mean. Tellingly, the Defendants could not in any manner explain their meaning(s).



This has always been the difficulty with regulating partially made items. Where do you start, and where do you stop?

...
Confused judges are funny.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Cody Wilson is not as confused as the judge above. His answer:

How about a block of aluminum?
 

...

The newest version of the Ghost Gunner, a milling machine that's roughly the size of home printers, will now be able to "take raw materials…in their primordial state…and turn them into guns," Wilson tells Reason. Blocks of aluminum will not be subject to the new regulation.

...

Wilson says that Defense Distributed is the only DIY gun company pivoting in the face of the upcoming rule, so its real impact will be to drive his competitors off the market. Biden is "giving us, the nation's premier ghost gun company, a monopoly of the market," Wilson says.

...

"There's a world of things that are not gun parts. We will give you the technology to turn these things into guns and gun parts," says Wilson.

...

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
ATF's New 'Ghost Gun' Rules Are as Clear as Mud
 

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' (ATF) finalized "ghost gun" rule surprised Cody Wilson, the head of Ghost Gunner. His company manufactures CNC mills that turn unfinished firearm receivers into products that can be included in completed firearms that have no serial numbers and are, hence, called "ghosts." He'd anticipated a more-or-less explicit ban on so-called "80 percent receivers" which would leave his Ghost Gunner 3 that can turn a raw block of metal into an AR-15 receiver as the simplest remaining solution. Instead, by his reading, the new rules consumed a lot of pages to go after the most basic end of the DIY market.

Well, maybe. Other industry experts aren't sure what the rules mean. That uncertainty poses huge challenges for manufacturers, vendors, and anybody trying to establish what is and isn't legal.

...
Everyone seems sure of one thing: here come the lawsuits.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,023
1,876
Punta Gorda FL
Sheriff Annoyed That People Are 3D Printing Guns to Sell to State Buyup Programs

An upstate New York sheriff is irked that people around the US are 3D printing firearms to turn into gun buyup programs for cold, hard cash.


"I know in Utica, New York, Houston, Texas, and Spartanburg, South Carolina that 3D printed guns were submitted to the gun buyup program," Robert Swenszkowski, the sheriff of New York's Oneida County and, strangely, a professor at Utica University, told Spectrum News 1.


He appeared to be referring to several stories that emerged this summer, in which people in Texas, South Carolina and New York did indeed sell back guns they 3D printed at home to local authorities as part of state gun buyup programs. One man, who identified himself only as "Kem," admitted that he 3D printed more than 100 guns to turn into New York State's gun buyup program. He was awarded $21,000 for his efforts, which was paid out to him in $500 gift cards.
...

"Kem" is the 14th most irksome man in New York.
 




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