14th Most Dangerous Man In The World

jocal505

moderate, informed, ex-gunowner
14,263
298
near Seattle, Wa
Mismoyled Jiblet. said:
(to Tom) Do you want an assault rifle shaped buttplug for your collection of gun-related bedroom accessories?
This very week, @Uncooperative Tom tossed in a picture of his assault sombrero, from his ghost database. Let's hope we ever see it again. If we do, in your honor, we can call it the assault buttplug.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,050
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Punta Gorda FL
Timewarp from 1994:

Pretty Good Privacy Gets Pretty Legal

I haven't heard the name "cypherpunks" in many years. I first noticed PGP about the time of versions 2.5-2.6, by which time Mr. Bidzos' patent became irrelevant.

Before he released PGP, Zimmermann asked Bidzos for a free license for the patents. Bidzos refused, noting that he had already sold licenses to third parties and didn't want to undercut their business. Zimmermann says that he released PGP because the US Senate's 1991 omnibus crime bill had a measure buried within it that would have directed manufacturers of secure communications equipment to insert "trapdoors" into their products so that messages could be decrypted by the government. Releasing PGP, Zimmermann claims, was a preemptive strike against such an Orwellian future. (Zimmermann has since become the subject of a criminal investigation focusing on PGP's export overseas.)

...

Back in the United States, cryptography had gone from an esoteric branch of mathematics to front-page news. At the center of the controversy is the Clipper Chip, a key escrow-based encryption system that nearly became the government-approved standard for a wiretap-ready infobahn. "If we wake up one morning with 100 million Clipper phones, it doesn't matter what the laws are," says Zimmermann. Such a vision caused Zimmermann to increase his efforts to make PGP available to anyone who wanted it, particularly in the US. If only the RSA patent weren't in the way!

...

"Finally we have been able to bring to the public a noncommercial version of PGP that really does not have any sword of Damocles hanging over its head - or over the head of its users," said Schiller. "Anybody in the US can get a copy of this, and RSA is not going to object."

Despite munitions export laws, PGP version 2.6 quickly made its way to Europe via the Net. Zimmermann sees the spread of PGP as a symbol of people's determination to defend their right to privacy. The solution, he claims, isn't fighting whatever key escrow encryption system eventually replaces Clipper as the government standard, but making something better. And, he adds, PGP is it.
What a different world we would have if we all had a Clipper Chip in our phones so the Trump administration could see whatever is on it.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Punta Gorda FL
Another file sharing flashback, this time from 2002

The Day The Napster Died

Napster and its founder held the promise of everything the new medium of the Internet encompassed: youth, radical change and the free exchange of information. But youthful exuberance would soon give way to reality as the music industry placed a bull's-eye squarely on Napster.

Ironically, that litigation propelled file trading to further astronomical heights. Open-source developers, long the defenders of free speech in the digital world, set about developing alternatives to Napster in case the record industry successfully shut down the rogue service.

The most successful alternative, Gnutella, was developed by Justin Frankel, a programmer who worked for one of the very companies suing Napster for copyright infringement.

...

With the RIAA bearing down on Napster, the open-source community kicked into action in early 2000, led by AOL's Frankel who released Gnutella, a new file-trading application, into the world.

Now, anyone with a computer and some programming skills could create their own version of Napster.

AOL quickly pulled Gnutella from its system in an act similar to locking the barn door after the horse has been stolen, because the programming code was now out there. Even if Napster was forced to shut down, file trading – no matter how much the recording industry wanted it stopped – was now part of the Internet. Frankel made sure of that.

Gnutella proved that file trading was more than just Napster. That got executives at Bertelsmann, a German media conglomerate, thinking. The company offered Napster millions of dollars to develop a secure distribution system. Over the next year, Bertelsmann poured $85 million dollars into the company, even as its music division fought to shut the service down.
I think it's more similar to locking the barn door after the barn has burned down.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,050
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Punta Gorda FL
YouTube Bans Cody Wilson Press Conference and Fundraising Videos

The video in question, which has already been reposted by other accounts on YouTube, shows a press conference Wilson gave for a collection of reporters from major media outlets including the Associated Press, New York Times, Houston Chronicle, and others. The 46-minute video features Wilson explaining his reaction to a recent ruling by a federal judge forcing the State Department to abandon its settlement with Wilson, which would have allowed him to publish certain gun files, including his design for a gun made mostly from 3D-printed components, pending further legal action. After explaining that he would begin to sell the files online and sharing them over email or other secured means of transmission in response to the judge's assertion that doing so would likely be legal, Wilson then took questions from the press for about 40 minutes.

When asked why YouTube considered the press conference video to be a violation of their guidelines, a YouTube spokesperson said the video included a link to DefCad.com where Wilson currently sells the blueprints. The company said it does not allow content that features firearms that intends to facilitate either the sale of firearms or their manufacture or links to sites selling firearms.
Hmm... I don't even know how to repost someone else's video to my account but may have to learn. Maybe I'll see if I can put it on Vimeo too, just for good measure.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,050
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Punta Gorda FL
Mismoyled Jiblet. said:
Another file sharing flashback, this time from 2002

The Day The Napster Died

I think it's more similar to locking the barn door after the barn has burned down.
The early 00s were a golden era for intellectual property theft. Napster, Kazaa, Limewire, Morpheus, Gnutella - all the movies, songs, books you want you could download for free! But then such property theft began to cut into prosperity. And governments got mad about people enabling industrial scale theft. So they cracked down on such theft. Mean, bad, nasty governments protecting property rights.
Technology completely changed things like the music industry and killing Napster did nothing to stop it, just like governments were unable to stop PGP and are unable to stop 3D printed guns.

A big difference is that Phil Zimmerman and Cody Wilson don't wish to sell their intellectual property. They're encouraging the kind of activity that's theft in another context.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,270
5,473
De Nile
Technology completely changed things like the music industry and killing Napster did nothing to stop it, just like governments were unable to stop PGP and are unable to stop 3D printed guns.

A big difference is that Phil Zimmerman and Cody Wilson don't wish to sell their intellectual property. They're encouraging the kind of activity that's theft in another context.
Cody’s doing a little more than that it seems. Great guy to admire there tommy-boy. 

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Punta Gorda FL
Mismoyled Jiblet. said:
Technology completely changed things like the music industry and killing Napster did nothing to stop it,
So property theft is fine with you as long as it's not your property.
No, I just pointed out that the theft issue doesn't have any relevance to PGP nor to Defense Distributed because you can't steal what is being given away.

Knowing what is or is not theft isn't approving of theft. It's just knowing the difference.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,270
5,473
De Nile
No, I just pointed out that the theft issue doesn't have any relevance to PGP nor to Defense Distributed because you can't steal what is being given away.

Knowing what is or is not theft isn't approving of theft. It's just knowing the difference.
Still find Cody a great example?

 

Fakenews

Super Anarchist
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Laughing my ass off at how this started off as a gun nutter thread and morphed in to a pedo thread.  Not so funny is that he’s still on the run.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Punta Gorda FL
Mismoyled Jiblet. said:
Theft is entirely relevant to the file sharing article you posted, that I responded too. For "file sharing" was wholesale IP theft, the only things that weren't were at the margins, at best. The only people who claim file sharing was about something other than piracy are 1) idots or 2) liars.
That's true, and you should probably start a thread on IP theft if you wish to discuss it.

But when I sent a copy of PGP to Anguilla, that wasn't theft. Spreading around DD files isn't either. So file sharing is more than theft and theft isn't really relevant to the issue at hand, which is how ineffective govt attempts to stop this stuff are, whether justified or not.

 

Fakenews

Super Anarchist
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Us lib hate gun nutters for the most part but we especially hate gun nuts who are also pedos. So yeah we are interested.  Gun nutters are most definitely not interested.

SAD!

 

Fakenews

Super Anarchist
13,740
1,859
Come on Tom.  You’ve got to own dogballs.  Please do so by changing your user name accordingly.

 




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