2014 Etchells Worlds

MR.CLEAN

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up now. btw, here's another fun one. Caption contest?

"This is definitely my last time sailing this fucking boat!"

etchellsfire.jpg

 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
North American Etchells Class Association

2014 Worlds

2014 Etchells World Championship

Days Four and Five: June 27-28 - Report from Steve Girling

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Hardesty is the Etchells World Champion

Bill Hardesty and team ground through to victory, ultimately with a race to spare in the 2014 Etchells World Championship.

For Race 6, we had a new breeze direction with the post frontal NE flow well established at 14-17 KTS. Sparkling, yet shift sailing conditions made for a fun first race.

The fleet liked the look of the boat-half of the line and the pressure certainly looked to favor the right, however the congestion off the line and a left shift meant that boats who could tack were able to cross the fleet 2 minutes after the start.

The pressure still looked better to the right; however, the boats that worked middle left got a nice leftie and were launched!

The leaders at the first mark were Bruce Golison, Bill Lynn, Richard Clarke and Dina Corsi, Jay Mills, Chris Constant, Bill Mills and Luke Reich, Jim Cunningham, Jeff Madrigali, Mark Ivey and Bryn Bachman and George Francisco, Michael Guerriero and Zach Railey.

In the run, the boats that held starboard gybe in the pressure made gains, with Lammens, Bojsen-Moller and Girling just off the back of the top 5 and Hardesty, Canfield, Egan and Roble right on their tail.

Golison sailed a nice second beat and run into the finish on this four lap course to claim victory, team Mills/Constant held on for an excellent 2nd. Jim Cunningham was strong in third.

Just behind the leaders, Hardesty had managed to gybe on Lammens breeze, and with the longer port gybe on this run, got up to 5th with Carruthers, Busch and Campbell in 6th and Lammens 7th.

Race seven started without much delay, but the breeze was already moderating.

Off the line, the fleet liked the boat-half of the line and immediately started to sheer away from the guys to leeward. This was a trend that would continue, and those teams that worked right early gained most. This was the first sign of a thermal influence.

Things seemed settled throughout the first lap of this 5-leg course, however, and on the second run, the fleet in the middle and left of the track (looking downwind) found themselves in a hole. This allowed for some shuffling of the order and a tricky decision for the last beat. The right had paid both times, but now looked awful and the left looked great.

Needless to say, the boats that worked left and got into the re-establishing gradient breeze found gold. This race came down to a battle between Shannon Bush, Kurt Oetking and Brad Boston and Senet Bischoff, Ben Kinney and Clay Bischoff, Ante Razmilovic, Chris Larsen and Stuart Flynn and Skip Dieball, John McClean and Jeff Eber and Cunningham, Madro, Ivey and Bachman.

Dieball prevailed for a nail biting victory, Bischoff was second, Razmilovic third and Cunningham fourth for an excellent 3,4 for the day.

Going into the last day of the regatta with a light sea breeze forecast, Hardesty had a twenty point lead over Lammens who was eight ahead of Razmilovic.

Race 8 in a light Southerly sea breeze proved how tricky a race track can be in Newport. Off the line, the fleet once again preferred the boat half of the line, but this time, the guys in the middle popped out, or so it looked. However, nobody tacked and crossed, and then slowly the fleet began to sheer off to windward. The further right you were able to work, the better it got.

Nils Razmilovic, Brian Hammersley and Andrew Mills played it perfectly and led around the weather mark, Kjeld Hestehave, Ian Storer and Lynne Shore were in hot pursuit in second and Scott Kaufmann, Justin Law, Jesse Kirkland and Austen Anderson third.

Although the boats that gybed early in this four lap course initially gained, the leaders were able to consolidate their positions by going back out to the right upwind.

So Nils Razmilovic and team were able to consolidate for a great win, Hestehave had an awesome second, and Kauffman and clan had a terrific third!

This race also decided the championship with Lammens deep, Hardesty able to recover to 15 and no other threats, Hardesty and team were able to pop the champagne corks with a race to spare.

Race 9 started with a weather mark at 195 degrees and a clear right influence in play; however, the pressure looked great on the left (as always).

Not surprisingly, the fleet favored the boat-half of the line, but off the line, the pin group was in great shape. Several boats were able to consolidate from the pin-half of the line, most notably, Peter Duncan, Jud Smith and Tom Blackwell.

At the weather mark, it was Australian legend John Bertrand, with crew Andrew Palfrey and Grant Simmer who led the fleet around with Duncan and Robert Elliott, Sam Richmond and Stuart Childerly got in their heels.

A tricky run ensued that allowed Duncan to make up some ground on Bertrand and force a split at the leeward gate. This let Duncan get to the favored right side and shepherd the action from there.

Across the finish line it was Duncan with a great win, Bertrand in second and Elliott third.

The conclusion of the regatta saw Lammens slip to sixth, Dieball fifth, Bischoff fourth and top Corinthian, 2013 World Champs, Marvin Beckmann, Steve Hunt and Ezra Culver in third, Ante Razmilovic in second and team Hardesty champions.

Congratulations to Bill, Taylor, Marcus and Stephanie for a great win among a tough fleet of champions and legends!



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Steve Girling, author of the Worlds race reports, is racing aboard CAN 1396 with Hank Lammens and Jens Bojsen-Møller.

Top 10 Results

Day 3, Cumulative

Sail Number / Boat Name / Skipper / Hometown / Race 1-2-3-4-5, Total

1. USA 979, Line Honors, Bill Hardesty, San Diego, 2-2-20-1-4-5-13-15-96/DNC 62.0

2. HKG 1333, Swedish Blue, Ante Razmilovic, London, U.K., 3-6-8-44-14-19-3-31-13 97.0

3, USA 1378, The Martian, Marvin Beckmann, Houston, 8-3-11-5-15-46-32-7-19 100.0

4. USA 1308, KGB, Senet Bischoff & Ben Kinney, Larchmont, N.Y. 10-20-25-52-1-31-2-9-15 113.0

5. USA 1372, Aretas, Skip Dieball, Beaver Dam, Wis., 38-13-4-19-7-17-1-61-23 122.0

6. CAN 1396, Hank Lammens, Norwalk, Conn., 1-8-1-12-16-7-47-49-42 134.0

7. AUS 1383, Triad, John Bertrand, South Yarra, Australia, 4-10-5-28-27-23-53-43-2 142.0

8. USA 1376, Arethusa, Phil Lotz, Newport, R.I., 9-18-6-96/BFD-52-9-12-37-8 151.0

9. USA 1137, La Tormenta, Shannon Bush, Refugio, Texas, 26-16-31-37-6-21-6-16-66 159.0

10. USA 1404, Lifted, Jim Cunningham, San Francisco, 42-4-32-40-50-3-4-25-10 160.0

See the full cumulative results online.

Photos from the Worlds

See a full gallery of photos from the 2014 Etchells World Championship, shot by Sharon Green.

 

fan

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I love how the Ed fails to mention the Worlds Billy won with //cough couch// Leweck //cough// as Crew hahaha

 

MR.CLEAN

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I love how the Ed fails to mention the Worlds Billy won with //cough couch// Leweck //cough// as Crew hahaha
That was actually my story, and I honestly forgot about Leweck - something I tend to do as I do not know him or have any history with him.

 

Ludicrous Speed

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Etchells are 9.5 of 10 on the boredom scale to anyone under 60 who has sailed a boat capable of breaking 8 knots. I completely understand why SA has ignored the regatta. Nobody cares. Dacron? Seriously? The copy/paste coverage added to this thread was boring enough. We are surrounded by far to many of these old dying classes IMO. This is what Scuttlebutt is for.

The Etchells, in particular, is a 3/4 man keelboat that is almost as ungainly to trailer down the highway as a Farr 40. It's a pain in the ass to tune and one of the most uncomfortable boats to crew that I have ever experienced. I just don't get why people still cling to old boats rather than moving into more modern boats that solve so many of those basic problems and at the same time are far less expensive.

The Etchells was a fine class back in its day (70s thru the early 90s) but any expectations of sailing media coverage for an Etchells regatta in 2014 is just laughable. Next time try begging.

 

Never was

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Etchells are 9.5 of 10 on the boredom scale to anyone under 60 who has sailed a boat capable of breaking 8 knots. I completely understand why SA has ignored the regatta. Nobody cares. Dacron? Seriously? The copy/paste coverage added to this thread was boring enough. We are surrounded by far to many of these old dying classes IMO. This is what Scuttlebutt is for.

The Etchells, in particular, is a 3/4 man keelboat that is almost as ungainly to trailer down the highway as a Farr 40. It's a pain in the ass to tune and one of the most uncomfortable boats to crew that I have ever experienced. I just don't get why people still cling to old boats rather than moving into more modern boats that solve so many of those basic problems and at the same time are far less expensive.

The Etchells was a fine class back in its day (70s thru the early 90s) but any expectations of sailing media coverage for an Etchells regatta in 2014 is just laughable. Next time try begging.
I challenge you to show me a deeper fleet the past three years. Its the level of competition, not the boat. Look who sails them. Are you going to condemn VX and Melges 20 standout Eagan for racing an Etchells?

 

Reht

Super Anarchist
2,758
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Etchells are 9.5 of 10 on the boredom scale to anyone under 60 who has sailed a boat capable of breaking 8 knots. I completely understand why SA has ignored the regatta. Nobody cares. Dacron? Seriously? The copy/paste coverage added to this thread was boring enough. We are surrounded by far to many of these old dying classes IMO. This is what Scuttlebutt is for.

The Etchells, in particular, is a 3/4 man keelboat that is almost as ungainly to trailer down the highway as a Farr 40. It's a pain in the ass to tune and one of the most uncomfortable boats to crew that I have ever experienced. I just don't get why people still cling to old boats rather than moving into more modern boats that solve so many of those basic problems and at the same time are far less expensive.

The Etchells was a fine class back in its day (70s thru the early 90s) but any expectations of sailing media coverage for an Etchells regatta in 2014 is just laughable. Next time try begging.
I race 49ers generally, I was asked to join in for the Etchells Worlds this year and have to say that if your buzz is from close racing there was nothing better. I regularly have this discussion with people, fast is fun, skiffs are a blast to sail and great fun to race. But compare a 15-30 boat fleet of skiffs or a 95 boat fleet of etchells from a racing perspective and the etchells win every time. We figured that from first to last in most races was maybe 12-15 minutes at most and generally less, that's after a 2+ hour race and from the leaders to the guys following in the back end of the fleet. If you stood on a boat mid-fleet and threw a rock, you could hit probably half of the boats in the regatta at almost any time. Tight racing like that where you're fighting for every inch becuase a boatlength can be worth 5 places on the finish line is exciting to some of us, more so than blasting around in the double-digits of boat speed.

Plus the fleet is amazing. Look at the names on the entry list and you'll see a reasonable list of who's who from the last few decades of sailing. Being able to line up with these guys is a great experience and as far as I saw every one there is there to have fun. Think of it this way, a lot of the front of that fleet is comprised of people who have done amazing things already in their sailing careers, they have nothing to prove on the water and thus come out to race and have a good time, that feeling spreads throughout the fleet.

I should dig up the bit of gopro footage I have from when that front started approaching the fleet. It was rather impressive to watch the bank of clouds roll slowly towards the fleet (which had their jibs down becuase the RC had reported 20+knt breeze behind the front).

 

Still

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Etchells likely bore the Ed because he knows that he'd never crack the top 50 in that fleet with any crew he could put together

The 650 was a cool boat. But it was an oddball without any one design prospects for the forseeable future. Essentially a "one off," anywhere in the USA. And now its gone

Most of us here like sailboat RACING. Great if its a "fast" boat (if speed alone where the criteria, the only events to cover would be Marstrom 32 and above) but close racing is great racing. Nothing boring about it

 




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