28ft-34ft Boat RECS

Hello Hello ya'll,

I've been sailing on a 1974 Pearson 26 for the last 5 years. I learned to sail as an adult and learned on this boat. It's been such a solid boat but am ready to move onto something larger and with more capacity.

Gimme some recommendations! I am looking for a solid, safe, stable cruising boat. Something I could comfortably live aboard when I take it down the intercostal and to FL. I've done my own internet research but I'm looking for the internet to throw some ideas my way. I'm not looking to win any races. I am not really looking for a performance boat either. I just want something thats solid as the pearson 26.

My budget is not so much - 15k max.
 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,071
1,003
SoCal
Step up to a Pearson 30? Or a Tartan 30?

Newer boats maybe a Tartan 28 or 3000

C&C 29 mk 2 or C&C 27 mk V

J-28 or later model J-30

Cal 27 Mk III

Ranger 29, Ranger/O'Day 30, Ranger 33

Ericson 30, or 32

etc.

It's not the model of boat that matters, its how good a condition is the one you buy. Buy the best maintained and equipped boat you can for your money. A well maintained 30 footer for 15k is a much better deal that a 34 foot fixer upper that's been "ignored" for the last 10 years.

30 footer is almost 2x as big as a Pearson 26. Costs 2-4x more to own and maintain. Same jump from 30 to 34 Ft. Its not the purchase price that is costly, its the ownership that's expensive.
 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,562
1,577
Laramie, WY, USA
Many Cape Dory midsized boats up and down the ICW and around FL. Here's a 33' that could probably be had for around your budget; some smaller and cheaper available. Interior is lovely. A shippy little ship that will take good care of you.

On the sportier end of things, and always a good value, is this S2 30 footer.
 

slap

Super Anarchist
5,923
1,341
Somewhat near Naptown
30 footer is almost 2x as big as a Pearson 26. Costs 2-4x more to own and maintain. Same jump from 30 to 34 Ft. Its not the purchase price that is costly, its the ownership that's expensive.
I don't think cost go up quite that fast. Slip fees and haulouts? Often a $/foot cost. A 30 foot boat is 15% longer. Bottom paint and sails? Roughly goes up as the length ratio squared: 33% more. Some things go up as the displacement - roughly goes up as the length ratio cubed: 54% more. Of course costs aren't always a smooth progression - going bigger at some point can mean jumping into a new pricing category.

Going from a 26 foot boat to a bigger boat typically means going from an outboard to diesel, and in the galley going from a simple alcohol stove to propane range and possibly refrigeration. And while these things drive up the cost it tends to be minor compared to the cost of slip fees.
 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,788
287
WLIS
There was a time, not so many years ago, that the sailboat industry in the US was dominated by 4 manufacturers: JBoats, Beneteau, Catalina, and Hunter. It follows that these 4 will dominate the used boat market now. Catalinas, in particular, can be found that are 45 years old up to new. They met user needs then, and will do so now.

I own a Hunter 28, and while I'm not suggesting you put Hunter at the top of the list, I suggest you take them seriously as an option despite the hate you may run into here on SA. Different models and different eras of Hunters have different good points and bad points. Some, including my H28, are tender, some are underpowered. None are racing boats. Many have relatively shoal draft. I once read through a whole bunch of owner reviews, and the most common complaint was odor from the head usually traced to cheap hose.
 

sailman

Super Anarchist
8,320
436
Portsmouth, RI
A move from a P26 to either a Catalina 27 or 30 would be just about right, I think. Both have better interiors than the 26, especially the 30. Both are reasonably priced in the used boat market.
 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,071
1,003
SoCal
There was a time, not so many years ago, that the sailboat industry in the US was dominated by 4 manufacturers: JBoats, Beneteau, Catalina, and Hunter. It follows that these 4 will dominate the used boat market now. Catalinas, in particular, can be found that are 45 years old up to new. They met user needs then, and will do so now.

I own a Hunter 28, and while I'm not suggesting you put Hunter at the top of the list, I suggest you take them seriously as an option despite the hate you may run into here on SA. Different models and different eras of Hunters have different good points and bad points. Some, including my H28, are tender, some are underpowered. None are racing boats. Many have relatively shoal draft. I once read through a whole bunch of owner reviews, and the most common complaint was odor from the head usually traced to cheap hose.
I didn’t mean to leave either Hunter nor Catalina out. I assumed, given the volume of boats these two alone produced with the OPs requirements, that he’d already had them on the list. But you know what they say about assumptions…😇
 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,651
723
Nova Scotia
Any of the pre-Tartan C&C boats, particularly the ones up to the mid 80s, were solid boats. The first generation of Hunters, the so-called Cherubini Hunters, were good boats from the same era. Most boats from 40 years ago had good bones but most will be in need of a refit at this point (unless the PO has just done it).
 




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