316 SS machine screws - Passivated or not

yoyo

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I thought about that method. 

I think that by the time I get one machine screw in place and tightened (just enough to maintain alignment) the rail will be pulled down so much that the donut will be smeared away from the next hole as it is bent into place.  I'm not confident that will maintain a good seal.   

With polysulfide I can envision putting some on the deck/under track, bend into position and then add more goop in the hole and on the bolt.   Its going to be a wonderful mess.  

 
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See Level

Working to overcome my inner peace
Buy a bag of these, they're perfect for initial cleanup to remove the bulk of the sealant. They're soft enough that they don't scratch the surface.

First stroke on edge against the toerail to separate the extra goo away from the joint, then flat on the deck to scoop away the goo. Keep the stick clean with paper towels and do a final wipe down with cotton rags and a little citrus solvent followed with water rinse.

For fastener clean up take a 1" chip brush and cut the bristles down to about 1" long, dab brush in some citrus cleaner and use it to scour around the fastener head, then wipe up thinned out sealant and rinse.

Screenshot_20200812-165309.png

 

yoyo

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cotton rags and a little citrus solvent followed with water rinse
Does that citrus solvent cut through the polysulfide?  Never tried that before.

I have a bunch of those west stirring sticks.  Also have plastic putty knives and plastic razor blades.

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

See Level

Working to overcome my inner peace
Yes it does, but try to keep it to a minimum and follow up with  wet rag to remove solvent film.

Also clean your machine screws with acetone prior to install to remove any machining oils that will eventually break the sealant bond.

 

bammiller

Super Anarchist
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Ten four. I was thinking of screws. The OP asked for machine screws. More coffee might help me. 
Having removed many different styles of stainless steel screws, the allen machine screws ALWAYS strip much easier that philips. Perhaps it is that stainless is much softer than regular steel, and more likely to deform. 

Bam Miller 

 

yoyo

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Fleetwood said:
You need to develop a bit of technique to bend the toerail enough to get a couple of screws in at a time; it helps to have it prebent as much as possible
I wish it would pre-bend.  When I removed it the dang thing went totally straight after having been curved since the 80's.  

 

gkny

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You might consider using shims to help with the install.  To install a long curved Genoa track, I cut thin shims and taped them at right angles to the track on the deck.  They were just thick enough so that I could lay the track on them and it would not touch the sealant.  I had a couple of long screwdrivers that fit through the holes in the deck and track.  As I flexed the track I kept it in place with the screwdrivers.  I would then insert the bolts in the track in that section and pull a shim or two and tighten the nuts.  I then pulled the screwdrivers and flexed the next section,etc.. The shims helped to cut down on the track touching the caulk and spreading it around while I worked sections of the track in place

 

slug zitski

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You might consider using shims to help with the install.  To install a long curved Genoa track, I cut thin shims and taped them at right angles to the track on the deck.  They were just thick enough so that I could lay the track on them and it would not touch the sealant.  I had a couple of long screwdrivers that fit through the holes in the deck and track.  As I flexed the track I kept it in place with the screwdrivers.  I would then insert the bolts in the track in that section and pull a shim or two and tighten the nuts.  I then pulled the screwdrivers and flexed the next section,etc.. The shims helped to cut down on the track touching the caulk and spreading it around while I worked sections of the track in place
I might be impossible to align  the old deck holes with the new track holes 

Plugging the old holes with epoxy bog then  shifting the new track clear of the old filled holes is very common 

the use of several tall studs , three inches tall  taped into the substrate are  commonly used as alignment pins     

Placement of the caulked track , using these alignment pins is s time , mess saver 

many workers ... perhaps   three or four are needed 

Dont use butyl rubber 

 
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yoyo

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many workers ... perhaps   three or four are needed 
Confirms my thoughts - water, then beer and sandwiches, advil and cocktails, probably a gift card.

Thankfully its the same rail going back in so it should fit.  

 

slug zitski

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If you Are working outside be alert to temp

aluminum changes shape like crazy with temperature 

The main sheet track pictured took a full day to install

the  first attempt was at 0800 on a cold  winter day ... during the dry fit the holes would not align. Temperature too cold 

the track needed to be brought outside , wrapped in black plastic , then sun heated till Noon before it changed back to the original shape 

Be alert 

225602B2-5EE5-497F-9FB5-C871BE868379.jpeg

 

gkny

Member
338
25
I might be impossible to align  the old deck holes with the new track holes 

Plugging the old holes with epoxy bog then  shifting the new track clear of the old filled holes is very common 

the use of several tall studs , three inches tall  taped into the substrate are  commonly used as alignment pins     

Placement of the caulked track , using these alignment pins is s time , mess saver 

many workers ... perhaps   three or four are needed 

Dont use butyl rubber 
Whether you use new or old holes (assuming original track), they need to be drilled before caulking.  I had epoxied and then redrilled the original holes and dry fit the track before I tried to caulk it. When I dry fit it, I masked the desk at the edges of the track.  I used the screwdrivers as levers and they allowed me to shift the track very small amounts in very specific locations to be able to line up the bolt that I was inserting.   Same idea as the studs but I found that I needed to tweak the adjustment in more than a couple of locations to get all of the bolts located in their holes. 

 

yoyo

Anarchist
691
267
If you Are working outside be alert to temp

aluminum changes shape like crazy with temperature 

The main sheet track pictured took a full day to install

the  first attempt was at 0800 on a cold  winter day ... during the dry fit the holes would not align. Temperature too cold 

the track needed to be brought outside , wrapped in black plastic , then sun heated till Noon before it changed back to the original shape 

Be alert 

View attachment 384091
Nice job and thanks for the heads up.  Its going to be a PITA.  I wanted to ignore it since it didn't appear to be leaking - but knowing my luck as soon as it went offshore it would start to leak.    

That's a beautiful work station that obviously took some serious planning.  The grab bars behind the winches look like a great idea.    

 

yoyo

Anarchist
691
267
Whether you use new or old holes (assuming original track), they need to be drilled before caulking.  I had epoxied and then redrilled the original holes and dry fit the track before I tried to caulk it. When I dry fit it, I masked the desk at the edges of the track.  I used the screwdrivers as levers and they allowed me to shift the track very small amounts in very specific locations to be able to line up the bolt that I was inserting.   Same idea as the studs but I found that I needed to tweak the adjustment in more than a couple of locations to get all of the bolts located in their holes. 
I ran a drill followed by a small diameter stainless rotary wire brush to clean out old sealant.  The holes cleaned up nice. 

After the suggestions I am going to make sure I have multiple screwdrivers of the correct size to use just like iron worker spud wrenches.

I'm keeping fingers crossed that very few holes will need adjustment. 

 
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