34' Cruising sailboat

Editor

Administrator
Staff member
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carlsbad
if you are just now getting your first boat, offshore cruising should be the last thing you are considering.

 

AnIdiot

Member
300
198
Second Drawer
My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?
Chartering, to understand what your priorities are before buying... you will need qualifications to charter without a skipper and acquiring those will significantly aid your decision making.

 

T sailor

Member
414
89
Chesapeake
Yeah, new sailors don’t need an offshore boat.  It will be some time before you develop the skills and confidence to safely head offshore, not to mention determine if you would like that sort of thing.  No reason to start with a boat setup for something you may or may not do some years down the road.  Get something that is rewarding to sail and suited for coastal sailing in your local waters.  
You don’t really provide enough info about your goals/plans, budget, etc…. To make any sort of recommendation.

 

Sail4beer

Super Anarchist
9,516
3,086
Toms River,NJ
Here’s your boat! 

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kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
26,215
4,366
Kent Island!
My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?
You could post in Cruising Anarchy to find out about cruising ;)

Do you have a budget in mind? Where exactly "offshore" are you planning to go? Where are you now?

* the budget is important. If you send me $150,000, I will have an excellent offshore cruiser sent your way ASAP. For $15,000, it will be a challenge to say the least. For $1500 I'll set you up with a frying pan.

 
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bdeller

New member
I am very new to sailing. I know how to kiteboard and windsurf and sail sunfish and lasers but big boats with interiors were a complete mystery as of a month ago.

I opted to just buy one and figure it out instead of chartering. I am happy about it. Sailing moves a lot slower than I expected and I don't think I'd really get much use out of a charter. But because there are a ton of little improvements and maintenances you need to futz with on a boat you own it's a lot more fun going out and testing vs. having a clean boat that you know is going to work.

You probably don't want a true bluwater boat. My 26' boat doesn't even have an inboard motor and there's plenty of things to get confused about. Having a water generator, two autopilots, radar, lifeboats, working refrigerators etc would just be a mess

 
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On The Hard

Super Anarchist
3,526
417
San Antonio
Start with an ASA learn to sail, then bareboat certification. If you get through that you will may be qualified to start thinking about coastal cruising.

To quote me from another thread, if I found a well sorted Ranger 33 I would buy it. Good boat, cheap, manageable size. You can sell if you really want to pursue the offshore dream a year from now.

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,081
7,607
Eastern NC
I am very new to sailing. I know how to kiteboard and windsurf and sail sunfish and lasers but big boats with interiors were a complete mystery as of a month ago.

I opted to just buy one and figure it out instead of chartering. I am happy about it. Sailing moves a lot slower than I expected and I don't think I'd really get much use out of a charter. But because there are a ton of little improvements and maintenances you need to futz with on a boat you own it's a lot more fun going out and testing vs. having a clean boat that you know is going to work.

You probably don't want a true bluwater boat. My 26' boat doesn't even have an inboard motor and there's plenty of things to get confused about. Having a water generator, two autopilots, radar, lifeboats, working refrigerators etc would just be a mess
There are plenty of things to get confused about, and plenty of additional equipment... and skills to operate... over small boats. The basics of making the boat sail are the same, just slower and with a lot more momentum (which is why learnin to -sail- on a big boat is a mistake). Once you know how to make a sailboat go from point A to point B, add navigating (and the gear that your boat has to do so), reading a chart and a pilot is a skill all to itself... then learn to anchor (again, with the gear your boat has)... then learn to reef for strong winds, and also learn to read the weather... then learn about 12V systems including batteries and chargers...

There's a lot to it. Cruising is work, which is why more people dream about it than actually do it. But being skipper of one's own little vessel is one of the most rewarding experiences I've ever found.

- DSK

 

Sea warrior

Super Anarchist
2,899
559
Chicagoish
My husband and I are new sailors looking to buy our first boat. What do you recommend for a good offshore cruiser?
If you or your husband are hands on or are mechanically minded and adventurous and have bank then  a 34 footer is not an unreasonable starting point, but most people either gain experience crewing on Friend’s boats or start small. (Teens to mid twenties)

Failing that, Google nautical donations on the south side.

They have plenty of boats suited to noobs.

 

Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,270
675
North Louisiana
Laser, if you are young and athletic, a sunfish if you are not.  Also, a nice starter boat is the Precision 15.  Not cheap or easy to find but simple. 

Main point, learn to steer the boat before tackling the complexities of a large craft.  In my limited opinion as a professional educator as well as a fellow who has helped quite a few others get started sailing, the best way to really learn to sail once you understand the basics, is to get in a boat and sail.  Sailing, is somewhat of a muscle memory task.  Smaller boats make this learning much easier and quicker.  

 
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