50 yachts that changed the way we sail

Black Jack

Super Anarchist
two boat that changed how many of us sail. Alberg 28 (Triton) & H28

pearsontriton28-hull106-svblossom-undersail-2.jpg


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nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,634
655
New Orleans
Don't shoot me..

The Flying Scot.  

early mass-production in fiberglass starting in 1958.  Rugged construction and could handle breezy weather better than most 19-footers.  Yeah, not exciting upwind.  But thousands of kids in hundreds of camps or clubs, got their start on the Scot, and learned to race. 

Also the 210. Ray Hunt was way ahead of his time with the fin-type keel and spade rudder, flat bottom, fast downwind.  And marine plywood, which was new in 1939.  As was plywood and the flat bottom.

 
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Left Shift

Super Anarchist
10,532
3,272
Seattle
How about the Tempest 22 

This is a boat that was designed back in the early 1960's to replace the very out dated Star class at the Olympics in 1972. When you look at the Tempest it was very much ahead of it time and 1 of the very first sports boats. 

LOA       22 foot

Beam     6 foot 6 inch

Draft      3 foot 7 inch

Displacement 463 kgs

Ballast    200 kgs in a lifting bulb keel.

2 crew skipper and 1 on a trap 

As far as the Melges 24 ? 

What a out dated design when you look at the boats that have been designed in both Oz and NZ many years before it was even thought of that have lead the world in high performance designs.

I've seen a Hartley 16, designed back in 1956 as a plywood home built design, turboed with a dagger board keel and bulb and a mast head kite kick ass and it's a amazing little sports boat.

Pulpit


 
The Tempest was a nice boat.  I owned one.  But...too bad it was built like a ripe banana.  It's biggest impact may have been on the way we recycled fiberglass.

 

Left Shift

Super Anarchist
10,532
3,272
Seattle
How about Wild Oats IX / Wild Joe ? 

She was one of the first fully crewed canting keel twin rudder 60 foot designs in the world from Reichel / Pugh and built back in 2002 on the Gold Coast.

I remember seeing her coming out of the shed for the first time and the buzz around the marina. I had mates that were into power boat racing and they couldn't understand at first just how cutting edge the design was. In order to get her to open water they needed to put air bags under the hull to lift her out of the water as the Coomera river is so shallow.  

Great boat and design

Pulpit

Wild Joe is one of the world’s fastest 60 foot sailboats, built by the Australian Azzura Marine boat factory in 2002, based on the design of the world renowned Reichel/Pugh design team. The boat was introduced in the offshore sailing circuit as the first boat with a collapsible kiel. Its first owner was Australian winemaker Bob Oatley, who intended to use the boat for quick family trips, however, only three weeks after its launch, Wild Oats (by its original name) proved to be so quick and maneuverable for racing purposes that its owner was able to beat larger boats with better performance capabilities in the handicapped roster (time-adjusted racing), such as Wild Thing or Alfa Romeo and captured a trophy at its very first regatta. Since then, the boat’s performance has been unbeatable and is today rated as one of the fastest sixty footer sailboats in the world, it possesses an outstanding IRC number, hence can achieve magnificent results in handicapped (time corrected) racing. Following a change of ownership, the boat received a new name, Wild Joe, since Oatley insisted in keeping the name of his boats intact and all his new boats were also designated Wild Oats. The name and ownership change did not interrupt the boat’s success series, and up to now, it holds the record at the Pittwater Coffs Harbour Race, a regatta at which it captured four IRC victories. It also came out on top at the Sydney Gold Coast IRC regatta, twice at Hamilton Island Race Week, and it proved to be the fastest boat at the Sydney-Moolooabah regatta as well. It primarily showed its capabilities at distant overseas regattas, but had multiplied wins at both in shore (close to shore), offshore, and long ocean racing events alike. At offshore, or open water races, the boat is guided by a 9-10 member crew, while at in shore, or close to shore races, such as the Rolex Capri Sailing Week, or the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup, it typically needs 16 experienced sailors, so that the team can execute all necessary tasks at ease. The Hungarian team was able to acquire the legendary boat and would like to achieve respectable results at the most famous offshore cup racing events, at the Rolex Trophy, and by doing so, it aims to take a first step towards professional open sea team regatta sailing, so that it can pioneer the way for ambitious and proven domestic small boat racers towards this challenging and heretofore relatively scantly known, yet attractive and tough racing format.
The thread title is boats that changed the way WE sail not how "THEY" sail.

 

Swimsailor

Super Anarchist
4,511
1,833
WA
Did those 50 boats "change" the way we sail?  I don't think we have changed the way we sail 50 times.  Here's my list of boats that actually "changed" anything...

Catalina 22 - Sailing became accessible to the middle class masses.

IACC - Big roach mains and asymmetric spinnakers. 

J/105 - first critical mass one design with a bowsprit.

Melges 24 - first critical mass small one design sport boat

J/24 - EVERYONE has sailed on a J/24

Hobie 16 - proved sailing doesn't have to be boring.

ETNZ 2013 - because FOILING!

Merlin - because SLED's!

IMOCA - foils, canting keels, scow bows... truly the innovators offshore

TP52 - They spawned more than 100 45-56' boats that were light, high-tech and rate well under various rules.

Farr 40 - Changed the way rich people raced by driving their own boats.

Alfa Romeo - Because 100 (ahem, 98) footer's

Macgregor 26 - changed the landscape of people who had access to sailing

Laser - any single handed dinghy is still trying to catch up.  

Moore 24 - Because fast is fun in small boats too.

Capri 25 - Because I own one and it's the boat that changed me from crew on OPB's to boat owner.  So fuck yeah Capri 25's!

 
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blunted

Super Anarchist
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362
Toronto
International 14's

Boom vangs, Cunningham, Trapeze all got their start in 14's and they were early adopters of myriad other developments such as Assy kites etc.

They have seeded more sailing innovations than perhaps any other class

Fourteens Forever!

international14-daggerboard-2.jpg

 

Couta

Super Anarchist
1,166
912
Australia
The GP 14 (1949) and the Enterprise (1959) both preceded the Mirror (1962), all three could be home built. So the GP is really the start of mass participation in sailing. However the Newspaper backing the Mirror provided the big push..

Unfortunately  the papers especially the left wing ones like the Mirror have reverted to sailing is for the rich mode these days..
The GP 14 and Enterprise preceded the Mirror in terms of design....but they didn't influence the market in the way the Mirror did. The Mirror went international on a massive scale (hence the term "Red Tide") giving affordable access to a sport that had been the enclave of the privileged ( a major issue in the class wars of 1960's UK). Mass marketed, flatpack, homebuilt with stitch & glue technique (plywood and fibreglass were emerging technologies) the class was innovative in so many ways. In Australia, cheap to acquire & maintain & easy to transport, rig & sail the class took off and became the mainstay of many sailing clubs attracting family participation. As for the media "reverting" to positioning "sailing for the elite"....well, with some very few exceptions (Hobart "Hobie" Alter the most obvious!) the industry and sport's administration has done most of the damage to itself...the media just tagged along.

So I'd throw the Hobie 14 & 16 into the Top 50 - they repositioned the sport as "Lifestyle" and "fun". No stuffy boring expensive club membership required, just off-the-beach adventure...racing was considered optional (and when you did, the regattas were focussed on Fun!). GRP meant mass production and lower costs (both in purchase and maintenance). marketed as Young, Sexy, Adventurous, Individualist - Hobie captured the zeitgeist of the 60's & 70's and the numbers reflected its appeal. We didn't see this approach again until the Windsurfer came along (and Hobie Alter was there too)

 

Couta

Super Anarchist
1,166
912
Australia
And while I'm at it....there has to be mention of the revolution that was Trailer Sailing - from the brilliant simplicity of the stitch & glue plywood Hartley TS 16, to the mass production of GRP designs like the Boomerang 20 and Sunmaid/Coronet, these boats increased accessibility, bypassed club hierarchies and brought families to the sport....Australia & NZ went crazy for them. It was the 70's - The sport was never healthier, participation numbers were peaking....the middle class had fallen in love with sailing...we're still living on the remnants of that legacy (sadly!) but the trajectory is not good.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,406
5,551
De Nile
International 14's

Boom vangs, Cunningham, Trapeze all got their start in 14's and they were early adopters of myriad other developments such as Assy kites etc.

They have seeded more sailing innovations than perhaps any other class

Fourteens Forever!

View attachment 450507
Specifically, Uffa Fox's Avenger, the first planing dinghy.

image.png

 

Mikel_new

Member
205
5
Bilbao
Did those 50 boats "change" the way we sail?  I don't think we have changed the way we sail 50 times.  Here's my list of boats that actually "changed" anything...

Catalina 22 - Sailing became accessible to the middle class masses.

IACC - Big roach mains and asymmetric spinnakers. 

J/105 - first critical mass one design with a bowsprit.

Melges 24 - first critical mass small one design sport boat

J/24 - EVERYONE has sailed on a J/24

Hobie 16 - proved sailing doesn't have to be boring.

ETNZ 2013 - because FOILING!

Merlin - because SLED's!

IMOCA - foils, canting keels, scow bows... truly the innovators offshore

TP52 - They spawned more than 100 45-56' boats that were light, high-tech and rate well under various rules.

Farr 40 - Changed the way rich people raced by driving their own boats.

Alfa Romeo - Because 100 (ahem, 98) footer's

Macgregor 26 - changed the landscape of people who had access to sailing

Laser - any single handed dinghy is still trying to catch up.  

Moore 24 - Because fast is fun in small boats too.

Capri 25 - Because I own one and it's the boat that changed me from crew on OPB's to boat owner.  So fuck yeah Capri 25's!
Rather than the Farr40, the Farr45 was the first "light" boat with small jibs and large main and spinnaker; carbon mast, .... The Farr40 followed suit, as did all boats after it.

 

Doug Halsey

Member
342
100
Probably The Boat that Most changed the way we sail was a Snipe.  Not just any Snipe, not the first Snipe but the Snipe built by Ray Green in Toledo, Ohio in 1942.  

What was unusual about that Snipe.   It is thought to be The Very First SailBoat Built of Fiberglass

View attachment 450484
Do you have a specific link for that? I haven't had any luck googling  "The Very First SailBoat Built of Fiberglass"

I'm gathering material about the Trailer Class (which the original Snipes were part of) and  I think this distinction for the Snipe would be relevant.

 

Alhadder

Super Anarchist
3,714
362
Left coast of Oz
The GP 14 and Enterprise preceded the Mirror in terms of design....but they didn't influence the market in the way the Mirror did. The Mirror went international on a massive scale (hence the term "Red Tide") giving affordable access to a sport that had been the enclave of the privileged ( a major issue in the class wars of 1960's UK). Mass marketed, flatpack, homebuilt with stitch & glue technique (plywood and fibreglass were emerging technologies) the class was innovative in so many ways. In Australia, cheap to acquire & maintain & easy to transport, rig & sail the class took off and became the mainstay of many sailing clubs attracting family participation. As for the media "reverting" to positioning "sailing for the elite"....well, with some very few exceptions (Hobart "Hobie" Alter the most obvious!) the industry and sport's administration has done most of the damage to itself...the media just tagged along.
I was part of the Western Australian Mirror fleet in the 80's as a young teenager sailing out of Fremantle Sailing Club initially and then I got back into them in the late 00's as a father with two pre-teen sons who I tried to get into sailing. That didn't quite work but I still enjoyed it. We hosted the Mirror World Championships in 2010/11 and I was fairly pleased with my top 20 result. 

 




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